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   m
         adj 1: denoting a quantity consisting of 1,000 items or units
                  [syn: {thousand}, {one thousand}, {1000}, {m}, {k}]
         n 1: the basic unit of length adopted under the Systeme
               International d'Unites (approximately 1.094 yards) [syn:
               {meter}, {metre}, {m}]
         2: concentration measured by the number of moles of solute per
            liter of solution [syn: {molarity}, {molar concentration},
            {M}]
         3: the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100 [syn:
            {thousand}, {one thousand}, {1000}, {M}, {K}, {chiliad}, {G},
            {grand}, {thou}, {yard}]
         4: a unit of information equal to 1000 kilobytes or 10^6
            (1,000,000) bytes [syn: {megabyte}, {M}, {MB}]
         5: a unit of information equal to 1024 kibibytes or 2^20
            (1,048,576) bytes [syn: {megabyte}, {mebibyte}, {M}, {MB},
            {MiB}]
         6: the 13th letter of the Roman alphabet [syn: {M}, {m}]

English Dictionary: mhínáire by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
M-1
n
  1. a semiautomatic rifle [syn: Garand rifle, Garand, M-1, M-1 rifle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
M.M.
n
  1. the pace of music measured by the number of beats occurring in 60 seconds
    Synonym(s): beats per minute, bpm, metronome marking, M.M.
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
M1
n
  1. a measure of the money supply; includes currency in circulation plus demand deposits or checking account balances
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
M2
n
  1. a measure of the money supply; M1 plus net time deposits (other than large certificates of deposit)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
M3
n
  1. a measure of the money supply; M2 plus deposits at institutions that are not banks (such as savings and loan associations)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ma
n
  1. informal terms for a mother [syn: ma, mama, mamma, mom, momma, mommy, mammy, mum, mummy]
  2. a master's degree in arts and sciences
    Synonym(s): Master of Arts, MA, Artium Magister, AM
  3. one thousandth of an ampere
    Synonym(s): milliampere, mA
  4. a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
    Synonym(s): Massachusetts, Bay State, Old Colony, MA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Maha
n
  1. a member of the Siouan people formerly living in the Missouri river valley in northeastern Nebraska
    Synonym(s): Omaha, Maha
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mahoe
n
  1. shrubby tree widely distributed along tropical shores; yields a light tough wood used for canoe outriggers and a fiber used for cordage and caulk; often cultivated for ornament
    Synonym(s): mahoe, majagua, mahagua, balibago, purau, Hibiscus tiliaceus
  2. erect forest tree of Cuba and Jamaica having variably hairy leaves and orange-yellow or orange-red flowers; yields a moderately dense timber for cabinetwork and gunstocks
    Synonym(s): Cuban bast, blue mahoe, mahoe, majagua, mahagua, Hibiscus elatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Maia
n
  1. type genus of the Majidae; nearly cosmopolitan in distribution
    Synonym(s): Maja, genus Maja, Maia, genus Maia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
MAO
n
  1. an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of many body compounds (e.g., epinephrine and norepinephrine and serotonin)
    Synonym(s): monoamine oxidase, MAO
  2. Chinese communist leader (1893-1976)
    Synonym(s): Mao, Mao Zedong, Mao Tsetung
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
MAOI
n
  1. any of a group of antidepressant drugs that inhibit the action of monoamine oxidase in the brain and so allow monoamines to accumulate
    Synonym(s): monoamine oxidase inhibitor, MAOI
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Maui
n
  1. the second largest of the Hawaiian Islands [syn: Maui, Maui Island]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
maw
n
  1. informal terms for the mouth [syn: trap, cakehole, hole, maw, yap, gob]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
May
n
  1. the month following April and preceding June
  2. thorny Eurasian shrub of small tree having dense clusters of white to scarlet flowers followed by deep red berries; established as an escape in eastern North America
    Synonym(s): whitethorn, English hawthorn, may, Crataegus laevigata, Crataegus oxycantha
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
May 1
n
  1. observed in many countries to celebrate the coming of spring; observed in Russia and related countries in honor of labor
    Synonym(s): May Day, First of May, May 1
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
May 24
n
  1. British, anniversary of Queen Victoria's birth [syn: Commonwealth Day, Empire day, May 24]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Maya
n
  1. a member of an American Indian people of Yucatan and Belize and Guatemala who had a culture (which reached its peak between AD 300 and 900) characterized by outstanding architecture and pottery and astronomy; "Mayans had a system of writing and an accurate calendar"
    Synonym(s): Mayan, Maya
  2. a family of American Indian languages spoken by Maya
    Synonym(s): Maya, Mayan, Mayan language
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mayhaw
n
  1. hawthorn of southern United States bearing a juicy, acidic, scarlet fruit that is often used in jellies or preserves
    Synonym(s): mayhaw, summer haw, Crataegus aestivalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mayo
n
  1. egg yolks and oil and vinegar
    Synonym(s): mayonnaise, mayo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ME
n
  1. a state in New England [syn: Maine, Pine Tree State, ME]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mei
n
  1. Japanese ornamental tree with fragrant white or pink blossoms and small yellow fruits
    Synonym(s): Japanese apricot, mei, Prunus mume
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meow
n
  1. the sound made by a cat (or any sound resembling this)
    Synonym(s): meow, mew, miaou, miaow, miaul
v
  1. cry like a cat; "the cat meowed"
    Synonym(s): meow, mew
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mew
n
  1. the sound made by a cat (or any sound resembling this)
    Synonym(s): meow, mew, miaou, miaow, miaul
  2. the common gull of Eurasia and northeastern North America
    Synonym(s): mew, mew gull, sea mew, Larus canus
v
  1. cry like a cat; "the cat meowed"
    Synonym(s): meow, mew
  2. utter a high-pitched cry, as of seagulls
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mho
n
  1. a unit of conductance equal to the reciprocal of an ohm
    Synonym(s): mho, siemens, reciprocal ohm, S
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
MI
n
  1. destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle
    Synonym(s): myocardial infarction, myocardial infarct, MI
  2. a former British unit of length equivalent to 6,080 feet (1,853.184 meters); 800 feet longer than a statute mile
    Synonym(s): nautical mile, naut mi, mile, mi, geographical mile, Admiralty mile
  3. a unit of length used in navigation; exactly 1,852 meters; historically based on the distance spanned by one minute of arc in latitude
    Synonym(s): nautical mile, mile, mi, naut mi, knot, international nautical mile, air mile
  4. a unit of length equal to 1,760 yards or 5,280 feet; exactly 1609.344 meters
    Synonym(s): mile, statute mile, stat mi, land mile, international mile, mi
  5. a midwestern state in north central United States in the Great Lakes region
    Synonym(s): Michigan, Wolverine State, Great Lakes State, MI
  6. the government agency in the United Kingdom that is responsible for internal security and counterintelligence on British territory
    Synonym(s): Security Service, MI, Military Intelligence Section 5
  7. the government agency in the United Kingdom that is responsible for internal security and counterintelligence overseas
    Synonym(s): Secret Intelligence Service, MI, Military Intelligence Section 6
  8. the syllable naming the third (mediant) note of any major scale in solmization
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Miao
n
  1. a people living traditionally in mountain villages in southern China and adjacent areas of Vietnam and Laos and Thailand; many have emigrated to the United States
    Synonym(s): Hmong, Miao
  2. a language of uncertain affiliation spoken by the Hmong
    Synonym(s): Hmong, Hmong language, Miao
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
miaou
n
  1. the sound made by a cat (or any sound resembling this)
    Synonym(s): meow, mew, miaou, miaow, miaul
v
  1. make a cat-like sound
    Synonym(s): miaou, miaow
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
miaow
n
  1. the sound made by a cat (or any sound resembling this)
    Synonym(s): meow, mew, miaou, miaow, miaul
v
  1. make a cat-like sound
    Synonym(s): miaou, miaow
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mm
n
  1. a metric unit of length equal to one thousandth of a meter
    Synonym(s): millimeter, millimetre, mm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mn
n
  1. a hard brittle grey polyvalent metallic element that resembles iron but is not magnetic; used in making steel; occurs in many minerals
    Synonym(s): manganese, Mn, atomic number 25
  2. a midwestern state
    Synonym(s): Minnesota, Gopher State, North Star State, MN
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mo
n
  1. an indefinitely short time; "wait just a moment"; "in a mo"; "it only takes a minute"; "in just a bit"
    Synonym(s): moment, mo, minute, second, bit
  2. a polyvalent metallic element that resembles chromium and tungsten in its properties; used to strengthen and harden steel
    Synonym(s): molybdenum, Mo, atomic number 42
  3. a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union
    Synonym(s): Missouri, Show Me State, MO
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moa
n
  1. extinct flightless bird of New Zealand
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Moho
n
  1. the boundary between the Earth's crust and the underlying mantle; "the Mohorovicic discontinuity averages 5 miles down under oceans and 20 miles down under continents"
    Synonym(s): Mohorovicic discontinuity, Moho
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moo
n
  1. the sound made by a cow or bull
v
  1. make a low noise, characteristic of bovines [syn: moo, low]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moue
n
  1. a disdainful grimace
    Synonym(s): pout, moue, wry face
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mow
n
  1. a loft in a barn where hay is stored [syn: hayloft, haymow, mow]
v
  1. cut with a blade or mower; "mow the grass" [syn: mow, cut down]
  2. make a sad face and thrust out one's lower lip; "mop and mow"; "The girl pouted"
    Synonym(s): pout, mop, mow
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mu
n
  1. the 12th letter of the Greek alphabet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mya
n
  1. type genus of the family Myacidae
    Synonym(s): Mya, genus Mya
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   M \M\ ([ecr]m).
      1. M, the thirteenth letter of the English alphabet, is a
            vocal consonant, and from the manner of its formation, is
            called the labio-nasal consonant. See Guide to
            Pronunciation, [sect][sect] 178-180, 242.
  
