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   safari park
         n 1: an area of parkland where wild animals are kept and can be
               viewed by visitors driving through

English Dictionary: supervision/accreditation by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
safe harbor
n
  1. the target company defends itself by acquiring a company so onerously regulated that it makes the target less attractive; "the acquisition gave the company a safe harbor"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sapphire berry
n
  1. deciduous shrub of eastern Asia bearing decorative bright blue fruit
    Synonym(s): Asiatic sweetleaf, sapphire berry, Symplocus paniculata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprobe
n
  1. an organism that lives in and derives its nourishment from organic matter in stagnant or foul water
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprobic
adj
  1. living in or being an environment rich in organic matter but lacking oxygen
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sapropel
n
  1. sludge (rich in organic matter) that accumulates at the bottom of lakes or oceans
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprophagous
adj
  1. (of certain animals) feeding on dead or decaying animal matter
    Synonym(s): saprophagous, saprozoic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprophyte
n
  1. an organism that feeds on dead organic matter especially a fungus or bacterium
    Synonym(s): saprophyte, saprophytic organism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprophytic
adj
  1. obtaining food osmotically from dissolved organic material
  2. (of some plants or fungi) feeding on dead or decaying organic matter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
saprophytic organism
n
  1. an organism that feeds on dead organic matter especially a fungus or bacterium
    Synonym(s): saprophyte, saprophytic organism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
savoir-faire
n
  1. social skill
    Synonym(s): savoir-faire, address
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
separability
n
  1. the capability of being separated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
separable
adj
  1. capable of being divided or dissociated; "often drugs and crime are not dissociable"; "the siamese twins were not considered separable"; "a song...never conceived of as severable from the melody";
    Synonym(s): dissociable, separable, severable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
separably
adv
  1. with possibility of separation or individuation; "the two ideas were considered separably"
    Antonym(s): inseparably
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
severable
adj
  1. capable of being divided or dissociated; "often drugs and crime are not dissociable"; "the siamese twins were not considered separable"; "a song...never conceived of as severable from the melody";
    Synonym(s): dissociable, separable, severable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
severable contract
n
  1. a contract which, in the event of a breach by one of the parties, can be considered as several independent agreements expressed in a single instrument
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
skip rope
n
  1. a length of rope (usually with handles on each end) that is swung around while someone jumps over it
    Synonym(s): jump rope, skip rope, skipping rope
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
soapberry family
n
  1. chiefly tropical New and Old World deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs bearing leathery drupes with yellow translucent flesh; most plants produce toxic saponins
    Synonym(s): Sapindaceae, family Sapindaceae, soapberry family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
soapberry vine
n
  1. tendril-climbing vine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sober up
v
  1. become sober after excessive alcohol consumption; "Keep him in bed until he sobers up"
    Synonym(s): sober up, sober
  2. become more realistic; "After thinking about the potential consequences of his plan, he sobered up"
    Synonym(s): sober up, sober
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
soporiferous
adj
  1. sleep inducing [syn: soporific, soporiferous, somniferous, somnific, hypnogogic, hypnagogic]
  2. inducing mental lethargy; "a narcotic speech"
    Synonym(s): narcotic, soporiferous, soporific
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
soporific
adj
  1. sleep inducing [syn: soporific, soporiferous, somniferous, somnific, hypnogogic, hypnagogic]
  2. inducing mental lethargy; "a narcotic speech"
    Synonym(s): narcotic, soporiferous, soporific
n
  1. a drug that induces sleep
    Synonym(s): soporific, hypnotic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spar buoy
n
  1. a buoy resembling a vertical log
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spare part
n
  1. an extra component of a machine or other apparatus [syn: spare part, spare]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spear up
v
  1. thrust up like a spear; "The branch speared up into the air"
    Synonym(s): spear, spear up
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spear-point
n
  1. the head and sharpened point of a spear [syn: spearhead, spearpoint, spear-point]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spearfish
n
  1. any of several large vigorous pelagic fishes resembling sailfishes but with first dorsal fin much reduced; worldwide but rare
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spearpoint
n
  1. the head and sharpened point of a spear [syn: spearhead, spearpoint, spear-point]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sphaerobolaceae
n
  1. monotypic family of fungi in which the more or less spherical gleba is forcibly ejected at maturity
    Synonym(s): Sphaerobolaceae, family Sphaerobolaceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sphere of influence
n
  1. the geographical area in which one nation is very influential
    Synonym(s): sphere, sphere of influence
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sphyrapicus
n
  1. a genus of Picidae [syn: Sphyrapicus, {genus Sphyrapicus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sphyrapicus varius
n
  1. eastern North American sapsucker having a pale yellow abdomen
    Synonym(s): yellow-bellied sapsucker, Sphyrapicus varius
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sphyrapicus varius ruber
n
  1. western North American sapsucker [syn: {red-breasted sapsucker}, Sphyrapicus varius ruber]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Spiraea prunifolia
n
  1. shrub having copious small white flowers in spring [syn: bridal wreath, bridal-wreath, Saint Peter's wreath, St. Peter's wreath, Spiraea prunifolia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spore-bearing
adj
  1. bearing spores instead of producing seeds
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sporobolus
n
  1. cosmopolitan annual and perennial grasses (as dropseed or rush grass)
    Synonym(s): Sporobolus, genus Sporobolus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sporobolus cryptandrus
n
  1. erect smooth grass of sandy places in eastern North America
    Synonym(s): sand dropseed, Sporobolus cryptandrus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Sporobolus poiretii
n
  1. grass native to West Indies but common in southern United States having tufted wiry stems often infested with a dark fungus
    Synonym(s): smut grass, blackseed, carpet grass, Sporobolus poiretii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sporophore
n
  1. a spore-bearing branch or organ: the part of the thallus of a sporophyte that develops spores; in ferns and mosses and liverworts is practically equivalent to the sporophyte
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sporophyl
n
  1. leaf in ferns and mosses that bears the sporangia [syn: sporophyll, sporophyl]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sporophyll
n
  1. leaf in ferns and mosses that bears the sporangia [syn: sporophyll, sporophyl]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sporophyte
n
  1. the spore-producing individual or phase in the life cycle of a plant having alternation of generations
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spray paint
n
  1. paint applied with a spray gun
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spray painting
n
  1. applying paint with a sprayer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spur blight
n
  1. a disease of raspberries
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
spur-of-the-moment
adj
  1. in response to an unforeseen need; "a spur-of-the-moment party"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suborbital
adj
  1. having or involving a trajectory of less than one orbit; "the first manned suborbital flight"
  2. situated on or below the floor of the eye socket; "a suborbital bone"
    Synonym(s): suborbital, subocular
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburb
n
  1. a residential district located on the outskirts of a city
    Synonym(s): suburb, suburbia, suburban area
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburban
adj
  1. relating to or characteristic of or situated in suburbs; "suburban population"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburban area
n
  1. a residential district located on the outskirts of a city
    Synonym(s): suburb, suburbia, suburban area
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbanise
v
  1. take on suburban character; "the city suburbanized" [syn: suburbanize, suburbanise]
  2. make suburban in character; "highly suburbanized cities"
    Synonym(s): suburbanize, suburbanise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbanised
adj
  1. surrounded by many suburbs; "a highly suburbanized city"
    Synonym(s): suburbanized, suburbanised
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbanite
n
  1. a resident of a suburb
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbanize
v
  1. take on suburban character; "the city suburbanized" [syn: suburbanize, suburbanise]
  2. make suburban in character; "highly suburbanized cities"
    Synonym(s): suburbanize, suburbanise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbanized
adj
  1. surrounded by many suburbs; "a highly suburbanized city"
    Synonym(s): suburbanized, suburbanised
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
suburbia
n
  1. a residential district located on the outskirts of a city
    Synonym(s): suburb, suburbia, suburban area
  2. suburbanites considered as a cultural class or subculture
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
sufferable
adj
  1. capable of being borne though unpleasant; "sufferable punishment"
    Synonym(s): bearable, endurable, sufferable, supportable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
super heavyweight
n
  1. an amateur boxer who weighs more than 201 pounds
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superable
adj
  1. capable of being surmounted or excelled [syn: conquerable, superable]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superabundance
n
  1. a quantity that is more than what is appropriate; "four- year-olds have an overabundance of energy"; "we received an inundation of email"
    Synonym(s): overabundance, overmuch, overmuchness, superabundance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superabundant
adj
  1. most excessively abundant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superb
adj
  1. of surpassing excellence; "a brilliant performance"; "a superb actor"
    Synonym(s): brilliant, superb
  2. surpassingly good; "a superb meal"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superbia
n
  1. unreasonable and inordinate self-esteem (personified as one of the deadly sins)
    Synonym(s): pride, superbia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superbly
adv
  1. (used as an intensifier) extremely well; "her voice is superbly disciplined"; "the colors changed wondrously slowly"
    Synonym(s): wonderfully, wondrous, wondrously, superbly, toppingly, marvellously, terrifically, marvelously
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superbug
n
  1. a strain of bacteria that is resistant to all antibiotics
  2. a strain of pest accidentally imported into Florida from the Middle East then spread to California where it is a very serious pest feeding on almost all vegetable crops and poinsettias
    Synonym(s): superbug, Bemisia tabaci, poinsettia strain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily
n
  1. (biology) a taxonomic group ranking below an order but above a family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Aphidoidea
n
  1. plant lice
    Synonym(s): Aphidoidea, superfamily Aphidoidea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Apoidea
n
  1. bees
    Synonym(s): Apoidea, superfamily Apoidea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Coccoidea
n
  1. scale insects and mealybugs [syn: Coccoidea, {superfamily Coccoidea}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Hominoidea
n
  1. anthropoid apes and human beings [syn: Hominoidea, superfamily Hominoidea]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Lamellicornia
n
  1. scarabaeid beetles and stag beetles [syn: Lamellicornia, superfamily Lamellicornia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Muroidea
n
  1. a superfamily of rodents essentially equal to the suborder Myomorpha but with the Dipodidae excluded
    Synonym(s): Muroidea, superfamily Muroidea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Muscoidea
n
  1. two-winged flies especially the families: Muscidae; Gasterophilidae; Calliphoridae; Tachinidae
    Synonym(s): Muscoidea, superfamily Muscoidea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Platyrrhini
n
  1. New World monkeys: capuchin; douroucouli; howler monkey; saki; spider monkey; squirrel monkey; titi; uakari; woolly monkey; marmoset; tamarin
    Synonym(s): Platyrrhini, superfamily Platyrrhini
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Sphecoidea
n
  1. families Sphecidae and Stizidae [syn: Sphecoidea, superfamily Sphecoidea]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Tineoidea
n
  1. clothes moths; carpet moths; leaf miners [syn: Tineoidea, superfamily Tineoidea]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfamily Tyrannidae
n
  1. New World tyrant flycatchers most numerous in Central America and South America but also in the United States and Canada
    Synonym(s): Tyrannidae, superfamily Tyrannidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfatted
adj
  1. (of soap) containing extra unsaponified fat; "superfatted toilet soaps"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfecta
n
  1. a bet that you can pick the first four finishers in a race in the right order
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfecundation
n
  1. fertilization of two or more ova released during the same menstrual cycle by sperm from separate acts of coitus (especially by different males)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfetate
v
  1. conceive when a fetus is already present in the uterus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfetation
n
  1. fertilization of a second ovum after a pregnancy has begun; results in two fetuses of different ages in the uterus at the same time; "superfetation is normal in some animal species"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficial
adj
  1. concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually; "superficial similarities"; "a superficial mind"; "his thinking was superficial and fuzzy"; "superficial knowledge"; "the superficial report didn't give the true picture"; "only superficial differences"
    Antonym(s): profound
  2. of, affecting, or being on or near the surface; "superficial measurements"; "the superficial area of the wall"; "a superficial wound"
  3. of little substance or significance; "a few superficial editorial changes"; "only trivial objections"
    Synonym(s): superficial, trivial
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficial epigastric vein
n
  1. empties into the great saphenous vein [syn: {superficial epigastric vein}, vena epigastrica superficialis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficial middle cerebral vein
n
  1. a large vein along the line of the Sylvian fissure to the cavernous sinus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficial temporal vein
n
  1. join the middle temporal vein to empty into the retromandibular vein
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficiality
n
  1. lack of depth of knowledge or thought or feeling [syn: superficiality, shallowness]
    Antonym(s): profoundness, profundity
  2. shallowness in terms of affecting only surface layers of something; "he ignored the wound because of its superficiality"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficially
adv
  1. in a superficial manner; "he was superficially interested"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superficies
n
  1. the purely external aspect of a thing; superficial appearance; "the audience was held by the substance of the play rather than by the superficies of the production"-R.W.Speaight
  2. outer surface of an area or a body
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfine
adj
  1. of extremely fine size or texture; "superfine sugar"; "a superfine file"
  2. excessively delicate or refined
    Synonym(s): overrefined, superfine
  3. (used especially of merchandise) very fine in quality; "made of superfine Flemish cloth"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfluity
n
  1. extreme excess; "an embarrassment of riches" [syn: overplus, plethora, superfluity, embarrassment]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfluous
adj
  1. serving no useful purpose; having no excuse for being; "otiose lines in a play"; "advice is wasted words"; "a pointless remark"; "a life essentially purposeless"; "senseless violence"
    Synonym(s): otiose, pointless, purposeless, senseless, superfluous, wasted
  2. more than is needed, desired, or required; "trying to lose excess weight"; "found some extra change lying on the dresser"; "yet another book on heraldry might be thought redundant"; "skills made redundant by technological advance"; "sleeping in the spare room"; "supernumerary ornamentation"; "it was supererogatory of her to gloat"; "delete superfluous (or unnecessary) words"; "extra ribs as well as other supernumerary internal parts"; "surplus cheese distributed to the needy"
    Synonym(s): excess, extra, redundant, spare, supererogatory, superfluous, supernumerary, surplus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superfluously
adv
  1. in a superfluous manner; "superfluously, he added his silly comments to the discussion"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Superfund
n
  1. the federal government's program to locate and investigate and clean up the worst uncontrolled and abandoned toxic waste sites nationwide; administered by the Environmental Protection Agency; "some have intimated that the Superfund's money may have turned into a political slush fund"
    Synonym(s): Superfund program, Superfund
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Superfund program
n
  1. the federal government's program to locate and investigate and clean up the worst uncontrolled and abandoned toxic waste sites nationwide; administered by the Environmental Protection Agency; "some have intimated that the Superfund's money may have turned into a political slush fund"
    Synonym(s): Superfund program, Superfund
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Superfund site
n
  1. a site where toxic wastes have been dumped and the Environmental Protection Agency has designated them to be cleaned up
    Synonym(s): toxic site, toxic waste area, Superfund site
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superpatriotic
adj
  1. fanatically patriotic [syn: chauvinistic, {flag- waving(a)}, jingoistic, nationalistic, ultranationalistic, superpatriotic]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superpatriotism
n
  1. fanatical patriotism [syn: chauvinism, jingoism, superpatriotism, ultranationalism]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superphylum
n
  1. (biology) a taxonomic group ranking between a phylum and below a class or subclass
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superposable
adj
  1. coinciding exactly when superimposed; "identical triangles"
    Synonym(s): identical, superposable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superpose
v
  1. place (one geometric figure) upon another so that their perimeters coincide
  2. place on top of; "can you superimpose the two images?"
    Synonym(s): superimpose, superpose, lay over
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superposition
n
  1. (geology) the deposition of one geological stratum on another
  2. (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
    Synonym(s): principle of superposition, superposition principle, superposition
  3. (geometry) the placement of one object ideally in the position of another one in order to show that the two coincide
  4. the placement of one thing on top of another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superposition principle
n
  1. (geology) the principle that in a series of stratified sedimentary rocks the lowest stratum is the oldest
    Synonym(s): principle of superposition, superposition principle, superposition
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
superpower
n
  1. a state powerful enough to influence events throughout the world
    Synonym(s): world power, major power, great power, power, superpower
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervene
v
  1. take place as an additional or unexpected development
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervene upon
v
  1. take the place or move into the position of; "Smith replaced Miller as CEO after Miller left"; "the computer has supplanted the slide rule"; "Mary replaced Susan as the team's captain and the highest-ranked player in the school"
    Synonym(s): supplant, replace, supersede, supervene upon, supercede
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervention
n
  1. a following on in addition
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervise
v
  1. watch and direct; "Who is overseeing this project?" [syn: oversee, supervise, superintend, manage]
  2. keep tabs on; keep an eye on; keep under surveillance; "we are monitoring the air quality"; "the police monitor the suspect's moves"
    Synonym(s): monitor, supervise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervised
adj
  1. under observation or under the direction of a superintendent or overseer; "supervised play"
    Antonym(s): unsupervised
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervising
n
  1. management by overseeing the performance or operation of a person or group
    Synonym(s): supervision, supervising, superintendence, oversight
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervision
n
  1. management by overseeing the performance or operation of a person or group
    Synonym(s): supervision, supervising, superintendence, oversight
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisor
n
  1. one who supervises or has charge and direction of
  2. a program that controls the execution of other programs
    Synonym(s): supervisory program, supervisor, executive program
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisor call instruction
n
  1. an instruction that interrupts the program being executed and passes control to the supervisor
    Synonym(s): system call, supervisor call instruction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisory
adj
  1. of or limited to or involving supervision; "in a supervisory capacity"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisory program
n
  1. a program that controls the execution of other programs
    Synonym(s): supervisory program, supervisor, executive program
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisory routine
n
  1. a routine that coordinates the operation of subroutines
    Synonym(s): supervisory routine, executive routine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
supervisory software
n
  1. specialized programs that reside permanently in the computer's main memory and control the processing of user's programs
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mykiss \My"kiss\, n. [Russ. muikize, prob. fr. a native name.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A salmon ({Salmo mykiss}, syn. {S. purpuratus}) marked with
      black spots and a red throat, found in most of the rivers
      from Alaska to the Colorado River, and in Siberia; -- called
      also {black-spotted trout}, {cutthroat trout}, and {redthroat
      trout}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saber \Sa"ber\, Sabre \Sa"bre\, n. [F. sabre, G. s[84]bel; of
      uncertain origin; cf. Hung. sz[a0]blya, Pol. szabla, Russ.
      sabla, and L. Gr. zabo`s crooked, curved.]
      A sword with a broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and
      usually more or less curved like a scimiter; a cavalry sword.
  
