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   habitus
         n 1: person's predisposition to be affected by something (as a
               disease); "the consumptive habitus"
         2: constitution of the human body [syn: {physique}, {build},
            {body-build}, {habitus}]

English Dictionary: Hauptzwecken by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
haptic
adj
  1. of or relating to or proceeding from the sense of touch; "haptic data"; "a tactile reflex"
    Synonym(s): haptic, tactile, tactual
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
haptic sensation
n
  1. a sensation localized on the skin [syn: {cutaneous sensation}, haptic sensation, skin sensation]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
haptically
adv
  1. by touch; "he perceives shapes tactually" [syn: tactually, haptically]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
haptoglobin
n
  1. a protein in plasma that binds free hemoglobin and removes it (as from wounds)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
have it coming
v
  1. deserve (either good or bad); "It's too bad he got fired, but he sure had it coming"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic
adj
  1. pertaining to or affecting the liver; "hepatic ducts"; "hepatic cirrhosis"
n
  1. any of numerous small green nonvascular plants of the class Hepaticopsida growing in wet places and resembling green seaweeds or leafy mosses
    Synonym(s): liverwort, hepatic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic artery
n
  1. arteries that supply the liver [syn: hepatic artery, arteria hepatica]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic coma
n
  1. coma that can occur in severe cases of liver disease
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic duct
n
  1. the duct that drains bile from the liver
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic lobe
n
  1. any of the five lobes forming the liver
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic portal vein
n
  1. a short vein that carries blood into the liver [syn: portal vein, hepatic portal vein, portal, vena portae]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic tanager
n
  1. common tanager of southwestern United States and Mexico
    Synonym(s): hepatic tanager, Piranga flava hepatica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatic vein
n
  1. a vein that drains the liver; empties into the vena cava
    Synonym(s): hepatic vein, vena hepatica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatica
n
  1. any of several plants of the genus Hepatica having three- lobed leaves and white or pinkish flowers in early spring; of moist and mossy subalpine woodland areas of north temperate regions
    Synonym(s): hepatica, liverleaf
  2. a common liverwort
    Synonym(s): hepatica, Marchantia polymorpha
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hepaticae
n
  1. liverworts: comprises orders Anthocerotales; Jungermanniales; Marchantiales; Sphaerocarpales
    Synonym(s): Hepaticopsida, class Hepaticopsida, Hepaticae, class Hepaticae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hepaticopsida
n
  1. liverworts: comprises orders Anthocerotales; Jungermanniales; Marchantiales; Sphaerocarpales
    Synonym(s): Hepaticopsida, class Hepaticopsida, Hepaticae, class Hepaticae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatocarcinoma
n
  1. carcinoma of the liver [syn: hepatoma, {malignant hepatoma}, hepatocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatocellular carcinoma
n
  1. carcinoma of the liver [syn: hepatoma, {malignant hepatoma}, hepatocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hepatojugular reflux
n
  1. a venous reflux occurring in congestive heart failure
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
heptagon
n
  1. a seven-sided polygon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hypo-eutectoid steel
n
  1. a steel that contains less that 0.9% carbon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hypothecate
v
  1. pledge without delivery or title of possession
  2. to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
    Synonym(s): speculate, theorize, theorise, conjecture, hypothesize, hypothesise, hypothecate, suppose
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hypothesis
n
  1. a proposal intended to explain certain facts or observations
  2. a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
    Synonym(s): hypothesis, possibility, theory
  3. a message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence
    Synonym(s): guess, conjecture, supposition, surmise, surmisal, speculation, hypothesis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hypothesise
v
  1. to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
    Synonym(s): speculate, theorize, theorise, conjecture, hypothesize, hypothesise, hypothecate, suppose
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hypothesize
v
  1. to believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds; "Scientists supposed that large dinosaurs lived in swamps"
    Synonym(s): speculate, theorize, theorise, conjecture, hypothesize, hypothesise, hypothecate, suppose
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Habitakle \Hab"ita*kle\, n. [F. habitacle dwelling place,
      binnacle, L. habitaculum dwelling place. See {Binnacle},
      {Habit}, v.]
      A dwelling place. --Chaucer. Southey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatic \He*pat"ic\, a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] the
      liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak[?]t: cf. F. h[82]patique.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic
            diseases.
  
