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   Mahayanism
         n 1: the religious doctrine of Mahayana Buddhism

English Dictionary: Mangandioxid by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
management
n
  1. the act of managing something; "he was given overall management of the program"; "is the direction of the economy a function of government?"
    Synonym(s): management, direction
  2. those in charge of running a business
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
management consultant
n
  1. adviser to business about efficient management practices
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
management consulting
n
  1. a service industry that provides advice to those in charge of running a business
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
management control
n
  1. an internal control performed by one or more managers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
management personnel
n
  1. personnel having overall planning and direction responsibilities
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
managing director
n
  1. someone who controls resources and expenditures [syn: director, manager, managing director]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
managing editor
n
  1. the editor in charge of all editorial activities of a newspaper or magazine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manakin
n
  1. a woman who wears clothes to display fashions; "she was too fat to be a mannequin"
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, fashion model, model
  2. a life-size dummy used to display clothes
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, form
  3. any of numerous small bright-colored birds of Central America and South America having short bills and elaborate courtship behavior
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manassa Mauler
n
  1. United States prizefighter who was world heavyweight champion (1895-1983)
    Synonym(s): Dempsey, Jack Dempsey, William Harrison Dempsey, Manassa Mauler
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mancunian
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of the English city of Manchester or its residents; "Mancunian merchants"
n
  1. a native or resident of Manchester
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganate
n
  1. a salt of manganic acid containing manganese as its anion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganese
n
  1. a hard brittle grey polyvalent metallic element that resembles iron but is not magnetic; used in making steel; occurs in many minerals
    Synonym(s): manganese, Mn, atomic number 25
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganese bronze
n
  1. a brass with from 1-4% manganese to harden it [syn: manganese bronze, high-strength brass]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganese steel
n
  1. a steel with a relatively large component (10-14%) of manganese; highly resistant to wear and shock
    Synonym(s): manganese steel, austenitic manganese steel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganese tetroxide
n
  1. an oxide of manganese found naturally as hausmannite
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganic acid
n
  1. a dibasic acid (H2MnO4) found only in solution and in manganate salts
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manganite
n
  1. a black mineral consisting of basic manganese oxide; a source of manganese
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manginess
n
  1. a lack of elegance as a consequence of wearing threadbare or dirty clothing
    Synonym(s): shabbiness, seediness, manginess, sleaziness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mangonel
n
  1. an engine that provided medieval artillery used during sieges; a heavy war engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
    Synonym(s): catapult, arbalest, arbalist, ballista, bricole, mangonel, onager, trebuchet, trebucket
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manichaean
adj
  1. of or relating to the philosophical doctrine of dualism; "a Manichaean conflict between good and evil"
    Synonym(s): dualistic, Manichaean
  2. of or relating to Manichaeism
    Synonym(s): Manichaean, Manichean, Manichee
n
  1. an adherent of Manichaeism [syn: Manichaean, Manichean, Manichee]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manichaeanism
n
  1. a religion founded by Manes in the third century; a synthesis of Zoroastrian dualism between light and dark and Babylonian folklore and Buddhist ethics and superficial elements of Christianity; spread widely in the Roman Empire but had largely died out by 1000
    Synonym(s): Manichaeism, Manichaeanism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manichean
adj
  1. of or relating to Manichaeism [syn: Manichaean, Manichean, Manichee]
n
  1. an adherent of Manichaeism [syn: Manichaean, Manichean, Manichee]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manikin
n
  1. a person who is very small but who is not otherwise deformed or abnormal
    Synonym(s): manikin, mannikin, homunculus
  2. a woman who wears clothes to display fashions; "she was too fat to be a mannequin"
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, fashion model, model
  3. a life-size dummy used to display clothes
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, form
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mankind
n
  1. all of the living human inhabitants of the earth; "all the world loves a lover"; "she always used `humankind' because `mankind' seemed to slight the women"
    Synonym(s): world, human race, humanity, humankind, human beings, humans, mankind, man
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manna gum
n
  1. tall tree yielding a false manna [syn: manna gum, Eucalyptus viminalis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mannequin
n
  1. a woman who wears clothes to display fashions; "she was too fat to be a mannequin"
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, fashion model, model
  2. a life-size dummy used to display clothes
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, form
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mannikin
n
  1. a person who is very small but who is not otherwise deformed or abnormal
    Synonym(s): manikin, mannikin, homunculus
  2. a woman who wears clothes to display fashions; "she was too fat to be a mannequin"
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, fashion model, model
  3. a life-size dummy used to display clothes
    Synonym(s): mannequin, manikin, mannikin, manakin, form
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mansion
n
  1. (astrology) one of 12 equal areas into which the zodiac is divided
    Synonym(s): sign of the zodiac, star sign, sign, mansion, house, planetary house
  2. a large and imposing house
    Synonym(s): mansion, mansion house, manse, hall, residence
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mansion house
n
  1. a large and imposing house [syn: mansion, {mansion house}, manse, hall, residence]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manson
n
  1. Scottish physician who discovered that elephantiasis is spread by mosquitos and suggested that mosquitos also spread malaria (1844-1922)
    Synonym(s): Manson, Sir Patrick Manson
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
many-chambered
adj
  1. having many chambers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manzanilla
n
  1. very dry pale sherry from Spain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manzanita
n
  1. chiefly evergreen shrubs of warm dry areas of western North America
  2. evergreen tree of the Pacific coast of North America having glossy leathery leaves and orange-red edible berries; wood used for furniture and bark for tanning
    Synonym(s): madrona, madrono, manzanita, Arbutus menziesii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manzoni
n
  1. Italian novelist and poet (1785-1873) [syn: Manzoni, Alessandro Manzoni]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mean sun
n
  1. a theoretical sun that moves along the celestial equator at a constant speed and completes its annual course in the same amount of time the real sun takes at variable speeds
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menachem Begin
n
  1. Israeli statesman (born in Russia) who (as prime minister of Israel) negotiated a peace treaty with Anwar Sadat (then the president of Egypt) (1913-1992)
    Synonym(s): Begin, Menachem Begin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
menacing
adj
  1. threatening or foreshadowing evil or tragic developments; "a baleful look"; "forbidding thunderclouds"; "his tone became menacing"; "ominous rumblings of discontent"; "sinister storm clouds"; "a sinister smile"; "his threatening behavior"; "ugly black clouds"; "the situation became ugly"
    Synonym(s): baleful, forbidding, menacing, minacious, minatory, ominous, sinister, threatening
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
menacingly
adv
  1. in a menacing manner; "the voice at the other end of the line dropped menacingly"
    Synonym(s): menacingly, threateningly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mencken
n
  1. United States journalist and literary critic (1880-1956)
    Synonym(s): Mencken, H. L. Mencken, Henry Louis Mencken
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Meniscium
n
  1. terrestrial ferns of tropical Americas [syn: Meniscium, genus Meniscium]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mincemeat
n
  1. spiced mixture of chopped raisins and apples and other ingredients with or without meat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mincing
adj
  1. affectedly dainty or refined [syn: dainty, mincing, niminy-piminy, prim, twee]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mincing machine
n
  1. a kitchen utensil that cuts or chops food (especially meat) into small pieces
    Synonym(s): mincer, mincing machine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mincingly
adv
  1. in a mincing manner; "she stepped mincingly over the puddles"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
minginess
n
  1. extreme stinginess [syn: meanness, minginess, niggardliness, niggardness, parsimony, parsimoniousness, tightness, tightfistedness, closeness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
minicomputer
n
  1. a digital computer of medium size
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Miniconju
n
  1. a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Minocin
n
  1. tetracycline antibiotic (trade name Minocin) used to treat a variety of bacterial and rickettsial infections
    Synonym(s): minocycline, Minocin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mnemosyne
n
  1. (Greek mythology) the Titaness who was goddess of memory; mother of the Muses
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
momism
n
  1. excessive protection [syn: momism, overprotection, overshielding]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mommsen
n
  1. German historian noted for his history of Rome (1817-1903)
    Synonym(s): Mommsen, Theodor Mommsen
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mon-Khmer
n
  1. a branch of the Austro-Asiatic languages
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monacan
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Monaco or its people
    Synonym(s): Monacan, Monegasque
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Monaco [syn: Monegasque, Monacan]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
money changer
n
  1. one whose business is to exchange the money of one country for that of another country
    Synonym(s): exchanger, money changer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monism
n
  1. the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
    Antonym(s): pluralism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monkey nut
n
  1. pod of the peanut vine containing usually 2 nuts or seeds; `groundnut' and `monkey nut' are British terms
    Synonym(s): peanut, earthnut, goober, goober pea, groundnut, monkey nut
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monocanthidae
n
  1. filefishes
    Synonym(s): Monocanthidae, family Monocanthidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monocanthus
n
  1. type genus of the Monocanthidae [syn: Monocanthus, {genus Monocanthus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monochamus
n
  1. sawyer beetles
    Synonym(s): Monochamus, genus Monochamus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogamist
n
  1. someone who practices monogamy (one spouse at a time) [syn: monogamist, monogynist]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogamous
adj
  1. (used of relationships and of individuals) having one mate; "monogamous marriage"; "monogamous for life"
    Antonym(s): polygamous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogamousness
n
  1. having only one spouse at a time [syn: monogamy, monogamousness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogamy
n
  1. having only one spouse at a time [syn: monogamy, monogamousness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogenesis
n
  1. asexual reproduction by the production and release of spores
    Synonym(s): monogenesis, sporulation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogenic
adj
  1. of or relating to an inheritable character that is controlled by a single pair of genes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogenic disease
n
  1. an inherited disease controlled by a single pair of genes
    Synonym(s): monogenic disorder, monogenic disease
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogenic disorder
n
  1. an inherited disease controlled by a single pair of genes
    Synonym(s): monogenic disorder, monogenic disease
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogynic
adj
  1. having one head or chief wife at a time (along with concubines)
    Synonym(s): monogynous, monogynic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogynist
n
  1. someone who practices monogamy (one spouse at a time) [syn: monogamist, monogynist]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogynous
adj
  1. having one head or chief wife at a time (along with concubines)
    Synonym(s): monogynous, monogynic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monogyny
n
  1. having only one wife at a time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monosemous
adj
  1. having only one meaning
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monosemy
n
  1. having a single meaning (absence of ambiguity) usually of individual words or phrases
    Antonym(s): lexical ambiguity, polysemy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monosomy
n
  1. chromosomal abnormality consisting of the absence of one chromosome from the normal diploid number
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monsoon
n
  1. a seasonal wind in southern Asia; blows from the southwest (bringing rain) in summer and from the northeast in winter
  2. rainy season in southern Asia when the southwestern monsoon blows, bringing heavy rains
  3. any wind that changes direction with the seasons
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moonshine
n
  1. the light of the Moon; "moonlight is the smuggler's enemy"; "the Moon was bright enough to read by"
    Synonym(s): moonlight, moonshine, Moon
  2. whiskey illegally distilled from a corn mash
    Synonym(s): moonshine, bootleg, corn liquor
v
  1. distill (alcohol) illegally; produce moonshine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moonshiner
n
  1. someone who makes or sells illegal liquor [syn: bootlegger, moonshiner]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mu-meson
n
  1. an elementary particle with a negative charge and a half- life of 2 microsecond; decays to electron and neutrino and antineutrino
    Synonym(s): muon, negative muon, mu-meson
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Muenchen
n
  1. the capital and largest city of Bavaria in southwestern Germany
    Synonym(s): Munich, Muenchen
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Munchener
n
  1. a dark lager produced in Munich since the 10th century; has a distinctive taste of malt
    Synonym(s): Munich beer, Munchener
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Main \Main\, a. [From {Main} strength, possibly influenced by
      OF. maine, magne, great, L. magnus. Cf. {Magnate}.]
      1. Very or extremely strong. [Obs.]
  