      {Saber fish}, or {Sabre fish} (Zo[94]l.), the cutlass fish.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cutlass \Cut"lass\ (k[ucr]t"l[ait]s), n.; pl. {Cutlasses}
      (-[ecr]z). [F. coutelas (cf. It. coltellaccio), augm. fr. L.
      cultellus a small knife, dim. of culter knife. See {Colter},
      and cf. {Curtal ax}.]
      A short, heavy, curving sword, used in the navy. See {Curtal
      ax}.
  
      {Cutlass fish}, (Zo[94]l.), a peculiar, long, thin, marine
            fish ({Trichiurus lepturus}) of the southern United States
            and West Indies; -- called also {saber fish}, {silver
            eel}, and, improperly, {swordfish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saber \Sa"ber\, Sabre \Sa"bre\, n. [F. sabre, G. s[84]bel; of
      uncertain origin; cf. Hung. sz[a0]blya, Pol. szabla, Russ.
      sabla, and L. Gr. zabo`s crooked, curved.]
      A sword with a broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and
      usually more or less curved like a scimiter; a cavalry sword.
  
      {Saber fish}, or {Sabre fish} (Zo[94]l.), the cutlass fish.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cutlass \Cut"lass\ (k[ucr]t"l[ait]s), n.; pl. {Cutlasses}
      (-[ecr]z). [F. coutelas (cf. It. coltellaccio), augm. fr. L.
      cultellus a small knife, dim. of culter knife. See {Colter},
      and cf. {Curtal ax}.]
      A short, heavy, curving sword, used in the navy. See {Curtal
      ax}.
  
      {Cutlass fish}, (Zo[94]l.), a peculiar, long, thin, marine
            fish ({Trichiurus lepturus}) of the southern United States
            and West Indies; -- called also {saber fish}, {silver
            eel}, and, improperly, {swordfish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saberbill \Sa"ber*bill`\, Sabrebill \Sa"bre*bill`\, n.
      (Zo[94]l.)
      The curlew.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saber \Sa"ber\, Sabre \Sa"bre\, n. [F. sabre, G. s[84]bel; of
      uncertain origin; cf. Hung. sz[a0]blya, Pol. szabla, Russ.
      sabla, and L. Gr. zabo`s crooked, curved.]
      A sword with a broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and
      usually more or less curved like a scimiter; a cavalry sword.
  
