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   hacienda
         n 1: a large estate in Spanish-speaking countries
         2: the main house on a ranch or large estate

English Dictionary: hochnotwichtig by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hackmatack
n
  1. poplar of northeastern North America with broad heart- shaped leaves
    Synonym(s): balsam poplar, hackmatack, tacamahac, Populus balsamifera
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hackneyed
adj
  1. repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
    Synonym(s): banal, commonplace, hackneyed, old-hat, shopworn, stock(a), threadbare, timeworn, tired, trite, well-worn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
n
  1. an Arab kingdom in southwestern Asia on the Red Sea [syn: Jordan, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hashimoto's disease
n
  1. autoimmune disorder of the thyroid gland; most common in middle-aged women
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hawk moth
n
  1. any of various moths with long narrow forewings capable of powerful flight and hovering over flowers to feed
    Synonym(s): hawkmoth, hawk moth, sphingid, sphinx moth, hummingbird moth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hawkmoth
n
  1. any of various moths with long narrow forewings capable of powerful flight and hovering over flowers to feed
    Synonym(s): hawkmoth, hawk moth, sphingid, sphinx moth, hummingbird moth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hay conditioner
n
  1. a farm machine that treats hay to cause more rapid and even drying
    Synonym(s): haymaker, hay conditioner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hay-scented
n
  1. fern of eastern North America with pale green fronds and an aroma like hay
    Synonym(s): hay-scented, hay-scented fern, scented fern, boulder fern, Dennstaedtia punctilobula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hay-scented fern
n
  1. fern of eastern North America with pale green fronds and an aroma like hay
    Synonym(s): hay-scented, hay-scented fern, scented fern, boulder fern, Dennstaedtia punctilobula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
HAZMAT
n
  1. an abbreviation for `hazardous material' used on warning signs; "NO HAZMATS IN TUNNEL"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hessonite
n
  1. a garnet ranging in color from yellow to brown [syn: cinnamon stone, essonite, hessonite]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hex nut
n
  1. a nut with a hexagonal shape
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hexameter
n
  1. a verse line having six metrical feet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hexamita
n
  1. flagellates free-living or parasitic in intestines of birds
    Synonym(s): Hexamita, genus Hexamita
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hexanedioic acid
n
  1. a carboxylic acid used in the manufacture of nylon [syn: hexanedioic acid, adipic acid]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high and low
adv
  1. everywhere; "searched high and low"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high wind
n
  1. a very strong wind; "rain and high winds covered the region"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high-and-mighty
adj
  1. offensively self-assured or given to exercising usually unwarranted power; "an autocratic person"; "autocratic behavior"; "a bossy way of ordering others around"; "a rather aggressive and dominating character"; "managed the employees in an aloof magisterial way"; "a swaggering peremptory manner"
    Synonym(s): autocratic, bossy, dominating, high-and-mighty, magisterial, peremptory
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high-handed
adj
  1. given to haughty disregard of others [syn: cavalier, high-handed]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high-handedly
adv
  1. in a domineering high-handed manner; "he behaved high- handedly toward his employees"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high-handedness
n
  1. overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors
    Synonym(s): arrogance, haughtiness, hauteur, high-handedness, lordliness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
high-interest
adj
  1. (used of loans) charging a relatively large percentage of the amount borrowed
    Antonym(s): low-interest
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hock-joint
n
  1. tarsal joint of the hind leg of hoofed mammals; corresponds to the human ankle
    Synonym(s): hock, hock-joint
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hook and eye
n
  1. a kind of fastener used on clothing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
housemaid
n
  1. a female domestic [syn: maid, maidservant, housemaid, amah]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
housemaid's knee
n
  1. swelling of the bursa in the knee (due to trauma or excessive kneeling)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
housemate
n
  1. someone who resides in the same house with you
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
housemother
n
  1. a woman employed as a chaperon in a residence for young people
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hug-me-tight
n
  1. a woman's fitted jacket
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Huguenot
n
  1. a French Calvinist of the 16th or 17th centuries
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hyacinth
n
  1. a red transparent variety of zircon used as a gemstone
    Synonym(s): hyacinth, jacinth
  2. any of numerous bulbous perennial herbs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hyacinth bean
n
  1. perennial twining vine of Old World tropics having trifoliate leaves and racemes of fragrant purple pea-like flowers followed by maroon pods of edible seeds; grown as an ornamental and as a vegetable on the Indian subcontinent; sometimes placed in genus Dolichos
    Synonym(s): hyacinth bean, bonavist, Indian bean, Egyptian bean, Lablab purpureus, Dolichos lablab
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthaceae
n
  1. one of many families or subfamilies in which some classification systems subdivide the Liliaceae but not widely accepted
    Synonym(s): Hyacinthaceae, family Hyacinthaceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthoides
n
  1. small genus of perennial bulbs of western Europe and North Africa; sometimes placed in family Hyacinthaceae
    Synonym(s): Hyacinthoides, genus Hyacinthoides
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthoides nonscripta
n
  1. sometimes placed in genus Scilla [syn: wild hyacinth, wood hyacinth, bluebell, harebell, Hyacinthoides nonscripta, Scilla nonscripta]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthus candicans
n
  1. southern African herb with white bell-shaped flowers [syn: summer hyacinth, cape hyacinth, Hyacinthus candicans, Galtonia candicans]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthus orientalis
n
  1. widely grown for its fragrance and its white, pink, blue, or purplish flowers
    Synonym(s): common hyacinth, Hyacinthus orientalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Hyacinthus orientalis albulus
n
  1. hyacinth with loosely flowered spikes, several growing from one bulb
    Synonym(s): Roman hyacinth, Hyacinthus orientalis albulus
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Rockrose \Rock"rose`\, n. (Bot.)
      A name given to any species of the genus {Helianthemum}, low
      shrubs or herbs with yellow flowers, especially the European
      {H. vulgare} and the American frostweed, {H. Canadense}.
  