                     That current with main fury ran.         --Daniel.
  
      2. Vast; huge. [Obs.] [bd]The main abyss.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. Unqualified; absolute; entire; sheer. [Obs.] [bd]It's a
            man untruth.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
      4. Principal; chief; first in size, rank, importance, etc.
  
                     Our main interest is to be happy as we can.
                                                                              --Tillotson.
  
      5. Important; necessary. [Obs.]
  
                     That which thou aright Believest so main to our
                     success, I bring.                              --Milton.
  
      {By main force}, by mere force or sheer force; by violent
            effort; as, to subdue insurrection by main force.
  
                     That Maine which by main force Warwick did win.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {By main strength}, by sheer strength; as, to lift a heavy
            weight by main strength.
  
      {Main beam} (Steam Engine), working beam.
  
      {Main boom} (Naut.), the boom which extends the foot of the
            mainsail in a fore and aft vessel.
  
      {Main brace}.
            (a) (Mech.) The brace which resists the chief strain. Cf.
                  {Counter brace}.
            (b) (Naut.) The brace attached to the main yard.
  
      {Main center} (Steam Engine), a shaft upon which a working
            beam or side lever swings.
  
      {Main chance}. See under {Chance}.
  
      {Main couple} (Arch.), the principal truss in a roof.
  
      {Main deck} (Naut.), the deck next below the spar deck; the
            principal deck.
  
      {Main keel} (Naut.), the principal or true keel of a vessel,
            as distinguished from the false keel.
  
      Syn: Principal; chief; leading; cardinal; capital.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Main \Main\, a. [From {Main} strength, possibly influenced by
      OF. maine, magne, great, L. magnus. Cf. {Magnate}.]
      1. Very or extremely strong. [Obs.]
  
                     That current with main fury ran.         --Daniel.
  
      2. Vast; huge. [Obs.] [bd]The main abyss.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. Unqualified; absolute; entire; sheer. [Obs.] [bd]It's a
            man untruth.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
      4. Principal; chief; first in size, rank, importance, etc.
  
                     Our main interest is to be happy as we can.
                                                                              --Tillotson.
  
      5. Important; necessary. [Obs.]
  
                     That which thou aright Believest so main to our
                     success, I bring.                              --Milton.
  
      {By main force}, by mere force or sheer force; by violent
            effort; as, to subdue insurrection by main force.
  
                     That Maine which by main force Warwick did win.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {By main strength}, by sheer strength; as, to lift a heavy
            weight by main strength.
  
      {Main beam} (Steam Engine), working beam.
  
      {Main boom} (Naut.), the boom which extends the foot of the
            mainsail in a fore and aft vessel.
  
      {Main brace}.
            (a) (Mech.) The brace which resists the chief strain. Cf.
                  {Counter brace}.
            (b) (Naut.) The brace attached to the main yard.
  
      {Main center} (Steam Engine), a shaft upon which a working
            beam or side lever swings.
  
      {Main chance}. See under {Chance}.
  
      {Main couple} (Arch.), the principal truss in a roof.
  
      {Main deck} (Naut.), the deck next below the spar deck; the
            principal deck.
  
      {Main keel} (Naut.), the principal or true keel of a vessel,
            as distinguished from the false keel.
  
      Syn: Principal; chief; leading; cardinal; capital.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Management \Man"age*ment\, n. [From {Manage}, v.]
      1. The act or art of managing; the manner of treating,
            directing, carrying on, or using, for a purpose; conduct;
            administration; guidance; control; as, the management of a
            family or of a farm; the management of state affairs.
            [bd]The management of the voice.[b8] --E. Porter.
  