      {Saber fish}, or {Sabre fish} (Zo[94]l.), the cutlass fish.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saberbill \Sa"ber*bill`\, Sabrebill \Sa"bre*bill`\, n.
      (Zo[94]l.)
      The curlew.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saporific \Sap`o*rif"ic\, a. [L. sapor taste + facere to make.]
      Having the power to produce the sensation of taste; producing
      taste, flavor, or relish.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saprophagan \Sa*proph"a*gan\, n. [Gr. sapro`s rotten + fagei^n
      to eat: cf. F. saprophage.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of a tribe of beetles which feed upon decaying animal and
      vegetable substances; a carrion beetle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saprophagous \Sa*proph"a*gous\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Feeding on carrion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saprophyte \Sap"ro*phyte\, n. [Gr. sapro`s rotten + fyto`n a
      plant.] (Bot.)
      Any plant growing on decayed animal or vegetable matter, as
      most fungi and some flowering plants with no green color, as
      the Indian pipe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saprophytic \Sap`ro*phyt"ic\, a.
      Feeding or growing upon decaying animal or vegetable matter;
      pertaining to a saprophyte or the saprophytes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Saprophytism \Sap"ro*phyt*ism\, n.
      State or fact of being saprophytic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reverence \Rev"er*ence\, n. [F. r[82]v[82]rence, L. reverentia.
      See {Reverent}.]
      1. Profound respect and esteem mingled with fear and
            affection, as for a holy being or place; the disposition
            to revere; veneration.
  
                     If thou be poor, farewell thy reverence. --Chaucer.
  
                     Reverence, which is the synthesis of love and fear.
                                                                              --Coleridge.
  
                     When discords, and quarrels, and factions, are
                     carried openly and audaciously, it is a sign the
                     reverence of government islost.         --Bacon.
  
      Note: Formerly, as in Chaucer, reverence denoted
               [bd]respect[b8] [bd]honor[b8], without awe or fear.
  
      2. The act of revering; a token of respect or veneration; an
            obeisance.
  
                     Make twenty reverences upon receiving . . . about
                     twopence.                                          --Goldsmith.
  
                     And each of them doeth all his diligence To do unto
                     the feast reverence.                           --Chaucer.
  
      3. That which deserves or exacts manifestations of reverence;
            reverend character; dignity; state.
  
                     I am forced to lay my reverence by.   --Shak.
  
      4. A person entitled to be revered; -- a title applied to
            priests or other ministers with the pronouns his or your;
            sometimes poetically to a father. --Shak.
  
      {Save your reverence}, {Saving your reverence}, an
            apologetical phrase for an unseemly expression made in the
            presence of a priest or clergyman.
  
      {Sir reverence}, a contracted form of Save your reverence.
  
                     Such a one as a man may not speak of, without he
                     say. [bd]Sir reverence.[b8]               --Shak.
  
      {To do reverence}, to show reverence or honor; to perform an
            act of reverence.
  
                     Now lies he there, And none so poor to do him
                     reverence.                                          --Shak.
  
      Syn: Awe; honor; veneration; adoration; dread.
  
      Usage: {Awe}, {Reverence}, {Dread}, {Veneration}. Reverence
                  is a strong sentiment of respect and esteem, sometimes
                  mingled slightly with fear; as, reverence for the
                  divine law. Awe is a mixed feeling of sublimity and
                  dread in view of something great or terrible, sublime
                  or sacred; as, awe at the divine presence. It does not
                  necessarily imply love. Dread is an anxious fear in
                  view of an impending evil; as, dread of punishment.
                  Veneration is reverence in its strongest
                  manifestations. It is the highest emotion we can
                  exercise toward human beings. Exalted and noble
                  objects produce reverence; terrific and threatening
                  objects awaken dread; a sense of the divine presence
                  fills us with awe; a union of wisdom and virtue in one
                  who is advanced in years inspires us with veneration.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Scupper hose} (Naut.), a pipe of leather, canvas, etc.,
            attached to the mouth of the scuppers, on the outside of a
            vessel, to prevent the water from entering. --Totten.
  
      {Scupper nail} (Naut.), a nail with a very broad head, for
            securing the edge of the hose to the scupper.
  
      {Scupper plug} (Naut.), a plug to stop a scupper. --Totten.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sea brief \Sea" brief`\
      Same as {Sea letter}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Separability \Sep`a*ra*bil"i*ty\, n.
      Quality of being separable or divisible; divisibility;
      separableness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Separable \Sep"a*ra*ble\, a. [L. separabilis: cf. F.
      s[82]parable.]
      Capable of being separated, disjoined, disunited, or divided;
      as, the separable parts of plants; qualities not separable
      from the substance in which they exist. --
      {Sep"a*ra*ble*ness}, n. -- {Sep"a*ra*bly}, adv.
  
               Trials permit me not to doubt of the separableness of a
               yellow tincture from gold.                     --Boyle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Separable \Sep"a*ra*ble\, a. [L. separabilis: cf. F.
      s[82]parable.]
      Capable of being separated, disjoined, disunited, or divided;
      as, the separable parts of plants; qualities not separable
      from the substance in which they exist. --
      {Sep"a*ra*ble*ness}, n. -- {Sep"a*ra*bly}, adv.
  
               Trials permit me not to doubt of the separableness of a
               yellow tincture from gold.                     --Boyle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Separable \Sep"a*ra*ble\, a. [L. separabilis: cf. F.
      s[82]parable.]
      Capable of being separated, disjoined, disunited, or divided;
      as, the separable parts of plants; qualities not separable
      from the substance in which they exist. --
      {Sep"a*ra*ble*ness}, n. -- {Sep"a*ra*bly}, adv.
  
               Trials permit me not to doubt of the separableness of a
               yellow tincture from gold.                     --Boyle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Severable \Sev"er*a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being severed. --Encyc. Dict.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
            A week or so will probably reconcile us.      --Gay.
  
      Note: See the Note under {Ill}, adv.
  
      {So} . . . {as}. So is now commonly used as a demonstrative
            correlative of as when it is the puprpose to emphasize the
            equality or comparison suggested, esp. in negative
            assertions, and questions implying a negative answer. By
            Shakespeare and others so . . . as was much used where as
            . . . as is now common. See the Note under {As}, 1.
  
                     So do, as thou hast said.                  --Gen. xviii.
                                                                              5.
  
                     As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth. --Ps.
                                                                              ciii. 15.
  
                     Had woman been so strong as men.         --Shak.
  
                     No country suffered so much as England. --Macaulay.
  
      {So far}, to that point or extent; in that particular.
            [bd]The song was moral, and so far was right.[b8]
            --Cowper.
  
      {So far forth}, as far; to such a degree. --Shak. --Bacon.
  
      {So forth}, further in the same or similar manner; more of
            the same or a similar kind. See {And so forth}, under
            {And}.
  
      {So, so}, well, well. [bd]So, so, it works; now, mistress,
            sit you fast.[b8] --Dryden. Also, moderately or tolerably
            well; passably; as, he succeeded but so so. [bd]His leg is
            but so so.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {So that}, to the end that; in order that; with the effect or
            result that.
  
      {So then}, thus then it is; therefore; the consequence is.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ferforth \Fer"forth`\, adv.
      Far forth. [Obs.]
  
      {As ferforth as}, as far as.
  
      {So ferforth}, to such a degree.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soporiferous \Sop`o*rif"er*ous\, a. [L. soparifer; sopor a heavy
      sleep + ferere to bring.]
      Causing sleep; somniferous; soporific. [bd]Soporiferous
      medicine.[b8] --Swift. --- {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ly}, adv. --
      {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soporiferous \Sop`o*rif"er*ous\, a. [L. soparifer; sopor a heavy
      sleep + ferere to bring.]
      Causing sleep; somniferous; soporific. [bd]Soporiferous
      medicine.[b8] --Swift. --- {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ly}, adv. --
      {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soporiferous \Sop`o*rif"er*ous\, a. [L. soparifer; sopor a heavy
      sleep + ferere to bring.]
      Causing sleep; somniferous; soporific. [bd]Soporiferous
      medicine.[b8] --Swift. --- {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ly}, adv. --
      {Sop`o*rif"er*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soporific \Sop`o*rif"ic\ (?; 277), a. [L. sopor a heavy sleep
      (akin to somnus sleep) + facere to make. See {Somnolent},
      {Fact}.]
      Causing sleep; tending to cause sleep; soporiferous; as, the
      soporific virtues of opium.
  
      Syn: Somniferous; narcotic; opiate; anodyne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soporific \Sop`o*rif"ic\, n.
      A medicine, drug, plant, or other agent that has the quality
      of inducing sleep; a narcotic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spar \Spar\, n. [OE. sparre; akin to D. spar, G. sparren, OHG.
      sparro, Dan.& Sw. sparre, Icel. sparri; of uncertain origin.
      [?] 171. Cf. {Spar}, v. t. ]
      1. (Naut.) A general term any round piece of timber used as a
            mast, yard, boom, or gaff.
  
      2. (Arch.) Formerly, a piece of timber, in a general sense;
            -- still applied locally to rafters.
  
      3. The bar of a gate or door. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      {Spar buoy} (Naut.), a buoy anchored by one end so that the
            other end rises above the surface of the water.
  
      {Spar deck} (Naut.), the upper deck of a vessel; especially,
            in a frigate, the deck which is continued in a straight
            line from the quarter-deck to the forecastle, and on which
            spare spars are usually placed. See under {Deck}.
  
      {Spar torpedo} (Naut.), a torpedo carried on the end of a
            spar usually projecting from the bow of a vessel, and
            intended to explode upon contact with an enemy's ships.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparable \Spar"a*ble\, n. [Corrupted from sparrow bill.]
      A kind of small nail used by shoemakers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparble \Spar"ble\, v. t. [OF. esparpiller to scatter, F.
      [82]parpiller.]
      To scatter; to disperse; to rout. [Obs.]
  
               The king's host was sparbled and chased. --Fabyan.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spareful \Spare"ful\, a.
      Sparing; chary. [Obs.] --Fairfax. -- {Spare"ful*ness}, n.
      [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spareful \Spare"ful\, a.
      Sparing; chary. [Obs.] --Fairfax. -- {Spare"ful*ness}, n.
      [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparpiece \Spar"piece`\, n. (Arch.)
      The collar beam of a roof; the spanpiece. --Gwilt.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparpoil \Spar"poil\, v. t. [See {Sparble}.]
      To scatter; to spread; to disperse. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparrow \Spar"row\, n. [OE. sparwe, AS. spearwa; akin to OHG.
      sparo, G. sperling, Icel. sp[94]rr, Dan. spurv, spurre, Sw.
      sparf, Goth. sparwa; -- originally, probably, the quiverer or
      flutterer, and akin to E. spurn. See {Spurn}, and cf.
      {Spavin}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) One of many species of small singing birds of
            the family {Fringillig[91]}, having conical bills, and
            feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also
            {finches}, and {buntings}. The common sparrow, or house
            sparrow, of Europe ({Passer domesticus}) is noted for its
            familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young,
            and its fecundity. See {House sparrow}, under {House}.
  
