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   gaudiness
         n 1: tasteless showiness [syn: {flashiness}, {garishness},
               {gaudiness}, {loudness}, {brashness}, {meretriciousness},
               {tawdriness}, {glitz}]
         2: strident color or excessive ornamentation [syn: {garishness},
            {gaudiness}]

English Dictionary: Gedankenkreisen by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gautama Siddhartha
n
  1. founder of Buddhism; worshipped as a god (c 563-483 BC)
    Synonym(s): Buddha, Siddhartha, Gautama, Gautama Siddhartha, Gautama Buddha
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gdansk
n
  1. a port city of northern Poland near the mouth of the Vistula River on a gulf of the Baltic Sea; a member of the Hanseatic League in the 14th century
    Synonym(s): Gdansk, Danzig
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
get a noseful
v
  1. smell strongly and intensely [syn: get a noseful, {get a whiff}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
get one's lumps
v
  1. suffer the results or consequences of one's behavior or actions
    Synonym(s): take one's lumps, get one's lumps
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
get the hang
v
  1. be or become completely proficient or skilled in; "She mastered Japanese in less than two years"
    Synonym(s): master, get the hang
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
getting
n
  1. the act of acquiring something; "I envied his talent for acquiring"; "he's much more interested in the getting than in the giving"
    Synonym(s): acquiring, getting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
getting even
n
  1. a reciprocal group action; "in return we gave them as good as we got"
    Synonym(s): return, paying back, getting even
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
giddiness
n
  1. an impulsive scatterbrained manner [syn: giddiness, silliness]
  2. a reeling sensation; a feeling that you are about to fall
    Synonym(s): dizziness, giddiness, lightheadedness, vertigo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
goading
n
  1. a verbalization that encourages you to attempt something; "the ceaseless prodding got on his nerves"
    Synonym(s): goad, goading, prod, prodding, urging, spur, spurring
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Godwin Austen
n
  1. a mountain peak in the Karakoram Range in northern Kashmir; the 2nd highest peak in the world (28,250 feet high)
    Synonym(s): K2, Godwin Austen, Mount Godwin Austen, Dapsang
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
good enough
adj
  1. adequately good for the circumstances; "if it's good enough for you it's good enough for me"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
good night
n
  1. a conventional expression of farewell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
good-neighborliness
n
  1. a disposition to be friendly and helpful to neighbors [syn: neighborliness, neighbourliness, good-neighborliness, good-neighbourliness]
    Antonym(s): unneighborliness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
good-neighbourliness
n
  1. a disposition to be friendly and helpful to neighbors [syn: neighborliness, neighbourliness, good-neighborliness, good-neighbourliness]
    Antonym(s): unneighborliness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Goodeniaceae
n
  1. a family of sappy plants that grow in Australasia and southeast China
    Synonym(s): Goodeniaceae, family Goodeniaceae, Goodenia family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
goodness
n
  1. that which is pleasing or valuable or useful; "weigh the good against the bad"; "among the highest goods of all are happiness and self-realization"
    Synonym(s): good, goodness
    Antonym(s): bad, badness
  2. moral excellence or admirableness; "there is much good to be found in people"
    Synonym(s): good, goodness
    Antonym(s): evil, evilness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guidance
n
  1. something that provides direction or advice as to a decision or course of action
    Synonym(s): guidance, counsel, counseling, counselling, direction
  2. the act of guiding or showing the way
    Synonym(s): guidance, steering
  3. the act of setting and holding a course; "a new council was installed under the direction of the king"
    Synonym(s): steering, guidance, direction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guidance device
n
  1. a system of equipment for automatically guiding the path of a vehicle (especially a missile)
    Synonym(s): guidance system, guidance device
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guidance system
n
  1. a system of equipment for automatically guiding the path of a vehicle (especially a missile)
    Synonym(s): guidance system, guidance device
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guiding
adj
  1. exerting control or influence; "a guiding principle"
  2. showing the way by conducting or leading; imposing direction on; "felt his mother's directing arm around him"; "the directional role of science on industrial progress"
    Synonym(s): directing, directional, directive, guiding
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guiding light
n
  1. a celebrity who is an inspiration to others; "he was host to a large gathering of luminaries"
    Synonym(s): luminary, leading light, guiding light, notable, notability
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Green-broom \Green"-broom`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant of the genus {Genista} ({G. tinctoria}); dyer's weed;
      -- called also {greenweed}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gad \Gad\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gadded}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gadding}.] [Prob. fr. gad, n., and orig. meaning to drive
      about.]
      To walk about; to rove or go about, without purpose; hence,
      to run wild; to be uncontrolled. [bd]The gadding vine.[b8]
      --Milton.
  