      2. Business dealing; negotiation; arrangement.
  
                     He had great managements with ecclesiastics.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      3. Judicious use of means to accomplish an end; conduct
            directed by art or address; skillful treatment; cunning
            practice; -- often in a bad sense.
  
                     Mark with what management their tribes divide Some
                     stick to you, and some to t'other side. --Dryden.
  
      4. The collective body of those who manage or direct any
            enterprise or interest; the board of managers.
  
      Syn: Conduct; administration; government; direction;
               guidance; care; charge; contrivance; intrigue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manage \Man"age\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Managed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Managing}.] [From {Manage}, n.]
      1. To have under control and direction; to conduct; to guide;
            to administer; to treat; to handle.
  
                     Long tubes are cumbersome, and scarce to be easily
                     managed.                                             --Sir I.
                                                                              Newton.
  
                     What wars Imanage, and what wreaths I gain. --Prior.
  
      2. Hence: Esp., to guide by careful or delicate treatment; to
            wield with address; to make subservient by artful conduct;
            to bring around cunningly to one's plans.
  
                     It was so much his interest to manage his Protestant
                     subjects.                                          --Addison.
  
                     It was not her humor to manage those over whom she
                     had gained an ascendant.                     --Bp. Hurd.
  
      3. To train in the manege, as a horse; to exercise in
            graceful or artful action.
  
      4. To treat with care; to husband. --Dryden.
  
      5. To bring about; to contrive. --Shak.
  
      Syn: To direct; govern; control; wield; order; contrive;
               concert; conduct; transact.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manakin \Man"a*kin\, n. [Cf. F. & G. manakin; prob. the native
      name.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous small birds belonging to {Pipra},
      {Manacus}, and other genera of the family {Piprid[91]}. They
      are mostly natives of Central and South America. some are
      bright-colored, and others have the wings and tail curiously
      ornamented. The name is sometimes applied to related birds of
      other families.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manakin \Man"a*kin\, n.
      A dwarf. See {Manikin}. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manchineel \Man`chi*neel"\, n. [Sp. manzanillo, fr. manzana an
      apple, fr. L. malum Matianum a kind of apple. So called from
      its apple-like fruit.] (Bot.)
      A euphorbiaceous tree ({Hippomane Mancinella}) of tropical
      America, having a poisonous and blistering milky juice, and
      poisonous acrid fruit somewhat resembling an apple.
  
      {Bastard manchineel}, a tree ({Cameraria latifolia}) of the
            East Indies, having similar poisonous properties.
            --Lindley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sassy bark \Sas"sy bark`\ (Bot.)
      The bark of a West African leguminous tree ({Erythrophl[91]um
      Guineense}, used by the natives as an ordeal poison, and also
      medicinally; -- called also {mancona bark}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mancona bark \Man*co"na bark`\
      See {Sassy bark}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sassy bark \Sas"sy bark`\ (Bot.)
      The bark of a West African leguminous tree ({Erythrophl[91]um
      Guineense}, used by the natives as an ordeal poison, and also
      medicinally; -- called also {mancona bark}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mancona bark \Man*co"na bark`\
      See {Sassy bark}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manequin \Man"e*quin\, n. [See {Manikin}.]
      An artist's model of wood or other material.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mangan \Man"gan\, n.
      See {Mangonel}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganate \Man"ga*nate\, n. [Cf. F. manganate.] (Chem.)
      A salt of manganic acid.
  
      Note: The manganates are usually green, and are wellknown
               compounds, though derived from a hypothetical acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesate \Man`ga*ne"sate\, n. (Chem.)
      A manganate. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese \Man`ga*nese"\, n. [F. mangan[8a]se, It. manganese,
      sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of
      its resemblance to the magnet. See {Magnet}, and cf.
      {Magnesia}.] (Chem.)
      An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard,
      grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily
      oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals
      pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8.
  
      Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese)
               is used to increase the density and hardness of steel.
  
      {Black oxide of manganese}, {Manganese dioxide [or]
      peroxide}, or {Black manganese} (Chem.), a heavy black powder
            {MnO2}, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and
            valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly
            {manganese}. It colors glass violet, and is used as a
            decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass.
  
      {Manganese bronze}, an alloy made by adding from one to two
            per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in
            brass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese \Man`ga*nese"\, n. [F. mangan[8a]se, It. manganese,
      sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of
      its resemblance to the magnet. See {Magnet}, and cf.
      {Magnesia}.] (Chem.)
      An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard,
      grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily
      oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals
      pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8.
  
      Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese)
               is used to increase the density and hardness of steel.
  
      {Black oxide of manganese}, {Manganese dioxide [or]
      peroxide}, or {Black manganese} (Chem.), a heavy black powder
            {MnO2}, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and
            valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly
            {manganese}. It colors glass violet, and is used as a
            decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass.
  
      {Manganese bronze}, an alloy made by adding from one to two
            per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in
            brass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese \Man`ga*nese"\, n. [F. mangan[8a]se, It. manganese,
      sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of
      its resemblance to the magnet. See {Magnet}, and cf.
      {Magnesia}.] (Chem.)
      An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard,
      grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily
      oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals
      pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8.
  
      Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese)
               is used to increase the density and hardness of steel.
  
      {Black oxide of manganese}, {Manganese dioxide [or]
      peroxide}, or {Black manganese} (Chem.), a heavy black powder
            {MnO2}, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and
            valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly
            {manganese}. It colors glass violet, and is used as a
            decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass.
  
      {Manganese bronze}, an alloy made by adding from one to two
            per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in
            brass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese \Man`ga*nese"\, n. [F. mangan[8a]se, It. manganese,
      sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of
      its resemblance to the magnet. See {Magnet}, and cf.
      {Magnesia}.] (Chem.)
      An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard,
      grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily
      oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals
      pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8.
  
      Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese)
               is used to increase the density and hardness of steel.
  
      {Black oxide of manganese}, {Manganese dioxide [or]
      peroxide}, or {Black manganese} (Chem.), a heavy black powder
            {MnO2}, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and
            valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly
            {manganese}. It colors glass violet, and is used as a
            decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass.
  
      {Manganese bronze}, an alloy made by adding from one to two
            per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in
            brass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese steel \Man`ga*nese" steel\
      Cast steel containing a considerable percentage of manganese,
      which makes it very hard and tough. See {Alloy steel}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesian \Man`ga*ne"sian\, a. [Cf. F. mangan[82]sien.]
      (Chem.)
      Manganic. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesic \Man`ga*ne"sic\, a. [Cf. F. mangan[82]sique.] (Chem.)
      Manganic. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesious \Man`ga*ne"sious\, a. (Chem.)
      Manganous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesium \Man`ga*ne"si*um\, n. [NL.]
      Manganese.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganesous \Man`ga*ne"sous\, a. (Chem.)
      Manganous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganic \Man`gan"ic\, a. [Cf. F. manganique.] (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to resembling, or containing, manganese;
      specif., designating compounds in which manganese has a
      higher valence as contrasted with manganous compounds. Cf.
      {Manganous}.
  
      {Manganic acid}, an acid, {H2MnO4}, formed from manganese,
            analogous to sulphuric acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganic \Man`gan"ic\, a. [Cf. F. manganique.] (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to resembling, or containing, manganese;
      specif., designating compounds in which manganese has a
      higher valence as contrasted with manganous compounds. Cf.
      {Manganous}.
  
