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   Gael
         n 1: a Gaelic-speaking Celt in Ireland or Scotland or the Isle
               of Man

English Dictionary: glänzendweiß by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gaily
adv
  1. in a gay manner; "the scandals were gaily diverting"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gal
n
  1. United States liquid unit equal to 4 quarts or 3.785 liters
    Synonym(s): gallon, gal
  2. a unit of gravitational acceleration equal to one centimeter per second per second (named after Galileo)
  3. alliterative term for girl (or woman)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gala
n
  1. a gay festivity [syn: gala, gala affair, jamboree, blowout]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gale
n
  1. a strong wind moving 45-90 knots; force 7 to 10 on Beaufort scale
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
galea
n
  1. an organ shaped like a helmet; usually a vaulted and enlarged petal as in Aconitum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gall
n
  1. an open sore on the back of a horse caused by ill-fitting or badly adjusted saddle
    Synonym(s): saddle sore, gall
  2. a skin sore caused by chafing
  3. abnormal swelling of plant tissue caused by insects or microorganisms or injury
  4. a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
    Synonym(s): resentment, bitterness, gall, rancor, rancour
  5. a digestive juice secreted by the liver and stored in the gallbladder; aids in the digestion of fats
    Synonym(s): bile, gall
  6. the trait of being rude and impertinent; inclined to take liberties
    Synonym(s): crust, gall, impertinence, impudence, insolence, cheekiness, freshness
v
  1. become or make sore by or as if by rubbing [syn: chafe, gall, fret]
  2. irritate or vex; "It galls me that we lost the suit"
    Synonym(s): gall, irk
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
galley
n
  1. a large medieval vessel with a single deck propelled by sails and oars with guns at stern and prow; a complement of 1,000 men; used mainly in the Mediterranean for war and trading
  2. (classical antiquity) a crescent-shaped seagoing vessel propelled by oars
  3. the kitchen area for food preparation on an airliner
  4. the area for food preparation on a ship
    Synonym(s): galley, ship's galley, caboose, cookhouse
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gallia
n
  1. an ancient region of western Europe that included what is now northern Italy and France and Belgium and part of Germany and the Netherlands
    Synonym(s): Gaul, Gallia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Galloway
n
  1. a district in southwestern Scotland
  2. breed of hardy black chiefly beef cattle native to Scotland
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Galway
n
  1. a port city in western Ireland on Galway Bay
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gaol
n
  1. a correctional institution used to detain persons who are in the lawful custody of the government (either accused persons awaiting trial or convicted persons serving a sentence)
    Synonym(s): jail, jailhouse, gaol, clink, slammer, poky, pokey
v
  1. lock up or confine, in or as in a jail; "The suspects were imprisoned without trial"; "the murderer was incarcerated for the rest of his life"
    Synonym(s): imprison, incarcerate, lag, immure, put behind bars, jail, jug, gaol, put away, remand
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gaul
n
  1. a person of French descent
    Synonym(s): frog, Gaul
  2. a Celt of ancient Gaul
  3. an ancient region of western Europe that included what is now northern Italy and France and Belgium and part of Germany and the Netherlands
    Synonym(s): Gaul, Gallia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gayal
n
  1. ox of southeast Asia sometimes considered a domesticated breed of the gaur
    Synonym(s): gayal, mithan, Bibos frontalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gayly
adv
  1. in a joyous manner; "they shouted happily" [syn: happily, merrily, mirthfully, gayly, blithely, jubilantly]
    Antonym(s): unhappily
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gel
n
  1. a colloid in a more solid form than a sol [syn: gel, colloidal gel]
  2. a thin translucent membrane used over stage lights for color effects
    Synonym(s): gelatin, gel
v
  1. become a gel; "The solid, when heated, gelled"
  2. apply a styling gel to; "she mousses her hair"
    Synonym(s): mousse, gel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gelly
n
  1. a type of dynamite in which the nitroglycerin is absorbed in a base of wood pulp and sodium or potassium nitrate
    Synonym(s): gelignite, gelly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ghillie
n
  1. a shoe without a tongue and with decorative lacing up the instep
    Synonym(s): ghillie, gillie
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ghoul
n
  1. someone who takes bodies from graves and sells them for anatomical dissection
    Synonym(s): graverobber, ghoul, body snatcher
  2. an evil spirit or ghost
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gila
n
  1. a river that rises in western New Mexico and flows westward through southern Arizona to become a tributary of the Colorado River
    Synonym(s): Gila, Gila River
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gill
n
  1. a British imperial capacity unit (liquid or dry) equal to 5 fluid ounces or 142.066 cubic centimeters
  2. a United States liquid unit equal to 4 fluid ounces
  3. any of the radiating leaflike spore-producing structures on the underside of the cap of a mushroom or similar fungus
    Synonym(s): gill, lamella
  4. respiratory organ of aquatic animals that breathe oxygen dissolved in water
    Synonym(s): gill, branchia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gillie
n
