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   Tarchanoff phenomenon
         n 1: a change in the electrical properties of the skin in
               response to stress or anxiety; can be measured either by
               recording the electrical resistance of the skin or by
               recording weak currents generated by the body [syn:
               {galvanic skin response}, {GSR}, {psychogalvanic response},
               {electrodermal response}, {electrical skin response}, {Fere
               phenomenon}, {Tarchanoff phenomenon}]

English Dictionary: Trockenrückstands by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarquin
n
  1. according to legend, the seventh and last Etruscan king of Rome who was expelled for his cruelty (reigned from 534 to 510 BC)
    Synonym(s): Tarquin, Tarquin the Proud, Tarquinius, Tarquinius Superbus, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarquin the Proud
n
  1. according to legend, the seventh and last Etruscan king of Rome who was expelled for his cruelty (reigned from 534 to 510 BC)
    Synonym(s): Tarquin, Tarquin the Proud, Tarquinius, Tarquinius Superbus, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarquinius
n
  1. according to legend, the seventh and last Etruscan king of Rome who was expelled for his cruelty (reigned from 534 to 510 BC)
    Synonym(s): Tarquin, Tarquin the Proud, Tarquinius, Tarquinius Superbus, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarquinius Superbus
n
  1. according to legend, the seventh and last Etruscan king of Rome who was expelled for his cruelty (reigned from 534 to 510 BC)
    Synonym(s): Tarquin, Tarquin the Proud, Tarquinius, Tarquinius Superbus, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarragon
n
  1. aromatic perennial of southeastern Russia [syn: tarragon, estragon, Artemisia dracunculus]
  2. fresh leaves (or leaves preserved in vinegar) used as seasoning
    Synonym(s): tarragon, estragon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarzan
n
  1. (sometimes used ironically) a man of great strength and agility (after the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs)
  2. a man raised by apes who was the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    Synonym(s): Tarzan, Tarzan of the Apes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tarzan of the Apes
n
  1. a man raised by apes who was the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    Synonym(s): Tarzan, Tarzan of the Apes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tercentenary
n
  1. the 300th anniversary (or the celebration of it) [syn: tercentennial, tercentenary, triennial]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tercentennial
n
  1. the 300th anniversary (or the celebration of it) [syn: tercentennial, tercentenary, triennial]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
teres major
n
  1. teres muscle that moves the arm and rotates it medially
    Synonym(s): teres major, teres major muscle, musculus teres major
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
teres major muscle
n
  1. teres muscle that moves the arm and rotates it medially
    Synonym(s): teres major, teres major muscle, musculus teres major
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
teres minor
n
  1. teres muscle that adducts the arm and rotates it laterally
    Synonym(s): teres minor, teres minor muscle, musculus teres minor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
teres minor muscle
n
  1. teres muscle that adducts the arm and rotates it laterally
    Synonym(s): teres minor, teres minor muscle, musculus teres minor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
teres muscle
n
  1. either of two muscles in the shoulder region that move the shoulders and arms
    Synonym(s): teres, teres muscle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
terseness
n
  1. a neatly short and concise expressive style [ant: verboseness, verbosity]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thoracentesis
n
  1. removal of fluid from the chest by centesis for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes
    Synonym(s): thoracocentesis, thoracentesis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thorazine
n
  1. a drug (trade name Thorazine) derived from phenothiazine that has antipsychotic effects and is used as a sedative and tranquilizer
    Synonym(s): chlorpromazine, Thorazine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thoroughness
n
  1. conscientiousness in performing all aspects of a task
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thracian
adj
  1. of or relating to Thrace or its people or culture
n
  1. an inhabitant of ancient Thrace
  2. a Thraco-Phrygian language spoken by the ancient people of Thrace but extinct by the early Middle Ages
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thrashing
n
  1. a sound defeat [syn: thrashing, walloping, debacle, drubbing, slaughter, trouncing, whipping]
  2. the act of inflicting corporal punishment with repeated blows
    Synonym(s): beating, thrashing, licking, drubbing, lacing, trouncing, whacking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Three Kings' Day
n
  1. twelve days after Christmas; celebrates the visit of the three wise men to the infant Jesus
