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Gastritis
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   G. K. Chesterton
         n 1: conservative English writer of the Roman Catholic
               persuasion; in addition to volumes of criticism and
               polemics he wrote detective novels featuring Father Brown
               (1874-1936) [syn: {Chesterton}, {G. K. Chesterton},
               {Gilbert Keith Chesterton}]

English Dictionary: Gastritis by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gagster
n
  1. someone who writes comic material for public performers
    Synonym(s): gagman, gagster, gagwriter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gas heater
n
  1. a heater that burns gas for heat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gas thermometer
n
  1. thermometer that measures temperature by changes in the pressure of a gas kept at constant volume
    Synonym(s): gas thermometer, air thermometer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gas turbine
n
  1. turbine that converts the chemical energy of a liquid fuel into mechanical energy by internal combustion; gaseous products of the fuel (which is burned in compressed air) are expanded through a turbine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gas-turbine ship
n
  1. a ship powered by a gas turbine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gasteromycete
n
  1. any fungus of the class Gasteromycetes [syn: gasteromycete, gastromycete]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasteromycetes
n
  1. fungi in which the hymenium is enclosed until after spores have matured: puffballs; earth stars; stinkhorn fungi
    Synonym(s): Gasteromycetes, class Gasteromycetes, Gastromycetes, class Gastromycetes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterophilidae
n
  1. horse botflies [syn: Gasterophilidae, {family Gasterophilidae}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterophilus
n
  1. type genus of the Gasterophilidae: horse botflies [syn: Gasterophilus, genus Gasterophilus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterophilus intestinalis
n
  1. parasitic chiefly on horses [syn: horse botfly, Gasterophilus intestinalis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasteropoda
n
  1. snails and slugs and their relatives [syn: Gastropoda, class Gastropoda, Gasteropoda, class Gasteropoda]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterosteidae
n
  1. sticklebacks [syn: Gasterosteidae, {family Gasterosteidae}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterosteus
n
  1. type genus of the family Gasterosteidae [syn: Gasterosteus, genus gasterosteus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterosteus aculeatus
n
  1. of rivers and coastal regions [syn: {three-spined stickleback}, Gasterosteus aculeatus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gasterosteus pungitius
n
  1. confined to rivers [syn: ten-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus pungitius]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastralgia
n
  1. an ache localized in the stomach or abdominal region [syn: stomachache, stomach ache, bellyache, gastralgia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrectomy
n
  1. surgical removal of all or part of the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric
adj
  1. relating to or involving the stomach; "gastric ulcer"
    Synonym(s): gastric, stomachic, stomachal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric acid
n
  1. digestive secretions of the stomach glands consisting chiefly of hydrochloric acid and mucin and the enzymes pepsin and rennin and lipase
    Synonym(s): gastric juice, gastric acid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric antacid
n
  1. an agent that counteracts or neutralizes acidity (especially in the stomach)
    Synonym(s): antacid, gastric antacid, alkalizer, alkaliser, antiacid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric artery
n
  1. the arteries that supply the walls of the stomach [syn: gastric artery, arteria gastrica]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric digestion
n
  1. the process of breaking down proteins by the action of the gastric juice in the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric juice
n
  1. digestive secretions of the stomach glands consisting chiefly of hydrochloric acid and mucin and the enzymes pepsin and rennin and lipase
    Synonym(s): gastric juice, gastric acid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric lavage
n
  1. washing out the stomach with sterile water or a saltwater solution; removes blood or poisons; "when the doctor ordered a gastric lavage the hospital pumped out my stomach"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric mill
n
  1. thick-walled muscular pouch below the crop in many birds and reptiles for grinding food
    Synonym(s): gizzard, ventriculus, gastric mill
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric smear
n
  1. alimentary tract smear of material obtained from the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric ulcer
n
  1. a peptic ulcer of the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastric vein
n
  1. one of several veins draining the stomach walls [syn: gastric vein, vena gastrica]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrin
n
  1. polypeptide hormone secreted by the mucous lining of the stomach; when peptides and amino acids are present in the small intestine the secretion of gastric acid is stimulated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastritis
n
  1. inflammation of the lining of the stomach; nausea and loss of appetite and discomfort after eating
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastroboletus
n
  1. a genus of fungi belonging to the family Secotiaceae; they resemble boletes but the spores are not discharged from the basidium
    Synonym(s): Gastroboletus, genus Gastroboletus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastroboletus scabrosus
n
  1. a dingy yellow brown fungus with a rough stalk that superficially resembles a bolete
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastroboletus turbinatus
n
  1. a fungus with a cap that can vary from red to dark brown; superficially resembles a bolete
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrocnemius
n
  1. the muscle in the back part of the leg that forms the greater part of the calf; responsible for the plantar flexion of the foot
    Synonym(s): gastrocnemius, gastrocnemius muscle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrocnemius muscle
n
  1. the muscle in the back part of the leg that forms the greater part of the calf; responsible for the plantar flexion of the foot
    Synonym(s): gastrocnemius, gastrocnemius muscle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrocolic omentum
n
  1. part of the peritoneum attached to the stomach and to the colon and covering the intestines
    Synonym(s): greater omentum, gastrocolic omentum, caul
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastrocybe
n
  1. a genus of fungi of the family Secotiaceae [syn: Gastrocybe, genus Gastrocybe]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastrocybe lateritia
n
  1. a species of Gastrocybe fungus that has a conic cap and a thin stalk; at first the stalk is upright but as it matures the stalk bends over and then downward; the cap then gelatinizes and a slimy mass containing the spores falls to the ground as the stalk collapses
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroduodenal
adj
  1. of or relating to the stomach and the duodenum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroenteritis
n
  1. inflammation of the stomach and intestines; can be caused by Salmonella enteritidis
    Synonym(s): gastroenteritis, stomach flu, intestinal flu
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroenterologist
n
  1. a physician who specializes in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroenterology
n
  1. the branch of medicine that studies the gastrointestinal tract and its diseases
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroenterostomy
n
  1. surgical creation of an opening between the stomach wall and the small intestines; performed when the normal opening has been eliminated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroepiploic vein
n
  1. one of two veins serving the great curvature of the stomach