      {Cretan rockrose}, a related shrub ({Cistus Creticus}), one
            of the plants yielding the fragrant gum called ladanum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stilt \Stilt\, n. [OE. stilte; akin to Dan. stylte, Sw. stylta,
      LG. & D. stelt, OHG. stelza, G. stelze, and perh. to E.
      stout.]
      1. A pole, or piece of wood, constructed with a step or loop
            to raise the foot above the ground in walking. It is
            sometimes lashed to the leg, and sometimes prolonged
            upward so as to be steadied by the hand or arm.
  
                     Ambition is but avarice on stilts, and masked.
                                                                              --Landor.
  
      2. A crutch; also, the handle of a plow. [Prov. Eng.]
            --Halliwell.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any species of limicoline birds belonging to
            {Himantopus} and allied genera, in which the legs are
            remarkably long and slender. Called also {longshanks},
            {stiltbird}, {stilt plover}, and {lawyer}.
  
      Note: The American species ({Himantopus Mexicanus}) is well
               known. The European and Asiatic stilt ({H. candidus})
               is usually white, except the wings and interscapulars,
               which are greenish black. The white-headed stilt ({H.
               leucocephalus}) and the banded stilt ({Cladorhynchus
               pectoralis}) are found in Australia.
  
      {Stilt plover} (Zo[94]l.), the stilt.
  
      {Stilt sandpiper} (Zo[94]l.), an American sandpiper
            ({Micropalama himantopus}) having long legs. The bill is
            somewhat expanded at the tip.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hackmatack \Hack"ma*tack`\, n. [Of American Indian origin.]
      (Bot.)
      The American larch ({Larix Americana}), a coniferous tree
      with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained
      timber. Called also {tamarack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hackney \Hack"ney\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hackneyed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Hackneying}.]
      1. To devote to common or frequent use, as a horse or
            carriage; to wear out in common service; to make trite or
            commonplace; as, a hackneyed metaphor or quotation.
  
                     Had I lavish of my presence been, So
                     common-hackneyed in the eyes of men.   --Shak.
  
      2. To carry in a hackney coach. --Cowper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hag \Hag\, n. [OE. hagge, hegge, with, hag, AS. h[91]gtesse;
      akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw.
      h[84]xa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E.
      haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild
      woman. [?].]
      1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; also, a wizard. [Obs.]
            [bd][Silenus] that old hag.[b8] --Golding.
  
      2. An ugly old woman.
  
      3. A fury; a she-monster. --Grashaw.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) An eel-like marine marsipobranch ({Myxine
            glutinosa}), allied to the lamprey. It has a suctorial
            mouth, with labial appendages, and a single pair of gill
            openings. It is the type of the order Hyperotpeta. Called
            also {hagfish}, {borer}, {slime eel}, {sucker}, and
            {sleepmarken}.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) The hagdon or shearwater.
  
      6. An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a
            man's hair. --Blount.
  
      {Hag moth} (Zo[94]l.), a moth ({Phobetron pithecium}), the
            larva of which has curious side appendages, and feeds on
            fruit trees.
  
      {Hag's tooth} (Naut.), an ugly irregularity in the pattern of
            matting or pointing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Haikwan tael \Haikwan tael\
      A Chinese weight ([frac1x10] catty) equivalent to 1[frac13]
      oz. or 37.801 g.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
            The awful ruins of the days of old . . . Or jasper tomb,
            or mutilated sphinx.                                    --Shelley.
            (b) On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually
                  represented as having the winged body of a lion, and
                  the face and breast of a young woman.
  
      Note: The most famous Grecian sphinx, that of Thebes in
               B[oe]otia, is said to have proposed a riddle to the
               Thebans, and killed those who were unable to guess it.
               The enigma was solved by [OE]dipus, whereupon the
               sphinx slew herself. [bd]Subtle as sphinx.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. Hence: A person of enigmatical character and purposes,
            especially in politics and diplomacy.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of
            the family {Sphingid[91]}; -- called also {hawk moth}.
  
      Note: The larva is a stout naked caterpillar which, when at
               rest, often assumes a position suggesting the Egyptian
               sphinx, whence the name.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) The Guinea, or sphinx, baboon ({Cynocephalus
            sphinx}).
  
      {Sphinx baboon} (Zo[94]l.), a large West African baboon
            ({Cynocephalus sphinx}), often kept in menageries.
  
      {Sphinx moth}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Sphinx}, 3.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hawk \Hawk\, n. [OE. hauk (prob. fr. Icel.), havek, AS. hafoc,
      heafoc; akin to D. havik, OHG. habuh, G. habicht, Icel.
      haukr, Sw. h[94]k, Dan. h[94]g, prob. from the root of E.
      heave.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the
      family {Falconid[91]}. They differ from the true falcons in
      lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in
      having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size
      and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were
      formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the
      word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as
      the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
  
      Note: Among the common American species are the red-tailed
               hawk ({Buteo borealis}); the red-shouldered ({B.
               lineatus}); the broad-winged ({B. Pennsylvanicus}); the
               rough-legged ({Archibuteo lagopus}); the sharp-shinned
               {Accipiter fuscus}). See {Fishhawk}, {Goshawk}, {Marsh
               hawk}, under {Marsh}, {Night hawk}, under {Night}.
  
      {Bee hawk} (Zo[94]l.), the honey buzzard.
  
      {Eagle hawk}. See under {Eagle}.
  
      {Hawk eagle} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic bird of the genus
            {Spiz[91]tus}, or {Limn[91]tus}, intermediate between the
            hawks and eagles. There are several species.
  
      {Hawk fly} (Zo[94]l.), a voracious fly of the family
            {Asilid[91]}. See {Hornet fly}, under {Hornet}.
  
      {Hawk moth}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Hawk moth}, in the Vocabulary.
           
  
      {Hawk owl}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A northern owl ({Surnia ulula}) of Europe and America. It
            flies by day, and in some respects resembles the hawks.
      (b) An owl of India ({Ninox scutellatus}).
  
