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Hang
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English Dictionary: Hang by the DICT Development Group
9 results for Hang
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hang
n
  1. a special way of doing something; "he had a bent for it"; "he had a special knack for getting into trouble"; "he couldn't get the hang of it"
    Synonym(s): bent, knack, hang
  2. the way a garment hangs; "he adjusted the hang of his coat"
  3. a gymnastic exercise performed on the rings or horizontal bar or parallel bars when the gymnast's weight is supported by the arms
v
  1. be suspended or hanging; "The flag hung on the wall"
  2. cause to be hanging or suspended; "Hang that picture on the wall"
    Synonym(s): hang, hang up
  3. kill by hanging; "The murderer was hanged on Friday"
    Synonym(s): hang, string up
  4. let drop or droop; "Hang one's head in shame"
  5. fall or flow in a certain way; "This dress hangs well"; "Her long black hair flowed down her back"
    Synonym(s): hang, fall, flow
  6. be menacing, burdensome, or oppressive; "This worry hangs on my mind"; "The cloud of suspicion hangs over her"
  7. give heed (to); "The children in the audience attended the recital quietly"; "She hung on his every word"; "They attended to everything he said"
    Synonym(s): attend, hang, advert, pay heed, give ear
  8. be suspended or poised; "Heavy fog hung over the valley"
  9. hold on tightly or tenaciously; "hang on to your father's hands"; "The child clung to his mother's apron"
    Synonym(s): cling, hang
  10. be exhibited; "Picasso hangs in this new wing of the museum"
  11. prevent from reaching a verdict, of a jury
  12. decorate or furnish with something suspended; "Hang wallpaper"
  13. be placed in position as by a hinge; "This cabinet door doesn't hang right!"
  14. place in position as by a hinge so as to allow free movement in one direction; "hang a door"
  15. suspend (meat) in order to get a gamey taste; "hang the venison for a few days"
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hang \Hang\, v. i. (Cricket, Tennis, etc.)
      Of a ball: To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due
      to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of ground.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hang \Hang\, v. t.
      To prevent from reaching a decision, esp. by refusing to join
      in a verdict that must be unanimous; as, one obstinate juror
      can hang a jury.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sleeve \Sleeve\, n. [OE. sleeve, sleve, AS. sl[?]fe, sl[?]fe;
      akin to sl[?]fan to put on, to clothe; cf. OD. sloove the
      turning up of anything, sloven to turn up one's sleeves,
      sleve a sleeve, G. schlaube a husk, pod.]
      1. The part of a garment which covers the arm; as, the sleeve
            of a coat or a gown. --Chaucer.
  
      2. A narrow channel of water. [R.]
  
                     The Celtic Sea, called oftentimes the Sleeve.
                                                                              --Drayton.
  
      3. (Mach.)
            (a) A tubular part made to cover, sustain, or steady
                  another part, or to form a connection between two
                  parts.
            (b) A long bushing or thimble, as in the nave of a wheel.
            (c) A short piece of pipe used for covering a joint, or
                  forming a joint between the ends of two other pipes.
  
      {Sleeve button}, a detachable button to fasten the wristband
            or cuff.
  
      {Sleeve links}, two bars or buttons linked together, and used
            to fasten a cuff or wristband.
  
      {To laugh in the sleeve}, to laugh privately or unperceived,
            especially while apparently preserving a grave or serious
            demeanor toward the person or persons laughed at; that is,
            perhaps, originally, by hiding the face in the wide
            sleeves of former times.
  
      {To pin}, [or] {hang}, {on the sleeve of}, to be, or make,
            dependent upon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hang \Hang\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hanged} (h?ngd) [or] {Hung};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Hanging}.
  
      Usage: The use of hanged is preferable to that of hung, when
                  reference is had to death or execution by suspension,
                  and it is also more common.] [OE. hangen, hangien, v.
                  t. & i., AS. hangian, v. i., fr. h[?]n, v. t. (imp.
                  heng, p. p. hongen); akin to OS. hang[?]n, v. i. D.
                  hangen, v. t. & i., G. hangen, v. i, h[84]ngen, v. t,
                  Isel hanga, v. i., Goth. h[be]han, v. t. (imp.
                  ha[a1]hah), h[be]han, v. i. (imp. hahaida), and perh.
                  to L. cunctari to delay. [root]37. ]
      1. To suspend; to fasten to some elevated point without
            support from below; -- often used with up or out; as, to
            hang a coat on a hook; to hang up a sign; to hang out a
            banner.
  
