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   Sachs disease
         n 1: a hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism occurring most
               frequently in individuals of Jewish descent in eastern
               Europe; accumulation of lipids in nervous tissue results in
               death in early childhood [syn: {Tay-Sachs disease}, {Tay-
               Sachs}, {Sachs disease}, {infantile amaurotic idiocy}]

English Dictionary: Schachschiedsrichter by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sagacity
n
  1. the mental ability to understand and discriminate between relations
    Synonym(s): sagacity, sagaciousness, judgment, judgement, discernment
  2. the trait of forming opinions by distinguishing and evaluating
    Synonym(s): judiciousness, sagacity, sagaciousness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sao Jose dos Campos
n
  1. a city in southeastern Brazil to the northeast of Sao Paulo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sash weight
n
  1. a counterweight for a sliding sash
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sausage dog
n
  1. informal term
    Synonym(s): sausage dog, sausage hound
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Saxe-gothea
n
  1. one species: Prince Albert's yew [syn: Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Saxe-gothea conspicua
n
  1. small yew having attractive foliage and partially weeping branches cultivated as an ornamental; mountains of southern Chile
    Synonym(s): Prince Albert yew, Prince Albert's yew, Saxe-gothea conspicua
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Saxegothea
n
  1. one species: Prince Albert's yew [syn: Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saxist
n
  1. a musician who plays the saxophone [syn: saxophonist, saxist]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sea chest
n
  1. a sailor's storage chest for personal property
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sea-coast
n
  1. the shore of a sea or ocean [syn: seashore, coast, seacoast, sea-coast]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
seacoast
n
  1. the shore of a sea or ocean [syn: seashore, coast, seacoast, sea-coast]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sequester
v
  1. requisition forcibly, as of enemy property; "the estate was sequestered"
  2. take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority; "The FBI seized the drugs"; "The customs agents impounded the illegal shipment"; "The police confiscated the stolen artwork"
    Synonym(s): impound, attach, sequester, confiscate, seize
  3. undergo sequestration by forming a stable compound with an ion; "The cations were sequestered"
  4. keep away from others; "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
    Synonym(s): seclude, sequester, sequestrate, withdraw
  5. set apart from others; "The dentist sequesters the tooth he is working on"
    Synonym(s): sequester, sequestrate, keep apart, set apart, isolate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sequestered
adj
  1. providing privacy or seclusion; "the cloistered academic world of books"; "sat close together in the sequestered pergola"; "sitting under the reclusive calm of a shade tree"; "a secluded romantic spot"
    Synonym(s): cloistered, reclusive, secluded, sequestered
  2. kept separate and secluded; "a sequestered jury"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sequestrate
v
  1. keep away from others; "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
    Synonym(s): seclude, sequester, sequestrate, withdraw
  2. set apart from others; "The dentist sequesters the tooth he is working on"
    Synonym(s): sequester, sequestrate, keep apart, set apart, isolate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sequestration
n
  1. the act of segregating or sequestering; "sequestration of the jury"
    Synonym(s): segregation, sequestration
    Antonym(s): desegregation, integrating, integration
  2. the action of forming a chelate or other stable compound with an ion or atom or molecule so that it is no longer available for reactions
  3. a writ that authorizes the seizure of property
  4. seizing property that belongs to someone else and holding it until profits pay the demand for which it was seized
    Synonym(s): sequestration, requisition
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sex act
n
  1. the act of sexual procreation between a man and a woman; the man's penis is inserted into the woman's vagina and excited until orgasm and ejaculation occur
    Synonym(s): sexual intercourse, intercourse, sex act, copulation, coitus, coition, sexual congress, congress, sexual relation, relation, carnal knowledge
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sex activity
n
  1. activities associated with sexual intercourse; "they had sex in the back seat"
    Synonym(s): sexual activity, sexual practice, sex, sex activity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sexist
adj
  1. discriminatory on the basis of sex (usually said of men's attitude toward women)
n
  1. a man with a chauvinistic belief in the inferiority of women
    Synonym(s): male chauvinist, sexist
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
shaggy-coated
adj
  1. used of hair; thick and poorly groomed; "bushy locks"; "a shaggy beard"
    Synonym(s): bushy, shaggy, shaggy-haired, shaggy-coated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
SI system
n
  1. a complete metric system of units of measurement for scientists; fundamental quantities are length (meter) and mass (kilogram) and time (second) and electric current (ampere) and temperature (kelvin) and amount of matter (mole) and luminous intensity (candela); "Today the United States is the only country in the world not totally committed to the Systeme International d'Unites"
    Synonym(s): Systeme International d'Unites, Systeme International, SI system, SI, SI unit, International System of Units, International System
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
size stick
n
  1. a mechanical measuring stick used by shoe fitters to measure the length and width of your foot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ski jacket
n
  1. a parka to be worn while skiing [syn: ski parka, {ski jacket}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sou'-sou'-east
adv
  1. to, toward, or in the south southeast [syn: {south- southeast}, sou'-sou'-east]
n
  1. the compass point midway between south and southeast [syn: south southeast, sou'-sou'-east, SSE]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sou'-sou'-west
adv
  1. to, toward, or in the south southwest [syn: {south- southwest}, sou'-sou'-west]
n
  1. the compass point midway between south and southwest [syn: south southwest, sou'-sou'-west, SSW]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggest
v
  1. make a proposal, declare a plan for something; "the senator proposed to abolish the sales tax"
    Synonym(s): propose, suggest, advise
  2. drop a hint; intimate by a hint
    Synonym(s): hint, suggest
  3. imply as a possibility; "The evidence suggests a need for more clarification"
    Synonym(s): suggest, intimate
  4. suggest the necessity of an intervention; in medicine; "Tetracycline is indicated in such cases"
    Synonym(s): indicate, suggest
    Antonym(s): contraindicate
  5. call to mind; "this remark evoked sadness"
    Synonym(s): suggest, evoke, paint a picture
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggester
n
  1. someone who advances a suggestion or proposal; "the suggester of this absurd strategy was a fool"
    Synonym(s): suggester, proposer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggestibility
n
  1. susceptibility or responsiveness to suggestion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggestible
adj
  1. susceptible or responsive to suggestion; "suggestible young minds"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggestion
n
  1. an idea that is suggested; "the picnic was her suggestion"
  2. a proposal offered for acceptance or rejection; "it was a suggestion we couldn't refuse"
    Synonym(s): suggestion, proposition, proffer
  3. a just detectable amount; "he speaks French with a trace of an accent"
    Synonym(s): trace, hint, suggestion
  4. persuasion formulated as a suggestion
    Synonym(s): suggestion, prompting
  5. the sequential mental process in which one thought leads to another by association
  6. the act of inducing hypnosis
    Synonym(s): hypnotism, mesmerism, suggestion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggestive
adj
  1. tending to suggest or imply; "artifacts suggestive of an ancient society"; "an implicative statement"
    Synonym(s): implicative, suggestive
  2. (usually followed by `of') pointing out or revealing clearly; "actions indicative of fear"
    Synonym(s): indicative, indicatory, revelatory, significative, suggestive
  3. tending to suggest something improper or indecent; "a suggestive nod"; "suggestive poses"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suggestively
adv
  1. in a suggestive manner; "she smiled suggestively"
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sagacity \Sa*gac"i*ty\, n. [L. sagacitas. See {Sagacious}.]
      The quality of being sagacious; quickness or acuteness of
      sense perceptions; keenness of discernment or penetration
      with soundness of judgment; shrewdness.
  