      {Hawk's bill} (Horology), the pawl for the rack, in the
            striking mechanism of a clock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hawk moth \Hawk" moth`\ (?; 115). (Zo[94]l.)
      Any moth of the family {Sphingid[91]}, of which there are
      numerous genera and species. They are large, handsome moths,
      which fly mostly at twilight and hover about flowers like a
      humming bird, sucking the honey by means of a long, slender
      proboscis. The larv[91] are large, hairless caterpillars
      ornamented with green and other bright colors, and often with
      a caudal spine. See {Sphinx}, also {Tobacco worm}, and
      {Tomato worm}. Tobacco Hawk Moth ({Macrosila Carolina}), and
      its Larva, the Tobacco Worm.
  
      Note: The larv[91] of several species of hawk moths feed on
               grapevines. The elm-tree hawk moth is {Ceratomia
               Amyntor}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
            The awful ruins of the days of old . . . Or jasper tomb,
            or mutilated sphinx.                                    --Shelley.
            (b) On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually
                  represented as having the winged body of a lion, and
                  the face and breast of a young woman.
  
      Note: The most famous Grecian sphinx, that of Thebes in
               B[oe]otia, is said to have proposed a riddle to the
               Thebans, and killed those who were unable to guess it.
               The enigma was solved by [OE]dipus, whereupon the
               sphinx slew herself. [bd]Subtle as sphinx.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. Hence: A person of enigmatical character and purposes,
            especially in politics and diplomacy.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of
            the family {Sphingid[91]}; -- called also {hawk moth}.
  
      Note: The larva is a stout naked caterpillar which, when at
               rest, often assumes a position suggesting the Egyptian
               sphinx, whence the name.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) The Guinea, or sphinx, baboon ({Cynocephalus
            sphinx}).
  
      {Sphinx baboon} (Zo[94]l.), a large West African baboon
            ({Cynocephalus sphinx}), often kept in menageries.
  
      {Sphinx moth}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Sphinx}, 3.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hawk \Hawk\, n. [OE. hauk (prob. fr. Icel.), havek, AS. hafoc,
      heafoc; akin to D. havik, OHG. habuh, G. habicht, Icel.
      haukr, Sw. h[94]k, Dan. h[94]g, prob. from the root of E.
      heave.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the
      family {Falconid[91]}. They differ from the true falcons in
      lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in
      having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size
      and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were
      formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the
      word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as
      the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
  
      Note: Among the common American species are the red-tailed
               hawk ({Buteo borealis}); the red-shouldered ({B.
               lineatus}); the broad-winged ({B. Pennsylvanicus}); the
               rough-legged ({Archibuteo lagopus}); the sharp-shinned
               {Accipiter fuscus}). See {Fishhawk}, {Goshawk}, {Marsh
               hawk}, under {Marsh}, {Night hawk}, under {Night}.
  
      {Bee hawk} (Zo[94]l.), the honey buzzard.
  
      {Eagle hawk}. See under {Eagle}.
  
      {Hawk eagle} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic bird of the genus
            {Spiz[91]tus}, or {Limn[91]tus}, intermediate between the
            hawks and eagles. There are several species.
  
      {Hawk fly} (Zo[94]l.), a voracious fly of the family
            {Asilid[91]}. See {Hornet fly}, under {Hornet}.
  
      {Hawk moth}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Hawk moth}, in the Vocabulary.
           
  
      {Hawk owl}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A northern owl ({Surnia ulula}) of Europe and America. It
            flies by day, and in some respects resembles the hawks.
      (b) An owl of India ({Ninox scutellatus}).
  
      {Hawk's bill} (Horology), the pawl for the rack, in the
            striking mechanism of a clock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hawk moth \Hawk" moth`\ (?; 115). (Zo[94]l.)
      Any moth of the family {Sphingid[91]}, of which there are
      numerous genera and species. They are large, handsome moths,
      which fly mostly at twilight and hover about flowers like a
      humming bird, sucking the honey by means of a long, slender
      proboscis. The larv[91] are large, hairless caterpillars
      ornamented with green and other bright colors, and often with
      a caudal spine. See {Sphinx}, also {Tobacco worm}, and
      {Tomato worm}. Tobacco Hawk Moth ({Macrosila Carolina}), and
      its Larva, the Tobacco Worm.
  
      Note: The larv[91] of several species of hawk moths feed on
               grapevines. The elm-tree hawk moth is {Ceratomia
               Amyntor}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Groundnut \Ground"nut`\ (-n[ucr]t`), n. (Bot.)
      (a) The fruit of the {Arachis hypog[91]a} (native country
            uncertain); the peanut; the earthnut.
      (b) A leguminous, twining plant ({Apios tuberosa}), producing
            clusters of dark purple flowers and having a root
            tuberous and pleasant to the taste.
      (c) The dwarf ginseng ({Aralia trifolia}). [U. S.] --Gray.
      (d) A European plant of the genus {Bunium} ({B. flexuosum}),
            having an edible root of a globular shape and sweet,
            aromatic taste; -- called also {earthnut}, {earth
            chestnut}, {hawknut}, and {pignut}. [1913 Webster]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexameter \Hex*am"e*ter\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?] of six meters;
      (sc. [?]) hexameter verse; "e`x six + [?] measure: cf. F.
      hexam[8a]tre. See {Six}, and {Meter}.] (Gr. & Lat. Pros.)
      A verse of six feet, the first four of which may be either
      dactyls or spondees, the fifth must regularly be a dactyl,
      and the sixth always a spondee. In this species of verse are
      composed the Iliad of Homer and the [92]neid of Virgil. In
      English hexameters accent takes the place of quantity.
  
               Leaped like the | roe when he | hears in the | woodland
               the | voice of the | huntsman.               --Longfellow.
  
               Strongly it | bears us a- | long on | swelling and |
               limitless | billows, Nothing be- | fore and | nothing
               be- | hind but the | sky and the | ocean. --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexameter \Hex*am"e*ter\, a.
      Having six metrical feet, especially dactyls and spondees.
      --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexametric \Hex`a*met"ric\, Hexametrical \Hex`a*met"ric*al\, a.
      Consisting of six metrical feet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexametric \Hex`a*met"ric\, Hexametrical \Hex`a*met"ric*al\, a.
      Consisting of six metrical feet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexametrist \Hex*am"e*trist\, n.
      One who writes in hexameters. [bd]The Christian
      hexametrists.[b8] --Milman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexandrian \Hex*an"dri*an\, Hex-androus \Hex-an"drous\, a. [Cf.
      F. hexandre.] (Bot.)
      Having six stamens.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hexandrian \Hex*an"dri*an\, Hex-androus \Hex-an"drous\, a. [Cf.
      F. hexandre.] (Bot.)
      Having six stamens.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
            (e) Very abstract; difficult to comprehend or surmount;
                  grand; noble.
  