  1. a young male attendant on a Scottish Highlander chief
  2. a shoe without a tongue and with decorative lacing up the instep
    Synonym(s): ghillie, gillie
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
glee
n
  1. great merriment [syn: hilarity, mirth, mirthfulness, glee, gleefulness]
  2. malicious satisfaction
    Synonym(s): gloat, gloating, glee
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
glia
n
  1. sustentacular tissue that surrounds and supports neurons in the central nervous system; glial and neural cells together compose the tissue of the central nervous system
    Synonym(s): neuroglia, glia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
glow
n
  1. an alert and refreshed state
    Synonym(s): freshness, glow
  2. light from nonthermal sources
    Synonym(s): luminescence, glow
  3. the phenomenon of light emission by a body as its temperature is raised
    Synonym(s): incandescence, glow
  4. a feeling of considerable warmth; "the glow of new love"; "a glow of regret"
  5. a steady even light without flames
  6. the amount of electromagnetic radiation leaving or arriving at a point on a surface
    Synonym(s): radiance, glow, glowing
  7. an appearance of reflected light
    Synonym(s): gleam, gleaming, glow, lambency
v
  1. emit a steady even light without flames; "The fireflies were glowing and flying about in the garden"
  2. have a complexion with a strong bright color, such as red or pink; "Her face glowed when she came out of the sauna"
    Synonym(s): glow, beam, radiate, shine
  3. shine intensely, as if with heat; "The coals were glowing in the dark"; "The candles were burning"
    Synonym(s): burn, glow
  4. be exuberant or high-spirited; "Make the people's hearts glow"
  5. experience a feeling of well-being or happiness, as from good health or an intense emotion; "She was beaming with joy"; "Her face radiated with happiness"
    Synonym(s): glow, beam, radiate, shine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
glue
n
  1. cement consisting of a sticky substance that is used as an adhesive
    Synonym(s): glue, gum, mucilage
v
  1. join or attach with or as if with glue; "paste the sign on the wall"; "cut and paste the sentence in the text"
    Synonym(s): glue, paste
  2. be fixed as if by glue; "His eyes were glued on her"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gluey
adj
  1. having the sticky properties of an adhesive [syn: gluey, glutinous, gummy, mucilaginous, pasty, sticky, viscid, viscous]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
goal
n
  1. the state of affairs that a plan is intended to achieve and that (when achieved) terminates behavior intended to achieve it; "the ends justify the means"
    Synonym(s): goal, end
  2. the place designated as the end (as of a race or journey); "a crowd assembled at the finish"; "he was nearly exhausted as their destination came into view"
    Synonym(s): finish, destination, goal
  3. game equipment consisting of the place toward which players of a game try to advance a ball or puck in order to score points
  4. a successful attempt at scoring; "the winning goal came with less than a minute left to play"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
goalie
n
  1. the soccer or hockey player assigned to protect the goal
    Synonym(s): goalkeeper, goalie, goaltender, netkeeper, netminder
  2. the defensive position on an ice hockey or soccer or lacrosse team who stands in front of the goal and tries to prevent opposing players from scoring
    Synonym(s): goalkeeper, goalie, goaltender, netkeeper
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guayule
n
  1. much-branched subshrub with silvery leaves and small white flowers of Texas and northern Mexico; cultivated as a source of rubber
    Synonym(s): guayule, Parthenium argentatum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guile
n
  1. shrewdness as demonstrated by being skilled in deception
    Synonym(s): craft, craftiness, cunning, foxiness, guile, slyness, wiliness
  2. the quality of being crafty
    Synonym(s): craftiness, deceitfulness, guile
  3. the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
    Synonym(s): trickery, chicanery, chicane, guile, wile, shenanigan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gula
n
  1. the Babylonian goddess of healing and consort of Ninurta
  2. eating to excess (personified as one of the deadly sins)
    Synonym(s): gluttony, overeating, gula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gull
n
  1. a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of
    Synonym(s): chump, fool, gull, mark, patsy, fall guy, sucker, soft touch, mug
  2. mostly white aquatic bird having long pointed wings and short legs
    Synonym(s): gull, seagull, sea gull
v
  1. make a fool or dupe of
    Synonym(s): fool, gull, befool
  2. fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!"
    Synonym(s): gull, dupe, slang, befool, cod, fool, put on, take in, put one over, put one across
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gully
n
  1. deep ditch cut by running water (especially after a prolonged downpour)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gulo
n
  1. a genus of Mustelidae
    Synonym(s): Gulo, genus Gulo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gulu
n
  1. a city in northern Uganda
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gael \Gael\, n.sing. & pl. [See {Gaelic}.] (Ethnol.)
      A Celt or the Celts of the Scotch Highlands or of Ireland;
      now esp., a Scotch Highlander of Celtic origin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaily \Gai"ly\, adv. [From {Gay}.]
      Merrily; showily. See {gaily}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gala \Ga"la\, n. [F. gala show, pomp, fr. It. gala finery, gala;
      of German origin. See {Gallant}.]
      Pomp, show, or festivity. --Macaulay.
  