               Some [brutes] show that nice sagacity of smell.
                                                                              --Cowper.
  
               Natural sagacity improved by generous education. --V.
                                                                              Knox.
  
      Syn: Penetration; shrewdness; judiciousness.
  
      Usage: {Sagacity}, {Penetration}. Penetration enables us to
                  enter into the depths of an abstruse subject, to
                  detect motives, plans, etc. Sagacity adds to
                  penetration a keen, practical judgment, which enables
                  one to guard against the designs of others, and to
                  turn everything to the best possible advantage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sage \Sage\, a. [Compar. {Sager}; superl. {Sagest}.] [F., fr. L.
      sapius (only in nesapius unwise, foolish), fr. sapere to be
      wise; perhaps akin to E. sap. Cf. {Savor}, {Sapient},
      {Insipid}.]
      1. Having nice discernment and powers of judging; prudent;
            grave; sagacious.
  
                     All you sage counselors, hence!         --Shak.
  
      2. Proceeding from wisdom; well judged; shrewd; well adapted
            to the purpose.
  
                     Commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of
                     sage advice, counseled the general to retreat.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. Grave; serious; solemn. [R.] [bd][Great bards] in sage and
            solemn tunes have sung.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saucy \Sau"cy\, a. [Compar. {Saucier}; superl. {Sauciest}.]
      [From {Sauce}.]
      1. Showing impertinent boldness or pertness; transgressing
            the rules of decorum; treating superiors with contempt;
            impudent; insolent; as, a saucy fellow.
  
                     Am I not protector, saucy priest?      --Shak.
  
      2. Expressive of, or characterized by, impudence;
            impertinent; as, a saucy eye; saucy looks.
  
                     We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs. --Shak.
  