                           Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                           Plain living and high thinking are no more.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
            (f) Costly; dear in price; extravagant; as, to hold goods
                  at a high price.
  
                           If they must be good at so high a rate, they
                           know they may be safe at a cheaper. --South.
            (g) Arrogant; lofty; boastful; proud; ostentatious; --
                  used in a bad sense.
  
                           An high look and a proud heart . . . is sin.
                                                                              --Prov. xxi.
                                                                              4.
  
                           His forces, after all the high discourses,
                           amounted really but to eighteen hundred foot.
                                                                              --Clarendon.
  
      3. Possessing a characteristic quality in a supreme or
            superior degree; as, high (i. e., intense) heat; high (i.
            e., full or quite) noon; high (i. e., rich or spicy)
            seasoning; high (i. e., complete) pleasure; high (i. e.,
            deep or vivid) color; high (i. e., extensive, thorough)
            scholarship, etc.
  
                     High time it is this war now ended were. --Spenser.
  
                     High sauces and spices are fetched from the Indies.
                                                                              --Baker.
  
      4. (Cookery) Strong-scented; slightly tainted; as, epicures
            do not cook game before it is high.
  
      5. (Mus.) Acute or sharp; -- opposed to {grave} or {low}; as,
            a high note.
  
      6. (Phon.) Made with a high position of some part of the
            tongue in relation to the palate, as [emac] ([emac]ve),
            [oomac] (f[oomac]d). See Guide to Pronunciation,
            [sect][sect] 10, 11.
  
      {High admiral}, the chief admiral.
  
      {High altar}, the principal altar in a church.
  
      {High and dry}, out of water; out of reach of the current or
            tide; -- said of a vessel, aground or beached.
  
      {High and mighty} arrogant; overbearing. [Colloq.]
  
      {High art}, art which deals with lofty and dignified subjects
            and is characterized by an elevated style avoiding all
            meretricious display.
  
      {High bailiff}, the chief bailiff.
  
      {High Church}, [and] {Low Church}, two ecclesiastical parties
            in the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal
            Church. The high-churchmen emphasize the doctrine of the
            apostolic succession, and hold, in general, to a
            sacramental presence in the Eucharist, to baptismal
            regeneration, and to the sole validity of Episcopal
            ordination. They attach much importance to ceremonies and
            symbols in worship. Low-churchmen lay less stress on these
            points, and, in many instances, reject altogether the
            peculiar tenets of the high-church school. See {Broad
            Church}.
  
      {High constable} (Law), a chief of constabulary. See
            {Constable}, n., 2.
  
      {High commission court},a court of ecclesiastical
            jurisdiction in England erected and united to the regal
            power by Queen Elizabeth in 1559. On account of the abuse
            of its powers it was abolished in 1641.
  
      {High day} (Script.), a holy or feast day. --John xix. 31.
  
      {High festival} (Eccl.), a festival to be observed with full
            ceremonial.
  
      {High German}, [or] {High Dutch}. See under {German}.
  
      {High jinks}, an old Scottish pastime; hence, noisy revelry;
            wild sport. [Colloq.] [bd]All the high jinks of the
            county, when the lad comes of age.[b8] --F. Harrison.
  
      {High latitude} (Geog.), one designated by the higher
            figures; consequently, a latitude remote from the equator.
           
  
      {High life}, life among the aristocracy or the rich.
  
      {High liver}, one who indulges in a rich diet.
  
      {High living}, a feeding upon rich, pampering food.
  
      {High Mass}. (R. C. Ch.) See under {Mass}.
  
      {High milling}, a process of making flour from grain by
            several successive grindings and intermediate sorting,
            instead of by a single grinding.
  
      {High noon}, the time when the sun is in the meridian.
  
      {High place} (Script.), an eminence or mound on which
            sacrifices were offered.
  
      {High priest}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {High relief}. (Fine Arts) See {Alto-rilievo}.
  
      {High school}. See under {School}.
  
      {High seas} (Law), the open sea; the part of the ocean not in
            the territorial waters of any particular sovereignty,
            usually distant three miles or more from the coast line.
            --Wharton.
  
      {High steam}, steam having a high pressure.
  
      {High steward}, the chief steward.
  
      {High tea}, tea with meats and extra relishes.
  
      {High tide}, the greatest flow of the tide; high water.
  
      {High time}.
            (a) Quite time; full time for the occasion.
            (b) A time of great excitement or enjoyment; a carousal.
                  [Slang]
  
      {High treason}, treason against the sovereign or the state,
            the highest civil offense. See {Treason}.
  
      Note: It is now sufficient to speak of high treason as
               treason simply, seeing that petty treason, as a
               distinct offense, has been abolished. --Mozley & W.
  
      {High water}, the utmost flow or greatest elevation of the
            tide; also, the time of such elevation.
  
      {High-water mark}.
            (a) That line of the seashore to which the waters
                  ordinarily reach at high water.
            (b) A mark showing the highest level reached by water in a
                  river or other body of fresh water, as in time of
                  freshet.
  
      {High-water shrub} (Bot.), a composite shrub ({Iva
            frutescens}), growing in salt marshes along the Atlantic
            coast of the United States.
  
      {High wine}, distilled spirits containing a high percentage
            of alcohol; -- usually in the plural.
  
      {To be on a high horse}, to be on one's dignity; to bear
            one's self loftily. [Colloq.]
  
      {With a high hand}.
            (a) With power; in force; triumphantly. [bd]The children
                  of Israel went out with a high hand.[b8] --Ex. xiv. 8.
            (b) In an overbearing manner, arbitrarily. [bd]They
                  governed the city with a high hand.[b8] --Jowett
                  (Thucyd. ).
  
