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Trend
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English Dictionary: trend by the DICT Development Group
7 results for trend
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trend
n
  1. a general direction in which something tends to move; "the shoreward tendency of the current"; "the trend of the stock market"
    Synonym(s): tendency, trend
  2. general line of orientation; "the river takes a southern course"; "the northeastern trend of the coast"
    Synonym(s): course, trend
  3. a general tendency to change (as of opinion); "not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book"; "a broad movement of the electorate to the right"
    Synonym(s): drift, trend, movement
  4. the popular taste at a given time; "leather is the latest vogue"; "he followed current trends"; "the 1920s had a style of their own"
    Synonym(s): vogue, trend, style
v
  1. turn sharply; change direction abruptly; "The car cut to the left at the intersection"; "The motorbike veered to the right"
    Synonym(s): swerve, sheer, curve, trend, veer, slue, slew, cut
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fault \Fault\, n.
      1. (Elec.) A defective point in an electric circuit due to a
            crossing of the parts of the conductor, or to contact with
            another conductor or the earth, or to a break in the
            circuit.
  
      2. (Geol. & Mining) A dislocation caused by a slipping of
            rock masses along a plane of facture; also, the dislocated
            structure resulting from such slipping.
  
      Note: The surface along which the dislocated masses have
               moved is called the
  
      {fault plane}. When this plane is vertical, the fault is a
  
      {vertical fault}; when its inclination is such that the
            present relative position of the two masses could have
            been produced by the sliding down, along the fault plane,
            of the mass on its upper side, the fault is a
  
      {normal}, [or] {gravity}, {fault}. When the fault plane is so
            inclined that the mass on its upper side has moved up
            relatively, the fault is then called a
  
      {reverse} (or {reversed}), {thrust}, or {overthrust},
      {fault}. If no vertical displacement has resulted, the fault
            is then called a
  
      {horizontal fault}. The linear extent of the dislocation
            measured on the fault plane and in the direction of
            movement is the
  
      {displacement}; the vertical displacement is the
  
      {throw}; the horizontal displacement is the
  
      {heave}. The direction of the line of intersection of the
            fault plane with a horizontal plane is the
  
      {trend} of the fault. A fault is a
  
      {strike fault} when its trend coincides approximately with
            the strike of associated strata (i.e., the line of
            intersection of the plane of the strata with a horizontal
            plane); it is a
  
      {dip fault} when its trend is at right angles to the strike;
            an
  
      {oblique fault} when its trend is oblique to the strike.
            Oblique faults and dip faults are sometimes called
  
      {cross faults}. A series of closely associated parallel
            faults are sometimes called
  
      {step faults} and sometimes
  
      {distributive faults}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trend \Trend\, v. t.
      To cause to turn; to bend. [R.]
  
               Not far beneath i' the valley as she trends Her silver
               stream.                                                   --W. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trend \Trend\, n.
      Inclination in a particular direction; tendency; general
      direction; as, the trend of a coast.
  
      {Trend of an anchor}. (Naut.)
      (a) The lower end of the shank of an anchor, being the same
            distance on the shank from the throat that the arm
            measures from the throat to the bill. --R. H. Dana, Jr.
      (b) The angle made by the line of a vessel's keel and the
            direction of the anchor cable, when she is swinging at
            anchor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trend \Trend\, v. t. [Cf. G. & OD. trennen to separate.]
      To cleanse, as wool. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trend \Trend\, n.
      Clean wool. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trend \Trend\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Trended}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trending}.] [OE. trenden to roll or turn about; akin to
      OFries. trind, trund, round, Dan. & Sw. trind, AS. trendel a
      circle, ring, and E. trendle, trundle.]
      To have a particular direction; to run; to stretch; to tend;
      as, the shore of the sea trends to the southwest.
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2019
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