      Note: The following American species are well known; the
               {chipping sparrow}, or {chippy}, the {sage sparrow},
               the {savanna sparrow}, the {song sparrow}, the {tree
               sparrow}, and the {white-throated sparrow} (see
               {Peabody bird}). See these terms under {Sage},
               {Savanna}, etc.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of several small singing birds somewhat
            resembling the true sparrows in form or habits, as the
            European hedge sparrow. See under {Hedge}.
  
                     He that doth the ravens feed, Yea, providently
                     caters for the sparrow, Be comfort to my age!
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Field sparrow}, {Fox sparrow}, etc. See under {Field},
            {Fox}, etc.
  
      {Sparrow bill}, a small nail; a castiron shoe nail; a
            sparable.
  
      {Sparrow hawk}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small European hawk ({Accipiter nisus}) or any of
                  the allied species.
            (b) A small American falcon ({Falco sparverius}).
            (c) The Australian collared sparrow hawk ({Accipiter
                  torquatus}).
  
      Note: The name is applied to other small hawks, as the
               European kestrel and the New Zealand quail hawk.
  
      {Sparrow owl} (Zo[94]l.), a small owl ({Glaucidium
            passerinum}) found both in the Old World and the New. The
            name is also applied to other species of small owls.
  
      {Sparrow spear} (Zo[94]l.), the female of the reed bunting.
            [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sparve \Sparve\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The hedge sparrow. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spear \Spear\, n. [OE. spere, AS. spere; akin to D. & G. speer,
      OS. & OHS. sper, Icel. spj[94]r, pl., Dan. sp[91]r, L.
      sparus.]
      1. A long, pointed weapon, used in war and hunting, by
            thrusting or throwing; a weapon with a long shaft and a
            sharp head or blade; a lance.
  
      Note: [See Illust. of {Spearhead}.] [bd]A sharp ground
               spear.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                        They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and
                        their spears into pruning hooks.   --Micah iv. 3.
  
      2. Fig.: A spearman. --Sir W. Scott.
  
      3. A sharp-pointed instrument with barbs, used for stabbing
            fish and other animals.
  
      4. A shoot, as of grass; a spire.
  
      5. The feather of a horse. See {Feather}, n., 4.
  
      6. The rod to which the bucket, or plunger, of a pump is
            attached; a pump rod.
  
      {Spear foot}, the off hind foot of a horse.
  
      {Spear grass}. (Bot.)
            (a) The common reed. See {Reed}, n., 1.
            (b) meadow grass. See under {Meadow}.
  
      {Spear hand}, the hand in which a horseman holds a spear; the
            right hand. --Crabb.
  
      {Spear side}, the male line of a family. --Lowell.
  
      {Spear thistle} (Bot.), the common thistle ({Cnicus
            lanceolatus}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spearfish \Spear"fish`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A large and powerful fish ({Tetrapturus albidus}) related
            to the swordfish, but having scales and ventral fins. It
            is found on the American coast and the Mediterranean.
      (b) The carp sucker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Quillback \Quill"back`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      An American fresh-water fish ({Ictiobus, [or] Carpiodes,
      cyprinus}); -- called also {carp sucker}, {sailfish},
      {spearfish}, and {skimback}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spearfish \Spear"fish`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A large and powerful fish ({Tetrapturus albidus}) related
            to the swordfish, but having scales and ventral fins. It
            is found on the American coast and the Mediterranean.
      (b) The carp sucker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Quillback \Quill"back`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      An American fresh-water fish ({Ictiobus, [or] Carpiodes,
      cyprinus}); -- called also {carp sucker}, {sailfish},
      {spearfish}, and {skimback}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sperable \Spe"ra*ble\, a. [L. spearabilis, fr. sperare to hope.]
      Within the range of hpe; proper to be hoped for. [Obs.]
      --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sperable \Sper"a*ble\, n.
      See {Sperable}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Micrococcus \[d8]Mi`cro*coc"cus\, n.; pl. {Micrococci}. [NL.
      See {Micro-}, and {Coccus}.] (Biol.)
      A genus of {Spherobacteria}, in the form of very small
      globular or oval cells, forming, by transverse division,
      filaments, or chains of cells, or in some cases single
      organisms shaped like dumb-bells ({Diplococcus}), all without
      the power of motion. See Illust. of {Ascoccus}.
  
      Note: Physiologically, micrococci are divided into three
               groups; chromogenic, characterized by their power of
               forming pigment; zymogenic, including those associated
               with definite chemical processes; and pathogenic, those
               connected with disease.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Spherobacteria \[d8]Sphe`ro*bac*te"ri*a\, n. pl.; sing.
      {Spherobacterium}. [NL. See {Sphere}, {and Bacterium}.]
      (Biol.)
      See the Note under {Microbacteria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spirable \Spi"ra*ble\, a. [L. spirabilis.]
      Capable of being breathed; respirable. [Obs.] --Nash.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spire \Spire\, n. [L. spira coil, twist; akin to Gr. [?][?][?]:
      cf. F. spire.]
      1. A spiral; a curl; a whorl; a twist. --Dryden.
  
      2. (Geom.) The part of a spiral generated in one revolution
            of the straight line about the pole. See {Spiral}, n.
  
      {Spire bearer}. (Paleon.) Same as {Spirifer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spirifer \Spi"ri*fer\, n. [NL., fr. L. spira a coil + ferreto
      bear.] (Paleon.)
      Any one of numerous species of fossil brachipods of the genus
      {Spirifer}, or {Delthyris}, and allied genera, in which the
      long calcareous supports of the arms form a large spiral, or
      helix, on each side.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Spirillum \[d8]Spi*ril"lum\, n. [NL., dim. of L. spira a
      coil.] (Biol.)
      A genus of common motile micro[94]rganisms ({Spirobacteria})
      having the form of spiral-shaped filaments. One species is
      said to be the cause of relapsing fever.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Spirobacteria \[d8]Spi`ro*bac*te"ri*a\, n. pl.; sing.
      {Spirobacterium}. [NL. See 4th {Spire}, and {Bacterium}.]
      (Biol.)
      See the Note under {Microbacteria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spore \Spore\, n. [Gr. [?] a sowing, seed, from [?] to sow. Cf.
      {Sperm}.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) One of the minute grains in flowerless plants, which
                  are analogous to seeds, as serving to reproduce the
                  species.
  
      Note: Spores are produced differently in the different
               classes of cryptogamous plants, and as regards their
               nature are often so unlike that they have only their
               minuteness in common. The peculiar spores of diatoms
               (called auxospores) increase in size, and at length
               acquire a siliceous coating, thus becoming new diatoms
               of full size. Compare {Macrospore}, {Microspore},
               {O[94]spore}, {Restingspore}, {Sph[91]rospore},
               {Swarmspore}, {Tetraspore}, {Zo[94]spore}, and
               {Zygospore}.
            (b) An embryo sac or embryonal vesicle in the ovules of
                  flowering plants.
  
      2. (Biol.)
            (a) A minute grain or germ; a small, round or ovoid body,
                  formed in certain organisms, and by germination giving
                  rise to a new organism; as, the reproductive spores of
                  bacteria, etc.
            (b) One of the parts formed by fission in certain
                  Protozoa. See {Spore formation}, belw.
  
      {Spore formation}.
            (a) (Biol) A mode of reproduction resembling multitude
                  fission, common among Protozoa, in which the organism
                  breaks up into a number of pieces, or spores, each of
                  which eventually develops into an organism like the
                  parent form. --Balfour.
            (b) The formation of reproductive cells or spores, as in
                  the growth of bacilli.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ascocarp \As"co*carp\, n. [Gr. 'asko`s a bladder + karpo`s
      fruit.] (Bot.)
      In ascomycetous fungi, the spherical, discoid, or cup-shaped
      body within which the asci are collected, and which
      constitutes the mature fructification. The different forms
      are known in mycology under distinct names. Called also
      {spore fruit}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporiferous \Spo*rif"er*ous\, a. [Spore + -ferous.] (Biol.)
      Bearing or producing spores.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporification \Spo`ri*fi*ca"tion\, n. [Spore + L. -ficare (in
      comp.) to make. See {-fy}.] (Biol.)
      Spore formation. See {Spore formation}
      (b), under {Spore}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporophore \Spo"ro*phore\, n. [Spore + Gr. [?] to bear.] (Bot.)
      (a) A placenta.
      (b) That alternately produced form of certain cryptogamous
            plants, as ferns, mosses, and the like, which is
            nonsexual, but produces spores in countless numbers. In
            ferns it is the leafy plant, in mosses the capsule. Cf.
            {O[94]phore}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporophoric \Spo`ro*phor"ic\, a. (Bot.)
      Having the nature of a sporophore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporophyte \Spo"ro*phyte\, n. [Spore + Gr. [?] plant.] (Bot.)
      In plants exhibiting alternation of generations, the
      generation which bears asexual spores; -- opposed to
      {gametophyte}. It is not clearly differentiated in the life
      cycle of the lower plants. -- {Spo`ro*phyt"ic}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporophyte \Spo"ro*phyte\, n. [Spore + Gr. [?] plant.] (Bot.)
      In plants exhibiting alternation of generations, the
      generation which bears asexual spores; -- opposed to
      {gametophyte}. It is not clearly differentiated in the life
      cycle of the lower plants. -- {Spo`ro*phyt"ic}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sprayboard \Spray"board`\, n. (Naut.)
      A screen raised above any part of the gunwale of a boat to
      keep out spray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sprayboard \Spray`board\, n. (Naut.)
      See {Dashboard}, n., 2
      (b) .

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dashboard \Dash"board`\ (d[acr]sh"b[omac]rd`), n.
      1. A board placed on the fore part of a carriage, sleigh, or
            other vehicle, to intercept water, mud, or snow, thrown up
            by the heels of the horses; -- in England commonly called
            {splashboard}.
  
      2. (Naut.)
            (a) The float of a paddle wheel.
            (b) A screen at the bow af a steam launch to keep off the
                  spray; -- called also {sprayboard}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sprayboard \Spray"board`\, n. (Naut.)
      A screen raised above any part of the gunwale of a boat to
      keep out spray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sprayboard \Spray`board\, n. (Naut.)
      See {Dashboard}, n., 2
      (b) .

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dashboard \Dash"board`\ (d[acr]sh"b[omac]rd`), n.
      1. A board placed on the fore part of a carriage, sleigh, or
            other vehicle, to intercept water, mud, or snow, thrown up
            by the heels of the horses; -- in England commonly called
            {splashboard}.
  
      2. (Naut.)
            (a) The float of a paddle wheel.
            (b) A screen at the bow af a steam launch to keep off the
                  spray; -- called also {sprayboard}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      2. That which goads to action; an incitement.
  
                     Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise
                     (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn
                     delights and live laborious days.      --Milton.
  
      3. Something that projects; a snag.
  
      4. One of the large or principal roots of a tree. --Shak.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) Any stiff, sharp spine, as on the wings and
            legs of certain burds, on the legs of insects, etc.;
            especially, the spine on a cock's leg.
  