    Synonym(s): gastroomental vein, gastroepiploic vein, vena gastroomentalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroesophageal
adj
  1. of or relating to or involving the stomach and esophagus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroesophageal reflux
n
  1. reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus [syn: gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal reflux, oesophageal reflux]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrogavage
n
  1. feeding a nutrient solution into the stomach through a tube through a surgically created opening
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrointestinal
adj
  1. of or relating to the stomach and intestines; "a gastrointestinal disorder"
    Synonym(s): gastrointestinal, GI
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrointestinal disorder
n
  1. illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food [syn: food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrointestinal hormone
n
  1. hormones that affect gastrointestinal functioning [syn: gastrointestinal hormone, GI hormones]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrointestinal system
n
  1. the system that makes food absorbable into the body [syn: digestive system, gastrointestinal system, systema alimentarium, systema digestorium]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrointestinal tract
n
  1. tubular passage of mucous membrane and muscle extending about 8.3 meters from mouth to anus; functions in digestion and elimination
    Synonym(s): alimentary canal, alimentary tract, digestive tube, digestive tract, gastrointestinal tract, GI tract
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrolobium
n
  1. any of various Australian evergreen shrubs of the genus Gastrolobium having whorled compound leaves poisonous to livestock and showy yellow to deep reddish-orange flowers followed by two-seeded pods
    Synonym(s): poison bush, poison pea, gastrolobium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastromy
n
  1. surgical incision into the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastromycete
n
  1. any fungus of the class Gasteromycetes [syn: gasteromycete, gastromycete]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastromycetes
n
  1. fungi in which the hymenium is enclosed until after spores have matured: puffballs; earth stars; stinkhorn fungi
    Synonym(s): Gasteromycetes, class Gasteromycetes, Gastromycetes, class Gastromycetes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastronome
n
  1. a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)
    Synonym(s): epicure, gourmet, gastronome, bon vivant, epicurean, foodie
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastronomic
adj
  1. of or relating to gastronomy; "gastronomic adventures"
    Synonym(s): gastronomic, gastronomical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastronomical
adj
  1. of or relating to gastronomy; "gastronomic adventures"
    Synonym(s): gastronomic, gastronomical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastronomy
n
  1. a particular style of cookery (as of a region); "New England gastronomy"
  2. the art and practice of choosing and preparing and eating good food
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroomental vein
n
  1. one of two veins serving the great curvature of the stomach
    Synonym(s): gastroomental vein, gastroepiploic vein, vena gastroomentalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastrophryne
n
  1. primarily tropical narrow-mouthed toads [syn: Gastrophryne, genus Gastrophryne]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastrophryne carolinensis
n
  1. small toad of southeastern United States [syn: {eastern narrow-mouthed toad}, Gastrophryne carolinensis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastrophryne olivacea
n
  1. small secretive toad with smooth tough skin of central and western North America
    Synonym(s): western narrow-mouthed toad, Gastrophryne olivacea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastropod
n
  1. a class of mollusks typically having a one-piece coiled shell and flattened muscular foot with a head bearing stalked eyes
    Synonym(s): gastropod, univalve
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gastropoda
n
  1. snails and slugs and their relatives [syn: Gastropoda, class Gastropoda, Gasteropoda, class Gasteropoda]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroscope
n
  1. a type of endoscope for visually examining the stomach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastroscopy
n
  1. visual examination of the stomach by means of a gastroscope inserted through the esophagus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrostomy
n
  1. surgical creation of an opening through the abdominal wall into the stomach (as for gastrogavage)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrula
n
  1. double-walled stage of the embryo resulting from invagination of the blastula; the outer layer of cells is the ectoderm and the inner layer differentiates into the mesoderm and endoderm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gastrulation
n
  1. the process in which a gastrula develops from a blastula by the inward migration of cells
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gazetteer
n
  1. a journalist who writes for a gazette
  2. a geographical dictionary (as at the back of an atlas)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Geastraceae
n
  1. a family of earthstar fungi belonging to the order Lycoperdales
    Synonym(s): Geastraceae, family Geastraceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Geastrum
n
  1. type genus of Geastraceae; fungi whose outer peridium when dry splits into starlike segments
    Synonym(s): Geastrum, genus Geastrum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Geastrum coronatum
n
  1. an earthstar with a bluish spore sac and a purplish brown gleba; at maturity the outer layer splits into rays that bend backward and elevate the spore sac
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
geostrategic
adj
  1. of or relating to geostrategy; "Pakistan became a country of paramount geostrategic importance to the United States"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
geostrategy
n
  1. the branch of geopolitics dealing with strategy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gestural
adj
  1. used of the language of the deaf [syn: gestural, sign(a), signed, sign-language(a)]
  2. being other than verbal communication; "the study of gestural communication"; "art like gesture is a form of nonverbal expression"
    Synonym(s): gestural, nonverbal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gesture
n
  1. motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
  2. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals
    Synonym(s): gesture, motion
  3. something done as an indication of intention; "a political gesture"; "a gesture of defiance"
v
  1. show, express or direct through movement; "He gestured his desire to leave"
    Synonym(s): gesticulate, gesture, motion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ghost word
n
  1. a word form that has entered the language through the perpetuation of an error
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ghostwrite
v
  1. write for someone else; "How many books have you ghostwritten so far?"
    Synonym(s): ghost, ghostwrite
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ghostwriter
n
  1. a writer who gives the credit of authorship to someone else
    Synonym(s): ghostwriter, ghost
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
go-getter
n
  1. someone whose career progresses rapidly [syn: go-getter, whizz-kid, whiz-kid, ball of fire]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guest worker
n
  1. a person with temporary permission to work in another country; "a Moroccan guestworker in Canada was accused of aiding terrorists"
    Synonym(s): guest worker, guestworker
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guestroom
n
  1. a bedroom that is kept for the use of guests
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guestworker
n
  1. a person with temporary permission to work in another country; "a Moroccan guestworker in Canada was accused of aiding terrorists"
    Synonym(s): guest worker, guestworker
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Gas fitter}, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for
            gas.
  