      Syn: Tall; lofty; elevated; noble; exalted; supercilious;
               proud; violent; full; dear. See {Tall}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   High \High\, adv.
      In a high manner; in a high place; to a great altitude; to a
      great degree; largely; in a superior manner; eminently;
      powerfully. [bd]And reasoned high.[bd] --Milton. [bd]I can
      not reach so high.[b8] --Shak.
  
      Note: High is extensively used in the formation of compound
               words, most of which are of very obvious signification;
               as, high-aimed, high-arched, high-aspiring,
               high-bearing, high-boasting, high-browed, high-crested,
               high-crowned, high-designing, high-engendered,
               high-feeding, high-flaming, high-flavored, high-gazing,
               high-heaped, high-heeled, high-priced, high-reared,
               high-resolved, high-rigged, high-seated,
               high-shouldered, high-soaring, high-towering,
               high-voiced, and the like.
  
      {High and low}, everywhere; in all supposable places; as, I
            hunted high and low. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
            (e) Very abstract; difficult to comprehend or surmount;
                  grand; noble.
  
                           Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                           Plain living and high thinking are no more.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
            (f) Costly; dear in price; extravagant; as, to hold goods
                  at a high price.
  
                           If they must be good at so high a rate, they
                           know they may be safe at a cheaper. --South.
            (g) Arrogant; lofty; boastful; proud; ostentatious; --
                  used in a bad sense.
  
                           An high look and a proud heart . . . is sin.
                                                                              --Prov. xxi.
                                                                              4.
  
                           His forces, after all the high discourses,
                           amounted really but to eighteen hundred foot.
                                                                              --Clarendon.
  
      3. Possessing a characteristic quality in a supreme or
            superior degree; as, high (i. e., intense) heat; high (i.
            e., full or quite) noon; high (i. e., rich or spicy)
            seasoning; high (i. e., complete) pleasure; high (i. e.,
            deep or vivid) color; high (i. e., extensive, thorough)
            scholarship, etc.
  
                     High time it is this war now ended were. --Spenser.
  
                     High sauces and spices are fetched from the Indies.
                                                                              --Baker.
  
      4. (Cookery) Strong-scented; slightly tainted; as, epicures
            do not cook game before it is high.
  
      5. (Mus.) Acute or sharp; -- opposed to {grave} or {low}; as,
            a high note.
  
      6. (Phon.) Made with a high position of some part of the
            tongue in relation to the palate, as [emac] ([emac]ve),
            [oomac] (f[oomac]d). See Guide to Pronunciation,
            [sect][sect] 10, 11.
  
      {High admiral}, the chief admiral.
  
      {High altar}, the principal altar in a church.
  
      {High and dry}, out of water; out of reach of the current or
            tide; -- said of a vessel, aground or beached.
  
      {High and mighty} arrogant; overbearing. [Colloq.]
  
      {High art}, art which deals with lofty and dignified subjects
            and is characterized by an elevated style avoiding all
            meretricious display.
  
      {High bailiff}, the chief bailiff.
  
      {High Church}, [and] {Low Church}, two ecclesiastical parties
            in the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal
            Church. The high-churchmen emphasize the doctrine of the
            apostolic succession, and hold, in general, to a
            sacramental presence in the Eucharist, to baptismal
            regeneration, and to the sole validity of Episcopal
            ordination. They attach much importance to ceremonies and
            symbols in worship. Low-churchmen lay less stress on these
            points, and, in many instances, reject altogether the
            peculiar tenets of the high-church school. See {Broad
            Church}.
  
      {High constable} (Law), a chief of constabulary. See
            {Constable}, n., 2.
  
      {High commission court},a court of ecclesiastical
            jurisdiction in England erected and united to the regal
            power by Queen Elizabeth in 1559. On account of the abuse
            of its powers it was abolished in 1641.
  
      {High day} (Script.), a holy or feast day. --John xix. 31.
  
      {High festival} (Eccl.), a festival to be observed with full
            ceremonial.
  
      {High German}, [or] {High Dutch}. See under {German}.
  
      {High jinks}, an old Scottish pastime; hence, noisy revelry;
            wild sport. [Colloq.] [bd]All the high jinks of the
            county, when the lad comes of age.[b8] --F. Harrison.
  
      {High latitude} (Geog.), one designated by the higher
            figures; consequently, a latitude remote from the equator.
           
  
      {High life}, life among the aristocracy or the rich.
  
      {High liver}, one who indulges in a rich diet.
  
      {High living}, a feeding upon rich, pampering food.
  
      {High Mass}. (R. C. Ch.) See under {Mass}.
  
      {High milling}, a process of making flour from grain by
            several successive grindings and intermediate sorting,
            instead of by a single grinding.
  
      {High noon}, the time when the sun is in the meridian.
  
      {High place} (Script.), an eminence or mound on which
            sacrifices were offered.
  
      {High priest}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {High relief}. (Fine Arts) See {Alto-rilievo}.
  
      {High school}. See under {School}.
  
      {High seas} (Law), the open sea; the part of the ocean not in
            the territorial waters of any particular sovereignty,
            usually distant three miles or more from the coast line.
            --Wharton.
  
      {High steam}, steam having a high pressure.
  
      {High steward}, the chief steward.
  
      {High tea}, tea with meats and extra relishes.
  
      {High tide}, the greatest flow of the tide; high water.
  
      {High time}.
            (a) Quite time; full time for the occasion.
            (b) A time of great excitement or enjoyment; a carousal.
                  [Slang]
  
      {High treason}, treason against the sovereign or the state,
            the highest civil offense. See {Treason}.
  
      Note: It is now sufficient to speak of high treason as
               treason simply, seeing that petty treason, as a
               distinct offense, has been abolished. --Mozley & W.
  
      {High water}, the utmost flow or greatest elevation of the
            tide; also, the time of such elevation.
  
      {High-water mark}.
            (a) That line of the seashore to which the waters
                  ordinarily reach at high water.
            (b) A mark showing the highest level reached by water in a
                  river or other body of fresh water, as in time of
                  freshet.
  
      {High-water shrub} (Bot.), a composite shrub ({Iva
            frutescens}), growing in salt marshes along the Atlantic
            coast of the United States.
  