      6. A mountain that shoots from any other mountain, or range
            of mountains, and extends to some distance in a lateral
            direction, or at right angles.
  
      7. A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot,
            to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to
            strip off the blubber.
  
      8. (Carp.) A brace strengthening a post and some connected
            part, as a rafter or crossbeam; a strut.
  
      9. (Arch.)
            (a) The short wooden buttress of a post.
            (b) A projection from the round base of a column,
                  occupying the angle of a square plinth upon which the
                  base rests, or bringing the bottom bed of the base to
                  a nearly square form. It is generally carved in
                  leafage.
  
      10. (Bot.)
            (a) Any projecting appendage of a flower looking like a
                  spur. --Gray.
            (b) Ergotized rye or other grain. [R.]
  
      11. (Fort.) A wall that crosses a part of a rampart and joins
            to an inner wall.
  
      12. (Shipbuilding)
            (a) A piece of timber fixed on the bilge ways before
                  launching, having the upper ends bolted to the
                  vessel's side.
            (b) A curved piece of timber serving as a half to support
                  the deck where a whole beam can not be placed.
  
      {Spur fowl} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Asiatic
            gallinaceous birds of the genus {Galloperdix}, allied to
            the jungle fowl. The males have two or more spurs on each
            leg.
  
      {Spur gear} (Mach.), a cogwheel having teeth which project
            radially and stand parallel to the axis; a spur wheel.
  
      {Spur gearing}, gearing in which spur gears are used. See
            under {Gearing}.
  
      {Spur pepper}. (Bot.) See the Note under {Capsicum}.
  
      {Spur wheel}. Same as {Spur gear}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      2. That which goads to action; an incitement.
  
                     Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise
                     (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn
                     delights and live laborious days.      --Milton.
  
      3. Something that projects; a snag.
  
      4. One of the large or principal roots of a tree. --Shak.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) Any stiff, sharp spine, as on the wings and
            legs of certain burds, on the legs of insects, etc.;
            especially, the spine on a cock's leg.
  
      6. A mountain that shoots from any other mountain, or range
            of mountains, and extends to some distance in a lateral
            direction, or at right angles.
  
      7. A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot,
            to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to
            strip off the blubber.
  
      8. (Carp.) A brace strengthening a post and some connected
            part, as a rafter or crossbeam; a strut.
  
      9. (Arch.)
            (a) The short wooden buttress of a post.
            (b) A projection from the round base of a column,
                  occupying the angle of a square plinth upon which the
                  base rests, or bringing the bottom bed of the base to
                  a nearly square form. It is generally carved in
                  leafage.
  
      10. (Bot.)
            (a) Any projecting appendage of a flower looking like a
                  spur. --Gray.
            (b) Ergotized rye or other grain. [R.]
  
      11. (Fort.) A wall that crosses a part of a rampart and joins
            to an inner wall.
  
      12. (Shipbuilding)
            (a) A piece of timber fixed on the bilge ways before
                  launching, having the upper ends bolted to the
                  vessel's side.
            (b) A curved piece of timber serving as a half to support
                  the deck where a whole beam can not be placed.
  
      {Spur fowl} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Asiatic
            gallinaceous birds of the genus {Galloperdix}, allied to
            the jungle fowl. The males have two or more spurs on each
            leg.
  
      {Spur gear} (Mach.), a cogwheel having teeth which project
            radially and stand parallel to the axis; a spur wheel.
  
      {Spur gearing}, gearing in which spur gears are used. See
            under {Gearing}.
  
      {Spur pepper}. (Bot.) See the Note under {Capsicum}.
  
      {Spur wheel}. Same as {Spur gear}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suborbicular \Sub`or*bic"u*lar\, Suborbiculate
   \Sub`or*bic"u*late\, a.
      Almost orbiculate or orbicular.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suborbicular \Sub`or*bic"u*lar\, Suborbiculate
   \Sub`or*bic"u*late\, a.
      Almost orbiculate or orbicular.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suborbital \Sub*or"bit*al\, Suborbitar \Sub*or"bit*ar\, a.
      (Anat.)
      Situated under or below the orbit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suborbital \Sub*or"bit*al\, Suborbitar \Sub*or"bit*ar\, a.
      (Anat.)
      Situated under or below the orbit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Subpyriform \Sub*pyr"i*form\, a.
      Somewhat pyriform.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Subreption \Sub*rep"tion\, n. [L. subreptio, fr. subripere,
      subreptum, to snatch or take away secretly: cf. F.
      subreption. See {Surreptitious}.]
      The act of obtaining a favor by surprise, or by unfair
      representation through suppression or fraudulent concealment
      of facts. --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Subreptitious \Sub`rep*ti"tious\, a. [L. subreptitius. See
      {Surreptitious}.]
      Surreptitious. [Obs.] -- {Sub`rep*ti"tious*ly}, adv. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Subreptitious \Sub`rep*ti"tious\, a. [L. subreptitius. See
      {Surreptitious}.]
      Surreptitious. [Obs.] -- {Sub`rep*ti"tious*ly}, adv. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Subreptive \Sub*rep"tive\, a. [L. subreptivus.]
      Surreptitious. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburb \Sub"urb\, n. [L. suburbium; sub under, below, near +
      urbs a city. See {Urban}.]
      1. An outlying part of a city or town; a smaller place
            immediately adjacent to a city; in the plural, the region
            which is on the confines of any city or large town; as, a
            house stands in the suburbs; a garden situated in the
            suburbs of Paris. [bd]In the suburbs of a town.[b8]
            --Chaucer.
  
                     [London] could hardly have contained less than
                     thirty or forty thousand souls within its walls; and
                     the suburbs were very populous.         --Hallam.
  
      2. Hence, the confines; the outer part; the environment.
            [bd]The suburbs . . . of sorrow.[b8] --Jer. Taylor.
  
                     The suburb of their straw-built citadel. --Milton.
  
      {Suburb roister}, a rowdy; a loafer. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburb \Sub"urb\, n. [L. suburbium; sub under, below, near +
      urbs a city. See {Urban}.]
      1. An outlying part of a city or town; a smaller place
            immediately adjacent to a city; in the plural, the region
            which is on the confines of any city or large town; as, a
            house stands in the suburbs; a garden situated in the
            suburbs of Paris. [bd]In the suburbs of a town.[b8]
            --Chaucer.
  
                     [London] could hardly have contained less than
                     thirty or forty thousand souls within its walls; and
                     the suburbs were very populous.         --Hallam.
  
      2. Hence, the confines; the outer part; the environment.
            [bd]The suburbs . . . of sorrow.[b8] --Jer. Taylor.
  
                     The suburb of their straw-built citadel. --Milton.
  
      {Suburb roister}, a rowdy; a loafer. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburban \Sub*ur"ban\, a. [L. suburbanus.]
      Of or pertaining to suburbs; inhabiting, or being in, the
      suburbs of a city. [bd]Suburban taverns.[b8] --Longfellow.
  
               Suburban villas, highway-side retreats, . . . Delight
               the citizen.                                          --Cowper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburban \Sub*ur"ban\, n.
      One who dwells in the suburbs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburbed \Sub"urbed\, a.
      Having a suburb or suburbs on its outer part.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburbial \Sub*ur"bi*al\, Suburbian \Sub*ur"bi*an\, a.
      Suburban. [Obs.] [bd]Suburbial fields.[b8] --Warton.
      [bd]Suburbian muse.[b8] --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburbial \Sub*ur"bi*al\, Suburbian \Sub*ur"bi*an\, a.
      Suburban. [Obs.] [bd]Suburbial fields.[b8] --Warton.
      [bd]Suburbian muse.[b8] --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburbicarian \Sub*ur`bi*ca"ri*an\, Suburbicary
   \Sub*ur"bi*ca*ry\, a. [LL. suburbicarius, equiv. to L.
      suburbanus: cf. F. suburbicaire. See {Suburban}.]
      Being in the suburbs; -- applied to the six dioceses in the
      suburbs of Rome subject to the pope as bishop of Rome.
  
               The pope having stretched his authority beyond the
               bounds of his suburbicarian precincts.   --Barrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suburbicarian \Sub*ur`bi*ca"ri*an\, Suburbicary
   \Sub*ur"bi*ca*ry\, a. [LL. suburbicarius, equiv. to L.
      suburbanus: cf. F. suburbicaire. See {Suburban}.]
      Being in the suburbs; -- applied to the six dioceses in the
      suburbs of Rome subject to the pope as bishop of Rome.
  
               The pope having stretched his authority beyond the
               bounds of his suburbicarian precincts.   --Barrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sufferable \Suf"fer*a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. souffrable.]
      1. Able to suffer or endure; patient. [Obs.] [bd]Ye must be
            sufferable.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      2. That may be suffered, tolerated, or permitted; allowable;
            tolerable. -- {Suf"fer*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Suf"fer*a*bly},
            adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sufferable \Suf"fer*a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. souffrable.]
      1. Able to suffer or endure; patient. [Obs.] [bd]Ye must be
            sufferable.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      2. That may be suffered, tolerated, or permitted; allowable;
            tolerable. -- {Suf"fer*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Suf"fer*a*bly},
            adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sufferable \Suf"fer*a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. souffrable.]
      1. Able to suffer or endure; patient. [Obs.] [bd]Ye must be
            sufferable.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      2. That may be suffered, tolerated, or permitted; allowable;
            tolerable. -- {Suf"fer*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Suf"fer*a*bly},
            adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superable \Su"per*a*ble\, a. [L. superabilis, from superare to
      go over, to surmount, fr. super above, over.]
      Capable of being overcome or conquered; surmountable.
  
               Antipathies are generally superable by a single effort.
                                                                              --Johnson.
      -- {Su"per*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Su"per*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superable \Su"per*a*ble\, a. [L. superabilis, from superare to
      go over, to surmount, fr. super above, over.]
      Capable of being overcome or conquered; surmountable.
  
               Antipathies are generally superable by a single effort.
                                                                              --Johnson.
      -- {Su"per*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Su"per*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superable \Su"per*a*ble\, a. [L. superabilis, from superare to
      go over, to surmount, fr. super above, over.]
      Capable of being overcome or conquered; surmountable.
  