      2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic
            cinnabar.
  
      3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called
            Hepatic[91], or scale mosses and liverworts.
  
      {Hepatic duct} (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or
            one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to
            the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under
            {Digestive}.
  
      {Hepatic gas} (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas.
  
      {Hepatic mercurial ore}, [or] {Hepatic cinnabar}. See under
            {Cinnabar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinnabar \Cin"na*bar\, n. [L. cinnabaris, Gr. [?]; prob. of
      Oriental origin; cf. Per. qinb[be]r, Hind. shangarf.]
      1. (Min.) Red sulphide of mercury, occurring in brilliant red
            crystals, and also in red or brown amorphous masses. It is
            used in medicine.
  
      2. The artificial red sulphide of mercury used as a pigment;
            vermilion.
  
      {Cinnabar Gr[91]corum}. [L. Graecorum, gen. pl., of the
            Greeks.] (Med.) Same as {Dragon's blood}.
  
      {Green cinnabar}, a green pigment consisting of the oxides of
            cobalt and zinc subjected to the action of fire.
  
      {Hepatic cinnabar} (Min.), an impure cinnabar of a
            liver-brown color and submetallic luster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatic \He*pat"ic\, a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] the
      liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak[?]t: cf. F. h[82]patique.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic
            diseases.
  
      2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic
            cinnabar.
  
      3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called
            Hepatic[91], or scale mosses and liverworts.
  
      {Hepatic duct} (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or
            one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to
            the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under
            {Digestive}.
  
      {Hepatic gas} (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas.
  
      {Hepatic mercurial ore}, [or] {Hepatic cinnabar}. See under
            {Cinnabar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Colic \Col"ic\, n. [F. colique, fr. L. colicus sick with the
      colic, GR. [?], fr. [?], [?], the colon. The disease is so
      named from its being seated in or near the colon. See
      {Colon}.] (Med.)
      A severe paroxysmal pain in the abdomen, due to spasm,
      obstruction, or distention of some one of the hollow viscera.
  
      {Hepatic colic}, the severe pain produced by the passage of a
            gallstone from the liver or gall bladder through the bile
            duct.
  
      {Intestinal colic}, [or] {Ordinary colic}, pain due to
            distention of the intestines by gas.
  
      {Lead colic}, {Painter's colic}, a violent form of intestinal
            colic, associated with obstinate constipation, produced by
            chronic lead poisoning.
  
      {Renal colic}, the severe pain produced by the passage of a
            calculus from the kidney through the ureter.
  
      {Wind colic}. See {Intestinal colic}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatic \He*pat"ic\, a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] the
      liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak[?]t: cf. F. h[82]patique.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic
            diseases.
  
      2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic
            cinnabar.
  
      3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called
            Hepatic[91], or scale mosses and liverworts.
  
      {Hepatic duct} (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or
            one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to
            the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under
            {Digestive}.
  
      {Hepatic gas} (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas.
  
      {Hepatic mercurial ore}, [or] {Hepatic cinnabar}. See under
            {Cinnabar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatic \He*pat"ic\, a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] the
      liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak[?]t: cf. F. h[82]patique.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic
            diseases.
  
      2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic
            cinnabar.
  
      3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called
            Hepatic[91], or scale mosses and liverworts.
  
      {Hepatic duct} (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or
            one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to
            the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under
            {Digestive}.
  
      {Hepatic gas} (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas.
  
      {Hepatic mercurial ore}, [or] {Hepatic cinnabar}. See under
            {Cinnabar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatic \He*pat"ic\, a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] the
      liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak[?]t: cf. F. h[82]patique.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic
            diseases.
  