      Syn: Impudent; insolent; impertinent; rude.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Schizocd2le \Schiz"o*c[d2]le\, n. [Schizo- + Gr. [?] hollow.]
      (Anat.)
      See {Enteroc[d2]le}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Schizocd2lous \Schiz`o*c[d2]"lous\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a schizoc[d2]le.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sea chickweed \Sea" chick"weed`\ (Bot.)
      A fleshy plant ({Arenaria peploides}) growing in large tufts
      in the sands of the northern Atlantic seacoast; -- called
      also {sea sandwort}, and {sea purslane}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gasket \Gas"ket\, n. [Cf. F. garcette, It. gaschetta, Sp. cajeta
      caburn, garceta reef point.]
      1. (Naut.) A line or band used to lash a furled sail
            securely. {Sea gaskets} are common lines; {harbor gaskets}
            are plaited and decorated lines or bands. Called also
            {casket}.
  
      2. (Mech.)
            (a) The plaited hemp used for packing a piston, as of the
                  steam engine and its pumps.
            (b) Any ring or washer of packing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Seacoast \Sea"coast`\, n.
      The shore or border of the land adjacent to the sea or ocean.
      Also used adjectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gun \Gun\, n. [OE. gonne, gunne; of uncertain origin; cf. Ir.,
      {Gael}.) A LL. gunna, W. gum; possibly (like cannon) fr. L.
      canna reed, tube; or abbreviated fr. OF. mangonnel, E.
      mangonel, a machine for hurling stones.]
      1. A weapon which throws or propels a missile to a distance;
            any firearm or instrument for throwing projectiles by the
            explosion of gunpowder, consisting of a tube or barrel
            closed at one end, in which the projectile is placed, with
            an explosive charge behind, which is ignited by various
            means. Muskets, rifles, carbines, and fowling pieces are
            smaller guns, for hand use, and are called {small arms}.
            Larger guns are called {cannon}, {ordnance},
            {fieldpieces}, {carronades}, {howitzers}, etc. See these
            terms in the Vocabulary.
  
                     As swift as a pellet out of a gunne When fire is in
                     the powder runne.                              --Chaucer.
  
                     The word gun was in use in England for an engine to
                     cast a thing from a man long before there was any
                     gunpowder found out.                           --Selden.
  
      2. (Mil.) A piece of heavy ordnance; in a restricted sense, a
            cannon.
  
      3. pl. (Naut.) Violent blasts of wind.
  
      Note: Guns are classified, according to their construction or
               manner of loading as {rifled} or {smoothbore},
               {breech-loading} or {muzzle-loading}, {cast} or
               {built-up guns}; or according to their use, as {field},
               {mountain}, {prairie}, {seacoast}, and {siege guns}.
  
      {Armstrong gun}, a wrought iron breech-loading cannon named
            after its English inventor, Sir William Armstrong.
  
      {Great gun}, a piece of heavy ordnance; hence (Fig.), a
            person superior in any way.
  
      {Gun barrel}, the barrel or tube of a gun.
  
      {Gun carriage}, the carriage on which a gun is mounted or
            moved.
  
      {Gun cotton} (Chem.), a general name for a series of
            explosive nitric ethers of cellulose, obtained by steeping
            cotton in nitric and sulphuric acids. Although there are
            formed substances containing nitric acid radicals, yet the
            results exactly resemble ordinary cotton in appearance. It
            burns without ash, with explosion if confined, but quietly
            and harmlessly if free and open, and in small quantity.
            Specifically, the lower nitrates of cellulose which are
            insoluble in ether and alcohol in distinction from the
            highest (pyroxylin) which is soluble. See {Pyroxylin}, and
            cf. {Xyloidin}. The gun cottons are used for blasting and
            somewhat in gunnery: for making celluloid when compounded
            with camphor; and the soluble variety (pyroxylin) for
            making collodion. See {Celluloid}, and {Collodion}. Gun
            cotton is frequenty but improperly called nitrocellulose.
            It is not a nitro compound, but an ethereal salt of nitric
            acid.
  
      {Gun deck}. See under {Deck}.
  
      {Gun fire}, the time at which the morning or the evening gun
            is fired.
  
      {Gun metal}, a bronze, ordinarily composed of nine parts of
            copper and one of tin, used for cannon, etc. The name is
            also given to certain strong mixtures of cast iron.
  
      {Gun port} (Naut.), an opening in a ship through which a
            cannon's muzzle is run out for firing.
  
      {Gun tackle} (Naut.), the blocks and pulleys affixed to the
            side of a ship, by which a gun carriage is run to and from
            the gun port.
  
      {Gun tackle purchase} (Naut.), a tackle composed of two
            single blocks and a fall. --Totten.
  
      {Krupp gun}, a wrought steel breech-loading cannon, named
            after its German inventor, Herr Krupp.
  