      {Gala day}, a day of mirth and festivity; a holiday.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\, n. [OE. gal. See {Gale} wind.]
      A song or story. [Obs.] --Toone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\, v. i. (Naut.)
      To sale, or sail fast.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\, v. i. [AS. galan. See 1st {Gale}.]
      To sing. [Obs.] [bd]Can he cry and gale.[b8] --Court of Love.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\, n. [AS. gagel, akin to D. gagel.] (Bot.)
      A plant of the genus {Myrica}, growing in wet places, and
      strongly resembling the bayberry. The sweet gale ({Myrica
      Gale}) is found both in Europe and in America.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\, n. [Cf. {Gabel}.]
      The payment of a rent or annuity. [Eng.] --Mozley & W.
  
      {Gale day}, the day on which rent or interest is due.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gale \Gale\ (g[amac]l), n. [Prob. of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. gal
      furious, Icel. galinn, cf. Icel. gala to sing, AS. galan to
      sing, Icel. galdr song, witchcraft, AS. galdor charm,
      sorcery, E. nightingale; also, Icel. gj[omac]la gust of wind,
      gola breeze. Cf. {Yell}.]
      1. A strong current of air; a wind between a stiff breeze and
            a hurricane. The most violent gales are called {tempests}.
  
      Note: Gales have a velocity of from about eighteen
               ([bd]moderate[b8]) to about eighty ([bd]very heavy[b8])
               miles an our. --Sir. W. S. Harris.
  
      2. A moderate current of air; a breeze.
  
                     A little gale will soon disperse that cloud. --Shak.
  
                     And winds of gentlest gale Arabian odors fanned From
                     their soft wings.                              --Milton.
  
      3. A state of excitement, passion, or hilarity.
  
                     The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting
                     into what, in New England, is sometimes called a
                     gale.                                                --Brooke
                                                                              (Eastford).
  
      {Topgallant gale} (Naut.), one in which a ship may carry her
            topgallant sails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, v. t. (Dyeing)
      To impregnate with a decoction of gallnuts. --Ure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Galled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Galling}.] [OE. gallen; cf. F. galer to scratch, rub, gale
      scurf, scab, G. galle a disease in horses' feet, an
      excrescence under the tongue of horses; of uncertain origin.
      Cf. {Gall} gallnut.]
      1. To fret and wear away by friction; to hurt or break the
            skin of by rubbing; to chafe; to injure the surface of by
            attrition; as, a saddle galls the back of a horse; to gall
            a mast or a cable.
  
                     I am loth to gall a new-healed wound. --Shak.
  
      2. To fret; to vex; as, to be galled by sarcasm.
  
                     They that are most galled with my folly, They most
                     must laugh.                                       --Shak.
  
      3. To injure; to harass; to annoy; as, the troops were galled
            by the shot of the enemy.
  
                     In our wars against the French of old, we used to
                     gall them with our longbows, at a greater distance
                     than they could shoot their arrows.   --Addison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, n. [F. galle, noix de galle, fr. L. galla.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      An excrescence of any form produced on any part of a plant by
      insects or their larvae. They are most commonly caused by
      small Hymenoptera and Diptera which puncture the bark and lay
      their eggs in the wounds. The larvae live within the galls.
      Some galls are due to aphids, mites, etc. See {Gallnut}.
  
      Note: The galls, or gallnuts, of commerce are produced by
               insects of the genus {Cynips}, chiefly on an oak
               ({Quercus infectoria [or] Lusitanica}) of Western Asia
               and Southern Europe. They contain much tannin, and are
               used in the manufacture of that article and for making
               ink and a black dye, as well as in medicine.
  
      {Gall insect} (Zo[94]l.), any insect that produces galls.
  
      {Gall midge} (Zo[94]l.), any small dipterous insect that
            produces galls.
  
      {Gall oak}, the oak ({Quercus infectoria}) which yields the
            galls of commerce.
  
      {Gall of glass}, the neutral salt skimmed off from the
            surface of melted crown glass;- called also {glass gall}
            and {sandiver}. --Ure.
  
      {Gall wasp}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Gallfly}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, n.[OE. galle, gal, AS. gealla; akin to D. gal, OS.
      & OHG. galla, Icel. gall, SW. galla, Dan. galde, L. fel, Gr.
      [?], and prob. to E. yellow. [?] See {Yellow}, and cf.
      {Choler}]
      1. (Physiol.) The bitter, alkaline, viscid fluid found in the
            gall bladder, beneath the liver. It consists of the
            secretion of the liver, or bile, mixed with that of the
            mucous membrane of the gall bladder.
  
      2. The gall bladder.
  
      3. Anything extremely bitter; bitterness; rancor.
  
                     He hath . . . compassed me with gall and travail.
                                                                              --Lam. iii. 5.
  
                     Comedy diverted without gall.            --Dryden.
  
      4. Impudence; brazen assurance. [Slang]
  
      {Gall bladder} (Anat.), the membranous sac, in which the
            bile, or gall, is stored up, as secreted by the liver; the
            cholecystis. See Illust. of Digestive apparatus.
  
      {Gall duct}, a duct which conveys bile, as the cystic duct,
            or the hepatic duct.
  
      {Gall sickness}, a remitting bilious fever in the
            Netherlands. --Dunglison.
  
      {Gall of the earth} (Bot.), an herbaceous composite plant
            with variously lobed and cleft leaves, usually the
            {Prenanthes serpentaria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, v. i.
      To scoff; to jeer. [R.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gall \Gall\, n.
      A wound in the skin made by rubbing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Caboose \Ca*boose"\ (k[adot]*b[oomac]s"), n. [Cf. D. kabuis,
      kombuis, Dan. kabys, Sw. kabysa, G. kabuse a little room or
      hut. The First part of the word seems to be allied to W. cab
      cabin, booth. Cf. {Cabin}.] [Written also {camboose}.]
      1. (Naut.) A house on deck, where the cooking is done; --
            commonly called the {galley}.
  
      2. (Railroad) A car used on freight or construction trains
            for brakemen, workmen, etc.; a tool car. [U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Galley \Gal"ley\, n.; pl. {Galleys}. [OE. gale, galeie (cf. OF.
      galie, gal[82]e, LL. galea, LGr. [?]; of unknown origin.]
      1. (Naut.) A vessel propelled by oars, whether having masts
            and sails or not; as:
            (a) A large vessel for war and national purposes; --
                  common in the Middle Ages, and down to the 17th
                  century.
            (b) A name given by analogy to the Greek, Roman, and other
                  ancient vessels propelled by oars.
            (c) A light, open boat used on the Thames by customhouse
                  officers, press gangs, and also for pleasure.
            (d) One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.
  
      Note: The typical galley of the Mediterranean was from one
               hundred to two hundred feet long, often having twenty
               oars on each side. It had two or three masts rigged
               with lateen sails, carried guns at prow and stern, and
               a complement of one thousand to twelve hundred men, and
               was very efficient in mediaeval walfare. Galleons,
               galliots, galleasses, half galleys, and quarter galleys
               were all modifications of this type.
  