    Synonym(s): Epiphany, Epiphany of Our Lord, Twelfth day, Three Kings' Day, January 6
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
three-centered arch
n
  1. a round arch whose inner curve is drawn with circles having three centers
    Synonym(s): three-centered arch, basket-handle arch
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
threesome
n
  1. the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
    Synonym(s): three, 3, III, trio, threesome, tierce, leash, troika, triad, trine, trinity, ternary, ternion, triplet, tercet, terzetto, trey, deuce- ace
  2. three people considered as a unit
    Synonym(s): trio, threesome, triad, trinity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
threshing
n
  1. the separation of grain or seeds from the husks and straw; "they used to do the threshing by hand but now there are machines to do it"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
threshing floor
n
  1. a floor or ground area for threshing or treading out grain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
threshing machine
n
  1. a farm machine for separating seeds or grain from the husks and straw
    Synonym(s): thresher, thrasher, threshing machine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
through an experiment
adv
  1. in an experimental fashion; "this can be experimentally determined"
    Synonym(s): experimentally, by experimentation, through an experiment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
through and through
adv
  1. throughout the entire extent; "got soaked through in the rain"; "I'm frozen through"; "a letter shot through with the writer's personality"; "knew him through and through"; "boards rotten through and through"
    Synonym(s): through, through and through
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
through empirical observation
adv
  1. in an empirical manner; "this can be empirically tested"
    Synonym(s): empirically, through empirical observation, by trial and error
    Antonym(s): theoretically
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thrush nightingale
n
  1. large nightingale of eastern Europe [syn: {thrush nightingale}, Luscinia luscinia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thyroxin
n
  1. hormone produced by the thyroid glands to regulate metabolism by controlling the rate of oxidation in cells; "thyroxine is 65% iodine"
    Synonym(s): thyroxine, thyroxin, tetraiodothyronine, T
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thyroxine
n
  1. hormone produced by the thyroid glands to regulate metabolism by controlling the rate of oxidation in cells; "thyroxine is 65% iodine"
    Synonym(s): thyroxine, thyroxin, tetraiodothyronine, T
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tire chain
n
  1. chain attached to wheels to increase traction on ice or snow
    Synonym(s): tire chain, snow chain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tiresome
adj
  1. so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness; "a boring evening with uninteresting people"; "the deadening effect of some routine tasks"; "a dull play"; "his competent but dull performance"; "a ho-hum speaker who couldn't capture their attention"; "what an irksome task the writing of long letters is"- Edmund Burke; "tedious days on the train"; "the tiresome chirping of a cricket"- Mark Twain; "other people's dreams are dreadfully wearisome"
    Synonym(s): boring, deadening, dull, ho-hum, irksome, slow, tedious, tiresome, wearisome
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tiresomely
adv
  1. in a tedious manner; "boringly slow work"; "he plodded tediously forward"
    Synonym(s): boringly, tediously, tiresomely
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tiresomeness
n
  1. dullness owing to length or slowness [syn: tediousness, tedium, tiresomeness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tirich Mir
n
  1. a mountain in the Hindu Kush in Pakistan (25,230 feet high)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Torquemada
n
  1. the Spaniard who as Grand Inquisitor was responsible for the death of thousands of Jews and suspected witches during the Spanish Inquisition (1420-1498)
    Synonym(s): Torquemada, Tomas de Torquemada
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
torsion
n
  1. a tortuous and twisted shape or position; "they built a tree house in the tortuosities of its boughs"; "the acrobat performed incredible contortions"
    Synonym(s): tortuosity, tortuousness, torsion, contortion, crookedness
  2. a twisting force
    Synonym(s): torsion, torque
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
torsion balance
n
  1. measuring instrument designed to measure small forces by the torsion they exert on a thin wire
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tourism
n
  1. the business of providing services to tourists; "Tourism is a major business in Bermuda"
    Synonym(s): tourism, touristry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trachinotus
n
  1. a genus of Carangidae [syn: Trachinotus, {genus Trachinotus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trachinotus carolinus
n
  1. found in coastal waters New England to Brazil except clear waters of West Indies