      {High wine}, distilled spirits containing a high percentage
            of alcohol; -- usually in the plural.
  
      {To be on a high horse}, to be on one's dignity; to bear
            one's self loftily. [Colloq.]
  
      {With a high hand}.
            (a) With power; in force; triumphantly. [bd]The children
                  of Israel went out with a high hand.[b8] --Ex. xiv. 8.
            (b) In an overbearing manner, arbitrarily. [bd]They
                  governed the city with a high hand.[b8] --Jowett
                  (Thucyd. ).
  
      Syn: Tall; lofty; elevated; noble; exalted; supercilious;
               proud; violent; full; dear. See {Tall}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   High-handed \High"-hand`ed\, a.
      Overbearing; oppressive; arbitrary; violent; as, a
      high-handed act.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   High-mettled \High"-met`tled\, a.
      Having abundance of mettle; ardent; full of fire; as, a
      high-mettled steed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hognut \Hog"nut`\, n. (Bot.)
      (a) The pignut. See {Hickory}.
      (b) In England, the {Bunium flexuosum}, a tuberous plant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {On one's own hook}, on one's own account or responsibility;
            by one's self. [Colloq. U.S.] --Bartlett.
  
      {To go off the hooks}, to die. [Colloq.] --Thackeray.
  
      {Bid hook}, a small boat hook.
  
      {Chain hook}. See under {Chain}.
  
      {Deck hook}, a horizontal knee or frame, in the bow of a
            ship, on which the forward part of the deck rests.
  
      {Hook and eye}, one of the small wire hooks and loops for
            fastening together the opposite edges of a garment, etc.
           
  
      {Hook bill} (Zo[94]l.), the strongly curved beak of a bird.
           
  
      {Hook ladder}, a ladder with hooks at the end by which it can
            be suspended, as from the top of a wall.
  
      {Hook motion} (Steam Engin.), a valve gear which is reversed
            by V hooks.
  
      {Hook squid}, any squid which has the arms furnished with
            hooks, instead of suckers, as in the genera
            {Enoploteuthis} and {Onychteuthis}.
  
      {Hook wrench}, a wrench or spanner, having a hook at the end,
            instead of a jaw, for turning a bolthead, nut, or
            coupling.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {On one's own hook}, on one's own account or responsibility;
            by one's self. [Colloq. U.S.] --Bartlett.
  
      {To go off the hooks}, to die. [Colloq.] --Thackeray.
  
      {Bid hook}, a small boat hook.
  
      {Chain hook}. See under {Chain}.
  
      {Deck hook}, a horizontal knee or frame, in the bow of a
            ship, on which the forward part of the deck rests.
  
      {Hook and eye}, one of the small wire hooks and loops for
            fastening together the opposite edges of a garment, etc.
           
  
      {Hook bill} (Zo[94]l.), the strongly curved beak of a bird.
           
  
      {Hook ladder}, a ladder with hooks at the end by which it can
            be suspended, as from the top of a wall.
  
      {Hook motion} (Steam Engin.), a valve gear which is reversed
            by V hooks.
  
      {Hook squid}, any squid which has the arms furnished with
            hooks, instead of suckers, as in the genera
            {Enoploteuthis} and {Onychteuthis}.
  
      {Hook wrench}, a wrench or spanner, having a hook at the end,
            instead of a jaw, for turning a bolthead, nut, or
            coupling.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   House \House\, n.; pl. {Houses}. [OE. hous, hus, AS. h[?]s; akin
      to OS. & OFries. h[?]s, D. huis, OHG. h[?]s, G. haus, Icel.
      h[?]s, Sw. hus, Dan. huus, Goth. gudh[?]s, house of God,
      temple; and prob. to E. hide to conceal. See {Hide}, and cf.
      {Hoard}, {Husband}, {Hussy}, {Husting}.]
      1. A structure intended or used as a habitation or shelter
            for animals of any kind; but especially, a building or
            edifice for the habitation of man; a dwelling place, a
            mansion.
  
                     Houses are built to live in; not to look on.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
                     Bees with smoke and doves with noisome stench Are
                     from their hives and houses driven away. --Shak.
  
      2. Household affairs; domestic concerns; particularly in the
            phrase to keep house. See below.
  
      3. Those who dwell in the same house; a household.
  
                     One that feared God with all his house. --Acts x. 2.
  
      4. A family of ancestors, descendants, and kindred; a race of
            persons from the same stock; a tribe; especially, a noble
            family or an illustrious race; as, the house of Austria;
            the house of Hanover; the house of Israel.
  
                     The last remaining pillar of their house, The one
                     transmitter of their ancient name.      --Tennyson.
  
      5. One of the estates of a kingdom or other government
            assembled in parliament or legislature; a body of men
            united in a legislative capacity; as, the House of Lords;
            the House of Commons; the House of Representatives; also,
            a quorum of such a body. See {Congress}, and {Parliament}.
  
      6. (Com.) A firm, or commercial establishment.
  
      7. A public house; an inn; a hotel.
  
      8. (Astrol.) A twelfth part of the heavens, as divided by six
            circles intersecting at the north and south points of the
            horizon, used by astrologers in noting the positions of
            the heavenly bodies, and casting horoscopes or nativities.
            The houses were regarded as fixed in respect to the
            horizon, and numbered from the one at the eastern horizon,
            called the ascendant, first house, or house of life,
            downward, or in the direction of the earth's revolution,
            the stars and planets passing through them in the reverse
            order every twenty-four hours.
  
      9. A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of
            a piece.
  
      10. An audience; an assembly of hearers, as at a lecture, a
            theater, etc.; as, a thin or a full house.
  
      11. The body, as the habitation of the soul.
  
                     This mortal house I'll ruin, Do C[91]sar what he
                     can.                                                --Shak.
  
      12.
  
      Usage: [With an adj., as narrow, dark, etc.] The grave.
                  [bd]The narrow house.[b8] --Bryant.
  
      Note: House is much used adjectively and as the first element
               of compounds. The sense is usually obvious; as, house
               cricket, housemaid, house painter, housework.
  