      {Manganic acid}, an acid, {H2MnO4}, formed from manganese,
            analogous to sulphuric acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganiferous \Man`ga*nif"er*ous\, a. [Manganese + -ferous.]
      Containing manganese.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganite \Man"ga*nite\, n.
      1. (Min.) One of the oxides of manganese; -- called also
            {gray manganese ore}. It occurs in brilliant steel-gray or
            iron-black crystals, also massive.
  
      2. (Chem.) A compound of manganese dioxide with a metallic
            oxide; so called as though derived from the hypothetical
            manganous acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganium \Man*ga"ni*um\, n. [NL.]
      Manganese.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganous \Man"ga*nous\, a. (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, designating, those compounds of manganese
      in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with
      manganic compounds; as, manganous oxide.
  
      {Manganous acid}, a hypothetical compound analogous to
            sulphurous acid, and forming the so-called manganites.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganous \Man"ga*nous\, a. (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, designating, those compounds of manganese
      in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with
      manganic compounds; as, manganous oxide.
  
      {Manganous acid}, a hypothetical compound analogous to
            sulphurous acid, and forming the so-called manganites.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mange \Mange\, n. [See {Mangy}.] (Vet.)
      The scab or itch in cattle, dogs, and other beasts.
  
      {Mange insect} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            small parasitic mites, which burrow in the skin of cattle.
            horses, dogs, and other animals, causing the mange. The
            mange insect of the horse ({Psoroptes, [or] Dermatodectes,
            equi}), and that of cattle ({Symbiotes, [or]
            Dermatophagys, bovis}) are the most important species. See
            {Acarina}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manginess \Man"gi*ness\, n. [From {Mangy}.]
      The condition or quality of being mangy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mangonel \Man"go*nel\, n. [OF. mangonel, LL. manganellus,
      manganum, fr. Gr. [?] See {Mangle}, n.]
      A military engine formerly used for throwing stones and
      javelins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mangonism \Man"go*nism\, n.
      The art of mangonizing, or setting off to advantage. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mangonist \Man"go*nist\, n.
      1. One who mangonizes. [Obs.]
  
      2. A slave dealer; also, a strumpet. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mangonize \Man"go*nize\, v. t. [L. mangonizare, fr. mango a
      dealer in slaves or wares, to which he tries to give an
      appearance of greater value by decking them out or furbishing
      them up.]
      To furbish up for sale; to set off to advantage. [Obs. or R.]
      --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manich91an \Man`i*ch[91]"an\, Manichean \Man`i*che"an\, a.
      Of or pertaining to the Manich[91]ans.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manich91an \Man`i*ch[91]"an\, Manichean \Man`i*che"an\, Manichee
   \Man"i*chee\, n. [LL. Manichaeus: cf. F. manich[82]en.]
      A believer in the doctrines of Manes, a Persian of the third
      century A. D., who taught a dualism in which Light is
      regarded as the source of Good, and Darkness as the source of
      Evil.
  
               The Manich[91]ans stand as representatives of dualism
               pushed to its utmost development.            --Tylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manich91an \Man`i*ch[91]"an\, Manichean \Man`i*che"an\, a.
      Of or pertaining to the Manich[91]ans.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manich91an \Man`i*ch[91]"an\, Manichean \Man`i*che"an\, Manichee
   \Man"i*chee\, n. [LL. Manichaeus: cf. F. manich[82]en.]
      A believer in the doctrines of Manes, a Persian of the third
      century A. D., who taught a dualism in which Light is
      regarded as the source of Good, and Darkness as the source of
      Evil.
  
               The Manich[91]ans stand as representatives of dualism
               pushed to its utmost development.            --Tylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manikin \Man"i*kin\, n. [OD. manneken, dim. of man man. See
      {Man}, and {-kin}.]
      1. A little man; a dwarf; a pygmy; a manakin.
  
      2. A model of the human body, made of papier-mache or other
            material, commonly in detachable pieces, for exhibiting
            the different parts and organs, their relative position,
            etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mankind \Man`kind"\, n. [AS. mancynn. See {Kin} kindred, {Kind},
      n.]
      1. The human race; man, taken collectively.
  
                     The proper study of mankind is man.   --Pore.
  
      2. Men, as distinguished from women; the male portion of
            human race. --Lev. xviii. 22.
  
      3. Human feelings; humanity. [Obs] --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mankind \Man"kind`\, a.
      Manlike; not womanly; masculine; bold; cruel. [Obs]
  
               Are women grown so mankind? Must they be wooing?
                                                                              --Beau. & Fl.
  
               Be not too mankind against your wife.      --Chapman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mannish \Man"nish\, a. [Man + -ish: cf. AS. mennisc, menisc.]
      1. Resembling a human being in form or nature; human.
            --Chaucer.
  
                     But yet it was a figure Most like to mannish
                     creature.                                          --Gower.
  
      2. Resembling, suitable to, or characteristic of, a man,
            manlike, masculine. --Chaucer.
  
                     A woman impudent and mannish grown.   --Shak.
  
      3. Fond of men; -- said of a woman. [Obs.] --Chaucer. --
            {Man"nish*ly},adv. -- {Man"nish*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mansion \Man"sion\, n. [OF. mansion, F. maison, fr. L. mansio a
      staying, remaining, a dwelling, habitation, fr. manere,
      mansum, to stay, dwell; akin to Gr. [?]. Cf. {Manse},
      {Manor}, {Menagerie}, {Menial}, {Permanent}.]
      1. A dwelling place, -- whether a part or whole of a house or
            other shelter. [Obs.]
  
                     In my Father's house are many mansions. --John xiv.
                                                                              2.
  
                     These poets near our princes sleep, And in one grave
                     their mansions keep.                           --Den[?]am.
  
      2. The house of the lord of a manor; a manor house; hence:
            Any house of considerable size or pretension.
  
      3. (Astrol.) A twelfth part of the heavens; a house. See 1st
            {House}, 8. --Chaucer.
  
      4. The place in the heavens occupied each day by the moon in
            its monthly revolution. [Obs.]
  
                     The eight and twenty mansions That longen to the
                     moon.                                                --Chaucer.
  
      {Mansion house}, the house in which one resides;
            specifically, in London and some other cities, the
            official residence of the Lord Mayor. --Blackstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mansion \Man"sion\, v. i.
      To dwell; to reside. [Obs.] --Mede.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mansion \Man"sion\, n. [OF. mansion, F. maison, fr. L. mansio a
      staying, remaining, a dwelling, habitation, fr. manere,
      mansum, to stay, dwell; akin to Gr. [?]. Cf. {Manse},
      {Manor}, {Menagerie}, {Menial}, {Permanent}.]
      1. A dwelling place, -- whether a part or whole of a house or
            other shelter. [Obs.]
  
                     In my Father's house are many mansions. --John xiv.
                                                                              2.
  
                     These poets near our princes sleep, And in one grave
                     their mansions keep.                           --Den[?]am.
  
      2. The house of the lord of a manor; a manor house; hence:
            Any house of considerable size or pretension.
  
      3. (Astrol.) A twelfth part of the heavens; a house. See 1st
            {House}, 8. --Chaucer.
  
      4. The place in the heavens occupied each day by the moon in
            its monthly revolution. [Obs.]
  
                     The eight and twenty mansions That longen to the
                     moon.                                                --Chaucer.
  