      {Machine gun}, a breech-loading gun or a group of such guns,
            mounted on a carriage or other holder, and having a
            reservoir containing cartridges which are loaded into the
            gun or guns and fired in rapid succession, sometimes in
            volleys, by machinery operated by turning a crank. Several
            hundred shots can be fired in a minute with accurate aim.
            The {Gatling gun}, {Gardner gun}, {Hotchkiss gun}, and
            {Nordenfelt gun}, named for their inventors, and the
            French {mitrailleuse}, are machine guns.
  
      {To blow great guns} (Naut.), to blow a gale. See {Gun}, n.,
            3.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Seacoast \Sea"coast`\, n.
      The shore or border of the land adjacent to the sea or ocean.
      Also used adjectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gun \Gun\, n. [OE. gonne, gunne; of uncertain origin; cf. Ir.,
      {Gael}.) A LL. gunna, W. gum; possibly (like cannon) fr. L.
      canna reed, tube; or abbreviated fr. OF. mangonnel, E.
      mangonel, a machine for hurling stones.]
      1. A weapon which throws or propels a missile to a distance;
            any firearm or instrument for throwing projectiles by the
            explosion of gunpowder, consisting of a tube or barrel
            closed at one end, in which the projectile is placed, with
            an explosive charge behind, which is ignited by various
            means. Muskets, rifles, carbines, and fowling pieces are
            smaller guns, for hand use, and are called {small arms}.
            Larger guns are called {cannon}, {ordnance},
            {fieldpieces}, {carronades}, {howitzers}, etc. See these
            terms in the Vocabulary.
  
                     As swift as a pellet out of a gunne When fire is in
                     the powder runne.                              --Chaucer.
  
                     The word gun was in use in England for an engine to
                     cast a thing from a man long before there was any
                     gunpowder found out.                           --Selden.
  
      2. (Mil.) A piece of heavy ordnance; in a restricted sense, a
            cannon.
  
      3. pl. (Naut.) Violent blasts of wind.
  
      Note: Guns are classified, according to their construction or
               manner of loading as {rifled} or {smoothbore},
               {breech-loading} or {muzzle-loading}, {cast} or
               {built-up guns}; or according to their use, as {field},
               {mountain}, {prairie}, {seacoast}, and {siege guns}.
  
      {Armstrong gun}, a wrought iron breech-loading cannon named
            after its English inventor, Sir William Armstrong.
  
      {Great gun}, a piece of heavy ordnance; hence (Fig.), a
            person superior in any way.
  
      {Gun barrel}, the barrel or tube of a gun.
  
      {Gun carriage}, the carriage on which a gun is mounted or
            moved.
  
      {Gun cotton} (Chem.), a general name for a series of
            explosive nitric ethers of cellulose, obtained by steeping
            cotton in nitric and sulphuric acids. Although there are
            formed substances containing nitric acid radicals, yet the
            results exactly resemble ordinary cotton in appearance. It
            burns without ash, with explosion if confined, but quietly
            and harmlessly if free and open, and in small quantity.
            Specifically, the lower nitrates of cellulose which are
            insoluble in ether and alcohol in distinction from the
            highest (pyroxylin) which is soluble. See {Pyroxylin}, and
            cf. {Xyloidin}. The gun cottons are used for blasting and
            somewhat in gunnery: for making celluloid when compounded
            with camphor; and the soluble variety (pyroxylin) for
            making collodion. See {Celluloid}, and {Collodion}. Gun
            cotton is frequenty but improperly called nitrocellulose.
            It is not a nitro compound, but an ethereal salt of nitric
            acid.
  
      {Gun deck}. See under {Deck}.
  
      {Gun fire}, the time at which the morning or the evening gun
            is fired.
  
      {Gun metal}, a bronze, ordinarily composed of nine parts of
            copper and one of tin, used for cannon, etc. The name is
            also given to certain strong mixtures of cast iron.
  
      {Gun port} (Naut.), an opening in a ship through which a
            cannon's muzzle is run out for firing.
  
      {Gun tackle} (Naut.), the blocks and pulleys affixed to the
            side of a ship, by which a gun carriage is run to and from
            the gun port.
  
      {Gun tackle purchase} (Naut.), a tackle composed of two
            single blocks and a fall. --Totten.
  
      {Krupp gun}, a wrought steel breech-loading cannon, named
            after its German inventor, Herr Krupp.
  
      {Machine gun}, a breech-loading gun or a group of such guns,
            mounted on a carriage or other holder, and having a
            reservoir containing cartridges which are loaded into the
            gun or guns and fired in rapid succession, sometimes in
            volleys, by machinery operated by turning a crank. Several
            hundred shots can be fired in a minute with accurate aim.
            The {Gatling gun}, {Gardner gun}, {Hotchkiss gun}, and
            {Nordenfelt gun}, named for their inventors, and the
            French {mitrailleuse}, are machine guns.
  