      2. To fasten in a manner which will allow of free motion upon
            the point or points of suspension; -- said of a pendulum,
            a swing, a door, gate, etc.
  
      3. To fit properly, as at a proper angle (a part of an
            implement that is swung in using), as a scythe to its
            snath, or an ax to its helve. [U. S.]
  
      4. To put to death by suspending by the neck; -- a form of
            capital punishment; as, to hang a murderer.
  
      5. To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures
            trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper
            hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.
  
                     Hung be the heavens with black.         --Shak.
  
                     And hung thy holy roofs with savage spoils.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      6. To paste, as paper hangings, on the walls of a room.
  
      7. To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or
            position instead of erect; to droop; as, he hung his head
            in shame.
  
                     Cowslips wan that hang the pensive head. --Milton.
  
      {To hang down}, to let fall below the proper position; to
            bend down; to decline; as, to hang down the head, or,
            elliptically, to hang the head.
  
      {To hang fire} (Mil.), to be slow in communicating fire
            through the vent to the charge; as, the gun hangs fire;
            hence, to hesitate, to hold back as if in suspense.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hang \Hang\, n.
      1. The manner in which one part or thing hangs upon, or is
            connected with, another; as, the hang of a scythe.
  
      2. Connection; arrangement; plan; as, the hang of a
            discourse. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hang \Hang\, v. i.
      1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without
            support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to
            remain; to stay.
  
      2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion
            on the point or points of suspension.
  
      3. To die or be put to death by suspension from the neck.
            [R.] [bd]Sir Balaam hangs.[b8] --Pope.
  
      4. To hold for support; to depend; to cling; -- usually with
            on or upon; as, this question hangs on a single point.
            [bd]Two infants hanging on her neck.[b8] --Peacham.
  
      5. To be, or be like, a suspended weight.
  
                     Life hangs upon me, and becomes a burden. --Addison.
  
      6. To hover; to impend; to appear threateningly; -- usually
            with over; as, evils hang over the country.
  
      7. To lean or incline; to incline downward.
  
                     To decide which way hung the victory. --Milton.
  
                     His neck obliquely o'er his shoulder hung. --Pope.
  
      8. To slope down; as, hanging grounds.
  
      9. To be undetermined or uncertain; to be in suspense; to
            linger; to be delayed.
  
                     A noble stroke he lifted high, Which hung not, but
                     so swift with tempest fell On the proud crest of
                     Satan.                                                --Milton.
  
      {To hang around}, to loiter idly about.
  
      {To hang back}, to hesitate; to falter; to be reluctant.
            [bd]If any one among you hangs back.[b8] --Jowett
            (Thucyd.).
  
      {To hang by the eyelids}.
            (a) To hang by a very slight hold or tenure.
            (b) To be in an unfinished condition; to be left
                  incomplete.
  
      {To hang in doubt}, to be in suspense.
  
      {To hang on} (with the emphasis on the preposition), to keep
            hold; to hold fast; to stick; to be persistent, as a
            disease.
  
      {To hang on the} {lips, words}, etc., to be charmed by
            eloquence.
  
      {To hang out}.
            (a) To be hung out so as to be displayed; to project.
            (b) To be unyielding; as, the juryman hangs out against an
                  agreement. [Colloq.]

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   hang v.   1. [very common] To wait for an event that will never
   occur.   "The system is hanging because it can't read from the
   crashed drive".   See {wedged}, {hung}.   2. To wait for some event to
   occur; to hang around until something happens.   "The program
   displays a menu and then hangs until you type a character."   Compare
   {block}.   3. To attach a peripheral device, esp. in the construction
   `hang off': "We're going to hang another tape drive off the file
   server."   Implies a device attached with cables, rather than
   something that is strictly inside the machine's chassis.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   hang
  
      1. To wait for an event that will never occur.   "The system is
      hanging because it can't read from the crashed drive".   See
      {wedged}, {hung}.
  
      2. To wait for some event to occur; to hang around until
      something happens.   "The program displays a menu and then
      hangs until you type a character."   Compare {block}.
  
      3. To attach a peripheral device, especially in the
      construction "hang off": "We're going to hang another tape
      drive off the file server."   Implies a device attached with
      cables, rather than something that is strictly inside the
      machine's chassis.
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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