      2. The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel;
            -- sometimes on merchant vessels called the caboose.
  
      3. (Chem.) An oblong oven or muffle with a battery of
            retorts; a gallery furnace.
  
      4. [F. gal[82]e; the same word as E. galley a vessel.]
            (Print.)
            (a) An oblong tray of wood or brass, with upright sides,
                  for holding type which has been set, or is to be made
                  up, etc.
            (b) A proof sheet taken from type while on a galley; a
                  galley proof.
  
      {Galley slave}, a person condemned, often as a punishment for
            crime, to work at the oar on board a galley. [bd]To toil
            like a galley slave.[b8] --Macaulay.
  
      {Galley slice} (Print.), a sliding false bottom to a large
            galley. --Knight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Caboose \Ca*boose"\ (k[adot]*b[oomac]s"), n. [Cf. D. kabuis,
      kombuis, Dan. kabys, Sw. kabysa, G. kabuse a little room or
      hut. The First part of the word seems to be allied to W. cab
      cabin, booth. Cf. {Cabin}.] [Written also {camboose}.]
      1. (Naut.) A house on deck, where the cooking is done; --
            commonly called the {galley}.
  
      2. (Railroad) A car used on freight or construction trains
            for brakemen, workmen, etc.; a tool car. [U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Galley \Gal"ley\, n.; pl. {Galleys}. [OE. gale, galeie (cf. OF.
      galie, gal[82]e, LL. galea, LGr. [?]; of unknown origin.]
      1. (Naut.) A vessel propelled by oars, whether having masts
            and sails or not; as:
            (a) A large vessel for war and national purposes; --
                  common in the Middle Ages, and down to the 17th
                  century.
            (b) A name given by analogy to the Greek, Roman, and other
                  ancient vessels propelled by oars.
            (c) A light, open boat used on the Thames by customhouse
                  officers, press gangs, and also for pleasure.
            (d) One of the small boats carried by a man-of-war.
  
      Note: The typical galley of the Mediterranean was from one
               hundred to two hundred feet long, often having twenty
               oars on each side. It had two or three masts rigged
               with lateen sails, carried guns at prow and stern, and
               a complement of one thousand to twelve hundred men, and
               was very efficient in mediaeval walfare. Galleons,
               galliots, galleasses, half galleys, and quarter galleys
               were all modifications of this type.
  
      2. The cookroom or kitchen and cooking apparatus of a vessel;
            -- sometimes on merchant vessels called the caboose.
  
      3. (Chem.) An oblong oven or muffle with a battery of
            retorts; a gallery furnace.
  
      4. [F. gal[82]e; the same word as E. galley a vessel.]
            (Print.)
            (a) An oblong tray of wood or brass, with upright sides,
                  for holding type which has been set, or is to be made
                  up, etc.
            (b) A proof sheet taken from type while on a galley; a
                  galley proof.
  
      {Galley slave}, a person condemned, often as a punishment for
            crime, to work at the oar on board a galley. [bd]To toil
            like a galley slave.[b8] --Macaulay.
  
      {Galley slice} (Print.), a sliding false bottom to a large
            galley. --Knight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gallow \Gal"low\, v. t. [Cf. AS. [be]gelwan to stupefy.]
      To fright or terrify. See {Gally}, v. t. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Galloway \Gal"lo*way\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A small horse of a breed raised at Galloway, Scotland; --
      called also {garran}, and {garron}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gally \Gal"ly\, v. t. [See {Gallow}, v. t.]
      To frighten; to worry. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] --T. Brown.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gally \Gall"y\, a.
      Like gall; bitter as gall. --Cranmer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gally \Gal"ly\, n.
      See {Galley}, n., 4.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Jail \Jail\, n. [OE. jaile, gail, gayhol, OF. gaole, gaiole,
      jaiole, F. ge[93]le, LL. gabiola, dim. of gabia cage, for L.
      cavea cavity, cage. See {Cage}.]
      A kind of prison; a building for the confinement of persons
      held in lawful custody, especially for minor offenses or with
      reference to some future judicial proceeding. [Written also
      {gaol}.]
  
               This jail I count the house of liberty.   --Milton.
  
      {Jail bird}, a prisoner; one who has been confined in prison.
            [Slang]
  
      {Jail delivery}, the release of prisoners from jail, either
            legally or by violence.
  
      {Jail delivery commission}. See under {Gaol}.
  
      {Jail fever} (Med.), typhus fever, or a disease resembling
            it, generated in jails and other places crowded with
            people; -- called also {hospital fever}, and {ship fever}.
           
  
      {Jail liberties}, [or] {Jail limits}, a space or district
            around a jail within which an imprisoned debtor was, on
            certain conditions, allowed to go at large. --Abbott.
  
      {Jail lock}, a peculiar form of padlock; -- called also
            {Scandinavian lock}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaol \Gaol\, n. [See {Jail}.]
      A place of confinement, especially for minor offenses or
      provisional imprisonment; a jail. [Preferably, and in the
      United States usually, written {jail}.]
  
      {Commission of general gaol delivery}, an authority conferred
            upon judges and others included in it, for trying and
            delivering every prisoner in jail when the judges, upon
            their circuit, arrive at the place for holding court, and
            for discharging any whom the grand jury fail to indict.
            [Eng.]
  