      {To blow great guns} (Naut.), to blow a gale. See {Gun}, n.,
            3.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Seguestration \Seg`ues*tra"tion\, n. [L. sequestratio: cf. F.
      s[82]questration.]
      1.
            (a) (Civil & Com. Law) The act of separating, or setting
                  aside, a thing in controversy from the possession of
                  both the parties that contend for it, to be delivered
                  to the one adjudged entitled to it. It may be
                  voluntary or involuntary.
            (b) (Chancery) A prerogative process empowering certain
                  commissioners to take and hold a defendant's property
                  and receive the rents and profits thereof, until he
                  clears himself of a contempt or performs a decree of
                  the court.
            (c) (Eccl. Law) A kind of execution for a rent, as in the
                  case of a beneficed clerk, of the profits of a
                  benefice, till he shall have satisfied some debt
                  established by decree; the gathering up of the fruits
                  of a benefice during a vacancy, for the use of the
                  next incumbent; the disposing of the goods, by the
                  ordinary, of one who is dead, whose estate no man will
                  meddle with. --Craig. --Tomlins. --Wharton.
            (d) (Intrnat. Law) The seizure of the property of an
                  individual for the use of the state; particularly
                  applied to the seizure, by a belligerent power, of
                  debts due from its subjects to the enemy. --Burrill.
  
      2. The state of being separated or set aside; separation;
            retirement; seclusion from society.
  
                     Since Henry Monmouth first began to reign, . . .
                     This loathsome sequestration have I had. --Shak.
  
      3. Disunion; disjunction. [Obs.] --Boyle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequacity \Se*quac"i*ty\, n. [L. sequacitas.]
      Quality or state of being sequacious; sequaciousness.
      --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequester \Se*ques"ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Sequestering}.] [F. s[82]questrer, L.
      sequestrare to give up for safe keeping, from sequester a
      depositary or trustee in whose hands the thing contested was
      placed until the dispute was settled. Cf. {Sequestrate}.]
      1. (Law) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from
            parties in controversy and put into the possession of an
            indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as
            property belonging to another, and hold it till the
            profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or
            till the owner has performed the decree of court, or
            clears himself of contempt; in international law, to
            confiscate.
  
                     Formerly the goods of a defendant in chancery were,
                     in the last resort, sequestered and detained to
                     enforce the decrees of the court. And now the
                     profits of a benefice are sequestered to pay the
                     debts of ecclesiastics.                     --Blackstone.
  
      2. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration;
            to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
  
                     It was his tailor and his cook, his fine fashions
                     and his French ragouts, which sequestered him.
                                                                              --South.
  
      3. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from
            other things.
  
                     I had wholly sequestered my civil affairss. --Bacon.
  
      4. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude;
            to withdraw; -- often used reflexively.
  
                     When men most sequester themselves from action.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
                     A love and desire to sequester a man's self for a
                     higher conversation.                           --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequester \Se*ques"ter\, v. i.
      1. To withdraw; to retire. [Obs.]
  
                     To sequester out of the world into Atlantic and
                     Utopian politics.                              --Milton.
  
      2. (Law) To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the
            estate of her husband.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequester \Se*ques"ter\, n.
      1. Sequestration; separation. [R.]
  
      2. (Law) A person with whom two or more contending parties
            deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who
            mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or
            referee. --Bouvier.
  
      3. (Med.) Same as {Sequestrum}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequester \Se*ques"ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Sequestering}.] [F. s[82]questrer, L.
      sequestrare to give up for safe keeping, from sequester a
      depositary or trustee in whose hands the thing contested was
      placed until the dispute was settled. Cf. {Sequestrate}.]
      1. (Law) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from
            parties in controversy and put into the possession of an
            indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as
            property belonging to another, and hold it till the
            profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or
            till the owner has performed the decree of court, or
            clears himself of contempt; in international law, to
            confiscate.
  
                     Formerly the goods of a defendant in chancery were,
                     in the last resort, sequestered and detained to
                     enforce the decrees of the court. And now the
                     profits of a benefice are sequestered to pay the
                     debts of ecclesiastics.                     --Blackstone.
  
      2. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration;
            to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
  
                     It was his tailor and his cook, his fine fashions
                     and his French ragouts, which sequestered him.
                                                                              --South.
  
      3. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from
            other things.
  
                     I had wholly sequestered my civil affairss. --Bacon.
  
      4. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude;
            to withdraw; -- often used reflexively.
  
                     When men most sequester themselves from action.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
                     A love and desire to sequester a man's self for a
                     higher conversation.                           --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestered \Se*ques"tered\, a.
      Retired; secluded. [bd]Sequestered scenes.[b8] --Cowper.
  