      {Mansion house}, the house in which one resides;
            specifically, in London and some other cities, the
            official residence of the Lord Mayor. --Blackstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mansionary \Man"sion*a*ry\, a.
      Resident; residentiary; as, mansionary canons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mansionry \Man"sion*ry\, n.
      The state of dwelling or residing; occupancy as a dwelling
      place. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manzanilla \Man`za*nil"la\, n. (Olive Trade)
      A kind of small roundish olive with a small freestone pit, a
      fine skin, and a peculiar bitterish flavor. Manzanillas are
      commonly pitted and stuffed with Spanish pimientos.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manzanita \Man`za*ni"ta\, n. [Sp., dim. of munzana an apple.]
      (Bot.)
      A name given to several species of {Arctostaphylos}, but
      mostly to {A. glauca} and {A. pungens}, shrubs of California,
      Oregon, etc., with reddish smooth bark, ovate or oval
      coriaceous evergreen leaves, and bearing clusters of red
      berries, which are said to be a favorite food of the grizzly
      bear.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mean \Mean\, a. [OE. mene, OF. meiien, F. moyen, fr. L. medianus
      that is in the middle, fr. medius; akin to E. mid. See
      {Mid}.]
      1. Occupying a middle position; middle; being about midway
            between extremes.
  
                     Being of middle age and a mean stature. --Sir. P.
                                                                              Sidney.
  
      2. Intermediate in excellence of any kind.
  
                     According to the fittest style of lofty, mean, or
                     lowly.                                                --Milton.
  
      3. (Math.) Average; having an intermediate value between two
            extremes, or between the several successive values of a
            variable quantity during one cycle of variation; as, mean
            distance; mean motion; mean solar day.
  
      {Mean distance} (of a planet from the sun) (Astron.), the
            average of the distances throughout one revolution of the
            planet, equivalent to the semi-major axis of the orbit.
  
      {Mean error} (Math. Phys.), the average error of a number of
            observations found by taking the mean value of the
            positive and negative errors without regard to sign.
  
      {Mean-square error}, [or] {Error of the mean square} (Math.
            Phys.), the error the square of which is the mean of the
            squares of all the errors; -- called also, especially by
            European writers, {mean error}.
  
      {Mean line}. (Crystallog.) Same as {Bisectrix}.
  
      {Mean noon}, noon as determined by mean time.
  
      {Mean proportional} (between two numbers) (Math.), the square
            root of their product.
  
      {Mean sun}, a fictitious sun supposed to move uniformly in
            the equator so as to be on the meridian each day at mean
            noon.
  
      {Mean time}, time as measured by an equable motion, as of a
            perfect clock, or as reckoned on the supposition that all
            the days of the year are of a mean or uniform length, in
            contradistinction from apparent time, or that actually
            indicated by the sun, and from sidereal time, or that
            measured by the stars.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menaccanite \Me*nac"can*ite\, n. [From Menaccan, in Cornwall,
      where it was first found.] (Min.)
      An iron-black or steel-gray mineral, consisting chiefly of
      the oxides of iron and titanium. It is commonly massive, but
      occurs also in rhombohedral crystals. Called also {titanic
      iron ore}, and {ilmenite}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menace \Men"ace\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Menaced} ([be]st); p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Menacing}.] [OF. menacier, F. menacer. See
      {Menace}, n.]
      1. To express or show an intention to inflict, or to hold out
            a prospect of inflicting, evil or injury upon; to
            threaten; -- usually followed by with before the harm
            threatened; as, to menace a country with war.
  
                     My master . . . did menace me with death. --Shak.
  
      2. To threaten, as an evil to be inflicted.
  
                     By oath he menaced Revenge upon the cardinal.
                                                                              --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menacingly \Men"a*cing*ly\, adv.
      In a threatening manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mimic \Mim"ic\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mimicked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Mimicking}.]
      1. To imitate or ape for sport; to ridicule by imitation.
  
                     The walk, the words, the gesture, could supply, The
                     habit mimic, and the mien belie.         --Dryden.
  
      2. (Biol.) To assume a resemblance to (some other organism of
            a totally different nature, or some surrounding object),
            as a means of protection or advantage.
  
      Syn: To ape; imitate; counterfeit; mock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mince-meat \Mince"-meat`\, n.
      Minced meat; meat chopped very fine; a mixture of boiled
      meat, suet, apples, etc., chopped very fine, to which spices
      and raisins are added; -- used in making mince pie.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mincing \Min"cing\, a.
      That minces; characterized by primness or affected nicety.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mincingly \Min"cing*ly\, adv.
      In a mincing manner; not fully; with affected nicety.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mince \Mince\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Minced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Minging}.] [AS. minsian to grow less, dwindle, fr. min
      small; akin to G. minder less, Goth. minniza less, mins less,
      adv., L. minor, adj. (cf. {Minor}); or more likely fr. F.
      mincer to mince, prob. from (assumed) LL. minutiare.
      [?][?][?][?]. See {Minish}.]
      1. To cut into very small pieces; to chop fine; to hash; as,
            to mince meat. --Bacon.
  
      2. To suppress or weaken the force of; to extenuate; to
            palliate; to tell by degrees, instead of directly and
            frankly; to clip, as words or expressions; to utter half
            and keep back half of.
  
                     I know no ways to mince it in love, but directly to
                     say -- [bd]I love you.[b8]                  --Shak.
  
                     Siren, now mince the sin, And mollify damnation with
                     a phrase.                                          --Dryden.
  
                     If, to mince his meaning, I had either omitted some
                     part of what he said, or taken from the strength of
                     his expression, I certainly had wronged him.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      3. To affect; to make a parade of. [R.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minikin \Min"i*kin\, n. [OD. minneken a darling, dim. of minne
      love; akin to G. minne, and to E. mind.]
      1. A little darling; a favorite; a minion. [Obs.] --Florio.
  
      2. A little pin. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minikin \Min"i*kin\, a.
      Small; diminutive. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minishment \Min"ish*ment\, n.
      The act of diminishing, or the state of being diminished;
      diminution. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minnesinger \Min"ne*sing`er\, n. [G., fr. minne love + singen to
      sing.]
      A love-singer; specifically, one of a class of German poets
      and musicians who flourished from about the middle of the
      twelfth to the middle of the fourteenth century. They were
      chiefly of noble birth, and made love and beauty the subjects
      of their verses.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mnemosyne \Mne*mos"y*ne\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?] remembrance,
      memory, and the goddess of memory. See {Mnemonic}.] (Class
      Myth.)
      The goddess of memory and the mother of the Muses.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monecian \Mo*ne"cian\, Monecious \Mo*ne"cious\, a. (Bot.)
      See {Mon[d2]cian}, and {Mon[d2]cious}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monesin \Mo*ne"sin\, n.
      The acrid principle of Monesia, sometimes used as a medicine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Money bill} (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue.
  
      {Money broker}, a broker who deals in different kinds of
            money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called
            also {money changer}.
  
      {Money cowrie} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            {Cypr[91]a} (esp. {C. moneta}) formerly much used as money
            by savage tribes. See {Cowrie}.
  
      {Money of account}, a denomination of value used in keeping
            accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an
            equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in
            the United States, but not a coin.
  
      {Money order}, an order for the payment of money;
            specifically, a government order for the payment of money,
            issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called
            also {postal money order}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monishment \Mon"ish*ment\, n.
      Admonition. [Archaic]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n. [From Gr. [?] single.]
      1. (Metaph.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a
            single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of
            dualism.
  
      Note: The doctrine has been held in three generic forms:
               matter and its phenomena have been explained as a
               modification of mind, involving an idealistic monism;
               or mind has been explained by and resolved into matter,
               giving a materialistic monism; or, thirdly, matter,
               mind, and their phenomena have been held to be
               manifestations or modifications of some one substance,
               like the substance of Spinoza, or a supposed unknown
               something of some evolutionists, which is capable of an
               objective and subjective aspect.
  
      2. (Biol.) See {Monogenesis}, 1.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenesis \Mon`o*gen"e*sis\, n. [Mono- + genesis.]
      1. Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings
            in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to
            {polygenesis}. Called also {monism}. --Dana. --Haeckel.
  