               Antipathies are generally superable by a single effort.
                                                                              --Johnson.
      -- {Su"per*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Su"per*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superabound \Su`per*a*bound"\, v. i. [L. superabundare: cf. OF.
      superabonder. See {Super-}, and {Abound}.]
      To be very abundant or exuberant; to be more than sufficient;
      as, the country superabounds with corn.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superabundance \Su`per*a*bun"dance\, n. [L. superabundantia: cf.
      OF. superabondance.]
      The quality or state of being superabundant; a superabundant
      quantity; redundancy; excess.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superabundant \Su`per*a*bun"dant\, a. [L. superabundans, p. pr.
      of superabundare. See {Superabound}.]
      Abounding to excess; being more than is sufficient;
      redundant; as, superabundant zeal. -- {Su`per*a*bun"dant*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superabundant \Su`per*a*bun"dant\, a. [L. superabundans, p. pr.
      of superabundare. See {Superabound}.]
      Abounding to excess; being more than is sufficient;
      redundant; as, superabundant zeal. -- {Su`per*a*bun"dant*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superb \Su*perb"\, a. [F. superbe, L. superbus, fr. super over.
      See {Super-}.]
      1. Grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice;
            a superb colonnade.
  
      2. Rich; elegant; as, superb furniture or decorations.
  
      3. Showy; excellent; grand; as, a superb exhibition.
  
      {Superb paradise bird} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of paradise
            ({Paradis[91]a, [or] Lophorina, superba}) having the
            scapulars erectile, and forming a large ornamental tuft on
            each shoulder, and a large gorget of brilliant feathers on
            the breast. The color is deep violet, or nearly black,
            with brilliant green reflections. The gorget is bright
            metallic green.
  
      {Superb warber}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blue wren}, under {Wren}. --
            {Su*perb"ly}, adv. -- {Su*perb"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superb \Su*perb"\, a. [F. superbe, L. superbus, fr. super over.
      See {Super-}.]
      1. Grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice;
            a superb colonnade.
  
      2. Rich; elegant; as, superb furniture or decorations.
  
      3. Showy; excellent; grand; as, a superb exhibition.
  
      {Superb paradise bird} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of paradise
            ({Paradis[91]a, [or] Lophorina, superba}) having the
            scapulars erectile, and forming a large ornamental tuft on
            each shoulder, and a large gorget of brilliant feathers on
            the breast. The color is deep violet, or nearly black,
            with brilliant green reflections. The gorget is bright
            metallic green.
  
      {Superb warber}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blue wren}, under {Wren}. --
            {Su*perb"ly}, adv. -- {Su*perb"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superb \Su*perb"\, a. [F. superbe, L. superbus, fr. super over.
      See {Super-}.]
      1. Grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice;
            a superb colonnade.
  
      2. Rich; elegant; as, superb furniture or decorations.
  
      3. Showy; excellent; grand; as, a superb exhibition.
  
      {Superb paradise bird} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of paradise
            ({Paradis[91]a, [or] Lophorina, superba}) having the
            scapulars erectile, and forming a large ornamental tuft on
            each shoulder, and a large gorget of brilliant feathers on
            the breast. The color is deep violet, or nearly black,
            with brilliant green reflections. The gorget is bright
            metallic green.
  
      {Superb warber}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blue wren}, under {Wren}. --
            {Su*perb"ly}, adv. -- {Su*perb"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wren \Wren\ (r[ecr]n), n. [OE. wrenne, AS. wrenna, wr[91]nna,
      perhaps akin to wr[aemac]ne lascivious.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of small singing
            birds belonging to {Troglodytes} and numerous allied of
            the family {Troglodytid[91]}.
  
      Note: Among the species best known are the house wren
               ({Troglodytes a[89]don}) common in both Europe and
               America, and the American winter wren ({T. hiemalis}).
               See also {Cactus wren}, {Marsh wren}, and {Rock wren},
               under {Cactus}, {Marsh}, and {Rock}.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of small singing
            birds more or less resembling the true wrens in size and
            habits.
  
      Note: Among these are several species of European warblers;
               as, the reed wren (see {Reed warbler}
            (a), under {Reed}), the sedge wren (see {Sedge warbler},
                  under {Sedge}), the willow wren (see {Willow warbler},
                  under {Willow}), the golden-crested wren, and the
                  ruby-crowned wren (see {Kinglet}).
  
      {Ant wren}, any one of numerous South American birds of the
            family {Formicarid[91]}, allied to the ant thrushes.
  
      {Blue wren}, a small Australian singing bird ({Malurus
            cyaneus}), the male of which in the breeding season is
            bright blue. Called also {superb warbler}.
  
      {Emu wren}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Wren babbler}, any one of numerous species of small timaline
            birds belonging to {Alcippe}, {Stachyris}, {Timalia}, and
            several allied genera. These birds are common in Southern
            Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Wren tit}. See {Ground wren}, under {Ground}.
  
      {Wren warbler}, any one of several species of small Asiatic
            and African singing birds belonging to {Prinia} and allied
            genera. These birds are closely allied to the tailor
            birds, and build their nests in a similar manner. See also
            {Pincpinc}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superbiate \Su*per"bi*ate\, v. t. [Cf. L. superbiare.]
      To make (a person) haughty. [Obs. & R.] --Feltham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superb \Su*perb"\, a. [F. superbe, L. superbus, fr. super over.
      See {Super-}.]
      1. Grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice;
            a superb colonnade.
  
      2. Rich; elegant; as, superb furniture or decorations.
  
      3. Showy; excellent; grand; as, a superb exhibition.
  
      {Superb paradise bird} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of paradise
            ({Paradis[91]a, [or] Lophorina, superba}) having the
            scapulars erectile, and forming a large ornamental tuft on
            each shoulder, and a large gorget of brilliant feathers on
            the breast. The color is deep violet, or nearly black,
            with brilliant green reflections. The gorget is bright
            metallic green.
  
      {Superb warber}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blue wren}, under {Wren}. --
            {Su*perb"ly}, adv. -- {Su*perb"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superb \Su*perb"\, a. [F. superbe, L. superbus, fr. super over.
      See {Super-}.]
      1. Grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice;
            a superb colonnade.
  
      2. Rich; elegant; as, superb furniture or decorations.
  
      3. Showy; excellent; grand; as, a superb exhibition.
  
      {Superb paradise bird} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of paradise
            ({Paradis[91]a, [or] Lophorina, superba}) having the
            scapulars erectile, and forming a large ornamental tuft on
            each shoulder, and a large gorget of brilliant feathers on
            the breast. The color is deep violet, or nearly black,
            with brilliant green reflections. The gorget is bright
            metallic green.
  
      {Superb warber}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blue wren}, under {Wren}. --
            {Su*perb"ly}, adv. -- {Su*perb"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfamily \Su"per*fam`i*ly\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A group intermediate between a family and a suborder.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfd2tation \Su`per*f[d2]*ta"tion\, n.
      Superfetation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfecundation \Su`per*fec`un*da"tion\, n. (Physiol.)
      Fertilization of two ova, at the same menstruation, by two
      different acts of coition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfecundity \Su`per*fe*cun"di*ty\, n.
      Superabundant fecundity or multiplication of the species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfetate \Su`per*fe"tate\, v. i. [L. superfetare; super
      above, over + fetare to bring forth.]
      To conceive after a prior conception, but before the birth of
      the offspring.
  
               The female . . . is said to superfetate. --Grew.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfetation \Su`per*fe*ta"tion\, n. [Cf. F. superf[82]tation.]
      (Physiol.)
      The formation of a fetus at the result of an impregnation
      occurring after another impregnation but before the birth of
      the offspring produced by it. This is possible only when
      there is a double uterus, or where menstruation persists up
      to the time of the second impregnation.
  
               In then became a superfetation upon, and not an
               ingredient in, the national character.   --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfete \Su`per*fete"\, v. i.
      To superfetate. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfete \Su`per*fete"\, v. t.
      To conceive (another fetus) after a former conception. [Obs.]
      --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfice \Su"per*fice\, n.
      A superficies. [Obs.] --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficial \Su`per*fi"cial\, a. [L. superficialis: cf. F.
      superficiel. See {Superficies}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the superficies, or surface; lying on
            the surface; shallow; not deep; as, a superficial color; a
            superficial covering; superficial measure or contents;
            superficial tillage.
  
      2. Reaching or comprehending only what is obvious or
            apparent; not deep or profound; shallow; -- said
            especially in respect to study, learning, and the like;
            as, a superficial scholar; superficial knowledge.
  
                     This superficial tale Is but a preface of her worthy
                     praise.                                             --Shak.
  
                     He is a presumptuous and superficial writer.
                                                                              --Burke.
  
                     That superficial judgment, which happens to be right
                     without deserving to be so.               --J. H.
                                                                              Newman.
            -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ly}, adv. -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficialist \Su`per*fi"cial*ist\, n.
      One who attends to anything superficially; a superficial or
      shallow person; a sciolist; a smatterer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficiality \Su`per*fi`ci*al"i*ty\, n. [Cf. F.
      superficialit[82].]
      The quality or state of being superficial; also, that which
      is superficial. --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficialize \Su`per*fi"cial*ize\, v. t.
      To attend to, or to treat, superficially, or in a shallow or
      slighting way. [R.]
  
               It is a characteristic weakness of the day to
               superficialize evil.                              --E. P.
                                                                              Whipple.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficial \Su`per*fi"cial\, a. [L. superficialis: cf. F.
      superficiel. See {Superficies}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the superficies, or surface; lying on
            the surface; shallow; not deep; as, a superficial color; a
            superficial covering; superficial measure or contents;
            superficial tillage.
  
      2. Reaching or comprehending only what is obvious or
            apparent; not deep or profound; shallow; -- said
            especially in respect to study, learning, and the like;
            as, a superficial scholar; superficial knowledge.
  
                     This superficial tale Is but a preface of her worthy
                     praise.                                             --Shak.
  
                     He is a presumptuous and superficial writer.
                                                                              --Burke.
  
                     That superficial judgment, which happens to be right
                     without deserving to be so.               --J. H.
                                                                              Newman.
            -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ly}, adv. -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficial \Su`per*fi"cial\, a. [L. superficialis: cf. F.
      superficiel. See {Superficies}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the superficies, or surface; lying on
            the surface; shallow; not deep; as, a superficial color; a
            superficial covering; superficial measure or contents;
            superficial tillage.
  
      2. Reaching or comprehending only what is obvious or
            apparent; not deep or profound; shallow; -- said
            especially in respect to study, learning, and the like;
            as, a superficial scholar; superficial knowledge.
  
                     This superficial tale Is but a preface of her worthy
                     praise.                                             --Shak.
  
                     He is a presumptuous and superficial writer.
                                                                              --Burke.
  
                     That superficial judgment, which happens to be right
                     without deserving to be so.               --J. H.
                                                                              Newman.
            -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ly}, adv. -- {Su`per*fi"cial*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficiary \Su`per*fi"ci*a*ry\, n. (Rom. Law)
      One to whom a right of surface occupation is granted; one who
      pays quitrent for a house built upon another man's ground.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficiary \Su`per*fi"ci*a*ry\, a.
      1. Of or pertaining to the superficies, or surface;
            superficial.
  