      2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic
            cinnabar.
  
      3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called
            Hepatic[91], or scale mosses and liverworts.
  
      {Hepatic duct} (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or
            one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to
            the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under
            {Digestive}.
  
      {Hepatic gas} (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas.
  
      {Hepatic mercurial ore}, [or] {Hepatic cinnabar}. See under
            {Cinnabar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Hepatica \[d8]He*pat"i*ca\, n.; pl. {Hepatic[91]}. [NL. See
      {Hepatic}. So called in allusion to the shape of the lobed
      leaves or fronds.]
      1. (Bot.) A genus of pretty spring flowers closely related to
            Anemone; squirrel cup.
  
      2. (bot.) Any plant, usually procumbent and mosslike, of the
            cryptogamous class Hepatic[91]; -- called also {scale
            moss} and {liverwort}. See {Hepatic[91]}, in the
            Supplement.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Squirrel \Squir"rel\ (skw[etil]r"r[etil]l or skw[icr]r"-; 277),
      n. [OE. squirel, OF. esquirel, escurel, F. [82]cureuil, LL.
      squirelus, squirolus, scuriolus, dim. of L. sciurus, Gr.
      si`oyros; skia` shade + o'yra` tail. Cf. {Shine}, v. i.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of small rodents
            belonging to the genus {Sciurus} and several allied genera
            of the family {Sciurid[91]}. Squirrels generally have a
            bushy tail, large erect ears, and strong hind legs. They
            are commonly arboreal in their habits, but many species
            live in burrows.
  
      Note: Among the common North American squirrels are the gray
               squirrel ({Scirius Carolinensis}) and its black
               variety; the fox, or cat, sqirrel ({S. cinereus}, or
               {S. niger}) which is a large species, and variable in
               color, the southern variety being frequently black,
               while the northern and western varieties are usually
               gray or rusty brown; the red squirrel (see
               {Chickaree}); the striped, or chipping, squirrel (see
               {Chipmunk}); and the California gray squirrel ({S.
               fossor}). Several other species inhabit Mexico and
               Central America. The common European species ({Sciurus
               vulgaris}) has a long tuft of hair on each ear. the
               so-called Australian squirrels are marsupials. See
               {Petaurist}, and {Phalanger}.
  
      2. One of the small rollers of a carding machine which work
            with the large cylinder.
  
      {Barking squirrel} (Zo[94]l.), the prairie dog.
  
      {Federation squirrel} (Zo[94]l.), the striped gopher. See
            {Gopher}, 2.
  
      {Flying squirrel} (Zo[94]l.). See {Flying squirrel}, in the
            Vocabulary.
  
      {Java squirrel} (Zo[94]l.). See {Jelerang}.
  
      {Squirrel corn} (Bot.), a North American herb ({Dicantra
            Canadensis}) bearing little yellow tubers.
  
      {Squirrel cup} (Bot.), the blossom of the {Hepatica triloba},
            a low perennial herb with cup-shaped flowers varying from
            purplish blue to pink or even white. It is one of the
            earliest flowers of spring.
  
      {Squirrel fish} (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A sea bass ({Serranus fascicularis}) of the Southern
                  United States.
            (b) The sailor's choice ({Diplodus rhomboides}).
            (c) The redmouth, or grunt.
            (d) A market fish of Bermuda ({Holocentrum Ascensione}).
                 
  
      {Squirrel grass} (Bot.), a pestiferous grass ({Hordeum
            murinum}) related to barley. In California the stiffly
            awned spiklets work into the wool of sheep, and into the
            throat, flesh, and eyes of animals, sometimes even
            producing death.
  
      {Squirrel hake} (Zo[94]l.), a common American hake ({Phycis
            tenuis}); -- called also {white hake}.
  
      {Squirrel hawk} (Zo[94]l.), any rough-legged hawk;
            especially, the California species {Archibuteo
            ferrugineus}.
  