      Note: The letter M came into English from the Greek, through
               the Latin, the form of the Greek letter being further
               derived from the Ph[oe]nician, and ultimately, it is
               believed, from the Egyptian. Etymologically M is
               related to n, in lime, linden; emmet, ant; also to b. M
               is readily followed by b and p. the position of the
               lips in the formation of both letters being the same.
               The relation of b and m is the same as that of d and t
               to n. and that of g and k to ng.
  
      2. As a numeral, M stands for one thousand, both in English
            and Latin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   M \M\, n.
      1. (Print.) A quadrat, the face or top of which is a perfect
            square; also, the size of such a square in any given size
            of type, used as the unit of measurement for that type:
            500 m's of pica would be a piece of matter whose length
            and breadth in pica m's multiplied together produce that
            number. [Written also {em}.]
  
      2. (law) A brand or stigma, having the shape of an M,
            formerly impressed on one convicted of manslaughter and
            admitted to the benefit of clergy.
  
      {M roof} (Arch.), a kind of roof formed by the junction of
            two common roofs with a valley between them, so that the
            section resembles the letter M.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ma \Ma\ (m[aum]), n. [Cf. {Mamma}.]
      1. A child's word for mother.
  
      2. [Hind.] In Oriental countries, a respectful form of
            address given to a woman; mother. --Balfour (Cyc. of
            India).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maa \Maa\, n. [See {New} a gull.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The common European gull ({Larus canus}); -- called also
      {mar}. See {New}, a gull.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maa \Maa\, n. [See {New} a gull.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The common European gull ({Larus canus}); -- called also
      {mar}. See {New}, a gull.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wanderoo \Wan`der*oo"\, n. [Cingalese wanderu a monkey.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A large monkey ({Macacus silenus}) native of Malabar. It is
      black, or nearly so, but has a long white or gray beard
      encircling the face. Called also {maha}, {silenus},
      {neelbhunder}, {lion-tailed baboon}, and {great wanderoo}.
      [Written also {ouanderoo}.]
  
      Note: The name is sometimes applied also to other allied
               species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mahoe \Ma"hoe\, n. (Bot.)
      A name given to several malvaceous trees (species of
      {Hibiscus}, {Ochroma}, etc.), and to their strong fibrous
      inner bark, which is used for strings and cordage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maw \Maw\ (m[add]), n. [See {Mew} a gull.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maw \Maw\, n. [OE. mawe, AS. maga stomach; akin to D. maag, OHG.
      mago, G. magen, Icel. magi, Sw. mage, Dan. mave. [root]103.]
      1. A stomach; the receptacle into which food is taken by
            swallowing; in birds, the craw; -- now used only of the
            lower animals, exept humorously or in contempt. --Chaucer.
  
                     Bellies and maws of living creatures. --Bacon.
  