      2. (Rom. Law) Situated or built on another man's land, as a
            house.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superficies \Su`per*fi"cies\, n. [L., fr. super above, over +
      facies make, figure, shape. See {Surface}.]
      1. The surface; the exterior part, superficial area, or face
            of a thing.
  
      2. (Civil Law)
            (a) Everything on the surface of a piece of ground, or of
                  a building, so closely connected by art or nature as
                  to constitute a part of it, as houses, or other
                  superstructures, fences, trees, vines, etc.
            (b) A real right consisting of a grant by a landed
                  proprietor of a piece of ground, bearing a strong
                  resemblance to the long building leases granted by
                  landholders in England, in consideration of a rent,
                  and under reservation of the ownership of the soil.
                  --Bouvier. Wharton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfine \Su"per*fine\, a.
      1. Very fine, or most fine; being of surpassing fineness; of
            extra nice or fine quality; as, superfine cloth.
  
      2. Excessively fine; too nice; over particular; as, superfine
            distinctions; superfine tastes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfineness \Su"per*fine`ness\, n.
      The state of being superfine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfinical \Su`per*fin"i*cal\, a.
      Extremely finical.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluence \Su*per"flu*ence\, n. [L. superfluens, p. pr. of
      superfluere to flow or run over. See {Superfluous}.]
      Superfluity. [Obs.] --Hammond.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluitant \Su`per*flu"i*tant\, a. [L. super above +
      fluitans, p. pr. of fluitare intensive fr. fluere to flow.]
      Floating above or on the surface. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne. --
      {Su`per*flu"i*tance}, n. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluitant \Su`per*flu"i*tant\, a. [L. super above +
      fluitans, p. pr. of fluitare intensive fr. fluere to flow.]
      Floating above or on the surface. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne. --
      {Su`per*flu"i*tance}, n. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluity \Su`per*flu"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Superfluities}. [L.
      superfluit[82], L. superfluitas. See {Superfluous}.]
      1. A greater quantity than is wanted; superabundance; as, a
            superfluity of water; a superfluity of wealth.
  
                     A quiet mediocrity is still to be preferred before a
                     troubled superfluity.                        --Suckling.
  
      2. The state or quality of being superfluous; excess. [bd]By
            a superfluity abominable.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      3. Something beyond what is needed; something which serves
            for show or luxury.
  
      Syn: Superabundance; excess; redundancy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluity \Su`per*flu"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Superfluities}. [L.
      superfluit[82], L. superfluitas. See {Superfluous}.]
      1. A greater quantity than is wanted; superabundance; as, a
            superfluity of water; a superfluity of wealth.
  
                     A quiet mediocrity is still to be preferred before a
                     troubled superfluity.                        --Suckling.
  
      2. The state or quality of being superfluous; excess. [bd]By
            a superfluity abominable.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      3. Something beyond what is needed; something which serves
            for show or luxury.
  
      Syn: Superabundance; excess; redundancy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluous \Su*per"flu*ous\, a. [L. superfluus overflowing;
      super over, above + fluere to flow. See {Super-}, and
      {Fluent}.]
      More than is wanted or is sufficient; rendered unnecessary by
      superabundance; unnecessary; useless; excessive; as, a
      superfluous price. --Shak.
  
               An authority which makes all further argument or
               illustration superfluous.                        --E. Everett.
  
      {Superfluous interval} (Mus.), an interval that exceeds a
            major or perfect interval by a semitone.
  
      Syn: Unnecessary; useless; exuberant; excessive; redundant;
               needless. -- {Su*per"flu*ous*ly}, adv. --
               {Su*per"flu*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluous \Su*per"flu*ous\, a. [L. superfluus overflowing;
      super over, above + fluere to flow. See {Super-}, and
      {Fluent}.]
      More than is wanted or is sufficient; rendered unnecessary by
      superabundance; unnecessary; useless; excessive; as, a
      superfluous price. --Shak.
  
               An authority which makes all further argument or
               illustration superfluous.                        --E. Everett.
  
      {Superfluous interval} (Mus.), an interval that exceeds a
            major or perfect interval by a semitone.
  
      Syn: Unnecessary; useless; exuberant; excessive; redundant;
               needless. -- {Su*per"flu*ous*ly}, adv. --
               {Su*per"flu*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluous \Su*per"flu*ous\, a. [L. superfluus overflowing;
      super over, above + fluere to flow. See {Super-}, and
      {Fluent}.]
      More than is wanted or is sufficient; rendered unnecessary by
      superabundance; unnecessary; useless; excessive; as, a
      superfluous price. --Shak.
  
               An authority which makes all further argument or
               illustration superfluous.                        --E. Everett.
  
      {Superfluous interval} (Mus.), an interval that exceeds a
            major or perfect interval by a semitone.
  
      Syn: Unnecessary; useless; exuberant; excessive; redundant;
               needless. -- {Su*per"flu*ous*ly}, adv. --
               {Su*per"flu*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfluous \Su*per"flu*ous\, a. [L. superfluus overflowing;
      super over, above + fluere to flow. See {Super-}, and
      {Fluent}.]
      More than is wanted or is sufficient; rendered unnecessary by
      superabundance; unnecessary; useless; excessive; as, a
      superfluous price. --Shak.
  
               An authority which makes all further argument or
               illustration superfluous.                        --E. Everett.
  
      {Superfluous interval} (Mus.), an interval that exceeds a
            major or perfect interval by a semitone.
  
      Syn: Unnecessary; useless; exuberant; excessive; redundant;
               needless. -- {Su*per"flu*ous*ly}, adv. --
               {Su*per"flu*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superflux \Su"per*flux\, n.
      Superabundance; superfluity; an overflowing. [R.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfoliation \Su`per*fo`li*a"tion\, n.
      Excess of foliation. --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfrontal \Su`per*fron"tal\, n. (Eccl.)
      A cloth which is placed over the top of an altar, and often
      hangs down a few inches over the frontal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superfuse \Su`per*fuse"\, a.
      To pour (something) over or on something else. [Obs.]
      --Evelyn.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superhive \Su"per*hive`\, n.
      A removable upper part of a hive. The word is sometimes
      contracted to super.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superparticular \Su`per*par*tic"u*lar\, a. [L.
      superparticularis. See {Super-}, and {Particular}.] (Math.)
      Of or pertaining to a ratio when the excess of the greater
      term over the less is a unit, as the ratio of 1 to 2, or of 3
      to 4. [Obs.] --Hutton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpartient \Su`per*par"tient\, a. [L. superpartiens; super
      over + partiens, p. pr. of partire to divide.] (Math.)
      Of or pertaining to a ratio when the excess of the greater
      term over the less is more than a unit, as that of 3 to 5, or
      7 to 10. [Obs.] --Hutton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superphosphate \Su`per*phos"phate\, n. (Chem.)
      An acid phosphate.
  
      {Superphosphate of lime} (Com. Chem.), a fertilizer obtained
            by trating bone dust, bone black, or phosphorite with
            sulphuric acid, whereby the insoluble neutral calcium
            phosphate, {Ca3(PO4)2}, is changed to the primary or acid
            calcium phosphate {Ca(H2PO4)2}, which is soluble and
            therefore available for the soil.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superphosphate \Su`per*phos"phate\, n. (Chem.)
      An acid phosphate.
  
      {Superphosphate of lime} (Com. Chem.), a fertilizer obtained
            by trating bone dust, bone black, or phosphorite with
            sulphuric acid, whereby the insoluble neutral calcium
            phosphate, {Ca3(PO4)2}, is changed to the primary or acid
            calcium phosphate {Ca(H2PO4)2}, which is soluble and
            therefore available for the soil.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superphysical \Su`per*phys"ic*al\, a.
      Above or beyond physics; not explainable by physical laws.
  
               Something superphysical and superchemical. --J. Le
                                                                              Conte.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superplant \Su"per*plant`\, n.
      A plant growing on another, as the mistletoe; an epiphyte.
      [Obs.] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superplease \Su`per*please"\, v. t.
      To please exceedingly. [Obs.] --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superplus \Su"per*plus\, n. [Pref. super- + L. plus more. See
      {Surplus}.]
      Surplus. [Obs.] --Goldsmith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superplusage \Su"per*plus`age\, n.
      Surplusage. [Obs.] [bd]There yet remained a superplusage.[b8]
      --Bp. Fell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpolitic \Su`per*pol"i*tic\, a.
      More than politic; above or exceeding policy. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superponderate \Su`per*pon"der*ate\, v. t.
      To wiegh over and above. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superposable \Su`per*pos"a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being superposed, as one figure upon another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpose \Su`per*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Superposing}.] [F. superposer. See {Super-},
      and {Pose}.]
      1. To lay upon, as one kind of rock on another.
  
      2. (Geom.) To lay (a figure) upon another in such a manner
            that all the parts of the one coincide with the parts of
            the other; as, to superpose one plane figure on another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpose \Su`per*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Superposing}.] [F. superposer. See {Super-},
      and {Pose}.]
      1. To lay upon, as one kind of rock on another.
  
      2. (Geom.) To lay (a figure) upon another in such a manner
            that all the parts of the one coincide with the parts of
            the other; as, to superpose one plane figure on another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpose \Su`per*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Superposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Superposing}.] [F. superposer. See {Super-},
      and {Pose}.]
      1. To lay upon, as one kind of rock on another.
  
      2. (Geom.) To lay (a figure) upon another in such a manner
            that all the parts of the one coincide with the parts of
            the other; as, to superpose one plane figure on another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superposition \Su`per*po*si"tion\, n. [Cf. F. superposition. See
      {Super-}, and {Position}.]
      The act of superposing, or the state of being superposed; as,
      the superposition of rocks; the superposition of one plane
      figure on another, in geometry.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpraise \Su`per*praise"\, v. t.
      To praise to excess.
  
               To vow, and swear, and superpraise my parts. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superproportion \Su`per*pro*por"tion\, n.
      Overplus or excess of proportion. --Sir K. Digby.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superpurgation \Su`per*pur*ga"tion\, n.
      Excessive purgation. --Wiseman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Superreflection \Su`per*re*flec"tion\, n.
      The reflection of a reflected image or sound. [R.] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervacaneous \Su`per*va*ca"ne*ous\, a. [L. supervacaneus,
      supervacuus; super over + vacuus empty.]
      Serving no purpose; superfluous; needless. [Obs.] --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervene \Su`per*vene"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Supervened}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervening}.] [L. supervenire, superventum, to
      come over, to come upon; super over + venire to come. See
      {Super-}, and {Come}, and cf. {Overcome}.]
      To come as something additional or extraneous; to occur with
      reference or relation to something else; to happen upon or
      after something else; to be added; to take place; to happen.
  