      {Squirrel monkey}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any one of several species of small, soft-haired South
                  American monkeys of the genus {Calithrix}. They are
                  noted for their graceful form and agility. See
                  {Teetee}.
            (b) A marmoset.
  
      {Squirrel petaurus} (Zo[94]l.), a flying phalanger of
            Australia. See {Phalanger}, {Petaurist}, and {Flying
            phalanger} under {Flying}.
  
      {Squirrel shrew} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            East Indian and Asiatic insectivores of the genus
            {Tupaia}. They are allied to the shrews, but have a bushy
            tail, like that of a squirrel.
  
      {Squirrel-tail grass} (Bot.), a grass ({Hordeum jubatum})
            found in salt marshes and along the Great Lakes, having a
            dense spike beset with long awns.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatical \He*pat"ic*al\, a.
      Hepatic. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatization \Hep`a*ti*za"tion\, n.
      1. (Chem.) Impregnating with sulphureted hydrogen gas. [Obs.]
  
      2. [Cf. F. h[82]patisation.] (Med.) Conversion into a
            substance resembling the liver; a state of the lungs when
            gorged with effused matter, so that they are no longer
            pervious to the air.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatize \Hep"a*tize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hepatized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Hepatizing}.] [Gr. [?] to be like the liver, to be
      liver-colored, fr. [?], [?], the liver: cf. E. hepatite, and
      (for sense 2) F. h[82]patiser.]
      1. To impregnate with sulphureted hydrogen gas, formerly
            called hepatic gas.
  
                     On the right . . . were two wells of hepatized
                     water.                                                --Barrow.
  
      2. To gorge with effused matter, as the lungs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatize \Hep"a*tize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hepatized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Hepatizing}.] [Gr. [?] to be like the liver, to be
      liver-colored, fr. [?], [?], the liver: cf. E. hepatite, and
      (for sense 2) F. h[82]patiser.]
      1. To impregnate with sulphureted hydrogen gas, formerly
            called hepatic gas.
  
                     On the right . . . were two wells of hepatized
                     water.                                                --Barrow.
  
      2. To gorge with effused matter, as the lungs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatize \Hep"a*tize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hepatized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Hepatizing}.] [Gr. [?] to be like the liver, to be
      liver-colored, fr. [?], [?], the liver: cf. E. hepatite, and
      (for sense 2) F. h[82]patiser.]
      1. To impregnate with sulphureted hydrogen gas, formerly
            called hepatic gas.
  
                     On the right . . . were two wells of hepatized
                     water.                                                --Barrow.
  
      2. To gorge with effused matter, as the lungs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatocele \He*pat"o*cele\, n. [Gr. [?], [?], the liver + [?]
      tumor.] (Med.)
      Hernia of the liver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatocystic \Hep`a*to*cys"tic\, a. [Hepatic + cystic.] (Anat.)
      Of or pertaining to the liver and gall bladder; as, the
      hepatocystic ducts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatogastric \Hep`a*to*gas"tric\, a. [Hepatic + gastric.]
      (Anat.)
      See {Gastrohepatic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatogenic \Hep`a*to*gen"ic\, Hepatogenous \Hep`a*tog"e*nous\,
      a. [Gr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + root of gi`gnesthai to
      be born] (Med.)
      Arising from the liver; due to a condition of the liver; as,
      hepatogenic jaundice.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatogenic \Hep`a*to*gen"ic\, Hepatogenous \Hep`a*tog"e*nous\,
      a. [Gr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + root of gi`gnesthai to
      be born] (Med.)
      Arising from the liver; due to a condition of the liver; as,
      hepatogenic jaundice.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hepatoscopy \Hep`a*tos"co*py\, n. [Gr. [?]; fr. "h^par,
      "h`patos, the liver + [?] to view: cf. F. h[82]patoscopie.]
      Divination by inspecting the liver of animals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptachord \Hep"ta*chord\, n. [Gr. "epta`xordos seven-stringed;
      "epta` seven + xordh` chord: cf. F. heptacorde. See {Seven},
      and {Chord}.]
      1. (Anc. Mus.)
            (a) A system of seven sounds.
            (b) A lyre with seven chords.
  