    Synonym(s): Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trachinotus falcatus
n
  1. large game fish; found in waters of the West Indies [syn: permit, Trachinotus falcatus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trachoma
n
  1. a chronic contagious viral disease marked by inflammation of the conjunctiva and cornea of the eye and the formation of scar tissue
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tracing
n
  1. the act of drawing a plan or diagram or outline
  2. a drawing created by superimposing a semitransparent sheet of paper on the original image and copying on it the lines of the original image
    Synonym(s): tracing, trace
  3. the discovery and description of the course of development of something; "the tracing of genealogies"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tracing paper
n
  1. a semitransparent paper that is used for tracing drawings
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tracing routine
n
  1. a routine that provides a chronological record of the execution of a computer program
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
track and field
n
  1. participating in athletic sports performed on a running track or on the field associated with it
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
track meet
n
  1. a track and field competition between two or more teams
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tracking
n
  1. the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behind
    Synonym(s): trailing, tracking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trajan
n
  1. Roman Emperor and adoptive son of Nerva; extended the Roman Empire to the east and conducted an extensive program of building (53-117)
    Synonym(s): Trajan, Marcus Ulpius Traianus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trashiness
n
  1. the quality of being cheaply imitative of something better
    Synonym(s): shoddiness, trashiness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trasimeno
n
  1. a battle in central Italy where Hannibal defeated the Romans under Flaminius in 217 BC
    Synonym(s): Trasimeno, battle of Trasimeno
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
treason
n
  1. a crime that undermines the offender's government [syn: treason, high treason, lese majesty]
  2. disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
    Synonym(s): treason, subversiveness, traitorousness
  3. an act of deliberate betrayal
    Synonym(s): treachery, betrayal, treason, perfidy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
treasonable
adj
  1. having the character of, or characteristic of, a traitor; "the faithless Benedict Arnold"; "a lying traitorous insurrectionist"
    Synonym(s): faithless, traitorous, unfaithful, treasonable, treasonous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
treasonably
adv
  1. in a disloyal and faithless manner; "he behaved treacherously"; "his wife played him false"
    Synonym(s): faithlessly, traitorously, treacherously, treasonably, false
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
treasonist
n
  1. someone who betrays his country by committing treason [syn: traitor, treasonist]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
treasonous
adj
  1. having the character of, or characteristic of, a traitor; "the faithless Benedict Arnold"; "a lying traitorous insurrectionist"
    Synonym(s): faithless, traitorous, unfaithful, treasonable, treasonous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tree kangaroo
n
  1. arboreal wallabies of New Guinea and northern Australia having hind and forelegs of similar length
    Synonym(s): tree wallaby, tree kangaroo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triazine
n
  1. any of three isomeric compounds having three carbon and three nitrogen atoms in a six-membered ring
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tricentenary
adj
  1. of or relating to or completing a period of 300 years
    Synonym(s): tricentenary, tricentennial
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tricentennial
adj
  1. of or relating to or completing a period of 300 years
    Synonym(s): tricentenary, tricentennial
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichina
n
  1. parasitic nematode occurring in the intestines of pigs and rats and human beings and producing larvae that form cysts in skeletal muscles
    Synonym(s): trichina, Trichinella spiralis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trichinella spiralis
n
  1. parasitic nematode occurring in the intestines of pigs and rats and human beings and producing larvae that form cysts in skeletal muscles
    Synonym(s): trichina, Trichinella spiralis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichiniasis
n
  1. infestation by trichina larvae that are transmitted by eating inadequately cooked meat (especially pork); larvae migrate from the intestinal tract to the muscles where they become encysted
    Synonym(s): trichinosis, trichiniasis, myositis trichinosa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichinosis
n
  1. infestation by trichina larvae that are transmitted by eating inadequately cooked meat (especially pork); larvae migrate from the intestinal tract to the muscles where they become encysted