      2. (Biol.) That form of reproduction which requires but one
            parent, as in reproduction by fission or in the formation
            of buds, etc., which drop off and form new individuals;
            asexual reproduction. --Haeckel.
  
      3. (Biol.) The direct development of an embryo, without
            metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent
            organism; -- opposed to {metagenesis}. --E. van Beneden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n.
      The doctrine that the universe is an organized unitary being
      or total self-inclusive structure.
  
               Monism means that the whole of reality, i.e.,
               everything that is, constitutes one inseparable and
               indicisible entirety. Monism accordingly is a unitary
               conception of the world. It always bears in mind that
               our words are abstracts representing parts or features
               of the One and All, and not separate existences. Not
               only are matter and mind, soul and body, abstracts, but
               also such scientific terms as atoms and molecules, and
               also religious terms such as God and world. --Paul
                                                                              Carus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n. [From Gr. [?] single.]
      1. (Metaph.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a
            single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of
            dualism.
  
      Note: The doctrine has been held in three generic forms:
               matter and its phenomena have been explained as a
               modification of mind, involving an idealistic monism;
               or mind has been explained by and resolved into matter,
               giving a materialistic monism; or, thirdly, matter,
               mind, and their phenomena have been held to be
               manifestations or modifications of some one substance,
               like the substance of Spinoza, or a supposed unknown
               something of some evolutionists, which is capable of an
               objective and subjective aspect.
  
      2. (Biol.) See {Monogenesis}, 1.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenesis \Mon`o*gen"e*sis\, n. [Mono- + genesis.]
      1. Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings
            in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to
            {polygenesis}. Called also {monism}. --Dana. --Haeckel.
  
      2. (Biol.) That form of reproduction which requires but one
            parent, as in reproduction by fission or in the formation
            of buds, etc., which drop off and form new individuals;
            asexual reproduction. --Haeckel.
  
      3. (Biol.) The direct development of an embryo, without
            metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent
            organism; -- opposed to {metagenesis}. --E. van Beneden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n.
      The doctrine that the universe is an organized unitary being
      or total self-inclusive structure.
  
               Monism means that the whole of reality, i.e.,
               everything that is, constitutes one inseparable and
               indicisible entirety. Monism accordingly is a unitary
               conception of the world. It always bears in mind that
               our words are abstracts representing parts or features
               of the One and All, and not separate existences. Not
               only are matter and mind, soul and body, abstracts, but
               also such scientific terms as atoms and molecules, and
               also religious terms such as God and world. --Paul
                                                                              Carus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n. [From Gr. [?] single.]
      1. (Metaph.) That doctrine which refers all phenomena to a
            single ultimate constituent or agent; -- the opposite of
            dualism.
  
      Note: The doctrine has been held in three generic forms:
               matter and its phenomena have been explained as a
               modification of mind, involving an idealistic monism;
               or mind has been explained by and resolved into matter,
               giving a materialistic monism; or, thirdly, matter,
               mind, and their phenomena have been held to be
               manifestations or modifications of some one substance,
               like the substance of Spinoza, or a supposed unknown
               something of some evolutionists, which is capable of an
               objective and subjective aspect.
  
      2. (Biol.) See {Monogenesis}, 1.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenesis \Mon`o*gen"e*sis\, n. [Mono- + genesis.]
      1. Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings
            in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to
            {polygenesis}. Called also {monism}. --Dana. --Haeckel.
  
      2. (Biol.) That form of reproduction which requires but one
            parent, as in reproduction by fission or in the formation
            of buds, etc., which drop off and form new individuals;
            asexual reproduction. --Haeckel.
  
      3. (Biol.) The direct development of an embryo, without
            metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent
            organism; -- opposed to {metagenesis}. --E. van Beneden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monism \Mon"ism\, n.
      The doctrine that the universe is an organized unitary being
      or total self-inclusive structure.
  
               Monism means that the whole of reality, i.e.,
               everything that is, constitutes one inseparable and
               indicisible entirety. Monism accordingly is a unitary
               conception of the world. It always bears in mind that
               our words are abstracts representing parts or features
               of the One and All, and not separate existences. Not
               only are matter and mind, soul and body, abstracts, but
               also such scientific terms as atoms and molecules, and
               also religious terms such as God and world. --Paul
                                                                              Carus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monking \Monk"ing\, a.
      Monkish. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monk's seam \Monk's" seam`\ (Naut.)
      An extra middle seam made at the junction of two breadths of
      canvas, ordinarily joined by only two rows of stitches.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogam \Mon"o*gam\, n. (Bot.)
      One of the Monogamia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogamian \Mon`o*ga"mi*an\, Monogamic \Mon`o*gam"ic\, a. [See
      {Monogamous}.]
      1. Pertaining to, or involving, monogamy.
  
      2. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to the Monogamia; having a simple
            flower with united anthers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogamian \Mon`o*ga"mi*an\, Monogamic \Mon`o*gam"ic\, a. [See
      {Monogamous}.]
      1. Pertaining to, or involving, monogamy.
  
      2. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to the Monogamia; having a simple
            flower with united anthers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogamist \Mo*nog"a*mist\, n.
      One who practices or upholds monogamy. --Goldsmith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogamous \Mo*nog"a*mous\, a. [L. monogamus having but one
      wife, Gr. [?]; [?] single + [?] marriage.]
      1. Upholding, or practicing, monogamy.
  
      2. (Bot.) Same as {Monogamian}.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Mating with but one of the opposite sex; --
            said of birds and mammals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogamy \Mo*nog"a*my\, n. [L. monogamia, Gr. [?]: cf. F.
      monogamie.]
      1. Single marriage; marriage with but one person, husband or
            wife, at the same time; -- opposed to {polygamy}. Also,
            one marriage only during life; -- opposed to
            {deuterogamy}.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) State of being paired with a single mate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenesis \Mon`o*gen"e*sis\, n. [Mono- + genesis.]
      1. Oneness of origin; esp. (Biol.), development of all beings
            in the universe from a single cell; -- opposed to
            {polygenesis}. Called also {monism}. --Dana. --Haeckel.
  
      2. (Biol.) That form of reproduction which requires but one
            parent, as in reproduction by fission or in the formation
            of buds, etc., which drop off and form new individuals;
            asexual reproduction. --Haeckel.
  
      3. (Biol.) The direct development of an embryo, without
            metamorphosis, into an organism similar to the parent
            organism; -- opposed to {metagenesis}. --E. van Beneden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenetic \Mon`o*ge*net"ic\, a. [See {Monogenesis}.]
      1. (Geol.) One in genesis; resulting from one process of
            formation; -- used of a mountain range. --Dana.
  
      2. (Biol.) Relating to, or involving, monogenesis; as, the
            monogenetic school of physiologists, who admit but one
            cell as the source of all beings.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenic \Mon`o*gen"ic\, a.
      1. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to monogenesis.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Producing only one kind of germs, or young;
            developing only in one way.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenism \Mo*nog"e*nism\, n. (Anthropol.)
      The theory or doctrine that the human races have a common
      origin, or constitute a single species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenist \Mo*nog"e*nist\, n. (Anthropol.)
      One who maintains that the human races are all of one
      species; -- opposed to {polygenist}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenistic \Mon`o*ge*nis"tic\, a.
      Monogenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogenous \Mo*nog"e*nous\, a. (Biol.)
      Of or pertaining to monogenesis; as, monogenous, or asexual,
      reproduction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogeny \Mo*nog"e*ny\, n.
      1. Monogenesis.
  