      2. (Anc. Poet.) A composition sung to the sound of seven
            chords or tones. --Moore (Encyc. of Music).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptaglot \Hep"ta*glot\, n. [Gr. [?]; "epta` seven + 3, [?],
      tongue, language.]
      A book in seven languages.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptagon \Hep"ta*gon\, n. [Gr. [?] sevencornered; "epta` seven +
      [?] angle: cf. F. heptagone.] (Geom.)
      A plane figure consisting of seven sides and having seven
      angles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptagonal \Hep*tag"o*nal\, a. [Cf. F. heptagonal.]
      Having seven angles or sides.
  
      {Heptagonal numbers} (Arith.), the numbers of the series 1,
            7, 18, 34, 55, etc., being figurate numbers formed by
            adding successively the terms of the arithmetical series
            1, 6, 11, 16, 21, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptagonal \Hep*tag"o*nal\, a. [Cf. F. heptagonal.]
      Having seven angles or sides.
  
      {Heptagonal numbers} (Arith.), the numbers of the series 1,
            7, 18, 34, 55, etc., being figurate numbers formed by
            adding successively the terms of the arithmetical series
            1, 6, 11, 16, 21, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptagynian \Hep`ta*gyn"i*an\, Heptagynous \Hep*tag"y*nous\, a.
      [Cf. F. heptagyne.] (Bot.)
      Having seven pistils.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptagynian \Hep`ta*gyn"i*an\, Heptagynous \Hep*tag"y*nous\, a.
      [Cf. F. heptagyne.] (Bot.)
      Having seven pistils.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptaspermous \Hep`ta*sper"mous\, a. [Hepta- + Gr. [?] a seed.]
      (Bot.)
      Having seven seeds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptastich \Hep"ta*stich\, n. [Hepta- + Gr. sti`chos line,
      verse.] (Pros.)
      A composition consisting of seven lines or verses.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heptoic \Hep*to"ic\, a. (Chem.)
      Pertaining to, or derived from, heptane; as, heptoic acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hoop \Hoop\, n. [OE. hope; akin to D. hoep, hoepel.]
      1. A pliant strip of wood or metal bent in a circular form,
            and united at the ends, for holding together the staves of
            casks, tubs, etc.
  
      2. A ring; a circular band; anything resembling a hoop, as
            the cylinder (cheese hoop) in which the curd is pressed in
            making cheese.
  
      3. A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone,
            metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the
            skirts of ladies' dresses; crinoline; -- used chiefly in
            the plural.
  
                     Though stiff with hoops, and armed with ribs of
                     whale.                                                --Pope.
  
      4. A quart pot; -- so called because originally bound with
            hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents
            measured by the distance between the hoops. [Obs.]
  
      5. An old measure of capacity, variously estimated at from
            one to four pecks. [Eng.] --Halliwell.
  
      {Bulge hoop}, {Chine hoop}, {Quarter hoop}, the hoop nearest
            the middle of a cask, that nearest the end, and the
            intermediate hoop between these two, respectively.
  
      {Flat hoop}, a wooden hoop dressed flat on both sides.
  
      {Half-round hoop}, a wooden hoop left rounding and undressed
            on the outside.
  
      {Hoop iron}, iron in thin narrow strips, used for making
            hoops.
  
      {Hoop lock}, the fastening for uniting the ends of wooden
            hoops by notching and interlocking them.
  
      {Hoop skirt}, a framework of hoops for expanding the skirts
            of a woman's dress; -- called also {hoop petticoat}.
  
      {Hoop snake} (Zo[94]l.), a harmless snake of the Southern
            United States ({Abaster erythrogrammus}); -- so called
            from the mistaken notion that it curves itself into a
            hoop, taking its tail into its mouth, and rolls along with
            great velocity.
  