    Synonym(s): trichinosis, trichiniasis, myositis trichinosa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichion
n
  1. point where the hairline meets the midpoint of the forehead
    Synonym(s): trichion, crinion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trichomanes
n
  1. bristle ferns; kidney ferns [syn: Trichomanes, {genus Trichomanes}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trichomanes boschianum
n
  1. a variety of bristle fern [syn: hare's-foot bristle fern, Trichomanes boschianum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trichomanes reniforme
n
  1. large fern of New Zealand having kidney-shaped fronds [syn: kidney fern, Trichomanes reniforme]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trichomanes speciosum
n
  1. large stout fern of extreme western Europe [syn: {Killarney fern}, Trichomanes speciosum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichomonad
n
  1. cause of trichomoniasis in women and cattle and birds
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trichomoniasis
n
  1. infection of the vagina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trickiness
n
  1. the quality of being a slippery rascal [syn: rascality, shiftiness, slipperiness, trickiness]
  2. the quality of requiring skill or caution; "these puzzles are famous for their trickiness"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigeminal
n
  1. the main sensory nerve of the face and motor nerve for the muscles of mastication
    Synonym(s): trigeminal, trigeminal nerve, trigeminus, nervus trigeminus, fifth cranial nerve
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigeminal nerve
n
  1. the main sensory nerve of the face and motor nerve for the muscles of mastication
    Synonym(s): trigeminal, trigeminal nerve, trigeminus, nervus trigeminus, fifth cranial nerve
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigeminal neuralgia
n
  1. intense paroxysmal neuralgia along the trigeminal nerve
    Synonym(s): trigeminal neuralgia, tic douloureux
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigeminus
n
  1. the main sensory nerve of the face and motor nerve for the muscles of mastication
    Synonym(s): trigeminal, trigeminal nerve, trigeminus, nervus trigeminus, fifth cranial nerve
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigon
n
  1. a three-sided polygon [syn: triangle, trigon, trilateral]
  2. (astrology) one of four groups of the zodiac where each group consists of three signs separated from each other by 120 degrees
    Synonym(s): triplicity, trigon
  3. a triangular lyre of ancient Greece and Rome
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonal
adj
  1. having threefold symmetry [syn: rhombohedral, trigonal]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trigonella
n
  1. Old World genus of frequently aromatic herbs [syn: Trigonella, genus Trigonella]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trigonella foenumgraecum
n
  1. annual herb or southern Europe and eastern Asia having off- white flowers and aromatic seeds used medicinally and in curry
    Synonym(s): fenugreek, Greek clover, Trigonella foenumgraecum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trigonella ornithopodioides
n
  1. Old World herb related to fenugreek [syn: {bird's foot trefoil}, Trigonella ornithopodioides]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonometric
adj
  1. of or relating to or according to the principles of trigonometry; "trigonometric function"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonometric function
n
  1. function of an angle expressed as a ratio of the length of the sides of right-angled triangle containing the angle
    Synonym(s): trigonometric function, circular function
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonometrician
n
  1. a mathematician specializing in trigonometry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonometry
n
  1. the mathematics of triangles and trigonometric functions
    Synonym(s): trigonometry, trig
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trigonum cerebrale
n
  1. an arched bundle of white fibers at the base of the brain by which the hippocampus of each hemisphere projects to the contralateral hippocampus and to the thalamus and mamillary bodies
    Synonym(s): fornix, trigonum cerebrale
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trismus
n
  1. prolonged spasm of the jaw muscles
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trisomy
n
  1. chrosomal abnormality in which there is one more than the normal number of chromosomes in a cell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trisomy 21
n
  1. a congenital disorder caused by having an extra 21st chromosome; results in a flat face and short stature and mental retardation
    Synonym(s): mongolism, mongolianism, Down's syndrome, Down syndrome, trisomy 21
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trochanter
n
  1. one of the bony prominences developed near the upper extremity of the femur to which muscles are attached
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trogium
n
  1. a genus of Psocidae
    Synonym(s): Trogium, genus Trogium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trogium pulsatorium