      {Gas fitting}.
            (a) The occupation of a gas fitter.
            (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas
                  into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc.
  
      {Gas fixture}, a device for conveying illuminating or
            combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner,
            consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn
            metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are
            adjusted.
  
      {Gas generator}, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as:
            (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by
                  heat;
            (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of
                  liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor;
            (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for
                  a[89]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight.
  
      {Gas jet}, a flame of illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas machine}, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as
            illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas meter}, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas
            consumed in a given time, at a particular place.
  
      {Gas retort}, a retort which contains the coal and other
            materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the
            manufacture of gas.
  
      {Gas stove}, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by
            gas.
  
      {Gas tar}, coal tar.
  
      {Gas trap}, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th {Trap}, 5.
  
      {Gas washer} (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from
            the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream
            of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it.
            --Knight.
  
      {Gas water}, water through which gas has been passed for
            purification; -- called also {gas liquor} and {ammoniacal
            water}, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac,
            carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson.
  
      {Gas well}, a deep boring, from which natural gas is
            discharged. --Raymond.
  
      {Gas works}, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and
            appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting
            cities.
  
      {Laughing gas}. See under {Laughing}.
  
      {Marsh gas} (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous
            hydrocarbon, {CH4}, produced artificially by the dry
            distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as
            a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools,
            whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary
            illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin
            series. Called also {methane}, and in coal mines, {fire
            damp}.
  
      {Natural gas}, gas obtained from wells, etc., in
            Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for
            fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from
            the Coal Measures.
  
      {Olefiant gas} (Chem.). See {Ethylene}.
  
      {Water gas} (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over
            glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen
            and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating
            power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which
            is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon,
            as gasoline.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Gas fitter}, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for
            gas.
  
      {Gas fitting}.
            (a) The occupation of a gas fitter.
            (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas
                  into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc.
  
      {Gas fixture}, a device for conveying illuminating or
            combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner,
            consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn
            metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are
            adjusted.
  
      {Gas generator}, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as:
            (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by
                  heat;
            (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of
                  liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor;
            (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for
                  a[89]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight.
  
      {Gas jet}, a flame of illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas machine}, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as
            illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas meter}, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas
            consumed in a given time, at a particular place.
  
      {Gas retort}, a retort which contains the coal and other
            materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the
            manufacture of gas.
  