      {House ant} (Zo[94]l.), a very small, yellowish brown ant
            ({Myrmica molesta}), which often infests houses, and
            sometimes becomes a great pest.
  
      {House of bishops} (Prot. Epis. Ch.), one of the two bodies
            composing a general convertion, the other being House of
            Clerical and Lay Deputies.
  
      {House boat}, a covered boat used as a dwelling.
  
      {House of call}, a place, usually a public house, where
            journeymen connected with a particular trade assemble when
            out of work, ready for the call of employers. [Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Housemaid \House"maid`\, n.
      A female servant employed to do housework, esp. to take care
      of the rooms.
  
      {Housemaid's knee} (Med.), a swelling over the knee, due to
            an enlargement of the bursa in the front of the kneepan;
            -- so called because frequently occurring in servant girls
            who work upon their knees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Housemaid \House"maid`\, n.
      A female servant employed to do housework, esp. to take care
      of the rooms.
  
      {Housemaid's knee} (Med.), a swelling over the knee, due to
            an enlargement of the bursa in the front of the kneepan;
            -- so called because frequently occurring in servant girls
            who work upon their knees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Housemate \House"mate`\, n.
      One who dwells in the same house with another. --R. Browning.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Huguenot \Hu"gue*not\, n. [F., properly a dim. of Hugues. The
      name is probably derived from the Christian name (Huguenot)
      of some person conspicuous as a reformer.] (Eccl. Hist.)
      A French Protestant of the period of the religious wars in
      France in the 16th century.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Huguenotism \Hu"gue*not*ism\, n. [Cf. F. huguenotisme.]
      The religion of the Huguenots in France.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Zircon \Zir"con\, n. [F., the same word as jargon. See {Jargon}
      a variety of zircon.] (Min.)
      A mineral occurring in tetragonal crystals, usually of a
      brown or gray color. It consists of silica and zirconia. A
      red variety, used as a gem, is called {hyacinth}. Colorless,
      pale-yellow or smoky-brown varieties from Ceylon are called
      {jargon}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinth \Hy"a*cinth\, n. [L. hyacinthus a kind of flower, prob.
      the iris, gladiolus, or larkspur, also a kind of gem, perh.
      the sapphire; as, a proper name, Hyacinthus, a beautiful
      Laconian youth, beloved by Apollo, fr. Gr. [?], [?]: cf. F.
      hyacinthe. Cf. {Jacinth}. The hyacinth was fabled to have
      sprung from the blood of Hyacinthus, who was accidentally
      slain by Apollo.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) A bulbous plant of the genus {Hyacinthus}, bearing
                  beautiful spikes of fragrant flowers. {H. orientalis}
                  is a common variety.
            (b) A plant of the genus {Camassia} ({C. Farseri}), called
                  also {Eastern camass}; wild hyacinth.
            (c) The name also given to {Scilla Peruviana}, a
                  Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces
                  white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from
                  a mistake as to its origin, {Hyacinth of Peru}.
  
      2. (Min.) A red variety of zircon, sometimes used as a gem.
            See {Zircon}.
  
      {Hyacinth bean} (Bot.), a climbing leguminous plant
            ({Dolichos Lablab}), related to the true bean. It has dark
            purple flowers and fruit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Zircon \Zir"con\, n. [F., the same word as jargon. See {Jargon}
      a variety of zircon.] (Min.)
      A mineral occurring in tetragonal crystals, usually of a
      brown or gray color. It consists of silica and zirconia. A
      red variety, used as a gem, is called {hyacinth}. Colorless,
      pale-yellow or smoky-brown varieties from Ceylon are called
      {jargon}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinth \Hy"a*cinth\, n. [L. hyacinthus a kind of flower, prob.
      the iris, gladiolus, or larkspur, also a kind of gem, perh.
      the sapphire; as, a proper name, Hyacinthus, a beautiful
      Laconian youth, beloved by Apollo, fr. Gr. [?], [?]: cf. F.
      hyacinthe. Cf. {Jacinth}. The hyacinth was fabled to have
      sprung from the blood of Hyacinthus, who was accidentally
      slain by Apollo.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) A bulbous plant of the genus {Hyacinthus}, bearing
                  beautiful spikes of fragrant flowers. {H. orientalis}
                  is a common variety.
            (b) A plant of the genus {Camassia} ({C. Farseri}), called
                  also {Eastern camass}; wild hyacinth.
            (c) The name also given to {Scilla Peruviana}, a
                  Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces
                  white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from
                  a mistake as to its origin, {Hyacinth of Peru}.
  
      2. (Min.) A red variety of zircon, sometimes used as a gem.
            See {Zircon}.
  
      {Hyacinth bean} (Bot.), a climbing leguminous plant
            ({Dolichos Lablab}), related to the true bean. It has dark
            purple flowers and fruit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinth \Hy"a*cinth\, n. [L. hyacinthus a kind of flower, prob.
      the iris, gladiolus, or larkspur, also a kind of gem, perh.
      the sapphire; as, a proper name, Hyacinthus, a beautiful
      Laconian youth, beloved by Apollo, fr. Gr. [?], [?]: cf. F.
      hyacinthe. Cf. {Jacinth}. The hyacinth was fabled to have
      sprung from the blood of Hyacinthus, who was accidentally
      slain by Apollo.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) A bulbous plant of the genus {Hyacinthus}, bearing
                  beautiful spikes of fragrant flowers. {H. orientalis}
                  is a common variety.
            (b) A plant of the genus {Camassia} ({C. Farseri}), called
                  also {Eastern camass}; wild hyacinth.
            (c) The name also given to {Scilla Peruviana}, a
                  Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces
                  white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from
                  a mistake as to its origin, {Hyacinth of Peru}.
  
      2. (Min.) A red variety of zircon, sometimes used as a gem.
            See {Zircon}.
  