      {Hoop tree} (Bot.), a small West Indian tree ({Melia
            sempervirens}), of the Mahogany family.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypodicrotic \Hyp`o*di*crot"ic\, Hypodicrotous
   \Hyp`o*di"cro*tous\, a. (Physiol.)
      Exhibiting retarded dicrotism; as, a hypodicrotic pulse
      curve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypodicrotic \Hyp`o*di*crot"ic\, Hypodicrotous
   \Hyp`o*di"cro*tous\, a. (Physiol.)
      Exhibiting retarded dicrotism; as, a hypodicrotic pulse
      curve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothec \Hy*poth"ec\, n. [F. hypoth[8a]que. See {Hypotheca}.]
      (Scot. Law)
      A landlord's right, independently of stipulation, over the
      stocking (cattle, implements, etc.), and crops of his tenant,
      as security for payment of rent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothecate \Hy*poth"e*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Hypothecated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hypothecating}.] [LL.
      hypothecatus, p. p. of hypothecare to pledge, fr. L.
      hypotheca pledge, security. See {Hypotheca}.] (Law)
      To subject, as property, to liability for a debt or
      engagement without delivery of possession or transfer of
      title; to pledge without delivery of possession; to mortgage,
      as ships, or other personal property; to make a contract by
      bottomry. See {Hypothecation}, {Bottomry}.
  
               He had found the treasury empty and the pay of the navy
               in arrear. He had no power to hypothecate any part of
               the public revenue. Those who lent him money lent it on
               no security but his bare word.               --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothecate \Hy*poth"e*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Hypothecated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hypothecating}.] [LL.
      hypothecatus, p. p. of hypothecare to pledge, fr. L.
      hypotheca pledge, security. See {Hypotheca}.] (Law)
      To subject, as property, to liability for a debt or
      engagement without delivery of possession or transfer of
      title; to pledge without delivery of possession; to mortgage,
      as ships, or other personal property; to make a contract by
      bottomry. See {Hypothecation}, {Bottomry}.
  
               He had found the treasury empty and the pay of the navy
               in arrear. He had no power to hypothecate any part of
               the public revenue. Those who lent him money lent it on
               no security but his bare word.               --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothecate \Hy*poth"e*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Hypothecated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hypothecating}.] [LL.
      hypothecatus, p. p. of hypothecare to pledge, fr. L.
      hypotheca pledge, security. See {Hypotheca}.] (Law)
      To subject, as property, to liability for a debt or
      engagement without delivery of possession or transfer of
      title; to pledge without delivery of possession; to mortgage,
      as ships, or other personal property; to make a contract by
      bottomry. See {Hypothecation}, {Bottomry}.
  
               He had found the treasury empty and the pay of the navy
               in arrear. He had no power to hypothecate any part of
               the public revenue. Those who lent him money lent it on
               no security but his bare word.               --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothecation \Hy*poth`e*ca"tion\, n. [LL. hypothecatio.]
      1. (Civ. Law) The act or contract by which property is
            hypothecated; a right which a creditor has in or to the
            property of his debtor, in virtue of which he may cause it
            to be sold and the price appropriated in payment of his
            debt. This is a right in the thing, or jus in re.
            --Pothier. B. R. Curtis.
  
                     There are but few cases, if any, in our law, where
                     an hypothecation, in the strict sense of the Roman
                     law, exists; that is a pledge without possession by
                     the pledgee.                                       --Story.
  
      Note: In the modern civil law, this contract has no
               application to movable property, not even to ships, to
               which and their cargoes it is most frequently applied
               in England and America. See {Hypothecate}. --B. R.
               Curtis. Domat.
  
      2. (Law of Shipping) A contract whereby, in consideration of
            money advanced for the necessities of the ship, the
            vessel, freight, or cargo is made liable for its
            repayment, provided the ship arrives in safety. It is
            usually effected by a bottomry bond. See {Bottomry}.
  
