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   Kalamazoo
         n 1: a town in southwest Michigan

English Dictionary: Kohlenstoffdioxidlaser by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
kalansuwa
n
  1. a cap that is wrapped around by a turban and worn by Muslim religious elders
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
kaoliang
n
  1. sorghums of China and Manchuria having small white or brown grains (used for food) and dry pithy stalks (used for fodder, fuel and thatching)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
kill oneself
v
  1. strain oneself more than is healthy [syn: kill oneself, overexert oneself]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
killing
adj
  1. very funny; "a killing joke"; "sidesplitting antics"
    Synonym(s): killing, sidesplitting
n
  1. an event that causes someone to die [syn: killing, violent death]
  2. the act of terminating a life
    Synonym(s): killing, kill, putting to death
  3. a very large profit
    Synonym(s): killing, cleanup
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
killing field
n
  1. (usually plural) an area where many people have died (usually by massacre or genocide during war or violent civil disturbance)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
killing zone
n
  1. an area where a battle has occurred with many fatalities
    Synonym(s): kill zone, killing zone
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
killingly
adv
  1. in a very humorous manner [syn: killingly, sidesplittingly]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Klansman
n
  1. a member of the Ku Klux Klan [syn: Klansman, Ku Kluxer, Kluxer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Kleenex
n
  1. a piece of soft absorbent paper (usually two or more thin layers) used as a disposable handkerchief
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Swamp \Swamp\, n. [Cf. AS. swam a fungus, OD. swam a sponge, D.
      zwam a fungus, G. schwamm a sponge, Icel. sv[94]ppr, Dan. &
      Sw. swamp, Goth. swamms, Gr. somfo`s porous, spongy.]
      Wet, spongy land; soft, low ground saturated with water, but
      not usually covered with it; marshy ground away from the
      seashore.
  
               Gray swamps and pools, waste places of the hern.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
               A swamp differs from a bog and a marsh in producing
               trees and shrubs, while the latter produce only
               herbage, plants, and mosses.                  --Farming
                                                                              Encyc. (E.
                                                                              Edwards,
                                                                              Words).
  
      {Swamp blackbird}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Redwing}
      (b) .
  
      {Swamp cabbage} (Bot.), skunk cabbage.
  
      {Swamp deer} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic deer ({Rucervus
            Duvaucelli}) of India.
  
      {Swamp hen}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) An Australian azure-breasted bird ({Porphyrio bellus});
            -- called also {goollema}.
      (b) An Australian water crake, or rail ({Porzana Tabuensis});
            -- called also {little swamp hen}.
      (c) The European purple gallinule.
  
      {Swamp honeysuckle} (Bot.), an American shrub ({Azalea, [or]
            Rhododendron, viscosa}) growing in swampy places, with
            fragrant flowers of a white color, or white tinged with
            rose; -- called also {swamp pink}.
  
      {Swamp hook}, a hook and chain used by lumbermen in handling
            logs. Cf. {Cant hook}.
  
      {Swamp itch}. (Med.) See {Prairie itch}, under {Prairie}.
  
      {Swamp laurel} (Bot.), a shrub ({Kalmia glauca}) having small
            leaves with the lower surface glaucous.
  
      {Swamp maple} (Bot.), red maple. See {Maple}.
  
      {Swamp oak} (Bot.), a name given to several kinds of oak
            which grow in swampy places, as swamp Spanish oak
            ({Quercus palustris}), swamp white oak ({Q. bicolor}),
            swamp post oak ({Q. lyrata}).
  
      {Swamp ore} (Min.), bog ore; limonite.
  
      {Swamp partridge} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several Australian
            game birds of the genera {Synoicus} and {Excalfatoria},
            allied to the European partridges.
  
      {Swamp robin} (Zo[94]l.), the chewink.
  
      {Swamp sassafras} (Bot.), a small North American tree of the
            genus {Magnolia} ({M. glauca}) with aromatic leaves and
            fragrant creamy-white blossoms; -- called also {sweet
            bay}.
  
      {Swamp sparrow} (Zo[94]l.), a common North American sparrow
            ({Melospiza Georgiana}, or {M. palustris}), closely
            resembling the song sparrow. It lives in low, swampy
            places.
  
      {Swamp willow}. (Bot.) See {Pussy willow}, under {Pussy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kalmuck \Kal"muck\, n.
      1. pl. (Ethnol.) See {Calmucks}.
  