      {Gas stove}, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by
            gas.
  
      {Gas tar}, coal tar.
  
      {Gas trap}, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th {Trap}, 5.
  
      {Gas washer} (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from
            the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream
            of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it.
            --Knight.
  
      {Gas water}, water through which gas has been passed for
            purification; -- called also {gas liquor} and {ammoniacal
            water}, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac,
            carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson.
  
      {Gas well}, a deep boring, from which natural gas is
            discharged. --Raymond.
  
      {Gas works}, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and
            appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting
            cities.
  
      {Laughing gas}. See under {Laughing}.
  
      {Marsh gas} (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous
            hydrocarbon, {CH4}, produced artificially by the dry
            distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as
            a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools,
            whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary
            illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin
            series. Called also {methane}, and in coal mines, {fire
            damp}.
  
      {Natural gas}, gas obtained from wells, etc., in
            Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for
            fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from
            the Coal Measures.
  
      {Olefiant gas} (Chem.). See {Ethylene}.
  
      {Water gas} (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over
            glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen
            and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating
            power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which
            is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon,
            as gasoline.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Gas fitter}, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for
            gas.
  
      {Gas fitting}.
            (a) The occupation of a gas fitter.
            (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas
                  into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc.
  
      {Gas fixture}, a device for conveying illuminating or
            combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner,
            consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn
            metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are
            adjusted.
  
      {Gas generator}, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as:
            (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by
                  heat;
            (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of
                  liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor;
            (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for
                  a[89]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight.
  
      {Gas jet}, a flame of illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas machine}, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as
            illuminating gas.
  
      {Gas meter}, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas
            consumed in a given time, at a particular place.
  
      {Gas retort}, a retort which contains the coal and other
            materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the
            manufacture of gas.
  
      {Gas stove}, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by
            gas.
  
      {Gas tar}, coal tar.
  
      {Gas trap}, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th {Trap}, 5.
  
      {Gas washer} (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from
            the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream
            of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it.
            --Knight.
  
      {Gas water}, water through which gas has been passed for
            purification; -- called also {gas liquor} and {ammoniacal
            water}, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac,
            carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson.
  
      {Gas well}, a deep boring, from which natural gas is
            discharged. --Raymond.
  
      {Gas works}, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and
            appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting
            cities.
  
      {Laughing gas}. See under {Laughing}.
  
      {Marsh gas} (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous
            hydrocarbon, {CH4}, produced artificially by the dry
            distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as
            a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools,
            whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary
            illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin
            series. Called also {methane}, and in coal mines, {fire
            damp}.
  
      {Natural gas}, gas obtained from wells, etc., in
            Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for
            fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from
            the Coal Measures.
  
      {Olefiant gas} (Chem.). See {Ethylene}.
  
      {Water gas} (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over
            glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen
            and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating
            power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which
            is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon,
            as gasoline.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaster \Gast"er\, v. t.
      To gast. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gasteropod \Gas"ter*o*pod\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Gastropod}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastropod \Gas"tro*pod\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the Gastropoda. [Written also {gasteropod}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gasteropod \Gas"ter*o*pod\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Gastropod}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastropod \Gas"tro*pod\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the Gastropoda. [Written also {gasteropod}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gastropoda \[d8]Gas*trop"o*da\, n. pl., [NL., fr. Gr. [?],
      [?], stomach + -poda.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes
      most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and
      fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat,
      muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The
      head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See
      {Mollusca}. [Written also {Gasteropoda}.]
  
      Note: The Gastropoda are divided into three subclasses; viz.:
               ({a}) The Streptoneura or Dioecia, including the
               Pectinibranchiata, Rhipidoglossa, Docoglossa, and
               Heteropoda. ({b}) The Euthyneura, including the
               Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia. ({c}) The Amphineura,
               including the Polyplacophora and Aplacophora.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gasteropodous \Gas`ter*op"o*dous\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Gastropodous}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Burnstickle \Burn"stic`kle\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A stickleback ({Gasterosteus aculeatus}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head
               streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes,
               and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in
               the way of their progress. The common salmon has been
               known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds;
               more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five
               pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and
               grilse. Among the true salmons are:
  
      {Black salmon}, or {Lake salmon}, the namaycush.
  
      {Dog salmon}, a salmon of Western North America
            ({Oncorhynchus keta}).
  
      {Humpbacked salmon}, a Pacific-coast salmon ({Oncorhynchus
            gorbuscha}).
  
      {King salmon}, the quinnat.
  
      {Landlocked salmon}, a variety of the common salmon (var.
            {Sebago}), long confined in certain lakes in consequence
            of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the
            sea. This last is called also {dwarf salmon}.
  
      Note: Among fishes of other families which are locally and
               erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called
               {jack salmon}; the spotted, or southern, squeteague;
               the cabrilla, called {kelp salmon}; young pollock,
               called {sea salmon}; and the California yellowtail.
  