      2. Appetite; inclination. [Obs.]
  
                     Unless you had more maw to do me good. --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Fish maw}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Fish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maw \Maw\, n.
      An old game at cards. --Sir A. Weldon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   May \May\, n. [Cf. Icel. m[91]r, Goth. mawi; akin to E. maiden.
      [?].]
      A maiden. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   May \May\, v. [imp. {Might}] [AS. pres. m[91]g I am able, pret.
      meahte, mihte; akin to D. mogen, G. m[94]gen, OHG. mugan,
      magan, Icel. mega, Goth. magan, Russ. moche. [?]. Cf.
      {Dismay}, {Main} strength, {Might}. The old imp. mought is
      obsolete, except as a provincial word.]
      An auxiliary verb qualifyng the meaning of another verb, by
      expressing:
      (a) Ability, competency, or possibility; -- now oftener
            expressed by can.
  
                     How may a man, said he, with idle speech, Be won to
                     spoil the castle of his health !      --Spenser.
  
                     For what he [the king] may do is of two kinds; what
                     he may do as just, and what he may do as possible.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
                     For of all sad words of tongue or pen The saddest
                     are these: [bd]It might have been.[b8] --Whittier.
      (b) Liberty; permission; allowance.
  
                     Thou mayst be no longer steward.      --Luke xvi. 2.
      (c) Contingency or liability; possibility or probability.
  
                     Though what he learns he speaks, and may advance
                     Some general maxims, or be right by chance. --Pope.
      (d) Modesty, courtesy, or concession, or a desire to soften a
            question or remark.
  
                     How old may Phillis be, you ask.      --Prior.
      (e) Desire or wish, as in prayer, imprecation, benediction,
            and the like. [bd]May you live happily.[b8] --Dryden.
  
      {May be}, [and] {It may be}, are used as equivalent to
            possibly, perhaps, by chance, peradventure. See 1st
            {Maybe}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   May \May\, n. [F. Mai, L. Maius; so named in honor of the
      goddess Maia (Gr. [?]), daughter of Atlas and mother of
      Mercury by Jupiter.]
      1. The fifth month of the year, containing thirty-one days.
            --Chaucer.
  
      2. The early part or springtime of life.
  
                     His May of youth, and bloom of lustihood. --Shak.
  
      3. (Bot.) The flowers of the hawthorn; -- so called from
            their time of blossoming; also, the hawthorn.
  
                     The palm and may make country houses gay. --Nash.
  
                     Plumes that micked the may.               --Tennyson.
  
      4. The merrymaking of May Day. --Tennyson.
  
      {Italian may} (Bot.), a shrubby species of {Spir[91]a} ({S.
            hypericifolia}) with many clusters of small white flowers
            along the slender branches.
  
      {May apple} (Bot.), the fruit of an American plant
            ({Podophyllum peltatum}). Also, the plant itself
            (popularly called {mandrake}), which has two lobed leaves,
            and bears a single egg-shaped fruit at the forking. The
            root and leaves, used in medicine, are powerfully drastic.
           
  
      {May beetle}, {May bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous
            species of large lamellicorn beetles that appear in the
            winged state in May. They belong to {Melolontha}, and
            allied genera. Called also {June beetle}.
  
      {May Day}, the first day of May; -- celebrated in the rustic
            parts of England by the crowning of a May queen with a
            garland, and by dancing about a May pole.
  
      {May dew}, the morning dew of the first day of May, to which
            magical properties were attributed.
  
      {May flower} (Bot.), a plant that flowers in May; also, its
            blossom. See {Mayflower}, in the vocabulary.
  
      {May fly} (Zo[94]l.), any species of {Ephemera}, and allied
            genera; -- so called because the mature flies of many
            species appear in May. See {Ephemeral fly}, under
            {Ephemeral}.
  
      {May game}, any May-day sport.
  
      {May lady}, the queen or lady of May, in old May games.
  
      {May lily} (Bot.), the lily of the valley ({Convallaria
            majalis}).
  
      {May pole}. See {Maypole} in the Vocabulary.
  
      {May queen}, a girl or young woman crowned queen in the
            sports of May Day.
  
      {May thorn}, the hawthorn.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Me \Me\ (m[emac]), pers. pron. [AS. m[emac], dat. & acc., mec,
      acc. only; akin to D. mij, G. mich, Icel. & Goth. mik, L. me,
      Gr. me`, 'eme`, Skr. m[be], m[be]m. [root]187. Cf. 2d
      {Mine}.]
      The person speaking, regarded as an object; myself; a pronoun
      of the first person used as the objective and dative case of
      the pronoum I; as, he struck me; he gave me the money, or he
      gave the money to me; he got me a hat, or he got a hat for
      me.
  
      Note: In methinks, me is properly in the dative case, and the
               verb is impersonal, the construction being, it appears
               to me. In early use me was often placed before forms of
               the verb to be with an adjective; as, me were lief.
  
                        Me rather had my heart might frrl your love Than
                        my unpleased eye see your courtesy. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Me \Me\, pron.
      One. See {Men}, pron. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meaw \Meaw\, n.
      The sea mew. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meaw \Meaw\, v. i.
      See {Mew}, to cry as a cat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meaw \Meaw\, n.
      The sea mew. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meaw \Meaw\, v. i.
      See {Mew}, to cry as a cat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meow \Me*ow"\, v. i. & n.
      See 6th and 7th {Mew}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meow \Me*ow"\, v. i. & n.
      See 6th and 7th {Mew}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [OE. mue, F. mue change of feathers, scales, skin,
      the time or place when the change occurs, fr. muer to molt,
      mew, L. mutare to change. See 2d {Mew}.]
      1. A cage for hawks while mewing; a coop for fattening fowls;
            hence, any inclosure; a place of confinement or shelter;
            -- in the latter sense usually in the plural.
  
                     Full many a fat partrich had he in mewe. --Chaucer.
  
                     Forthcoming from her darksome mew.      --Spenser.
  
                     Violets in their secret mews.            --Wordsworth.
  
      2. A stable or range of stables for horses; -- compound used
            in the plural, and so called from the royal stables in
            London, built on the site of the king's mews for hawks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. t. [From {Mew} a cage.]
      To shut up; to inclose; to confine, as in a cage or other
      inclosure.
  
               More pity that the eagle should be mewed. --Shak.
  