      {Gaol delivery}. (Law) See {Jail delivery}, under {Jail}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Jail \Jail\, n. [OE. jaile, gail, gayhol, OF. gaole, gaiole,
      jaiole, F. ge[93]le, LL. gabiola, dim. of gabia cage, for L.
      cavea cavity, cage. See {Cage}.]
      A kind of prison; a building for the confinement of persons
      held in lawful custody, especially for minor offenses or with
      reference to some future judicial proceeding. [Written also
      {gaol}.]
  
               This jail I count the house of liberty.   --Milton.
  
      {Jail bird}, a prisoner; one who has been confined in prison.
            [Slang]
  
      {Jail delivery}, the release of prisoners from jail, either
            legally or by violence.
  
      {Jail delivery commission}. See under {Gaol}.
  
      {Jail fever} (Med.), typhus fever, or a disease resembling
            it, generated in jails and other places crowded with
            people; -- called also {hospital fever}, and {ship fever}.
           
  
      {Jail liberties}, [or] {Jail limits}, a space or district
            around a jail within which an imprisoned debtor was, on
            certain conditions, allowed to go at large. --Abbott.
  
      {Jail lock}, a peculiar form of padlock; -- called also
            {Scandinavian lock}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaol \Gaol\, n. [See {Jail}.]
      A place of confinement, especially for minor offenses or
      provisional imprisonment; a jail. [Preferably, and in the
      United States usually, written {jail}.]
  
      {Commission of general gaol delivery}, an authority conferred
            upon judges and others included in it, for trying and
            delivering every prisoner in jail when the judges, upon
            their circuit, arrive at the place for holding court, and
            for discharging any whom the grand jury fail to indict.
            [Eng.]
  
      {Gaol delivery}. (Law) See {Jail delivery}, under {Jail}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gaul \Gaul\, n. [F. Gaule, fr. L. Gallia, fr. Gallus a Gaul.]
      1. The Anglicized form of Gallia, which in the time of the
            Romans included France and Upper Italy (Transalpine and
            Cisalpine Gaul).
  
      2. A native or inhabitant of Gaul.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gayal \Gay"al\, n. [Native name.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A Southern Asiatic species of wild cattle ({Bibos
      frontalis}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gayly \Gay"ly\, adv.
      1. With mirth and frolic; merrily; blithely; gleefully.
  
      2. Finely; splendidly; showily; as, ladies gayly dressed; a
            flower gayly blooming. --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Geal \Geal\, v. i. [F. geler, fr. L. gelare, fr. gelu. See
      {Gelid}.]
      To congeal. [Obs. or Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n.
      A leech. [Also {gell}.] [Scot.] --Jameison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gelly \Gel"ly\, n.
      Jelly. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Jowl \Jowl\, n. [For older chole, chaul, AS. ceaft jaw. Cf.
      {Chaps}.]
      The cheek; the jaw. [Written also {jole}, {choule}, {chowle},
      and {geoule}.]
  
      {Cheek by jowl}, with the cheeks close together; side by
            side; in close proximity. [bd]I will go with three cheek
            by jole.[b8] --Shak. [bd] Sits cheek by jowl.[b8]
            --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghole \Ghole\, n.
      See {Ghoul}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghoul \Ghoul\, n. [Per. gh[?]l an imaginary sylvan demon,
      supposed to devour men and animals: cf. Ar. gh[?]l, F.
      goule.]
      An imaginary evil being among Eastern nations, which was
      supposed to feed upon human bodies. [Written also {ghole} .]
      --Moore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghole \Ghole\, n.
      See {Ghoul}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghoul \Ghoul\, n. [Per. gh[?]l an imaginary sylvan demon,
      supposed to devour men and animals: cf. Ar. gh[?]l, F.
      goule.]
      An imaginary evil being among Eastern nations, which was
      supposed to feed upon human bodies. [Written also {ghole} .]
      --Moore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghoul \Ghoul\, n. [Per. gh[?]l an imaginary sylvan demon,
      supposed to devour men and animals: cf. Ar. gh[?]l, F.
      goule.]
      An imaginary evil being among Eastern nations, which was
      supposed to feed upon human bodies. [Written also {ghole} .]
      --Moore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghyll \Ghyll\, n.
      A ravine. See {Gill} a woody glen. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
      --Wordsworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gile \Gile\, n. [See {Guile}.]
      Guile. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n. [Abbrev. from Gillian.]
      1. A young woman; a sweetheart; a flirting or wanton girl.
            [bd]Each Jack with his Gill.[b8] --B. Jonson.
  
      2. (Bot.) The ground ivy ({Nepeta Glechoma}); -- called also
            {gill over the ground}, and other like names.
  
      3. Malt liquor medicated with ground ivy.
  
      {Gill ale}.
            (a) Ale flavored with ground ivy.
            (b) (Bot.) Alehoof.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n. [Dan. gi[91]lle, gelle; akin to Sw. g[84]l,
      Icel. gj[94]lnar gills; cf. AS. geagl, geahl, jaw.]
      1. (Anat.) An organ for aquatic respiration; a branchia.
  
                     Fishes perform respiration under water by the gills.
                                                                              --Ray.
  
      Note: Gills are usually lamellar or filamentous appendages,
               through which the blood circulates, and in which it is
               exposed to the action of the air contained in the
               water. In vertebrates they are appendages of the
               visceral arches on either side of the neck. In
               invertebrates they occupy various situations.
  
      2. pl. (Bot.) The radiating, gill-shaped plates forming the
            under surface of a mushroom.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) The fleshy flap that hangs below the beak of a
            fowl; a wattle.
  
      4. The flesh under or about the chin. --Swift.
  
      5. (Spinning) One of the combs of closely ranged steel pins
            which divide the ribbons of flax fiber or wool into fewer
            parallel filaments. [Prob. so called from F. aiguilles,
            needles. --Ure.]
  