      2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the
            salmon.
  
      {Salmon berry} (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from
            Alaska to California, the fruit of the {Rubus Nutkanus}.
           
  
      {Salmon killer} (Zo[94]l.), a stickleback ({Gasterosteus
            cataphractus}) of Western North America and Northern Asia.
           
  
      {Salmon ladder}, {Salmon stair}. See {Fish ladder}, under
            {Fish}.
  
      {Salmon peel}, a young salmon.
  
      {Salmon pipe}, a certain device for catching salmon. --Crabb.
  
      {Salmon trout}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The European sea trout ({Salmo trutta}). It resembles
                  the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more
                  numerous scales.
            (b) The American namaycush.
            (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black
                  spotted trout ({Salmo purpuratus}), and to the steel
                  head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sea adder \Sea" ad"der\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European fifteen-spined stickleback ({Gasterosteus
            spinachia}); -- called also {bismore}.
      (b) The European tanglefish, or pipefish ({Syngnathus acus}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bismer \Bis"mer\, n.
      1. A rule steelyard. [Scot.]
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The fifteen-spined ({Gasterosteus spinachia}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastric \Gas"tric\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], stomach: cf. F.
      gastrique.]
      Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; as, the
      gastric artery.
  
      {Gastric digestion} (Physiol.), the conversion of the
            albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and
            diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric
            juice.
  
      {Gastric fever} (Med.), a fever attended with prominent
            gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of
            typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the
            stomach attended with fever.
  
      {Gastric juice} (Physiol.), a thin, watery fluid, with an
            acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands
            contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It
            consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the
            ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid
            in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.
  
      {Gastric remittent fever} (Med.), a form of remittent fever
            with pronounced stomach symptoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastric \Gas"tric\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], stomach: cf. F.
      gastrique.]
      Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; as, the
      gastric artery.
  
      {Gastric digestion} (Physiol.), the conversion of the
            albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and
            diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric
            juice.
  
      {Gastric fever} (Med.), a fever attended with prominent
            gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of
            typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the
            stomach attended with fever.
  
      {Gastric juice} (Physiol.), a thin, watery fluid, with an
            acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands
            contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It
            consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the
            ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid
            in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.
  
      {Gastric remittent fever} (Med.), a form of remittent fever
            with pronounced stomach symptoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastric \Gas"tric\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], stomach: cf. F.
      gastrique.]
      Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; as, the
      gastric artery.
  
      {Gastric digestion} (Physiol.), the conversion of the
            albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and
            diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric
            juice.
  
      {Gastric fever} (Med.), a fever attended with prominent
            gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of
            typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the
            stomach attended with fever.
  
      {Gastric juice} (Physiol.), a thin, watery fluid, with an
            acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands
            contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It
            consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the
            ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid
            in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.
  
      {Gastric remittent fever} (Med.), a form of remittent fever
            with pronounced stomach symptoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastric \Gas"tric\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], stomach: cf. F.
      gastrique.]
      Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; as, the
      gastric artery.
  
      {Gastric digestion} (Physiol.), the conversion of the
            albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and
            diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric
            juice.
  
      {Gastric fever} (Med.), a fever attended with prominent
            gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of
            typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the
            stomach attended with fever.
  
      {Gastric juice} (Physiol.), a thin, watery fluid, with an
            acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands
            contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It
            consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the
            ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid
            in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.
  
      {Gastric remittent fever} (Med.), a form of remittent fever
            with pronounced stomach symptoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastric \Gas"tric\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], stomach: cf. F.
      gastrique.]
      Of, pertaining to, or situated near, the stomach; as, the
      gastric artery.
  
      {Gastric digestion} (Physiol.), the conversion of the
            albuminous portion of food in the stomach into soluble and
            diffusible products by the solvent action of gastric
            juice.
  
      {Gastric fever} (Med.), a fever attended with prominent
            gastric symptoms; -- a name applied to certain forms of
            typhoid fever; also, to catarrhal inflammation of the
            stomach attended with fever.
  
      {Gastric juice} (Physiol.), a thin, watery fluid, with an
            acid reaction, secreted by a peculiar set of glands
            contained in the mucous membrane of the stomach. It
            consists mainly of dilute hydrochloric acid and the
            ferment pepsin. It is the most important digestive fluid
            in the body, but acts only on proteid foods.
  
      {Gastric remittent fever} (Med.), a form of remittent fever
            with pronounced stomach symptoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nit \Nit\, n. [AS. hnitu; akin to D. neet, G. niss, OHG. niz;
      cf. gr. [?], [?], Icel. gnit, Sw. gnet, Dan. gnid, Russ. &
      Pol. gnida, Bohem. hnida, W. nedd.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The egg of a louse or other small insect.
  