               Close mewed in their sedans, for fear of air. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n.
      The common cry of a cat. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mewed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Mewing}.] [OE. muen, F. muer, fr. L. mutare to change, fr.
      movere to move. See {Move}, and cf. {Mew} a cage, {Molt}.]
      To shed or cast; to change; to molt; as, the hawk mewed his
      feathers.
  
               Nine times the moon had mewed her horns. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i.
      To cast the feathers; to molt; hence, to change; to put on a
      new appearance.
  
               Now everything doth mew, And shifts his rustic winter
               robe.                                                      --Turbervile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spicknel \Spick"nel\, n. [Contr. from spike nail a large, long
      nail; -- so called in allusion to the shape of its capillary
      leaves.] (Bot.)
      An umbelliferous herb ({Meum Athamanticum}) having finely
      divided leaves, common in Europe; -- called also {baldmoney},
      {mew}, and {bearwort}. [Written also {spignel}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [OE. mue, F. mue change of feathers, scales, skin,
      the time or place when the change occurs, fr. muer to molt,
      mew, L. mutare to change. See 2d {Mew}.]
      1. A cage for hawks while mewing; a coop for fattening fowls;
            hence, any inclosure; a place of confinement or shelter;
            -- in the latter sense usually in the plural.
  
                     Full many a fat partrich had he in mewe. --Chaucer.
  
                     Forthcoming from her darksome mew.      --Spenser.
  
                     Violets in their secret mews.            --Wordsworth.
  
      2. A stable or range of stables for horses; -- compound used
            in the plural, and so called from the royal stables in
            London, built on the site of the king's mews for hawks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. t. [From {Mew} a cage.]
      To shut up; to inclose; to confine, as in a cage or other
      inclosure.
  
               More pity that the eagle should be mewed. --Shak.
  
               Close mewed in their sedans, for fear of air. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i. [Of imitative origin; cf. G. miauen.]
      To cry as a cat. [Written also {meaw}, {meow}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n.
      The common cry of a cat. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mewed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Mewing}.] [OE. muen, F. muer, fr. L. mutare to change, fr.
      movere to move. See {Move}, and cf. {Mew} a cage, {Molt}.]
      To shed or cast; to change; to molt; as, the hawk mewed his
      feathers.
  
               Nine times the moon had mewed her horns. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, v. i.
      To cast the feathers; to molt; hence, to change; to put on a
      new appearance.
  
               Now everything doth mew, And shifts his rustic winter
               robe.                                                      --Turbervile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spicknel \Spick"nel\, n. [Contr. from spike nail a large, long
      nail; -- so called in allusion to the shape of its capillary
      leaves.] (Bot.)
      An umbelliferous herb ({Meum Athamanticum}) having finely
      divided leaves, common in Europe; -- called also {baldmoney},
      {mew}, and {bearwort}. [Written also {spignel}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mho \Mho\, n. [Anagram of ohm.] (Elec.)
      A unit of conductivity, being the reciprocal of the ohm.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mi \Mi\, n. [It.] (Mus.)
      A syllable applied to the third tone of the scale of C, i.
      e., to E, in European solmization, but to the third tone of
      any scale in the American system.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Centesimo \Cen*tes"i*mo\, n.; pl. {-mi}. [It. & Sp.]
      A copper coin of Italy and Spain equivalent to a centime.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mi \Mi\, n. [It.] (Mus.)
      A syllable applied to the third tone of the scale of C, i.
      e., to E, in European solmization, but to the third tone of
      any scale in the American system.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Centesimo \Cen*tes"i*mo\, n.; pl. {-mi}. [It. & Sp.]
      A copper coin of Italy and Spain equivalent to a centime.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Monsieur \[d8]Mon*sieur"\, n.; pl. {Messieurs}. [F., fr. mon
      my + Sieur, abbrev. of seigneur lord. See {Monseigneur}.]
      1. The common title of civility in France in speaking to, or
            of, a man; Mr. or Sir. [Represented by the abbreviation M.
            or Mons. in the singular, and by {MM.} or {Messrs.} in the
            plural.]
  
      2. The oldest brother of the king of France.
  
      3. A Frenchman. [Contemptuous] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Black \Black\, a. [OE. blak, AS. bl[91]c; akin to Icel. blakkr
      dark, swarthy, Sw. bl[84]ck ink, Dan. bl[91]k, OHG. blach,
      LG. & D. blaken to burn with a black smoke. Not akin to AS.
      bl[be]c, E. bleak pallid. [?]98.]
      1. Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the
            color of soot or coal; of the darkest or a very dark
            color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a
            color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes.
  
                     O night, with hue so black!               --Shak.
  
      2. In a less literal sense: Enveloped or shrouded in
            darkness; very dark or gloomy; as, a black night; the
            heavens black with clouds.
  
                     I spy a black, suspicious, threatening cloud.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. Fig.: Dismal, gloomy, or forbidding, like darkness;
            destitute of moral light or goodness; atrociously wicked;
            cruel; mournful; calamitous; horrible. [bd]This day's
            black fate.[b8] [bd]Black villainy.[b8] [bd]Arise, black
            vengeance.[b8] [bd]Black day.[b8] [bd]Black despair.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      4. Expressing menace, or discontent; threatening; sullen;
            foreboding; as, to regard one with black looks.
  
      Note: Black is often used in self-explaining compound words;
               as, black-eyed, black-faced, black-haired,
               black-visaged.
  
      {Black act}, the English statute 9 George I, which makes it a
            felony to appear armed in any park or warren, etc., or to
            hunt or steal deer, etc., with the face blackened or
            disguised. Subsequent acts inflicting heavy penalties for
            malicious injuries to cattle and machinery have been
            called black acts.
  
      {Black angel} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the West Indies and
            Florida ({Holacanthus tricolor}), with the head and tail
            yellow, and the middle of the body black.
  
      {Black antimony} (Chem.), the black sulphide of antimony,
            {Sb2S3}, used in pyrotechnics, etc.
  
      {Black bear} (Zo[94]l.), the common American bear ({Ursus
            Americanus}).
  
      {Black beast}. See {B[88]te noire}.
  
      {Black beetle} (Zo[94]l.), the common large cockroach
            ({Blatta orientalis}).
  
      {Black and blue}, the dark color of a bruise in the flesh,
            which is accompanied with a mixture of blue. [bd]To pinch
            the slatterns black and blue.[b8] --Hudibras.
  