               Why gaddest thou about so much to change thy way?
                                                                              --Jer. ii. 36.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gadding \Gad"ding\, a. & n.
      Going about much, needlessly or without purpose.
  
               Envy is a gadding passion, and walketh the streets.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
               The good nuns would check her gadding tongue.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      {Gadding car}, in quarrying, a car which carries a drilling
            machine so arranged as to drill a line of holes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gadding \Gad"ding\, a. & n.
      Going about much, needlessly or without purpose.
  
               Envy is a gadding passion, and walketh the streets.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
               The good nuns would check her gadding tongue.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      {Gadding car}, in quarrying, a car which carries a drilling
            machine so arranged as to drill a line of holes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaddingly \Gad"ding*ly\, adv.
      In a roving, idle manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaudiness \Gaud"i*ness\, n.
      The quality of being gaudy. --Whitlock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaud \Gaud\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gauded}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gauding}.]
      To bedeck gaudily; to decorate with gauds or showy trinkets
      or colors; to paint. [Obs.] [bd]Nicely gauded cheeks.[b8]
      --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Geitonogamy \Gei"to*nog"a*my\, n. [Gr. [?] neighbor + [?]
      marriage.] (Bot.)
      Fertilization of flowers by pollen from other flowers on the
      same plant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Get \Get\ (g[ecr]t), v. t. [imp. {Got} (g[ocr]t) (Obs. {Gat}
      (g[acr]t)); p. p. {Got} (Obsolescent {Gotten} (g[ocr]t"t'n));
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Getting}.] [OE. geten, AS. gitan, gietan (in
      comp.); akin to Icel. geta, Goth. bigitan to find, L.
      prehendere to seize, take, Gr. chanda`nein to hold, contain.
      Cf. {Comprehend}, {Enterprise}, {Forget}, {Impregnable},
      {Prehensile}.]
      1. To procure; to obtain; to gain possession of; to acquire;
            to earn; to obtain as a price or reward; to come by; to
            win, by almost any means; as, to get favor by kindness; to
            get wealth by industry and economy; to get land by
            purchase, etc.
  
      2. Hence, with have and had, to come into or be in possession
            of; to have. --Johnson.
  
                     Thou hast got the face of man.            --Herbert.
  
      3. To beget; to procreate; to generate.
  
                     I had rather to adopt a child than get it. --Shak.
  
      4. To obtain mental possession of; to learn; to commit to
            memory; to memorize; as to get a lesson; also with out;
            as, to get out one's Greek lesson.
  
                     It being harder with him to get one sermon by heart,
                     than to pen twenty.                           --Bp. Fell.
  
      5. To prevail on; to induce; to persuade.
  
                     Get him to say his prayers.               --Shak.
  
      6. To procure to be, or to cause to be in any state or
            condition; -- with a following participle.
  
                     Those things I bid you do; get them dispatched.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      7. To betake; to remove; -- in a reflexive use.
  
                     Get thee out from this land.               --Gen. xxxi.
                                                                              13.
  
                     He . . . got himself . . . to the strong town of
                     Mega.                                                --Knolles.
  
      Note: Get, as a transitive verb, is combined with adverbs
               implying motion, to express the causing to, or the
               effecting in, the object of the verb, of the kind of
               motion indicated by the preposition; thus, to get in,
               to cause to enter, to bring under shelter; as, to get
               in the hay; to get out, to make come forth, to extract;
               to get off, to take off, to remove; to get together, to
               cause to come together, to collect.
  
      {To get by heart}, to commit to memory.
  
      {To get the better of}, {To get the best of}, to obtain an
            advantage over; to surpass; to subdue.
  
      {To get up}, to cause to be established or to exit; to
            prepare; to arrange; to construct; to invent; as, to get
            up a celebration, a machine, a book, an agitation.
  
      Syn: To obtain; gain; win; acquire. See {Obtain}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Getting \Get"ting\, n.
      1. The act of obtaining or acquiring; acquisition.
  
                     With all thy getting, get understanding. --Prov. iv.
                                                                              7.
  