      {Nit grass} (Bot.), a pretty annual European grass
            ({Gastridium lendigerum}), with small spikelets somewhat
            resembling a nit. It is also found in California and
            Chili.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastriloquist \Gas*tril"o*quist\, n. [Gr. gasth`r, gastro`s,
      stomach + L. loqui to speak.]
      One who appears to speak from his stomach; a ventriloquist.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastriloquous \Gas*tril"o*quous\, a.
      Ventriloquous. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastriloquy \Gas*tril"o*quy\, n.
      A voice or utterance which appears to proceed from the
      stomach; ventriloquy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastro- \Gas"tro-\
      A combining form from the Gr. [?], [?], the stomach, or
      belly; as in gastrocolic, gastrocele, gastrotomy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrocnemius \Gas`troc*ne"mi*us\, n. [NL., from Gr. [?] the
      calf of the leg.] (Anat.)
      The muscle which makes the greater part of the calf of the
      leg.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrocolic \Gas`tro*col"ic\, a. [Gastro- + colic.] (Anat.)
      Pertaining to both the stomach and the colon; as, the
      gastrocolic, or great, omentum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yam \Yam\ (y[acr]m), n. [Pg. inhame, probably from some native
      name.] (Bot.)
      A large, esculent, farinaceous tuber of various climbing
      plants of the genus {Dioscorea}; also, the plants themselves.
      Mostly natives of warm climates. The plants have
      netted-veined, petioled leaves, and pods with three broad
      wings. The commonest species is {D. sativa}, but several
      others are cultivated.
  
      {Chinese yam}, a plant ({Dioscorea Batatas}) with a long and
            slender tuber, hardier than most of the other species.
  
      {Wild yam}.
      (a) A common plant ({Dioscorea villosa}) of the Eastern
            United States, having a hard and knotty rootstock.
      (b) An orchidaceous plant ({Gastrodia sesamoides}) of
            Australia and Tasmania.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrodisc \Gas`tro*disc\, n. [Gastro- + disc.] (Biol.)
      That part of blastoderm where the hypoblast appears like a
      small disk on the inner face of the epibladst.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroduodenal \Gas`tro*du"o*de"nal\, a. [Gastro- + -duodenal.]
      (Anat.)
      Pertaining to the stomach and duodenum; as, the
      gastroduodenal artery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroduodenitis \Gas`tro*du`o*de*ni"tis\, n. [NL. See
      {Gastroduodenal}, and {-itis}.] (Med.)
      Inflammation of the stomach and duodenum. It is one of the
      most frequent causes of jaundice.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroelytrotomy \Gas`tro*el`y*trot"o*my\, n. [Gastro- + Gr [?]
      sheath + [?] a cutting] (Surg.)
      The operation of cutting into the upper part of the vagina,
      through the abdomen (without opening the peritoneum), for the
      purpose of removing a fetus. It is a substitute for the
      C[91]sarean operation, and less dangerous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroenteric \Gas`tro*en*te"ric\, a. [Gastro- + -enteric.]
      (Anat. & Med.)
      Gastrointestinal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroepiploic \Gas`tro*ep`i*plo"ic\, a. [Gastro- + -epiploic.]
      (Anat.)
      Of or pertaining to the stomach and omentum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrohepatic \Gas`tro*he*pat"ic\, a. [Gastro- + -hepatic.]
      (Med.)
      Pertaining to the stomach and liver; hepatogastric; as, the
      gastrohepatic, or lesser, omentum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrohysterotomy \Gas`tro*hys`ter*ot"o*my\, n. [Gastro- + Gr.
      [?] womb + [?] to cut.] (Surg.)
      C[91]sarean section. See under {C[91]sarean}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrointestinal \Gas`tro*in*tes"ti*nal\, a. [Gastro- +
      -intestinal.] (Anat. & Med.)
      Of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines;
      gastroenteric.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrolith \Gas`tro*lith\, n. [Gastro- + -lith.] (Zo[94]l.)
      See {Crab's eyes}, under {Crab}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wallflower \Wall"flow`er\, n. (Bot.)
      In Australia, the desert poison bush ({Gastrolobium
      grandiflorum}); -- called also {native wallflower}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrology \Gas*trol"o*gy\, n. [Gr [?]; [?], [?], stomach + [?]
      discourse: cf. F. gastrologie.]
      The science which treats of the structure and functions of
      the stomach; a treatise of the stomach.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastromancy \Gas`tro*man"cy\, n. [Gastro- + -mancy: cf. F.
      gastromancy.] (Antiq.)
      (a) A kind of divination, by means of words seemingly uttered
            from the stomach.
      (b) A species of divination, by means of glasses or other
            round, transparent vessels, in the center of which
            figures are supposed to appear by magic art.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastromyth \Gas"tro*myth\, n. [Gastro- + Gr. [?] to say, speak.]
      One whose voice appears to proceed from the stomach; a
      ventriloquist. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronome \Gas"tro*nome\, Gastronomer \Gas*tron"o*mer\, n. [F.
      gastronome, fr. Gr. [?], [?], stomach + [?] law, [?] to
      distribute.]
      One fond of good living; an epicure. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronome \Gas"tro*nome\, Gastronomer \Gas*tron"o*mer\, n. [F.
      gastronome, fr. Gr. [?], [?], stomach + [?] law, [?] to
      distribute.]
      One fond of good living; an epicure. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronomic \Gas`tro*nom"ic\, Gastronomical \Gas`tro*nom"ic*al\,
      a. [Cf. F. gastronomique.]
      Pertaining to gastromony.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronomic \Gas`tro*nom"ic\, Gastronomical \Gas`tro*nom"ic*al\,
      a. [Cf. F. gastronomique.]
      Pertaining to gastromony.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronomist \Gas*tron"o*mist\, n.
      A gastromomer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastronomy \Gas*tron"o*my\, n. [Gr. [?]: cf. F. gastronomie.]
      The art or science of good eating; epicurism; the art of good
      cheer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lappet \Lap"pet\, n. [Dim. of lap a fold.]
      A small decorative fold or flap, esp, of lace or muslin, in a
      garment or headdress. --Swift.
  