      Note: This term is often applied to mortgages of ships.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothecator \Hy*poth"e*ca`tor\, n. (Law)
      One who hypothecates or pledges anything as security for the
      repayment of money borrowed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothesis \Hy*poth"e*sis\, n.; pl. {Hypotheses}. [NL., fr. Gr.
      [?] foundation, supposition, fr. [?] to place under, [?]
      under + [?] to put. See {Hypo-}, {Thesis}.]
      1. A supposition; a proposition or principle which is
            supposed or taken for granted, in order to draw a
            conclusion or inference for proof of the point in
            question; something not proved, but assumed for the
            purpose of argument, or to account for a fact or an
            occurrence; as, the hypothesis that head winds detain an
            overdue steamer.
  
                     An hypothesis being a mere supposition, there are no
                     other limits to hypotheses than those of the human
                     imagination.                                       --J. S. Mill.
  
      2. (Natural Science) A tentative theory or supposition
            provisionally adopted to explain certain facts, and to
            guide in the investigation of others; hence, frequently
            called a working hypothesis.
  
      Syn: Supposition; assumption. See {Theory}.
  
      {Nebular hypothesis}. See under {Nebular}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hypothesis \Hy*poth"e*sis\, n.; pl. {Hypotheses}. [NL., fr. Gr.
      [?] foundation, supposition, fr. [?] to place under, [?]
      under + [?] to put. See {Hypo-}, {Thesis}.]
      1. A supposition; a proposition or principle which is
            supposed or taken for granted, in order to draw a
            conclusion or inference for proof of the point in
            question; something not proved, but assumed for the
            purpose of argument, or to account for a fact or an
            occurrence; as, the hypothesis that head winds detain an
            overdue steamer.
  
                     An hypothesis being a mere supposition, there are no
                     other limits to hypotheses than those of the human
                     imagination.                                       --J. S. Mill.
  
      2. (Natural Science) A tentative theory or supposition
            provisionally adopted to explain certain facts, and to
            guide in the investigation of others; hence, frequently
            called a working hypothesis.
  
      Syn: Supposition; assumption. See {Theory}.
  
      {Nebular hypothesis}. See under {Nebular}.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hopatcong, NJ (borough, FIPS 32910)
      Location: 40.95609 N, 74.65772 W
      Population (1990): 15586 (6171 housing units)
      Area: 28.3 sq km (land), 3.6 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 07843

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   haptic interface
  
      A touch interface to a computer that
      provides {feedback}, such as a {data glove}.
  
      (2003-10-17)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   haptics
  
      The science of applying tactile sensation to human
      interaction with computers.
  
      {Haptics Community (http://haptic.mech.northwestern.edu/)}.
  
      (2003-10-17)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Havoth-jair
      hamlets of the enlightener a district in the east of Jordan.
      (1.) Jair, the son of Manasseh, took some villages of Gilead and
      called them by this name (Num. 32:41).
     
         (2.) Again, it is said that Jair "took all the tract of
      Argob," and called it Bashanhavoth-jair (Deut. 3:14). (See also
      Josh. 13:30; 1 Kings 4:13; 1 Chr. 2:22, 23.)
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Hivites
      one of the original tribes scattered over Palestine, from Hermon
      to Gibeon in the south. The name is interpreted as "midlanders"
      or "villagers" (Gen. 10:17; 1 Chr. 1:15). They were probably a
      branch of the Hittites. At the time of Jacob's return to Canaan,
      Hamor the Hivite was the "prince of the land" (Gen. 24:2-28).
     
         They are next mentioned during the Conquest (Josh. 9:7;
      11:19). They principally inhabited the northern confines of
      Western Palestine (Josh. 11:3; Judg. 3:3). A remnant of them
      still existed in the time of Solomon (1 Kings 9:20).
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Havoth-jair, the villages that enlighten
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Hivites, wicked; wickedness
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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