      2. That which is got or obtained; gain; profit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Giddiness \Gid"di*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being giddy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goad \Goad\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Goaded}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Goading}.]
      To prick; to drive with a goad; hence, to urge forward, or to
      rouse by anything pungent, severe, irritating, or inflaming;
      to stimulate.
  
               That temptation that doth goad us on.      --Shak.
  
      Syn: To urge; stimulate; excite; arouse; irritate; incite;
               instigate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goodness \Good"ness\, n. [AS. g[?]dnes.]
      The quality of being good in any of its various senses;
      excellence; virtue; kindness; benevolence; as, the goodness
      of timber, of a soil, of food; goodness of character, of
      disposition, of conduct, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gothamist \Go"tham*ist\, n.
      A wiseacre; a person deficient in wisdom; -- so called from
      Gotham, in Nottinghamshire, England, noted for some pleasant
      blunders. --Bp. Morton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goutiness \Gout"i*ness\, n.
      The state of being gouty; gout.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saury \Sau"ry\, n.; pl. {Sauries}. [Etymol. uncertain.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A slender marine fish ({Scomberesox saurus}) of Europe and
      America. It has long, thin, beaklike jaws. Called also
      {billfish}, {gowdnook}, {gawnook}, {skipper}, {skipjack},
      {skopster}, {lizard fish}, and {Egypt herring}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gowdnook \Gowd"nook"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The saury pike; -- called also gofnick.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saury \Sau"ry\, n.; pl. {Sauries}. [Etymol. uncertain.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A slender marine fish ({Scomberesox saurus}) of Europe and
      America. It has long, thin, beaklike jaws. Called also
      {billfish}, {gowdnook}, {gawnook}, {skipper}, {skipjack},
      {skopster}, {lizard fish}, and {Egypt herring}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gowdnook \Gowd"nook"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The saury pike; -- called also gofnick.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guidance \Guid"ance\, n. [See {Guide}.]
      The act or result of guiding; the superintendence or
      assistance of a guide; direction; government; a leading.
  
               His studies were without guidance and without plan.
                                                                              --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guide \Guide\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Guided}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Guiding}.] [OE. guiden, gyden, F. guiaer, It. guidare; prob.
      of Teutonic origin; cf. Goth. ritan to watch over, give heed
      to, Icel. viti signal, AS. witan to know. The word prob.
      meant, to indicate, point to, and hence, to show the way. Cf.
      {Wit}, {Guy} a rope, {Gye.}]
      1. To lead or direct in a way; to conduct in a course or
            path; to pilot; as, to guide a traveler.
  
                     I wish . . . you 'ld guide me to your sovereign's
                     court.                                                --Shak.
  
      2. To regulate and manage; to direct; to order; to
            superintend the training or education of; to instruct and
            influence intellectually or morally; to train.
  
                     He will guide his affairs with discretion. --Ps.
                                                                              cxii. 5.
  
                     The meek will he guide in judgment.   --Ps. xxv. 9.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gut \Gut\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gutted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gutting}.]
      1. To take out the bowels from; to eviscerate.
  
      2. To plunder of contents; to destroy or remove the interior
            or contents of; as, a mob gutted the bouse.
  
                     Tom Brown, of facetious memory, having gutted a
                     proper name of its vowels, used it as freely as he
                     pleased.                                             --Addison.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Giddings, TX (city, FIPS 29432)
      Location: 30.18334 N, 96.92785 W
      Population (1990): 4093 (1754 housing units)
      Area: 13.3 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 78942

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gooding, ID (city, FIPS 32140)
      Location: 42.93812 N, 114.71260 W
      Population (1990): 2820 (1291 housing units)
      Area: 3.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 83330

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gooding County, ID (county, FIPS 47)
      Location: 42.96532 N, 114.80004 W
      Population (1990): 11633 (4800 housing units)
      Area: 1892.9 sq km (land), 7.9 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Goodings Grove, IL (CDP, FIPS 30471)
      Location: 41.No definitions found for "Gedanken"
No definitions found for "gedanken"
62160 N, 87.94059 W
      Population (1990): 14054 (3952 housing units)
      Area: 24.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Goodnews Bay, AK (city, FIPS 29290)
      Location: 59.10981 N, 161.56529 W
      Population (1990): 241 (72 housing units)
      Area: 8.4 sq km (land), 5.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 99589

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   gedanken /g*-dahn'kn/ adj.   Ungrounded; impractical; not
   well-thought-out; untried; untested.
  