               Along the cool, sequestered vale of life. --Gray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequester \Se*ques"ter\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Sequestering}.] [F. s[82]questrer, L.
      sequestrare to give up for safe keeping, from sequester a
      depositary or trustee in whose hands the thing contested was
      placed until the dispute was settled. Cf. {Sequestrate}.]
      1. (Law) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from
            parties in controversy and put into the possession of an
            indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as
            property belonging to another, and hold it till the
            profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or
            till the owner has performed the decree of court, or
            clears himself of contempt; in international law, to
            confiscate.
  
                     Formerly the goods of a defendant in chancery were,
                     in the last resort, sequestered and detained to
                     enforce the decrees of the court. And now the
                     profits of a benefice are sequestered to pay the
                     debts of ecclesiastics.                     --Blackstone.
  
      2. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration;
            to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
  
                     It was his tailor and his cook, his fine fashions
                     and his French ragouts, which sequestered him.
                                                                              --South.
  
      3. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from
            other things.
  
                     I had wholly sequestered my civil affairss. --Bacon.
  
      4. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude;
            to withdraw; -- often used reflexively.
  
                     When men most sequester themselves from action.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
                     A love and desire to sequester a man's self for a
                     higher conversation.                           --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Sequestrum \[d8]Se*ques"trum\, n.; pl. {Sequestra}. [NL. See
      {Sequester}.] (Med.)
      A portion of dead bone which becomes separated from the sound
      portion, as in necrosis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestrable \Se*ques"tra*ble\, a.
      Capable of being sequestered; subject or liable to
      sequestration.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestral \Se*ques"tral\, a. (Med.)
      Of or pertaining to a sequestrum. --Quian.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestrate \Se*ques"trate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestrated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Sequestrating}.]
      To sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestrate \Se*ques"trate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestrated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Sequestrating}.]
      To sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestrate \Se*ques"trate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sequestrated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Sequestrating}.]
      To sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sequestrator \Seq"ues*tra`tor\, n. [L., one that hinders or
      impedes.] (Law)
            (a) One who sequesters property, or takes the possession
                  of it for a time, to satisfy a demand out of its rents
                  or profits.
            (b) One to whom the keeping of sequestered property is
                  committed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sesquioxide \Ses`qui*ox"ide\, n. [Sesqui- + oxide.] (Chem.)
      An oxide containing three atoms of oxygen with two atoms (or
      radicals) of some other substance; thus, alumina, {Al2O3} is
      a sesquioxide.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Shaggy \Shag"gy\, a. [Compar. {Shaggier}; superl. {Shaggiest}.]
      [From {Shag}, n.]
      Rough with long hair or wool.
  
               About his shoulders hangs the shaggy skin. --Dryden.
  
      2. Rough; rugged; jaggy. --Milton.
  
                     [A rill] that winds unseen beneath the shaggy fell.
                                                                              --Keble.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Shaky \Shak"y\, a. [Compar. {Shakier}; superl. {Shakiest}.]
      1. Shaking or trembling; as, a shaky spot in a marsh; a shaky
            hand. --Thackeray.
  
      2. Full of shakes or cracks; cracked; as, shaky timber.
            --Gwilt.
  
      3. Easily shaken; tottering; unsound; as, a shaky
            constitution; shaky business credit. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sick \Sick\, a. [Compar. {Sicker}; superl. {Sickest}.] [OE. sek,
      sik, ill, AS. se[a2]c; akin to OS. siok, seoc, OFries. siak,
      D. ziek, G. siech, OHG. sioh, Icel. sj[?]kr, Sw. sjuk, Dan.
      syg, Goth. siuks ill, siukan to be ill.]
      1. Affected with disease of any kind; ill; indisposed; not in
            health. See the Synonym under {Illness}.
  
                     Simon's wife's mother lay sick of a fever. --Mark i.
                                                                              30.
  
                     Behold them that are sick with famine. --Jer. xiv.
                                                                              18.
  
      2. Affected with, or attended by, nausea; inclined to vomit;
            as, sick at the stomach; a sick headache.
  
      3. Having a strong dislike; disgusted; surfeited; -- with of;
            as, to be sick of flattery.
  
                     He was not so sick of his master as of his work.
                                                                              --L'Estrange.
  
      4. Corrupted; imperfect; impaired; weakned.
  
                     So great is his antipathy against episcopacy, that,
                     if a seraphim himself should be a bishop, he would
                     either find or make some sick feathers in his wings.
                                                                              --Fuller.
  
      {Sick bay} (Naut.), an apartment in a vessel, used as the
            ship's hospital.
  
      {Sick bed}, the bed upon which a person lies sick.
  
      {Sick berth}, an apartment for the sick in a ship of war.
  
      {Sick headache} (Med.), a variety of headache attended with
            disorder of the stomach and nausea.
  
      {Sick list}, a list containing the names of the sick.
  
      {Sick room}, a room in which a person lies sick, or to which
            he is confined by sickness.
  