      {Black bonnet} (Zo[94]l.), the black-headed bunting ({Embriza
            Sch[d2]niclus}) of Europe.
  
      {Black canker}, a disease in turnips and other crops,
            produced by a species of caterpillar.
  
      {Black cat} (Zo[94]l.), the fisher, a quadruped of North
            America allied to the sable, but larger. See {Fisher}.
  
      {Black cattle}, any bovine cattle reared for slaughter, in
            distinction from dairy cattle. [Eng.]
  
      {Black cherry}. See under {Cherry}.
  
      {Black cockatoo} (Zo[94]l.), the palm cockatoo. See
            {Cockatoo}.
  
      {Black copper}. Same as {Melaconite}.
  
      {Black currant}. (Bot.) See {Currant}.
  
      {Black diamond}. (Min.) See {Carbonado}.
  
      {Black draught} (Med.), a cathartic medicine, composed of
            senna and magnesia.
  
      {Black drop} (Med.), vinegar of opium; a narcotic preparation
            consisting essentially of a solution of opium in vinegar.
           
  
      {Black earth}, mold; earth of a dark color. --Woodward.
  
      {Black flag}, the flag of a pirate, often bearing in white a
            skull and crossbones; a signal of defiance.
  
      {Black flea} (Zo[94]l.), a flea beetle ({Haltica nemorum})
            injurious to turnips.
  
      {Black flux}, a mixture of carbonate of potash and charcoal,
            obtained by deflagrating tartar with half its weight of
            niter. --Brande & C.
  
      {Black fly}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) In the United States, a small, venomous, two-winged
                  fly of the genus {Simulium} of several species,
                  exceedingly abundant and troublesome in the northern
                  forests. The larv[91] are aquatic.
            (b) A black plant louse, as the bean aphis ({A. fab[91]}).
                 
  
      {Black Forest} [a translation of G. Schwarzwald], a forest in
            Baden and W[81]rtemburg, in Germany; a part of the ancient
            Hercynian forest.
  
      {Black game}, or {Black grouse}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blackcock},
            {Grouse}, and {Heath grouse}.
  
      {Black grass} (Bot.), a grasslike rush of the species {Juncus
            Gerardi}, growing on salt marshes, and making good hay.
  
      {Black gum} (Bot.), an American tree, the tupelo or
            pepperidge. See {Tupelo}.
  
      {Black Hamburg (grape)} (Bot.), a sweet and juicy variety of
            dark purple or [bd]black[b8] grape.
  
      {Black horse} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the Mississippi valley
            ({Cycleptus elongatus}), of the sucker family; the
            Missouri sucker.
  
      {Black lemur} (Zo[94]l.), the {Lemurniger} of Madagascar; the
            {acoumbo} of the natives.
  
      {Black list}, a list of persons who are for some reason
            thought deserving of censure or punishment; -- esp. a list
            of persons stigmatized as insolvent or untrustworthy, made
            for the protection of tradesmen or employers. See
            {Blacklist}, v. t.
  
      {Black manganese} (Chem.), the black oxide of manganese,
            {MnO2}.
  
      {Black Maria}, the close wagon in which prisoners are carried
            to or from jail.
  
      {Black martin} (Zo[94]l.), the chimney swift. See {Swift}.
  
      {Black moss} (Bot.), the common so-called long moss of the
            southern United States. See {Tillandsia}.
  
      {Black oak}. See under {Oak}.
  
      {Black ocher}. See {Wad}.
  
      {Black pigment}, a very fine, light carbonaceous substance,
            or lampblack, prepared chiefly for the manufacture of
            printers' ink. It is obtained by burning common coal tar.
           
  
      {Black plate}, sheet iron before it is tinned. --Knight.
  
      {Black quarter}, malignant anthrax with engorgement of a
            shoulder or quarter, etc., as of an ox.
  
      {Black rat} (Zo[94]l.), one of the species of rats ({Mus
            rattus}), commonly infesting houses.
  
      {Black rent}. See {Blackmail}, n., 3.
  
      {Black rust}, a disease of wheat, in which a black, moist
            matter is deposited in the fissures of the grain.
  
      {Black sheep}, one in a family or company who is unlike the
            rest, and makes trouble.
  
      {Black silver}. (Min.) See under {Silver}.
  
      {Black and tan}, black mixed or spotted with tan color or
            reddish brown; -- used in describing certain breeds of
            dogs.
  
      {Black tea}. See under {Tea}.
  
      {Black tin} (Mining), tin ore (cassiterite), when dressed,
            stamped and washed, ready for smelting. It is in the form
            of a black powder, like fine sand. --Knight.
  
      {Black walnut}. See under {Walnut}.
  
      {Black warrior} (Zo[94]l.), an American hawk ({Buteo
            Harlani}).
  
      Syn: Dark; murky; pitchy; inky; somber; dusky; gloomy; swart;
               Cimmerian; ebon; atrocious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manganese \Man`ga*nese"\, n. [F. mangan[8a]se, It. manganese,
      sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of
      its resemblance to the magnet. See {Magnet}, and cf.
      {Magnesia}.] (Chem.)
      An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard,
      grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily
      oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals
      pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8.
  
      Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese)
               is used to increase the density and hardness of steel.
  
      {Black oxide of manganese}, {Manganese dioxide [or]
      peroxide}, or {Black manganese} (Chem.), a heavy black powder
            {MnO2}, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and
            valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly
            {manganese}. It colors glass violet, and is used as a
            decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass.
  
      {Manganese bronze}, an alloy made by adding from one to two
            per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in
            brass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mo \Mo\, a., adv., & n. [Written also {moe}.] [AS. m[be]. See
      {More}.]
      More; -- usually, more in number. [Obs.]
  
               An hundred thousand mo.                           --Chaucer.
  
               Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it.
                                                                              --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   -mo \-mo\
      A suffix added to the names of certain numerals or to the
      numerals themselves, to indicate the number of leaves made by
      folding a sheet of paper; as, sixteenmo or 16mo; eighteenmo
      or 18mo. It is taken from the Latin forms similarly used; as,
      duodecimo, sextodecimo, etc. A small circle, placed after the
      number and near its top, is often used for -mo; as, 16[f8],
      18[f8], etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mo \Mo\, a., adv., & n. [Written also {moe}.] [AS. m[be]. See
      {More}.]
      More; -- usually, more in number. [Obs.]
  
               An hundred thousand mo.                           --Chaucer.
  
               Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it.
                                                                              --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   -mo \-mo\
      A suffix added to the names of certain numerals or to the
      numerals themselves, to indicate the number of leaves made by
      folding a sheet of paper; as, sixteenmo or 16mo; eighteenmo
      or 18mo. It is taken from the Latin forms similarly used; as,
      duodecimo, sextodecimo, etc. A small circle, placed after the
      number and near its top, is often used for -mo; as, 16[f8],
      18[f8], etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moa \Mo"a\, n. [Native name.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several very large extinct species of wingless
      birds belonging to {Dinornis}, and other related genera, of
      the suborder {Dinornithes}, found in New Zealand. They are
      allied to the apteryx and the ostrich. They were probably
      exterminated by the natives before New Zealand was discovered
      by Europeans. Some species were much larger than the ostrich.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mo \Mo\, a., adv., & n. [Written also {moe}.] [AS. m[be]. See
      {More}.]
      More; -- usually, more in number. [Obs.]
  
               An hundred thousand mo.                           --Chaucer.
  
               Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it.
                                                                              --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, n.
      A wry face or mouth; a mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, a., adv., & n. [AS. m[be] See {More}.]
      More. See {Mo}. [Obs.] [bd]Sing no more ditties, sing no
      moe.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, v. i.
      To make faces; to mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mo \Mo\, a., adv., & n. [Written also {moe}.] [AS. m[be]. See
      {More}.]
      More; -- usually, more in number. [Obs.]
  
               An hundred thousand mo.                           --Chaucer.
  
               Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it.
                                                                              --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, n.
      A wry face or mouth; a mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, a., adv., & n. [AS. m[be] See {More}.]
      More. See {Mo}. [Obs.] [bd]Sing no more ditties, sing no
      moe.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, v. i.
      To make faces; to mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mo \Mo\, a., adv., & n. [Written also {moe}.] [AS. m[be]. See
      {More}.]
      More; -- usually, more in number. [Obs.]
  
               An hundred thousand mo.                           --Chaucer.
  
               Likely to find mo to commend than to imitate it.
                                                                              --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, n.
      A wry face or mouth; a mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, a., adv., & n. [AS. m[be] See {More}.]
      More. See {Mo}. [Obs.] [bd]Sing no more ditties, sing no
      moe.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moe \Moe\, v. i.
      To make faces; to mow. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moha \Mo"ha\, n. (Bot.)
      A kind of millet ({Setaria Italica}); German millet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moo \Moo\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Mooed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Mooing}.] [Of imitative origin.]
      To make the noise of a cow; to low; -- child's word.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moo \Moo\, n.
      The lowing of a cow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moo \Moo\, a., adv., & n.
      See {Mo}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. i.
      To make mouths.
  
               Nodding, becking, and mowing.                  --Tyndale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Mew}, a gull.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. t. [imp. {Mowed}; p. p. {Mowed} or {Mown}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Mowing}.] [OE. mowen, mawen, AS. m[be]wan; akin to
      D. maaijen, G. m[84]hen, OHG. m[be]jan, Dan. meie, L. metere
      to reap, mow, Gr. [?]. Cf. {Math}, {Mead} a meadow,
      {Meadow}.]
      1. To cut down, as grass, with a scythe or machine.
  
      2. To cut the grass from; as, to mow a meadow.
  
      3. To cut down; to cause to fall in rows or masses, as in
            mowing grass; -- with down; as, a discharge of grapeshot
            mows down whole ranks of men.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. [pres. sing. {Mow}, pl. {Mowe}, {Mowen}, {Moun}.]
      [AS. magan. See {May}, v.]
      May; can. [bd]Thou mow now escapen.[b8] [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
               Our walles mowe not make hem resistence. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. i.
      To cut grass, etc., with a scythe, or with a machine; to cut
      grass for hay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [OE. mowe, AS. m[?]ga.]
      1. A heap or mass of hay or of sheaves of grain stowed in a
            barn.
  
      2. The place in a barn where hay or grain in the sheaf is
            stowed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. t.
      To lay, as hay or sheaves of grain, in a heap or mass in a
      barn; to pile and stow away.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mew \Mew\, n. [AS. m[?]w, akin to D. meeuw, G. m[94]we, OHG.
      m[?]h, Icel. m[be]r.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A gull, esp. the common British species ({Larus canus});
      called also {sea mew}, {maa}, {mar}, {mow}, and {cobb}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. i.
      To make mouths.
  
               Nodding, becking, and mowing.                  --Tyndale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Mew}, a gull.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. t. [imp. {Mowed}; p. p. {Mowed} or {Mown}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Mowing}.] [OE. mowen, mawen, AS. m[be]wan; akin to
      D. maaijen, G. m[84]hen, OHG. m[be]jan, Dan. meie, L. metere
      to reap, mow, Gr. [?]. Cf. {Math}, {Mead} a meadow,
      {Meadow}.]
      1. To cut down, as grass, with a scythe or machine.
  
      2. To cut the grass from; as, to mow a meadow.
  
      3. To cut down; to cause to fall in rows or masses, as in
            mowing grass; -- with down; as, a discharge of grapeshot
            mows down whole ranks of men.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. [pres. sing. {Mow}, pl. {Mowe}, {Mowen}, {Moun}.]
      [AS. magan. See {May}, v.]
      May; can. [bd]Thou mow now escapen.[b8] [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
               Our walles mowe not make hem resistence. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. i.
      To cut grass, etc., with a scythe, or with a machine; to cut
      grass for hay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [OE. mowe, AS. m[?]ga.]
      1. A heap or mass of hay or of sheaves of grain stowed in a
            barn.
  