      2. (Anthropol.) The doctrine that the members of the human
            race have all a common origin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogoneutic \Mon`o*go*neu"tic\, a. [Mono- + Gr. [?] offspring.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Having but one brood in a season.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogyn \Mon"o*gyn\, n. (Bot.)
      One of the Monogynia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogynian \Mon`o*gyn"i*an\, a. (Bot.)
      Pertaining to the Monogynia; monogynous. -- n. One of the
      Monogynia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogynous \Mo*nog"y*nous\, a. [Cf. F. monogyne.] (Bot.)
      Of or pertaining to Monogynia; having only one style or
      stigma.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monogyny \Mo*nog"y*ny\, n. [See {Monogynia}.]
      1. Marriage with the one woman only.
  
      2. (Bot.) The state or condition of being monogynous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monoousian \Mon`o*ou"si*an\, Monoousious \Mon`o*ou"si*ous\, a.
      [Mono- + Gr. [?] being, substance, essence.] (Theil.)
      Having but one and the same nature or essence.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monosymmetric \Mon`o*sym*met"ric\, Monosymmetrical
   \Mon`o*sym*met"ric*al\, a. [Mono- + symmetric, -ical.]
      (Crystallog.)
      Same as {Monoclinic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monosymmetric \Mon`o*sym*met"ric\, Monosymmetrical
   \Mon`o*sym*met"ric*al\, a. [Mono- + symmetric, -ical.]
      (Crystallog.)
      Same as {Monoclinic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monsoon \Mon*soon"\, n. [Malay m[umac]sim, fr. Ar. mausim a
      time, season: cf. F. monson, mousson, Sr. monzon, Pg.
      mon[87][ee]o, It. monsone.]
      A wind blowing part of the year from one direction,
      alternating with a wind from the opposite direction; -- a
      term applied particularly to periodical winds of the Indian
      Ocean, which blow from the southwest from the latter part of
      May to the middle of September, and from the northeast from
      about the middle of October to the middle of December.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshine \Moon"shine`\, n.
      1. The light of the moon.
  
      2. Hence, show without substance or reality.
  
      3. A month. [R.] --Shak.
  
      4. A preparation of eggs for food. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshine \Moon"shine`\, a.
      Moonlight. [R.] --Clarendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshine \Moon"shine`\, n.
      Liquor smuggled or illicitly distilled. [Dial. Eng., &
      Colloq. or Slang, U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshine \Moon"shine`\, a.
      1. Empty; trivial; idle.
  
      2. Designating, or pertaining to, illicit liquor; as,
            moonshine whisky. [Dial. Eng., & Colloq. or Slang, U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshiner \Moon"shin`er\, n.
      A person engaged in illicit distilling; -- so called because
      the work is largely done at night. [Cant, U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshining \Moon"shin`ing\, n.
      Illicit distilling. [Slang or Colloq., U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonshiny \Moon"shin`y\, a.
      Moonlight. [Colloq.]
  
               I went to see them in a moonshiny night. --Addison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mowing \Mow"ing\, n.
      1. The act of one who, or the operation of that which, mows.
  
      2. Land from which grass is cut; meadow land.
  
      {Mowing machine}, an agricultural machine armed with knives
            or blades for cutting standing grass, etc. It is drawn by
            a horse or horses, or propelled by steam.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mum-chance \Mum"-chance`\, a.
      Silent and idle. [Colloq.]
  
               Boys can't sit mum-chance always.            --J. H. Ewing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mum-chance \Mum"-chance`\, n.
      1. A game of hazard played with cards in silence. [Obs. or
            Prov. Eng.] --Decker.
  
      2. A silent, stupid person. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Munch \Munch\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Munched}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Munching}.] [Prob. akin to mumble: cf. also F. manger to
      eat (cf. {Mange}), and m[83]cher to cher (cf. {Masticate}).
      See {Mumble}.]
      To chew with a grinding, crunching sound, as a beast chews
      provender; to chew deliberately or in large mouthfuls.
      [Formerly written also {maunch} and {mounch}.]
  
               I could munch your good dry oats.            --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mynchen \Myn"chen\, n. [AS. mynecen, fr. munec monk. See
      {Monk}.]
      A nun. [Obs.]

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manahawkin, NJ (CDP, FIPS 42930)
      Location: 39.69575 N, 74.25392 W
      Population (1990): 1594 (675 housing units)
      Area: 3.9 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 08050

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manakin Sabot, VA
      Zip code(s): 23103

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manasquan, NJ (borough, FIPS 43050)
      Location: 40.11280 N, 74.03696 W
      Population (1990): 5369 (3220 housing units)
      Area: 3.6 sq km (land), 3.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 08736

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mangham, LA (town, FIPS 48260)
      Location: 32.30605 N, 91.78095 W
      Population (1990): 598 (245 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 71259

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mangonia Park, FL (town, FIPS 42900)
      Location: 26.75777 N, 80.07410 W
      Population (1990): 1453 (500 housing units)
      Area: 1.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mangum, OK (city, FIPS 46050)
      Location: 34.87879 N, 99.50316 W
      Population (1990): 3344 (1820 housing units)
      Area: 4.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manquin, VA
      Zip code(s): 23106

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manson, IA (city, FIPS 48990)
      Location: 42.52867 N, 94.53926 W
      Population (1990): 1844 (834 housing units)
      Area: 8.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 50563
   Manson, NC
      Zip code(s): 27553
   Manson, WA
      Zip code(s): 98831

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manzanita, OR (city, FIPS 45700)
      Location: 45.71729 N, 123.93358 W
      Population (1990): 513 (695 housing units)
      Area: 1.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manzanola, CO (town, FIPS 48500)
      Location: 38.10878 N, 103.86616 W
      Population (1990): 437 (190 housing units)
      Area: 0.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 81058

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Menoken, ND
      Zip code(s): 58558

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Miami County, IN (county, FIPS 103)
      Location: 40.76887 N, 86.04829 W
      Population (1990): 36897 (14639 housing units)
      Area: 973.2 sq km (land), 4.2 sq km (water)
   Miami County, KS (county, FIPS 121)
      Location: 38.56466 N, 94.83353 W
      Population (1990): 23466 (8971 housing units)
      Area: 1493.8 sq km (land), 34.8 sq km (water)
   Miami County, OH (county, FIPS 109)
      Location: 40.05352 N, 84.22839 W
      Population (1990): 93182 (35985 housing units)
      Area: 1054.2 sq km (land), 5.6 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Minnehaha County, SD (county, FIPS 99)
      Location: 43.68146 N, 96.78590 W
      Population (1990): 123809 (49780 housing units)
      Area: 2095.8 sq km (land), 11.8 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Minnewaukan, ND (city, FIPS 53220)
      Location: 48.06985 N, 99.25010 W
      Population (1990): 401 (203 housing units)
      Area: 0.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 58351

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monessen, PA (city, FIPS 50344)
      Location: 40.15222 N, 79.88220 W
      Population (1990): 9901 (4902 housing units)
      Area: 7.5 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 15062

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mongmong, GU (CDP, FIPS 50800)
      Location: 13.47057 N, 144.76521 E
      Population (1990): 2346 (729 housing units)
      Area: 2.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monhegan, ME
      Zip code(s): 04852

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mono County, CA (county, FIPS 51)
      Location: 37.91055 N, 118.87397 W
      Population (1990): 9956 (10664 housing units)
      Area: 7885.2 sq km (land), 226.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monson, MA
      Zip code(s): 01057
   Monson, ME
      Zip code(s): 04464

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monson Center, MA (CDP, FIPS 42180)
      Location: 42.09707 N, 72.31041 W
      Population (1990): 2101 (904 housing units)
      Area: 8.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Munising, MI (city, FIPS 56200)
      Location: 46.41703 N, 86.64122 W
      Population (1990): 2783 (1268 housing units)
      Area: 13.9 sq km (land), 9.8 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Munson, PA
      Zip code(s): 16860