      {Lappet moth} (Zo[94]l.), one of several species of bombycid
            moths, which have stout, hairy caterpillars, flat beneath.
            Two common American species ({Gastropacha Americana}, and
            {Tolype velleda}) feed upon the apple tree.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Botfly \Bot"fly`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A dipterous insect of the family ({Estrid[91]}, of many
      different species, some of which are particularly troublesome
      to domestic animals, as the horse, ox, and sheep, on which
      they deposit their eggs. A common species is one of the
      botflies of the horse ({Gastrophilus equi}), the larv[91] of
      which (bots) are taken into the stomach of the animal, where
      they live several months and pass through their larval
      states. In tropical America one species sometimes lives under
      the human skin, and another in the stomach. See {Gadfly}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrophrenic \Gas`tro*phren"ic\, a. [Gastro- + -phrenic.]
      (Anat.)
      Pertaining to the stomach and diaphragm; as, the
      gastrophrenic ligament.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastropneumatic \Gas`tro*pneu*mat"ic\, a. [Gastro- + pneumatic.]
      (Anat.)
      Pertaining to the alimentary canal and air passages, and to
      the cavities connected with them; as, the gastropneumatic
      mucuos membranes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastropod \Gas"tro*pod\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the Gastropoda. [Written also {gasteropod}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastropodous \Gas*trop"o*dous\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Of or pertaining to the Gastropoda.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroraphy \Gas*tror"a*phy\, n. [Gr.[?]; [?], [?], stomach +
      [?] a sewing, fr. [?] to sew: cf. F. gastrorrhaphie.] (Surg.)
      The operation of sewing up wounds of the abdomen. --Quincy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroscope \Gas"tro*scope\, n. [Gastro- + -scope.] (Med.)
      An instrument for viewing or examining the interior of the
      stomach.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroscopic \Gas`tro*scop"ic\, a.
      Of or pertaining to gastroscopy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastroscopy \Gas*tros"co*py\, n. (Med.)
      Examination of the abdomen or stomach, as with the
      gastroscope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrosplenic \Gas`tro*splen"ic\, n. [Gastro- + splenic.]
      (Anat.)
      Pertaining to the stomach and spleen; as, the gastrosplenic
      ligament.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrostege \Gas*tros"tege\, n. [Gastro- + Gr. [?] roof.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the large scales on the belly of a serpent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrostomy \Gas*tros"to*my\, n. [Gastro- + Gr. [?] mouth.]
      (Surg.)
      The operation of making a permanent opening into the stomach,
      for the introduction of food.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrotomy \Gas*trot"o*my\, n. [Gastro + Gr. [?] to cut: cf. F.
      gastrotomie.] (Surg.)
      A cutting into, or opening of, the abdomen or the stomach.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrovascular \Gas`tro*vas"cu*lar\, a. [Gastro- + -vascular.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Having the structure, or performing the functions, both of
      digestive and circulatory organs; as, the gastrovascular
      cavity of c[oe]lenterates.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gastrula \[d8]Gas"tru*la\, n.; pl. {Gastrul[91]}[NL., dim. fr.
      Gr. [?] the stomach.] (Biol.)
      An embryonic form having its origin in the invagination or
      pushing in of the wall of the planula or blastula (the
      blastosphere) on one side, thus giving rise to a
      double-walled sac, with one opening or mouth (the blastopore)
      which leads into the cavity (the archenteron) lined by the
      inner wall (the hypoblast). See Illust. under {Invagination}.
      In a more general sense, an ideal stage in embryonic
      development. See {Gastr[91]a}. -- a. Of or pertaining to a
      gastrula.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Stomapoda \[d8]Sto*map"o*da\, n. pl. [NL. See {Stoma}, and
      {-poda}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      An order of Crustacea including the squillas. The maxillipeds
      are leglike in form, and the large claws are comblike. They
      have a large and elongated abdomen, which contains a part of
      the stomach and heart; the abdominal appendages are large,
      and bear the gills. Called also {Gastrula}, {Stomatopoda},
      and {Squilloidea}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Planula \[d8]Plan"u*la\, n.; pl. {Planul[91]}. [L., a little
      plane.]
      1. (Biol.) In embryonic development, a vesicle filled with
            fluid, formed from the morula by the divergence of its
            cells in such a manner as to give rise to a central space,
            around which the cells arrange themselves as an envelope;
            an embryonic form intermediate between the morula and
            gastrula. Sometimes used as synonymous with {gastrula}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Stomapoda \[d8]Sto*map"o*da\, n. pl. [NL. See {Stoma}, and
      {-poda}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      An order of Crustacea including the squillas. The maxillipeds
      are leglike in form, and the large claws are comblike. They
      have a large and elongated abdomen, which contains a part of
      the stomach and heart; the abdominal appendages are large,
      and bear the gills. Called also {Gastrula}, {Stomatopoda},
      and {Squilloidea}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Planula \[d8]Plan"u*la\, n.; pl. {Planul[91]}. [L., a little
      plane.]
      1. (Biol.) In embryonic development, a vesicle filled with
            fluid, formed from the morula by the divergence of its
            cells in such a manner as to give rise to a central space,
            around which the cells arrange themselves as an envelope;
            an embryonic form intermediate between the morula and
            gastrula. Sometimes used as synonymous with {gastrula}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrulation \Gas`tru*la"tion\
      (g[acr]s`tr[usdot]*l[amac]"sh[ucr]n), n. (Biol.)
      The process of invagination, in embryonic development, by
      which a gastrula is formed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gastrurous \Gas*tru"rous\ (-r[ucr]s), a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Pertaining to the Gastrura.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gauze \Gauze\, n. [F. gaze; so called because it was first
      introduced from Gaza, a city of Palestine.]
      A very thin, slight, transparent stuff, generally of silk;
      also, any fabric resembling silk gauze; as, wire gauze;
      cotton gauze.
  