      {Gill arches}, {Gill bars}. (Anat.) Same as {Branchial
            arches}.
  
      {Gill clefts}. (Anat.) Same as {Branchial clefts}. See under
            {Branchial}.
  
      {Gill cover}, {Gill lid}. See {Operculum}.
  
      {Gill frame}, [or] {Gill head} (Flax Manuf.), a spreader; a
            machine for subjecting flax to the action of gills.
            --Knight.
  
      {Gill net}, a flat net so suspended in the water that its
            meshes allow the heads of fish to pass, but catch in the
            gills when they seek to extricate themselves.
  
      {Gill opening}, [or] {Gill slit} (Anat.), an opening behind
            and below the head of most fishes, and some amphibians, by
            which the water from the gills is discharged. In most
            fishes there is a single opening on each side, but in the
            sharks and rays there are five, or more, on each side.
  
      {Gill rakes}, [or] {Gill rakers} (Anat.), horny filaments, or
            progresses, on the inside of the branchial arches of
            fishes, which help to prevent solid substances from being
            carried into gill cavities.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n. [Etymol. uncertain.]
      A two-wheeled frame for transporting timber. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n.
      A leech. [Also {gell}.] [Scot.] --Jameison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n. [Icel. gil.]
      A woody glen; a narrow valley containing a stream. [Prov.
      Eng. & Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gill \Gill\, n. [OF. gille, gelle, a sort of measure for wine,
      LL. gillo, gello., Cf. {Gallon}.]
      A measure of capacity, containing one fourth of a pint.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glee \Glee\ (gl[emac]), n. [OE. gle, gleo, AS. gle[a2]w,
      gle[a2], akin to Icel. gl[ymac]: cf. Gr. chley`n joke, jest.]
      1. Music; minstrelsy; entertainment. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      2. Joy; merriment; mirth; gayety; paricularly, the mirth
            enjoyed at a feast. --Spenser.
  
      3. (Mus.) An unaccompanied part song for three or more solo
            voices. It is not necessarily gleesome.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glew \Glew\, n.
      See {Glue}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gley \Gley\, v. i. [OE. gli[yogh]en, glien, gleien, to shine, to
      squint; cf. Icel. glj[be] to glitter.]
      To squint; to look obliquely; to overlook things. [Scot.]
      --Jamieson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gley \Gley\, adv.
      Asquint; askance; obliquely.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glow \Glow\, v. t.
      To make hot; to flush. [Poetic]
  
               Fans, whose wind did seem To glow the delicate cheeks
               which they did cool.                              --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glow \Glow\ (gl[omac]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Glowed}
      (gl[omac]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Glowing}.] [AS. gl[omac]wan;
      akin to D. gloeijen, OHG. gluoen, G. gl[81]hen, Icel.
      gl[omac]a, Dan. gloende glowing. [root]94. Cf. {Gloom}.]
      1. To shine with an intense or white heat; to give forth
            vivid light and heat; to be incandescent.
  
                     Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
      2. To exhibit a strong, bright color; to be brilliant, as if
            with heat; to be bright or red with heat or animation,
            with blushes, etc.
  
                     Clad in a gown that glows with Tyrian rays.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     And glow with shame of your proceedings. --Shak.
  
      3. To feel hot; to have a burning sensation, as of the skin,
            from friction, exercise, etc.; to burn.
  
                     Did not his temples glow In the same sultry winds
                     and acrching heats?                           --Addison.
  
                     The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands.
                                                                              --Gay.
  
      4. To feel the heat of passion; to be animated, as by intense
            love, zeal, anger, etc.; to rage, as passior; as, the
            heart glows with love, zeal, or patriotism.
  
                     With pride it mounts, and with revenge it glows.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     Burns with one love, with one resentment glows.
                                                                              --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glow \Glow\, n.
      1. White or red heat; incandscence.
  
      2. Brightness or warmth of color; redness; a rosy flush; as,
            the glow of health in the cheeks.
  
      3. Intense excitement or earnestness; vehemence or heat of
            passion; ardor.
  
                     The red glow of scorn.                        --Shak.
  
      4. Heat of body; a sensation of warmth, as that produced by
            exercise, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glue \Glue\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Glued}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gluing}.] [F. gluer. See {Glue}, n.]
      To join with glue or a viscous substance; to cause to stick
      or hold fast, as if with glue; to fix or fasten.
  
               This cold, congealed blood That glues my lips, and will
               not let me speak.                                    --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Glue \Glue\, n. [F. glu, L. glus, akin to gluten, from gluere to
      draw together. Cf. {Gluten}.]
      A hard brittle brownish gelatin, obtained by boiling to a
      jelly the skins, hoofs, etc., of animals. When gently heated
      with water, it becomes viscid and tenaceous, and is used as a
      cement for uniting substances. The name is also given to
      other adhesive or viscous substances.
  
      {Bee glue}. See under {Bee}.
  
      {Fish glue}, a strong kind of glue obtained from fish skins
            and bladders; isinglass.
  
      {Glue plant} (Bot.), a fucoid seaweed ({Gloiopeltis tenax}).
           
  
      {Liquid glue}, a fluid preparation of glue and acetic acid
            oralcohol.
  
      {Marine glue}, a solution of caoutchouc in naphtha, with
            shellac, used in shipbuilding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gluey \Glu"ey\, a.
      Viscous; glutinous; of the nature of, or like, glue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goal \Goal\, n. [F. gaule pole, Prov. F. waule, of German
      origin; cf. Fries. walu staff, stick, rod, Goth. walus, Icel.
      v[94]lr a round stick; prob. akin to E. wale.]
      1. The mark set to bound a race, and to or around which the
            constestants run, or from which they start to return to it
            again; the place at which a race or a journey is to end.
  