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Munsons Corners, NY (CDP, FIPS 49242)
      Location: 42.58006 N, 76.20526 W
      Population (1990): 2436 (1055 housing units)
      Area: 5.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Munsonville, NH
      Zip code(s): 03457

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   management n.   1. Corporate power elites distinguished
   primarily by their distance from actual productive work and their
   chronic failure to manage (see also {suit}).   Spoken derisively, as
   in "_Management_ decided that ...".   2. Mythically, a vast
   bureaucracy responsible for all the world's minor irritations.
   Hackers' satirical public notices are often signed `The Mgt'; this
   derives from the "Illuminatus" novels (see the {Bibliography} in
   Appendix C).
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   munching n.   Exploration of security holes of someone else's
   computer for thrills, notoriety, or to annoy the system manager.
   Compare {cracker}.   See also {hacked off}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   munching squares n.   A {display hack} dating back to the PDP-1
   (ca. 1962, reportedly discovered by Jackson Wright), which employs a
   trivial computation (repeatedly plotting the graph Y = X XOR T for
   successive values of T -- see {HAKMEM} items 146-148) to produce an
   impressive display of moving and growing squares that devour the
   screen.   The initial value of T is treated as a parameter, which,
   when well-chosen, can produce amazing effects.   Some of these, later
   (re)discovered on the LISP machine, have been christened `munching
   triangles' (try AND for XOR and toggling points instead of plotting
   them), `munching w's', and `munching mazes'.   More generally,
   suppose a graphics program produces an impressive and ever-changing
   display of some basic form, foo, on a display terminal, and does it
   using a relatively simple program; then the program (or the
   resulting display) is likely to be referred to as `munching foos'.
   [This is a good example of the use of the word {foo} as a
   {metasyntactic variable}.]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   management
  
      1. Corporate power elites distinguished primarily by their
      distance from actual productive work and their chronic failure
      to manage (see also {suit}).   Spoken derisively, as in
      "*Management* decided that ...".
  
      2. Mythically, a vast bureaucracy responsible for all the
      world's minor irritations.   Hackers' satirical public notices
      are often signed "The Mgt"; this derives from the
      "Illuminatus!" novels.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-02-28)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Management Information Base
  
      (MIB) A {database} of managed objects acessed by {network
      management} {protocol}s.   An {SNMP} MIB is a set of parameters
      which an {SNMP} {management station} can query or set in the
      {SNMP agent} of a network device (e.g. {router}).
  
      {SNMP} has two {standard} MIBs.   The first, MIB I, was
      established in {RFC 1156}, was defined to manage
      {TCP/IP}-based {internet}s.   MIB II, defined in {RFC 1213}, is
      basically an update to MIB I.
  
      Standard minimal MIBs have been defined, and many hardware
      (and certain software, e.g. {DBMS}) providers have developed
      private MIBs in {ASN.1} format allowing them to be compiled
      for use in a {Nework Management System}.   In theory, any {SNMP
      manager} can talk to any {SNMP agent} with a properly defined
      MIB.
  
      See also {client-server model}.
  
      (1994-11-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Management Information System
  
      (MIS) A computer system, usually based on a
      {mainframe} or {minicomputer}, designed to provide management
      personnel with up-to-date information on an organisation's
      performance, e.g. inventory and sales.   These systems output
      information in a form that is useable by managers at all
      levels of the organisation: strategic, tactical, and
      operational.   A good example of an MIS report is an annual
      report for a stockholder (a scheduled report).
  
      [Que's Computer User's Dictionary Second Edition, 1992].
  
      (2001-04-01)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   minicomputer
  
      A computer built between about 1963 and 1987,
      smaller and less powerful than a {mainframe}, typically about
      the size and shape of a wardrobe, mounted in a single tall
      rack.
  
      Minicomputers were characterised by short {word} lengths of 8
      to 32 {bit}s, limited hardware and software facilities and
      small physical size.   Their low cost made them suitable for a
      wide variety of applications such as industrial control, where
      a small, dedicated computer which is permanently assigned to
      one application, is needed. In recent years, improvements in
      device technology have resulted in minicomputers which are
      comparable in performance to large {second generation
      computers} and greatly exceed the performance of {first
      generation} {computers}.
  
      The processor was typically built using low integration logic
      {integrated circuits} - {TTL} or maybe {ECL}, thus
      distinguishing it from a {microcomputer} which is built around
      a {microprocessor} - a processor on a single (or maybe a few)
      ICs.
  
      {DEC}'s {PDP-1} was the first minicomputer and their {PDP-11}
      was the most successful, closely followed (in both time and
      success) by the {VAX} (which {DEC} called a "{super
      minicomputer}").
  
      Another early minicomputer was the {LINC} developed at {MIT} in
      1963.
  
      Other minicomputers were the {AS/400}, the {PRIME} series, the
      {AP-3}, {Olivetti}'s {Audit 7} and the {Interdata 8/32}.
  
      [Others?]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   minus infinity
  
      The most negative value, not necessarily or even usually the
      simple negation of plus {infinity}.   In N bit twos-complement
      arithmetic, infinity is 2^(N-1) - 1 but minus infinity is
      -(2^(N-1)), not -(2^(N-1) - 1).
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   munching
  
      Exploration of security holes of someone else's computer for
      thrills, notoriety or to annoy the system manager.   Compare
      {cracker}.   See also {hacked off}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   munching squares
  
      A {display hack} dating back to the {PDP-1} (ca. 1962,
      reportedly discovered by Jackson Wright), which employs a
      trivial computation (repeatedly plotting the graph Y = X XOR T
      for successive values of T - see {HAKMEM} items 146--148) to
      produce an impressive display of moving and growing squares
      that devour the screen.   The initial value of T is treated as
      a parameter, which, when well-chosen, can produce amazing
      effects.   Some of these, later (re)discovered on the {LISP
      Machine}, have been christened "munching triangles" (try AND
      for XOR and toggling points instead of plotting them),
      "munching w's", and "munching mazes".   More generally, suppose
      a graphics program produces an impressive and ever-changing
      display of some basic form, foo, on a display terminal, and
      does it using a relatively simple program; then the program
      (or the resulting display) is likely to be referred to as
      "munching foos".   [This is a good example of the use of the
      word {foo} as a {metasyntactic variable}.]
  
  

From The Elements (22Oct97) [elements]:
   manganese
   Symbol: Mn
   Atomic number: 25
   Atomic weight: 54.938
   Grey brittle metallic transition element. Rather electropositive, combines
   with some non-metals when heated. Discovered in 1774 by Scheele.
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Memucan
      dignified, one of the royal counsellors at the court of
      Ahasuerus, by whose suggestion Vashti was divorced (Esther 1:14,
      16, 21).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Mincing
      (Heb. taphoph, Isa. 3:16), taking affectedly short and quick
      steps. Luther renders the word by "wag" or "waggle," thus
      representing "the affected gait of coquettish females."
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Money-changer
      (Matt. 21:12; Mark 11:15; John 2:15). Every Israelite from
      twenty years and upwards had to pay (Ex. 30:13-15) into the
      sacred treasury half a shekel every year as an offering to
      Jehovah, and that in the exact Hebrew half-shekel piece. There
      was a class of men, who frequented the temple courts, who
      exchanged at a certain premium foreign moneys for these
      half-shekels to the Jews who came up to Jerusalem from all parts
      of the world. (See {PASSOVER}.) When our Lord drove the
      traffickers out of the temple, these money-changers fared worst.
      Their tables were overturned and they themselves were expelled.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Memucan, impoverished; to prepare; certain; true
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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