      Note: [These terms, sick bed, sick berth, etc., are also
               written both hyphened and solid.]
  
      Syn: Diseased; ill; disordered; distempered; indisposed;
               weak; ailing; feeble; morbid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Size \Size\, n. [Abbrev. from assize. See {Assize}, and cf.
      {Size} glue.]
      1. A settled quantity or allowance. See {Assize}. [Obs.]
            [bd]To scant my sizes.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. (Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) An allowance of food and drink
            from the buttery, aside from the regular dinner at
            commons; -- corresponding to battel at Oxford.
  
      3. Extent of superficies or volume; bulk; bigness; magnitude;
            as, the size of a tree or of a mast; the size of a ship or
            of a rock.
  
      4. Figurative bulk; condition as to rank, ability, character,
            etc.; as, the office demands a man of larger size.
  
                     Men of a less size and quality.         --L'Estrange.
  
                     The middling or lower size of people. --Swift.
  
      5. A conventional relative measure of dimension, as for
            shoes, gloves, and other articles made up for sale.
  
      6. An instrument consisting of a number of perforated gauges
            fastened together at one end by a rivet, -- used for
            ascertaining the size of pearls. --Knight.
  
      {Size roll}, a small piese of parchment added to a roll.
  
      {Size stick}, a measuring stick used by shoemakers for
            ascertaining the size of the foot.
  
      Syn: Dimension; bigness; largeness; greatness; magnitude.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soggy \Sog"gy\, a. [Compar. {Soggier}; superl. {Soggiest}.] [Cf.
      Icel. s[94]ggr damp, wet, or E. soak.]
      Filled with water; soft with moisture; sodden; soaked; wet;
      as, soggy land or timber.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Succussation \Suc`cus*sa"tion\, n. [L. succussare to jolt, v.
      intens. fr. succutere, succussum, to fling up from below, to
      toss up; sub under + quatere to shake.]
      1. A trot or trotting. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.
  
      2. A shaking; succussion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggest \Sug*gest"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Suggested}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Suggesting}.] [L. suggestus, p. p. of suggerere to
      put under, furnish, suggest; sub under + gerere to carry, to
      bring. See {Jest}.]
      1. To introduce indirectly to the thoughts; to cause to be
            thought of, usually by the agency of other objects.
  
                     Some ideas . . . are suggested to the mind by all
                     the ways of sensation and reflection. --Locke.
  
      2. To propose with difference or modesty; to hint; to
            intimate; as, to suggest a difficulty.
  
      3. To seduce; to prompt to evil; to tempt. [Obs.]
  
                     Knowing that tender youth is soon suggested. --Shak.
  
      4. To inform secretly. [Obs.]
  
      Syn: To hint; allude to; refer to; insinuate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggest \Sug*gest"\, v. i.
      To make suggestions; to tempt. [Obs.]
  
               And ever weaker grows through acted crime, Or
               seeming-genial, venial fault, Recurring and suggesting
               still.                                                   --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggest \Sug*gest"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Suggested}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Suggesting}.] [L. suggestus, p. p. of suggerere to
      put under, furnish, suggest; sub under + gerere to carry, to
      bring. See {Jest}.]
      1. To introduce indirectly to the thoughts; to cause to be
            thought of, usually by the agency of other objects.
  
                     Some ideas . . . are suggested to the mind by all
                     the ways of sensation and reflection. --Locke.
  
      2. To propose with difference or modesty; to hint; to
            intimate; as, to suggest a difficulty.
  
      3. To seduce; to prompt to evil; to tempt. [Obs.]
  
                     Knowing that tender youth is soon suggested. --Shak.
  
      4. To inform secretly. [Obs.]
  
      Syn: To hint; allude to; refer to; insinuate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggester \Sug*gest"er\, n.
      One who suggests. --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggest \Sug*gest"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Suggested}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Suggesting}.] [L. suggestus, p. p. of suggerere to
      put under, furnish, suggest; sub under + gerere to carry, to
      bring. See {Jest}.]
      1. To introduce indirectly to the thoughts; to cause to be
            thought of, usually by the agency of other objects.
  
                     Some ideas . . . are suggested to the mind by all
                     the ways of sensation and reflection. --Locke.
  
      2. To propose with difference or modesty; to hint; to
            intimate; as, to suggest a difficulty.
  
      3. To seduce; to prompt to evil; to tempt. [Obs.]
  
                     Knowing that tender youth is soon suggested. --Shak.
  
      4. To inform secretly. [Obs.]
  
      Syn: To hint; allude to; refer to; insinuate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestion \Sug*ges"tion\, n. (Hypnotism)
      The control of the mind of an hypnotic subject by ideas in
      the mind of the hypnotizer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestion \Sug*ges"tion\, n. [F. suggestion, L. suggestio.]
      1. The act of suggesting; presentation of an idea.
  