                     Part curb their fiery steeds, or shun the goal With
                     rapid wheels.                                    --Milton.
  
      2. The final purpose or aim; the end to which a design tends,
            or which a person aims to reach or attain.
  
                     Each individual seeks a several goal. --Pope.
  
      3. A base, station, or bound used in various games; in
            football, a line between two posts across which the ball
            must pass in order to score; also, the act of kicking the
            ball over the line between the goal posts.
  
      {Goal keeper}, the player charged with the defense of the
            goal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goel \Go"el\ (g[omac]"[ecr]l), a. [Cf. {Yellow}. [root]49.]
      Yellow. [Obs.] --Tusser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goll \Goll\, n. [Etymol. uncertain.]
      A hand, paw, or claw. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney. B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gowl \Gowl\, v. i. [OE. gaulen, goulen. Cf. {Yawl}, v. i.]
      To howl. [Obs.] --Wyclif.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guile \Guile\, n. [OE. guile, gile, OF. guile; of German origin,
      and the same word as E. wile. See {Wile}.]
      Craft; deceitful cunning; artifice; duplicity; wile; deceit;
      treachery.
  
               Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile. --John
                                                                              i. 47.
  
               To wage by force or guile eternal war.   --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guile \Guile\, v. t. [OF. guiler. See {Guile}, n.]
      To disguise or conceal; to deceive or delude. [Obs.]
      --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gula \[d8]Gu"la\, n.; pl. L. {Gul[92]}, E. {Gulas}. [L., the
      throat, gullet.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The upper front of the neck, next to the chin; the
                  upper throat.
            (b) A plate which in most insects supports the submentum.
  
      2. (Arch.) A capping molding. Same as {Cymatium}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gule \Gule\, v. t.
      To give the color of gules to.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gule \Gule\, n.
      The throat; the gullet. [Obs.]
  
               Throats so wide and gules so gluttonous. --Gauden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gull \Gull\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gulled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gulling}.] [Prob. fr. gull the bird; but cf. OSw. gylla to
      deceive, D. kullen, and E. cullibility.]
      To deceive; to cheat; to mislead; to trick; to defraud.
  
               The rulgar, gulled into rebellion, armed. --Dryden.
  
               I'm not gulling him for the emperor's service.
                                                                              --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gull \Gull\, n.
      1. A cheating or cheat; trick; fraud. --Shak.
  
      2. One easily cheated; a dupe. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gull \Gull\, n. [Of Celtic origin; cf. Corn. gullan, W. gwylan.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      One of many species of long-winged sea birds of the genus
      {Larus} and allied genera.
  
      Note: Among the best known American species are the herring
               gull ({Larus argentatus}), the great black-backed gull
               ({L. murinus}) the laughing gull ({L. atricilla}), and
               Bonaparte's gull ({L. Philadelphia}). The common
               European gull is {Larus canus}.
  
      {Gull teaser} (Zo[94]l.), the jager; -- also applied to
            certain species of terns.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gully \Gul"ly\, n.; pl. {Gulles}. [Etymol. uncertain]
      A large knife. [Scot.] --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gully \Gul"ly\, n.; pl. {Gullies}. [Formerly gullet.]
      1. A channel or hollow worn in the earth by a current of
            water; a short deep portion of a torrent's bed when dry.
  
      2. A grooved iron rail or tram plate. [Eng.]
  
      {Gully gut}, a glutton. [Obs.] --Chapman.
  
      {Gully hole}, the opening through which gutters discharge
            surface water.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gully \Gul"ly\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gullied}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gullying}.]
      To wear into a gully or into gullies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gully \Gul"ly\, v. i.
      To flow noisily. [Obs.] --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guly \Gul"y\, a.
      Of or pertaining to gules; red. [bd]Those fatal guly
      dragons.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guyle \Guyle\, v. t.
      To guile. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gyall \Gy"all\ (g[imac]"[add]l), n. (Zo[94]l.)
      See {Gayal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gyle \Gyle\, n. [F. guiller to ferment. Cf. {Guillevat}.]
      Fermented wort used for making vinegar.
  
      {Gyle tan} (Brewing), a large vat in which wort ferments.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gail, TX
      Zip code(s): 79738

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gale, IL
      Zip code(s): 62990

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gallaway, TN (city, FIPS 28560)
      Location: 35.33826 N, 89.60346 W
      Population (1990): 762 (211 housing units)
      Area: 9.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Galloway, OH
      Zip code(s): 43119

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Galway, NY (village, FIPS 28101)
      Location: 43.01878 N, 74.03182 W
      Population (1990): 151 (74 housing units)
      Area: 0.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 12074

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gill, CO
      Zip code(s): 80624

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gilly, KY
      Zip code(s): 41819

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gully, MN (city, FIPS 26270)
      Location: 47.76903 N, 95.62347 W
      Population (1990): 128 (65 housing units)
      Area: 5.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56646

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   gilley n.   [Usenet] The unit of analogical {bogosity}.
   According to its originator, the standard for one gilley was "the
   act of bogotoficiously comparing the shutting down of 1000 machines
   for a day with the killing of one person".   The milligilley has been
   found to suffice for most normal conversational exchanges.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   glue n.   Generic term for any interface logic or protocol that
   connects two component blocks.   For example, {Blue Glue} is IBM's
   SNA protocol, and hardware designers call anything used to connect
   large VLSI's or circuit blocks `glue logic'.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GAL
  
      {Generic Array Logic}.
  
      (1995-12-09)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GCL
  
      General Control Language.   A portable job control language.
  