      2. The place in a barn where hay or grain in the sheaf is
            stowed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. t.
      To lay, as hay or sheaves of grain, in a heap or mass in a
      barn; to pile and stow away.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. [pres. sing. {Mow}, pl. {Mowe}, {Mowen}, {Moun}.]
      [AS. magan. See {May}, v.]
      May; can. [bd]Thou mow now escapen.[b8] [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
               Our walles mowe not make hem resistence. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mowe \Mowe\, v.
      See 4th {Mow}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mowe \Mowe\, n. & v.
      See 1st & 2d {Mow}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, n. [Written also {moe} and {mowe}.] [F. moue pouting,
      a wry face; cf. OD. mouwe the protruded lip.]
      A wry face. [bd]Make mows at him.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mow \Mow\, v. [pres. sing. {Mow}, pl. {Mowe}, {Mowen}, {Moun}.]
      [AS. magan. See {May}, v.]
      May; can. [bd]Thou mow now escapen.[b8] [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
               Our walles mowe not make hem resistence. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mowe \Mowe\, v.
      See 4th {Mow}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mowe \Mowe\, n. & v.
      See 1st & 2d {Mow}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mue \Mue\ (m[umac]), v. i.
      To mew; to molt. [Obs.] --Quarles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   My \My\, a. & poss. pron. [OE. mi, fr. min. See {Mine}, and cf.,
      for loss of n, {A}, a., {An}, a.]
      Of or belonging to me; -- used always attributively; as, my
      body; my book; -- mine is used in the predicate; as, the book
      is mine. See {Mine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Myaria \[d8]My*a"ri*a\, n. pl. [NL.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A division of bivalve mollusks of which the common clam
      ({Mya}) is the type.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spoutfish \Spout"fish\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A marine animal that spouts water; -- applied especially to
      certain bivalve mollusks, like the long clams ({Mya}), which
      spout, or squirt out, water when retiring into their holes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Myo- \My"o-\
      A combining form of Gr. [?], [?], a muscle; as, myograph,
      myochrome.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   M M, GA
      Zip code(s): 31419

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mahwah, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07430

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Maia, AS (village, FIPS 47300)
      Location: 14.18594 S, 169.41866 W
      Population (1990): 207 (32 housing units)
      Area: 4.8 sq km (land), 36.5 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   May, OK (town, FIPS 47000)
      Location: 36.61650 N, 99.74896 W
      Population (1990): 42 (34 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 73851
   May, TX
      Zip code(s): 76857

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mayo, FL (town, FIPS 43575)
      Location: 30.05102 N, 83.17666 W
      Population (1990): 917 (346 housing units)
      Area: 2.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 32066
   Mayo, MD (CDP, FIPS 51575)
      Location: 38.89168 N, 76.50040 W
      Population (1990): 2537 (1152 housing units)
      Area: 6.6 sq km (land), 5.6 sq km (water)
   Mayo, SC (CDP, FIPS 45430)
      Location: 35.08453 N, 81.85438 W
      Population (1990): 1569 (627 housing units)
      Area: 8.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mio, MI (CDP, FIPS 54660)
      Location: 44.66303 N, 84.14459 W
      Population (1990): 1886 (1275 housing units)
      Area: 19.3 sq km (land), 1.7 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 48647

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   M pref. (on units) suff. (on numbers)   [SI] See {{quantifiers}}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   M$   Common net abbreviation for Microsoft, everybody's least
   favorite monopoly.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   M pref. (on units) suff. (on numbers)   [SI] See {{quantifiers}}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   M$   Common net abbreviation for Microsoft, everybody's least
   favorite monopoly.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   mu /moo/   The correct answer to the classic trick question
   "Have you stopped beating your wife yet?".   Assuming that you have
   no wife or you have never beaten your wife, the answer "yes" is
   wrong because it implies that you used to beat your wife and then
   stopped, but "no" is worse because it suggests that you have one and
   are still beating her.   According to various Discordians and Douglas
   Hofstadter the correct answer is usually "mu", a Japanese word
   alleged to mean "Your question cannot be answered because it depends
   on incorrect assumptions".   Hackers tend to be sensitive to logical
   inadequacies in language, and many have adopted this suggestion with
   enthusiasm.   The word `mu' is actually from Chinese, meaning
   `nothing'; it is used in mainstream Japanese in that sense, but
   native speakers do not recognize the Discordian question-denying
   use.   It almost certainly derives from overgeneralization of the
   answer in the following well-known Rinzei Zen {koan}:
  
      A monk asked Joshu, "Does a dog have the Buddha nature?"   Joshu
      retorted, "Mu!"
  
   See also {has the X nature}, {Some AI Koans}, and Douglas
   Hofstadter's "Go"del, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid"
   (pointer in the {Bibliography} in Appendix C.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   M
  
      1. Alternative name for {MUMPS}.
  
      2. A {C}-like language from {Silicon Compiler Systems} for
      multilevel {hardware description}.   It is currently available
      in the {GDT} package from {Mentor Graphics}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1994-10-26)
  
      3. The abbreviated for of {mega-}.
  
      (1995-01-10)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   m2
  
      A {Modula-2} {compiler} for {VAX} and {MIPS}.   A {Pascal}
      compiler for VAX is also included.   The Pascal compiler
      accepts a language that is almost identical to {Berkeley
      Pascal}.   It was originally designed and built by Michael L.
      Powell in 1984.   Joel McCormack made it faster, fixed lots of
      bugs, and swiped/wrote a User's Manual.   Len Lattanzi ported
      it to the MIPS.
  
      It has the following extensions: {foreign function} and data
      interface, {dynamic array} variables, {subarray parameter}s,
      multi-dimensional {open array parameter}s, {inline
      procedure}s, longfloat type, type-checked interface to {C}
      library I/O routines.
  
      It runs on {VAX} ({Ultrix}, {BSD}) and {MIPS} ({Ultrix}).
  
      {(ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/Modula-2/m2.tar.Z)}.
  
      E-mail: .
  
      (1992-07-06)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   M3
  
      A {macro} processor, forerunner of {M4}, for the {AP-3}
      {minicomputer}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   m4
  
      A {macro} processor for {Unix} and {GCOS} which is more
      flexible than {cpp}.   m4 copies its input to the output,
      expanding macros which can be either built-in or user-defined.
      m4 has built-in functions for including files, running {Unix}
      commands, doing integer arithmetic, manipulating text in
      various ways and recursing.   m4 can be used either as a
      {front-end} to a compiler or as a stand-alone tool.
  
      {sendmail}'s configuration file (/etc/sendmail.cf) is writen
      in m4 macros.
  
      There is a {GNU m4 v1.1
      (ftp://gnu.org/pub/gnu/m4-1.0.tar.Z)} by Francois
      Pinard and a {public domain} version
      by Ozan Yigit and Richard A. O'Keefe
      (FTP from any {386BSD}, {NetBSD} or
      {FreeBSD} archive).   A {Macintosh} version is {here
      (ftp://nic.switch.ch/pub/software/mac/src/mpw-c/)}.
  
      See also {m3}, {m5}.
  