      {Gauze dresser}, one employed in stiffening gauze.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gazetteer \Gaz`et*teer"\, n. [Cf. F. gazetier.]
      1. A writer of news, or an officer appointed to publish news
            by authority. --Johnson.
  
      2. A newspaper; a gazette. [Obs.] --Burke.
  
      3. A geographical dictionary; a book giving the names and
            descriptions, etc., of many places.
  
      4. An alphabetical descriptive list of anything.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gestour \Ges"tour\, n. [See {Gest} a deed.]
      A reciter of gests or legendary tales; a story-teller. [Obs.]
  
               Minstrels and gestours for to tell tales. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gestural \Ges"tur*al\, a.
      Relating to gesture.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesture \Ges"ture\, n. [LL. gestura mode of action, fr. L.
      gerere, gestum, to bear, behave, perform, act. See {Gest} a
      deed.]
      1. Manner of carrying the body; position of the body or
            limbs; posture. [Obs.]
  
                     Accubation, or lying down at meals, was a gesture
                     used by many nations.                        --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.
  
      2. A motion of the body or limbs expressive of sentiment or
            passion; any action or posture intended to express an idea
            or a passion, or to enforce or emphasize an argument,
            assertion, or opinion.
  
                     Humble and reverent gestures.            --Hooker.
  
                     Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye, In
                     every gesture dignity and love.         --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesture \Ges"ture\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gestured}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gesturing}.]
      To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action; to
      gesticulate.
  
               It is not orderly read, nor gestured as beseemeth.
                                                                              --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesture \Ges"ture\, v. i.
      To make gestures; to gesticulate.
  
               The players . . . gestured not undecently withal.
                                                                              --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesture \Ges"ture\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gestured}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gesturing}.]
      To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action; to
      gesticulate.
  
               It is not orderly read, nor gestured as beseemeth.
                                                                              --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gestureless \Ges"ture*less\, a.
      Free from gestures.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesturement \Ges"ture*ment\, n.
      Act of making gestures; gesturing. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gesture \Ges"ture\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gestured}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gesturing}.]
      To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action; to
      gesticulate.
  
               It is not orderly read, nor gestured as beseemeth.
                                                                              --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guest rope \Guest" rope"\ (Naut.)
      The line by which a boat makes fast to the swinging boom.
      --Ham. Nav. Encyc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gustard \Gus"tard\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The great bustard.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gaastra, MI (city, FIPS 31160)
      Location: 46.05884 N, 88.60542 W
      Population (1990): 376 (174 housing units)
      Area: 4.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49927
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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