      ["A General Control Interface for Satellite Systems",
      R.J. Dakin in Command Languages, C. Unger ed, N-H 1973].
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   gilley
  
      ({Usenet}) The unit of analogical bogosity.
      According to its originator, the standard for one gilley was
      "the act of bogotoficiously comparing the shutting down of
      1000 machines for a day with the killing of one person".   The
      milligilley has been found to suffice for most normal
      conversational exchanges.
  
      (1995-03-17)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GL
  
      Graphics Language.   A graphics package from {Silicon
      Graphics}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   gl
  
      The {country code} for Greenland.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GL
  
      Graphics Language.   A graphics package from {Silicon
      Graphics}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   gl
  
      The {country code} for Greenland.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GLOW
  
      A POP-11 variant with {lexical scope}.
  
      Available from Andrew Arnblaster, Bollostraat 6, B-3140
      Keerbergen, Belgium, for Mac or {MS-DOS}.
  
      [Byte's UK edition, May 1992, p.84UK-8].
  
      (1997-02-07)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GLU
  
      A practical {coarse grain} implementation of the
      Lucid dataflow language for networks.
  
      (1998-03-07)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   glue
  
      A generic term for any interface logic or {protocol}
      that connects two component blocks.   For example, {Blue Glue}
      is IBM's SNA protocol, and hardware designers call anything
      used to connect large VLSI's or circuit blocks "glue logic".
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1999-02-22)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   goal
  
      In {logic programming}, a {predicate} applied to
      its {arguments} which the system attempts to prove by matching
      it against the {clauses} of the program.   A goal may fail or
      it may succeed in one or more ways.
  
      (1997-07-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GOL
  
      General Operating Language.   Subsystem of {DOCUS}.   [Sammet
      1969, p.678].
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   GSL
  
      Grenoble System Language.   M. Berthaud, IBM, Grenoble.   "GSL
      Language Reference Manual", M. Berthaud et al, March 1973.   "A
      MOL-Based Software Construction System", M. Berthaud et al, in
      Machine Oriented Higher Level Languages, W. van der Poel, N-H
      1974, pp.151-157.
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Gaal
      loathing, the son of Ebed, in whom the Shechemites "placed their
      confidence" when they became discontented with Abimelech. He
      headed the revolution, and led out the men of Shechem against
      Abimelech; but was defeated, and fled to his own home (Judg.
      9:26-46). We hear no more of him after this battle.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Gall
      (1) Heb. mererah, meaning "bitterness" (Job 16:13); i.e., the
      bile secreted in the liver. This word is also used of the poison
      of asps (20:14), and of the vitals, the seat of life (25).
     
         (2.) Heb. rosh. In Deut. 32:33 and Job 20:16 it denotes the
      poison of serpents. In Hos. 10:4 the Hebrew word is rendered
      "hemlock." The original probably denotes some bitter, poisonous
      plant, most probably the poppy, which grows up quickly, and is
      therefore coupled with wormwood (Deut. 29:18; Jer. 9:15; Lam.
      3:19). Comp. Jer. 8:14; 23:15, "water of gall," Gesenius, "poppy
      juice;" others, "water of hemlock," "bitter water."
     
         (3.) Gr. chole (Matt. 27:34), the LXX. translation of the
      Hebrew _rosh_ in Ps. 69; 21, which foretells our Lord's
      sufferings. The drink offered to our Lord was vinegar (made of
      light wine rendered acid, the common drink of Roman soldiers)
      "mingled with gall," or, according to Mark (15:23), "mingled
      with myrrh;" both expressions meaning the same thing, namely,
      that the vinegar was made bitter by the infusion of wormwood or
      some other bitter substance, usually given, according to a
      merciful custom, as an anodyne to those who were crucified, to
      render them insensible to pain. Our Lord, knowing this, refuses
      to drink it. He would take nothing to cloud his faculties or
      blunt the pain of dying. He chooses to suffer every element of
      woe in the bitter cup of agony given him by the Father (John
      18:11).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Gallio
      the elder brother of Seneca the philosopher, who was tutor and
      for some time minister of the emperor Nero. He was "deputy",
      i.e., proconsul, as in Revised Version, of Achaia, under the
      emperor Claudius, when Paul visited Corinth (Acts 18:12). The
      word used here by Luke in describing the rank of Gallio shows
      his accuracy. Achaia was a senatorial province under Claudius,
      and the governor of such a province was called a "proconsul." He
      is spoken of by his contemporaries as "sweet Gallio," and is
      described as a most popular and affectionate man. When the Jews
      brought Paul before his tribunal on the charge of persuading
      "men to worship God contrary to the law" (18:13), he refused to
      listen to them, and "drave them from the judgment seat" (18:16).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Giloh
      exile, a city in the south-west part of the hill-country of
      Judah (Josh. 15:51). It was the native place or residence of the
      traitor Ahithophel "the Gilonite" (Josh. 15:51; 2 Sam. 15:12),
      and where he committed suicide (17:23). It has been identified
      with Kurbet Jala, about 7 miles north of Hebron.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Goel
      in Hebrew the participle of the verb _gaal_, "to redeem." It is
      rendered in the Authorized Version "kinsman," Num. 5:8; Ruth
      3:12; 4:1,6,8; "redeemer," Job 19:25; "avenger," Num. 35:12;
      Deut. 19:6, etc. The Jewish law gave the right of redeeming and
      repurchasing, as well as of avenging blood, to the next
      relative, who was accordingly called by this name. (See {REDEEMER}.)
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Gaal, contempt; abomination
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Gallio, who sucks, or lives on milk
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Geuel, God's redemption
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Giloh, he that rejoices; he that overturns
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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