      2. A kind of shaggy cloth, resembling bearskin.
  
      3. A coarse, dyed, cotton cloth, made in Prussia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Calmucks \Cal"mucks\, n. pl.; sing. {Calmuck}.
      A branch of the Mongolian race inhabiting parts of the
      Russian and Chinese empires; also (sing.), the language of
      the Calmucks. [Written also {Kalmucks}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kalong \Ka*long"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A fruit bat, esp. the Indian edible fruit bat ({Pteropus
      edulis}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kaolinization \Ka`o*lin`i*za"tion\, n.
      The process by which feldspar is changed into kaolin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kaolinize \Ka"o*lin*ize\, v. t.
      To convert into kaolin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Keeling \Kee"ling\, n. [Cf. Icel. keila, Sw. kolja, Dan. kulle.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A cod.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Keel \Keel\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Keeled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Keeling}.]
      1. To traverse with a keel; to navigate.
  
      2. To turn up the keel; to show the bottom.
  
      {To keel over}, to upset; to capsize. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kill \Kill\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Killed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Killing}.] [OE. killen, kellen, cullen, to kill, strike;
      perh. the same word as cwellen, quellen, to kill (cf.
      {Quell}), or perh. rather akin to Icel. kolla to hit in the
      head, harm, kollr top, summit, head, Sw. kulle, D. kollen to
      kill with the ax.]
      1. To deprive of life, animal or vegetable, in any manner or
            by any means; to render inanimate; to put to death; to
            slay.
  
                     Ah, kill me with thy weapon, not with words !
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To destroy; to ruin; as, to kill one's chances; to kill
            the sale of a book. [bd]To kill thine honor.[b8] --Shak.
  
                     Her lively color kill'd with deadly cares. --Shak.
  
      3. To cause to cease; to quell; to calm; to still; as, in
            seamen's language, a shower of rain kills the wind.
  
                     Be comforted, good madam; the great rage, You see,
                     is killed in him.                              --Shak.
  
      4. To destroy the effect of; to counteract; to neutralize;
            as, alkali kills acid.
  
      {To kill time}, to busy one's self with something which
            occupies the attention, or makes the time pass without
            tediousness.
  
      Syn: To murder; assassinate; slay; butcher; destroy. -- To
               {Kill}, {Murder}, {Assassinate}. To kill does not
               necessarily mean any more than to deprive of life. A man
               may kill another by accident or in self-defense, without
               the imputation of guilt. To murder is to kill with
               malicious forethought and intention. To assassinate is
               tomurder suddenly and by stealth. The sheriff may kill
               without murdering; the duelist murders, but does not
               assassinate his antagonist; the assassin kills and
               murders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Killing \Kill"ing\, a.
      Literally, that kills; having power to kill; fatal; in a
      colloquial sense, conquering; captivating; irresistible. --
      {Kill"ing*ly}, adv.
  
               Those eyes are made so killing.               --Pope.
  
               Nothing could be more killingly spoken.   --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Killing \Kill"ing\, a.
      Literally, that kills; having power to kill; fatal; in a
      colloquial sense, conquering; captivating; irresistible. --
      {Kill"ing*ly}, adv.
  
               Those eyes are made so killing.               --Pope.
  
               Nothing could be more killingly spoken.   --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Klicket \Klick"et\, n. [Cf. {Clicket}.] (Mil.)
      A small postern or gate in a palisade, for the passage of
      sallying parties. [Written also {klinket}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Klinkstone \Klink"stone`\, n.
      See {Clinkstone}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kolinsky \Ko*lin"sky\, n. [Russ. kolinski of Kola, a district in
      northeasten Russia where the finest minks abound.]
      Among furriers, any of several Asiatic minks; esp., {Putorius
      sibiricus}, the yellowish brown pelt of which is valued, esp.
      for the tail, used for making artists' brushes. Trade names
      for the fur are {red sable} and {Tatar sable}.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Kalamazoo, MI (city, FIPS 42160)
      Location: 42.27470 N, 85.58829 W
      Population (1990): 80277 (31488 housing units)
      Area: 63.6 sq km (land), 1.3 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49001, 49002, 49007, 49008, 49009

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Kalamazoo County, MI (county, FIPS 77)
      Location: 42.24488 N, 85.52987 W
      Population (1990): 223411 (88955 housing units)
      Area: 1455.3 sq km (land), 47.5 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Keeling, VA
      Zip code(s): 24566

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Killington, VT
      Zip code(s): 05751

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Killingworth, CT
      Zip code(s): 06419

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Kilmichael, MS (town, FIPS 37560)
      Location: 33.43903 N, 89.56695 W
      Population (1990): 826 (348 housing units)
      Area: 7.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 39747

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Klingerstown, PA
      Zip code(s): 17941

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Kleene closure
  
      {Kleene star}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Kleene star
  
      (Or "Kleene closure", named after {Stephen Kleene}) The
      {postfix} "*" operator used in {regular expressions},
      {Extended Backus-Naur Form}, and similar formalisms to specify
      a match for zero or more occurrences of the preceding
      expression.   For example, the regular expression "be*t" would
      match the string "bt", "bet", "beet", "beeeeet", and so on.
  
      (2000-07-26)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Kleene, Stephen Cole
  
      {Stephen Kleene}
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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