      `Gedanken' is a German word for `thought'.   A thought experiment
   is one you carry out in your head.   In physics, the term `gedanken
   experiment' is used to refer to an experiment that is impractical to
   carry out, but useful to consider because it can be reasoned about
   theoretically.   (A classic gedanken experiment of relativity theory
   involves thinking about a man in an elevator accelerating through
   space.)   Gedanken experiments are very useful in physics, but must
   be used with care.   It's too easy to idealize away some important
   aspect of the real world in constructing the `apparatus'.
  
      Among hackers, accordingly, the word has a pejorative connotation.
   It is typically used of a project, especially one in artificial
   intelligence research, that is written up in grand detail (typically
   as a Ph.D.   thesis) without ever being implemented to any great
   extent.   Such a project is usually perpetrated by people who aren't
   very good hackers or find programming distasteful or are just in a
   hurry.   A `gedanken thesis' is usually marked by an obvious lack of
   intuition about what is programmable and what is not, and about what
   does and does not constitute a clear specification of an algorithm.
   See also {AI-complete}, {DWIM}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Godwin's Law prov.   [Usenet] "As a Usenet discussion grows
   longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler
   approaches one."   There is a tradition in many groups that, once
   this occurs, that thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis
   has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress.   Godwin's
   Law thus practically guarantees the existence of an upper bound on
   thread length in those groups.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Good Thing n.,adj.   [very common; often capitalized; always
   pronounced as if capitalized.]   1. Self-evidently wonderful to
   anyone in a position to notice: "A language that manages dynamic
   memory automatically for you is a Good Thing."   2. Something that
   can't possibly have any ill side-effects and may save considerable
   grief later: "Removing the self-modifying code from that shared
   library would be a Good Thing."   3. When said of software tools or
   libraries, as in "YACC is a Good Thing", specifically connotes that
   the thing has drastically reduced a programmer's work load.   Oppose
   {Bad Thing}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Godwin's Law
  
      "As a {Usenet} discussion grows longer, the
      probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler
      approaches one."   There is a tradition in many groups that,
      once this occurs, that {thread} is over, and whoever mentioned
      the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in
      progress.   Godwin's Law thus practically guarantees the
      existence of an {upper bound} on thread length in those
      groups.   However there is also a widely recognised codicil
      that any intentional triggering of Godwin's Law in order to
      invoke its thread-ending effects will be unsuccessful.
  
      [{Jargon}].
  
      (2003-10-06)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Good Thing
  
      (From the 1930 Sellar and Yeatman parody "1066
      And All That") Often capitalised; always pronounced as if
      capitalised.
  
      1. Self-evidently wonderful to anyone in a position to notice:
      "The {Trailblazer}'s 19.2 K{baud} {PEP} mode with {on-the-fly}
      {Lempel-Ziv compression} is a Good Thing for sites relaying
      {netnews}".
  
      2. Something that can't possibly have any ill side-effects and
      may save considerable grief later: "Removing the
      {self-modifying code} from that {shared library} would be a
      Good Thing".
  
      3. When said of software tools or libraries, as in "{Yacc} is
      a Good Thing", specifically connotes that the thing has
      drastically reduced a programmer's work load.
  
      Opposite: {Bad Thing}, compare {big win}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-05-07)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Goodness
      in man is not a mere passive quality, but the deliberate
      preference of right to wrong, the firm and persistent resistance
      of all moral evil, and the choosing and following of all moral
      good.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Goodness of God
      a perfection of his character which he exercises towards his
      creatures according to their various circumstances and relations
      (Ps. 145:8, 9; 103:8; 1 John 4:8). Viewed generally, it is
      benevolence; as exercised with respect to the miseries of his
      creatures it is mercy, pity, compassion, and in the case of
      impenitent sinners, long-suffering patience; as exercised in
      communicating favour on the unworthy it is grace. "Goodness and
      justice are the several aspects of one unchangeable, infinitely
      wise, and sovereign moral perfection. God is not sometimes
      merciful and sometimes just, but he is eternally infinitely just
      and merciful." God is infinitely and unchangeably good (Zeph.
      3:17), and his goodness is incomprehensible by the finite mind
      (Rom. 11: 35, 36). "God's goodness appears in two things, giving
      and forgiving."
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2021
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