      2. That which is suggested; an intimation; an insinuation; a
            hint; a different proposal or mention; also, formerly, a
            secret incitement; temptation.
  
                     Why do I yield to that suggestion?      --Shak.
  
      3. Charge; complaint; accusation. [Obs.] [bd]A false
            suggestion.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      4. (Law) Information without oath; an entry of a material
            fact or circumstance on the record for the information of
            the court, at the death or insolvency of a party.
  
      5. (Physiol. & Metaph.) The act or power of originating or
            recalling ideas or relations, distinguished as original
            and relative; -- a term much used by Scottish
            metaphysicians from Hutcherson to Thomas Brown.
  
      Syn: Hint; allusion; intimation; insinuation.
  
      Usage: {Suggestion}, {Hint}. A hint is the briefest or most
                  indirect mode of calling one's attention to a subject.
                  A suggestion is a putting of something before the mind
                  for consideration, an indirect or guarded mode of
                  presenting argument or advice. A hint is usually
                  something slight or covert, and may by merely negative
                  in its character. A suggestion is ordinarily intended
                  to furnish us with some practical assistance or
                  direction. [bd]He gave me a hint of my danger, and
                  added some suggestions as to the means of avoiding
                  it.[b8]
  
                           Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike, Just
                           hint a fault, and hesitate dislike. --Pope.
  
                           Arthur, whom they say is killed to-night On your
                           suggestion.                                 --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestive \Sug*gest"ive\, a.
      Containing a suggestion, hint, or intimation. --
      {Sug*gest"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Sug*gest"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestive medicine \Sug*gest"ive med"i*cine\
      Treatment by commands or positive statements addressed to a
      more or less hypnotized patient.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestive \Sug*gest"ive\, a.
      Containing a suggestion, hint, or intimation. --
      {Sug*gest"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Sug*gest"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestive \Sug*gest"ive\, a.
      Containing a suggestion, hint, or intimation. --
      {Sug*gest"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Sug*gest"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestment \Sug*gest"ment\, n.
      Suggestion. [R.]
  
               They fancy that every thought must needs have an
               immediate outward suggestment.               --Hare.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suggestress \Sug*gest"ress\, n.
      A woman who suggests. [bd]The suggestress of suicides.[b8]
      --De Quincey.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Sikeston, MO (city, FIPS 67790)
      Location: 36.88017 N, 89.58071 W
      Population (1990): 17641 (7329 housing units)
      Area: 37.5 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 63801

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census, AK (Area, FIPS 231)
      Location: 58.81114 N, 136.62206 W
      Population (1990): 4385 (2102 housing units)
      Area: 33360.8 sq km (land), 11964.8 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Socastee, SC (CDP, FIPS 67390)
      Location: 33.68708 N, 79.00893 W
      Population (1990): 10426 (4179 housing units)
      Area: 34.7 sq km (land), 1.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Sykeston, ND (city, FIPS 77660)
      Location: 47.46571 N, 99.39853 W
      Population (1990): 167 (102 housing units)
      Area: 1.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 58486

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   SAS System
  
      (SAS) Integrated software to access, manage, analyze,
      and present data.   The SAS System can be used to perform data
      entry, retrieval and management; report writing and graphics
      design; statistical and mathematical analysis; business
      forecasting and decision support; operations research; project
      management and applications development.
  
      (1998-11-06)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   SyQuest Technology, Inc.
  
      An early entrant into the removable {hard
      disk} market for {personal computers}.   For may years SyQuest
      held the market, particularly as a method of transferring
      large {desktop publisher} documents to printers.   SyQuest aim
      their products to give personal computer users "endless" hard
      drive space for data-intensive applications like {desktop
      publishing}, {Internet} information management, pre-press,
      {multimedia}, {audio}, {video}, {digital photography}, fast
      {backup}, data exchange, {archiving}, confidential data
      security and easy portability for the road.
  
      At the top of their current (Mar 1997) range are two drives,
      The {SyJet} 1.5 {GB} a 3.5 inch, double platter removable
      drive and the {EZFlyer} 230 {MB} also on 3.5 inch media.   A
      cartridge holding over 4.7GB is promised before the end of
      1997.
  
      In recent years they have not fared as well in the market,
      whilst {Iomega} has cornered the {Small Office/Home Office}
      (SOHO) market.   Over the period 1995 to 1997 sales declined
      resulting in a series of losses.   In the first quarter of 1997
      these losses had been reduced to $6.8 million with net
      revenues increasing to $48.3 million.   This compares to a net
      loss of $33.8 million, or $2.98 per share, on net revenues of
      $78.7 million for the same period the year before.   It would
      appear that substantial restructuring has occurred over the
      past few years.
  
      {Home (http://www.syquest.com/)}.
  
      (1997-03-27)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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