      ["The M4 Macro Processor",
      Kernighan & Ritchie, Jul 1977].
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   M5
  
      Macro processor, a generalisation of {M4} by A. Dain, U
      Cincinnati, 1992.   For Unix and DOS.
  
      {(ftp://thor.exe.u.edu/pub/dain/m5)}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   ma
  
      The {country code} for Morocco.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MAO
  
      An early {symbolic mathematics} system.
  
      [A. Rom, Celest Mech 1:309-319 (1969)].
  
      (1995-02-10)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MAU
  
      {Media Access Unit}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mei
  
      A set of {class libraries} by Atsushi Aoki
      and others for {Objectworks Smalltalk}
      Release 4.1.   Mei includes: Grapher Library for drawing
      diagrams; Meta Grapher Library (grapher to develop grapher);
      Drawing tools and painting tools (structured diagram editors
      and drawing editors); {GUI builder}; {Lisp} {interpreter};
      {Prolog} interpreter; Pluggable gauges; Extended browser;
      (package, history, recover, etc.)
  
      Mei is available under {General Public License} and requires
      Objectworks Smalltalk Release 4.1.
  
      Current version: 0.50, as of 1993-01-20.
  
      {Home
      (http://www.sra.co.jp/people/aoki/htmls/FreeSoftwareForSmalltalk.html)}.
  
      E-mail: Watanabe Katsuhiro
  
      (1999-12-08)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mh
  
      The {country code} for Marshall Islands.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MII
  
      1. A consortium of {Microsoft}, {IBM}, and {Intel}.
  
      [When?   What did it do?]
  
      2. A broadcast component video tape format licensed
      by Panasonic.
  
      (1998-11-15)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mm
  
      The {country code} for Myanmar (Burma).
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mma
  
      A fast {Mathematica}-like system, in {Allegro CL} by
      R. Fateman, 1991.
  
      {(ftp://peoplesparc.berkeley.edu/pub/mma.tar.Z)}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MMI
  
      1. Man-Machine Interface.
  
      2. The company which developed the first
      {Programmable Array Logic} devices.   MMI was bought by {AMD}.
  
      [Dates?]
  
      (1995-12-09)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MMU
  
      {Memory Management Unit}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mn
  
      The {country code} for Mongolia.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mo
  
      The {country code} for Macau.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MOO
  
      {MUD Object Oriented}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mu
  
      (Greek letter).
  
      1. /micro/ prefix denoting division by 10^6, e.g. mu m
      (micrometre, a millionth part of a metre).   Sometimes written
      as a 'u', the ASCII character nearest in appearance.
  
      2. /myoo/ In the theory of functions, mu x . E
      denotes the least value of x for which E = x, i.e. the {least
      fixed point} of the function \ x . E.   The {recursive}
      function mu f . H f satisfies (and is defined by) the equation
  
      mu f . H f = H (mu f . H f)
  
      An alternative notation for the same function is
  
      fix H = H (fix H)
  
      See {fixed point combinator}.
  
      3. {multiple value}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-10-30)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mu
  
      1. The {country code} for Mauritius.
  
      2. /moo/ The correct answer to the classic trick
      question "Have you stopped beating your wife yet?".   Assuming
      that you have no wife or you have never beaten your wife, the
      answer "yes" is wrong because it implies that you used to beat
      your wife and then stopped, but "no" is worse because it
      suggests that you have one and are still beating her.
      According to various Discordians and Douglas Hofstadter the
      correct answer is usually "mu", a Japanese word alleged to
      mean "Your question cannot be answered because it depends on
      incorrect assumptions".
  
      Hackers tend to be sensitive to logical inadequacies in
      language, and many have adopted this suggestion with
      enthusiasm.   The word "mu" is actually from Chinese, meaning
      "nothing"; it is used in mainstream Japanese in that sense,
      but native speakers do not recognise the Discordian
      question-denying use.   It almost certainly derives from
      overgeneralisation of the answer in the following well-known
      Rinzei Zen teaching riddle:
  
      A monk asked Joshu, "Does a dog have the Buddha nature?"
      Joshu retorted, "Mu!"
  
      See also {has the X nature}, {AI Koan}.
  
      [Douglas Hofstadter, "Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden
      Braid"].
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (2000-11-22)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mu
  
      (Greek letter).
  
      1. /micro/ prefix denoting division by 10^6, e.g. mu m
      (micrometre, a millionth part of a metre).   Sometimes written
      as a 'u', the ASCII character nearest in appearance.
  
      2. /myoo/ In the theory of functions, mu x . E
      denotes the least value of x for which E = x, i.e. the {least
      fixed point} of the function \ x . E.   The {recursive}
      function mu f . H f satisfies (and is defined by) the equation
  
      mu f . H f = H (mu f . H f)
  
      An alternative notation for the same function is
  
      fix H = H (fix H)
  
      See {fixed point combinator}.
  
      3. {multiple value}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-10-30)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mu
  
      1. The {country code} for Mauritius.
  
      2. /moo/ The correct answer to the classic trick
      question "Have you stopped beating your wife yet?".   Assuming
      that you have no wife or you have never beaten your wife, the
      answer "yes" is wrong because it implies that you used to beat
      your wife and then stopped, but "no" is worse because it
      suggests that you have one and are still beating her.
      According to various Discordians and Douglas Hofstadter the
      correct answer is usually "mu", a Japanese word alleged to
      mean "Your question cannot be answered because it depends on
      incorrect assumptions".
  
      Hackers tend to be sensitive to logical inadequacies in
      language, and many have adopted this suggestion with
      enthusiasm.   The word "mu" is actually from Chinese, meaning
      "nothing"; it is used in mainstream Japanese in that sense,
      but native speakers do not recognise the Discordian
      question-denying use.   It almost certainly derives from
      overgeneralisation of the answer in the following well-known
      Rinzei Zen teaching riddle:
  
      A monk asked Joshu, "Does a dog have the Buddha nature?"
      Joshu retorted, "Mu!"
  
      See also {has the X nature}, {AI Koan}.
  
      [Douglas Hofstadter, "Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden
      Braid"].
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (2000-11-22)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MUA
  
      {Mail User Agent}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mw
  
      The {country code} for Malawi.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   my
  
      The {country code} for Malaysia.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Meah
      an hundred, a tower in Jersalem on the east wall (Neh. 3:1) in
      the time of Nehemiah.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Maai, belly; heaping up
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Meah, a hundred cubits
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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