      {Hyacinth bean} (Bot.), a climbing leguminous plant
            ({Dolichos Lablab}), related to the true bean. It has dark
            purple flowers and fruit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinth \Hy"a*cinth\, n. [L. hyacinthus a kind of flower, prob.
      the iris, gladiolus, or larkspur, also a kind of gem, perh.
      the sapphire; as, a proper name, Hyacinthus, a beautiful
      Laconian youth, beloved by Apollo, fr. Gr. [?], [?]: cf. F.
      hyacinthe. Cf. {Jacinth}. The hyacinth was fabled to have
      sprung from the blood of Hyacinthus, who was accidentally
      slain by Apollo.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) A bulbous plant of the genus {Hyacinthus}, bearing
                  beautiful spikes of fragrant flowers. {H. orientalis}
                  is a common variety.
            (b) A plant of the genus {Camassia} ({C. Farseri}), called
                  also {Eastern camass}; wild hyacinth.
            (c) The name also given to {Scilla Peruviana}, a
                  Mediterranean plant, one variety of which produces
                  white, and another blue, flowers; -- called also, from
                  a mistake as to its origin, {Hyacinth of Peru}.
  
      2. (Min.) A red variety of zircon, sometimes used as a gem.
            See {Zircon}.
  
      {Hyacinth bean} (Bot.), a climbing leguminous plant
            ({Dolichos Lablab}), related to the true bean. It has dark
            purple flowers and fruit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinthian \Hy`a*cin"thi*an\, a.
      Hyacinthine. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hyacinthine \Hy`a*cin"thine\, a. [L. hyacinthinus, Gr. [?].]
      Belonging to the hyacinth; resemblingthe hyacinth; in color
      like the hyacinth. --Milton.
  
               His curling locks like hyacinthine flowers. --Cowper.
  
               The hyacinthine boy, for whom Morn well might break and
               April bloom.                                          --Emerson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Hyoganoidei \[d8]Hy`o*ga*noi"de*i\, n. pl. [NL. See {Hyo-},
      and {Canoidei}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A division of ganoid fishes, including the gar pikes and
      bowfins. -- {Hy`o*ga"noid}, a.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hacienda Heights, CA (CDP, FIPS 31596)
      Location: 33.99575 N, 117.97137 W
      Population (1990): 52354 (16091 housing units)
      Area: 28.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 91745

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hawaii County, HI (county, FIPS 1)
      Location: 19.59748 N, 155.49850 W
      Population (1990): 120317 (48253 housing units)
      Area: 10433.1 sq km (land), 2742.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hayes Center, NE (village, FIPS 21660)
      Location: 40.51125 N, 101.01998 W
      Population (1990): 259 (136 housing units)
      Area: 0.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 69032

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hayes County, NE (county, FIPS 85)
      Location: 40.52703 N, 101.05956 W
      Population (1990): 1222 (583 housing units)
      Area: 1847.1 sq km (land), 0.6 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hays County, TX (county, FIPS 209)
      Location: 30.05756 N, 98.02953 W
      Population (1990): 65614 (25247 housing units)
      Area: 1755.9 sq km (land), 5.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Hokendauqua, PA (CDP, FIPS 35120)
      Location: 40.65867 N, 75.49582 W
      Population (1990): 3413 (1379 housing units)
      Area: 2.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 18052

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Huguenot, NY
      Zip code(s): 12746

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   hack mode n.   1. What one is in when hacking, of course.   2.
   More specifically, a Zen-like state of total focus on The Problem
   that may be achieved when one is hacking (this is why every good
   hacker is part mystic).   Ability to enter such concentration at will
   correlates strongly with wizardliness; it is one of the most
   important skills learned during {larval stage}.   Sometimes amplified
   as `deep hack mode'.
  
      Being yanked out of hack mode (see {priority interrupt}) may be
   experienced as a physical shock, and the sensation of being in hack
   mode is more than a little habituating.   The intensity of this
   experience is probably by itself sufficient explanation for the
   existence of hackers, and explains why many resist being promoted
   out of positions where they can code.   See also {cyberspace} (sense
   2).
  
      Some aspects of hacker etiquette will appear quite odd to an
   observer unaware of the high value placed on hack mode.   For
   example, if someone appears at your door, it is perfectly okay to
   hold up a hand (without turning one's eyes away from the screen) to
   avoid being interrupted.   One may read, type, and interact with the
   computer for quite some time before further acknowledging the
   other's presence (of course, he or she is reciprocally free to leave
   without a word).   The understanding is that you might be in {hack
   mode} with a lot of delicate {state} (sense 2) in your head, and you
   dare not {swap} that context out until you have reached a good point
   to pause. See also {juggling eggs}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Hackintosh n.   1. An Apple Lisa that has been hacked into
   emulating a Macintosh (also called a `Mac XL').   2. A Macintosh
   assembled from parts theoretically belonging to different models in
   the line.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   hack mode
  
      Engaged in {hack}ing.   A Zen-like state of total
      focus on The Problem that may be achieved when one is hacking
      (this is why every good hacker is part mystic).   Ability to
      enter such concentration at will correlates strongly with
      wizardliness; it is one of the most important skills learned
      during {larval stage}.   Sometimes amplified as "deep hack
      mode".
  
      Being yanked out of hack mode (see {priority interrupt}) may
      be experienced as a physical shock, and the sensation of being
      in hack mode is more than a little habituating.   The intensity
      of this experience is probably by itself sufficient
      explanation for the existence of hackers, and explains why
      many resist being promoted out of positions where they can
      code.   See also {cyberspace}.
  
      Some aspects of hackish etiquette will appear quite odd to an
      observer unaware of the high value placed on hack mode.   For
      example, if someone appears at your door, it is perfectly okay
      to hold up a hand (without turning one's eyes away from the
      screen) to avoid being interrupted.   One may read, type, and
      interact with the computer for quite some time before further
      acknowledging the other's presence (of course, he or she is
      reciprocally free to leave without a word).   The understanding
      is that you might be in {hack mode} with a lot of delicate
      state in your head, and you dare not {swap} that context out
      until you have reached a good point to pause.   See also
      {juggling eggs}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1996-07-31)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Hackintosh
  
      1. An {Apple Lisa} that has been hacked
      into emulating a {Macintosh} (also called a "Mac XL").
  
      2. A {Macintosh} assembled from parts
      theoretically belonging to different models in the line.
  
      (1995-03-08)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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