               Such a mutual gravitation can never supervene to matter
               unless impressed by divine power.            --Bentley.
  
               A tyrany immediately supervened.            --Burke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervene \Su`per*vene"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Supervened}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervening}.] [L. supervenire, superventum, to
      come over, to come upon; super over + venire to come. See
      {Super-}, and {Come}, and cf. {Overcome}.]
      To come as something additional or extraneous; to occur with
      reference or relation to something else; to happen upon or
      after something else; to be added; to take place; to happen.
  
               Such a mutual gravitation can never supervene to matter
               unless impressed by divine power.            --Bentley.
  
               A tyrany immediately supervened.            --Burke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervenient \Su`per*ven"ient\, a. [L. superveniens, p. pr.]
      Coming as something additional or extraneous; coming
      afterwards.
  
               That branch of belief was in him supervenient to
               Christian practice.                                 --Hammond.
  
               Divorces can be granted, a mensa et toro, only for
               supervenient causes.                              --Z. Swift.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervene \Su`per*vene"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Supervened}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervening}.] [L. supervenire, superventum, to
      come over, to come upon; super over + venire to come. See
      {Super-}, and {Come}, and cf. {Overcome}.]
      To come as something additional or extraneous; to occur with
      reference or relation to something else; to happen upon or
      after something else; to be added; to take place; to happen.
  
               Such a mutual gravitation can never supervene to matter
               unless impressed by divine power.            --Bentley.
  
               A tyrany immediately supervened.            --Burke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervention \Su`per*ven"tion\, n. [L. superventio.]
      The act of supervening. --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervisal \Su`per*vis"al\, n.
      Supervision. --Walpole.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervise \Su`per*vise"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Supervised}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervising}.] [Pref. super- + L. visere to
      look at attentively, to view, surely, intens. from videre,
      visum, to see. Cf. {Survise}, and {Survey}.]
      1. To oversee for direction; to superintend; to inspect with
            authority; as, to supervise the construction of a steam
            engine, or the printing of a book.
  
      2. To look over so as to read; to peruse. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      Syn: See {Superintend}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervise \Su`per*vise"\, n.
      Supervision; inspection. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervise \Su`per*vise"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Supervised}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervising}.] [Pref. super- + L. visere to
      look at attentively, to view, surely, intens. from videre,
      visum, to see. Cf. {Survise}, and {Survey}.]
      1. To oversee for direction; to superintend; to inspect with
            authority; as, to supervise the construction of a steam
            engine, or the printing of a book.
  
      2. To look over so as to read; to peruse. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      Syn: See {Superintend}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervise \Su`per*vise"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Supervised}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Supervising}.] [Pref. super- + L. visere to
      look at attentively, to view, surely, intens. from videre,
      visum, to see. Cf. {Survise}, and {Survey}.]
      1. To oversee for direction; to superintend; to inspect with
            authority; as, to supervise the construction of a steam
            engine, or the printing of a book.
  
      2. To look over so as to read; to peruse. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      Syn: See {Superintend}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervision \Su`per*vi"sion\, n.
      The act of overseeing; inspection; superintendence;
      oversight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervisive \Su`per*vi"sive\, a.
      Supervisory. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervisor \Su`per*vis"or\, n.
      1. One who supervises; an overseer; an inspector; a
            superintendent; as, a supervisor of schools.
  
      2. A spectator; a looker-on. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervisory \Su`per*vi"so*ry\, a.
      Of or pertaining to supervision; as, supervisory powers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervive \Su`per*vive"\, v. t. [L. supervivere. See {Survive}.]
      To survive; to outlive. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supervolute \Su`per*vo*lute"\, a. [L. supervolutus, p. p. of
      supervolvere to roll over; super over + volvere to roll.]
      (Bot.)
      Having a plainted and convolute arrangement in the bud, as in
      the morning-glory.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprabranchial \Su`pra*bran"chi*al\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Situated above the branchi[91]; -- applied especially to the
      upper division of the gill cavity of bivalve mollusks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprafoliaceous \Su`pra*fo`li*a"ceous\, a. (Bot.)
      Inserted into the stem above the leaf, petiole, or axil, as a
      peduncle or flower.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprahepatic \Su`pra*he*pat"ic\, a. (Anat.)
      Situated over, or on the dorsal side of, the liver; --
      applied to the branches of the hepatic veins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprapedal \Su*prap"e*dal\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Situated above the foot of a mollusk; as, the suprapedal
      gland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supraprotest \Su`pra*pro"test\, n. (Mercantile Law)
      An acceptance of a bill by a third person after protest for
      nonacceptance by the drawee. --Burrill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprapubian \Su`pra*pu"bi*an\, Suprapubic \Su`pra*pu"bic\, a.
      (Anat.)
      Situated above, or anterior to, the pubic bone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Suprapubian \Su`pra*pu"bi*an\, Suprapubic \Su`pra*pu"bic\, a.
      (Anat.)
      Situated above, or anterior to, the pubic bone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supravaginal \Su`pra*vag"i*nal\, a. (Anat.)
      Situated above or outside a sheath or vaginal membrane.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supravision \Su`pra*vi"sion\, n.
      Supervision. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supravisor \Su`pra*vis"or\, n.
      A supervisor. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Supravulgar \Su`pra*vul"gar\, a.
      Being above the vulgar or common people. [R.] --Collier.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Sevierville, TN (town, FIPS 67120)
      Location: 35.89203 N, 83.57823 W
      Population (1990): 7178 (3321 housing units)
      Area: 29.9 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37862

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Skipperville, AL
      Zip code(s): 36374

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Sparrowbush, NY
      Zip code(s): 12780

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Spearfish, SD (city, FIPS 60020)
      Location: 44.48876 N, 103.84711 W
      Population (1990): 6966 (2913 housing units)
      Area: 9.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 57783

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Spearfish Canyon, SD
      Zip code(s): 57754

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Spearville, KS (city, FIPS 67125)
      Location: 37.84797 N, 99.75426 W
      Population (1990): 716 (308 housing units)
      Area: 1.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67876

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Sperryville, VA
      Zip code(s): 22740

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Suburban, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07701

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   superprogrammer n.   A prolific programmer; one who can code
   exceedingly well and quickly.   Not all hackers are superprogrammers,
   but many are.   (Productivity can vary from one programmer to another
   by three orders of magnitude.   For example, one programmer might be
   able to write an average of 3 lines of working code in one day,
   while another, with the proper tools, might be able to write 3,000.
   This range is astonishing; it is matched in very few other areas of
   human endeavor.)   The term `superprogrammer' is more commonly used
   within such places as IBM than in the hacker community.   It tends to
   stress naive measures of productivity and to underweight creativity,
   ingenuity, and getting the job _done_ -- and to sidestep the
   question of whether the 3,000 lines of code do more or less useful
   work than three lines that do the {Right Thing}.   Hackers tend to
   prefer the terms {hacker} and {wizard}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Super Pascal
  
      A {Pascal} variant used in ["Data Structures and Algorithms",
      A.   Aho, Hopcroft & Ullman, A-W 1983].   It adds non-numeric
      labels, a return statement and expressions as names of types.
  
      (1994-12-15)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Super VGA
  
      {Super Video Graphics Array}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Super Video Graphics Adapter
  
      {Super Video Graphics Array}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Super Video Graphics Adaptor
  
      {Super Video Graphics Array}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Super Video Graphics Array
  
      (SVGA) A {video display} {standard} created by
      {VESA} for {IBM PC} compatible personal computers.   The
      resolution is 800 x 600 4-bit {pixel}s.   Each pixel can
      therefore be one of 16 colours.
  
      See {Video Graphics Array}.
  
      [Is there a palette?   Standard document?   Adapter, Adaptor, or
      Array?]
  
      (1995-01-12)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   superpipelined
  
      1. Traditional {pipelined} architectures have a single
      pipeline stage for each of: instruction fetch, instruction
      decode, memory read, {ALU} operation and memory write.   A
      superpipelined {processor} has a {pipeline} where each of
      these logical steps may be subdivided into multiple {pipeline}
      stages.
  
      2. Marketese for {pipelined}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   superprogrammer
  
      A prolific programmer; one who can code exceedingly well and
      quickly.   Not all hackers are superprogrammers, but many are.
      Productivity can vary from one programmer to another by three
      orders of magnitude.   For example, one programmer might be
      able to write an average of three lines of working code in one
      day, while another, with the proper tools, might be able to
      write 3,000.   This range is astonishing; it is matched in very
      few other areas of human endeavour.
  
      The term "superprogrammer" is more commonly used within such
      places as IBM than in the hacker community.   It tends to
      stress naive measures of productivity and to underweight
      creativity, ingenuity, and getting the job *done* - and to
      sidestep the question of whether the 3,000 lines of code do
      more or less useful work than three lines that do the {Right
      Thing}.   Hackers tend to prefer the terms {hacker} and
      {wizard}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   supervisor mode
  
      (Or "{supervisor state}") An execution mode on some processors
      which enables execution of all instructions, including
      {privileged instruction}s.   It may also give access to
      different a {address space}, to {memory management} hardware
      and to other peripherals.   This is the mode in which the
      {operating system} usually runs.
  
      Opposite: {user mode}.
  
      (1995-02-15)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
  
      (SCADA) Systems are used in industry to monitor
      and control plant status and provide logging facilities.
      SCADA systems are highly configurable, and usually interface
      to the plant via {PLC}s.
  
      (1997-02-11)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Sepharvaim
      taken by Sargon, king of Assyria (2 Kings 17:24; 18:34; 19:13;
      Isa. 37:13). It was a double city, and received the common name
      Sepharvaim, i.e., "the two Sipparas," or "the two booktowns."
      The Sippara on the east bank of the Euphrates is now called
      Abu-Habba; that on the other bank was Accad, the old capital of
      Sargon I., where he established a great library. (See {SARGON}.) The recent discovery of cuneiform inscriptions at
      Tel el-Amarna in Egypt, consisting of official despatches to
      Pharaoh Amenophis IV. and his predecessor from their agents in
      Palestine, proves that in the century before the Exodus an
      active literary intercourse was carried on between these
      nations, and that the medium of the correspondence was the
      Babylonian language and script. (See KIRJATH-{SEPHER}.)
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Suburbs
      the immediate vicinity of a city or town (Num. 35:3, 7; Ezek.
      45:2). In 2 Kings 23:11 the Hebrew word there used (parvarim)
      occurs nowhere else. The Revised Version renders it "precincts."
      The singular form of this Hebrew word (parvar) is supposed by
      some to be the same as Parbar (q.v.), which occurs twice in 1
      Chr. 26:18.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Sepharvaim, the two books; the two scribes
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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