n
  1. a variety of booklouse [syn: common booklouse, {Trogium pulsatorium}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trogon
n
  1. forest bird of warm regions of the New World having brilliant lustrous plumage and long tails
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trogonidae
n
  1. coextensive with the order Trogoniformes [syn: Trogonidae, family Trogonidae]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trogoniformes
n
  1. trogons
    Synonym(s): Trogoniformes, order Trogoniformes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trojan
adj
  1. of or relating to the ancient city of Troy or its inhabitants; "Trojan cities"
n
  1. a native of ancient Troy [syn: Trojan, Dardan, Dardanian]
  2. a program that appears desirable but actually contains something harmful; "the contents of a trojan can be a virus or a worm"; "when he downloaded the free game it turned out to be a trojan horse"
    Synonym(s): trojan, trojan horse
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trojan horse
n
  1. a subversive group that supports the enemy and engages in espionage or sabotage; an enemy in your midst
    Synonym(s): fifth column, Trojan horse
  2. a program that appears desirable but actually contains something harmful; "the contents of a trojan can be a virus or a worm"; "when he downloaded the free game it turned out to be a trojan horse"
    Synonym(s): trojan, trojan horse
  3. a large hollow wooden figure of a horse (filled with Greek soldiers) left by the Greeks outside Troy during the Trojan War
    Synonym(s): Trojan Horse, Wooden Horse
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trojan War
n
  1. (Greek mythology) a great war fought between Greece and Troy; the Greeks sailed to Troy to recover Helen of Troy, the beautiful wife of Menelaus who had been abducted by Paris; after ten years the Greeks (via the Trojan Horse) achieved final victory and burned Troy to the ground; "the story of the Trojan War is told in Homer's Iliad"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trucking
n
  1. the activity of transporting goods by truck [syn: hauling, trucking, truckage]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trucking company
n
  1. a company that ships goods or possessions by truck
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trucking industry
n
  1. an industry that provides transportation for commercial products
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trucking rig
n
  1. a truck consisting of a tractor and trailer together [syn: trailer truck, tractor trailer, trucking rig, rig, articulated lorry, semi]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
true sandalwood
n
  1. parasitic tree of Indonesia and Malaysia having fragrant close-grained yellowish heartwood with insect repelling properties and used, e.g., for making chests
    Synonym(s): sandalwood tree, true sandalwood, Santalum album
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
true senna
n
  1. erect shrub having racemes of tawny yellow flowers; the dried leaves are used medicinally as a cathartic; sometimes placed in genus Cassia
    Synonym(s): Alexandria senna, Alexandrian senna, true senna, tinnevelly senna, Indian senna, Senna alexandrina, Cassia acutifolia, Cassia augustifolia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truism
n
  1. an obvious truth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turcoman
n
  1. a member of a Turkic people living in Turkmenistan and neighboring areas
    Synonym(s): Turkoman, Turkmen, Turcoman
  2. the Turkic language spoken by the Turkoman
    Synonym(s): Turkmen, Turkoman, Turcoman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turgenev
n
  1. Russian writer of stories and novels and plays (1818-1883)
    Synonym(s): Turgenev, Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turkey wing
n
  1. the wing of a turkey
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkmen
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Turkmenistan or its people or culture
n
  1. a member of a Turkic people living in Turkmenistan and neighboring areas
    Synonym(s): Turkoman, Turkmen, Turcoman
  2. a republic in Asia to the east of the Caspian Sea and to the south of Kazakhstan and to the north of Iran; an Asian soviet from 1925 to 1991
    Synonym(s): Turkmenistan, Turkomen, Turkmen, Turkmenia
  3. the Turkic language spoken by the Turkoman
    Synonym(s): Turkmen, Turkoman, Turcoman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkmen monetary unit
n
  1. monetary unit in Turkmenistan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkmenia
n
  1. a republic in Asia to the east of the Caspian Sea and to the south of Kazakhstan and to the north of Iran; an Asian soviet from 1925 to 1991
    Synonym(s): Turkmenistan, Turkomen, Turkmen, Turkmenia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkmenistan
n
  1. a republic in Asia to the east of the Caspian Sea and to the south of Kazakhstan and to the north of Iran; an Asian soviet from 1925 to 1991
    Synonym(s): Turkmenistan, Turkomen, Turkmen, Turkmenia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkoman
n
  1. a member of a Turkic people living in Turkmenistan and neighboring areas
    Synonym(s): Turkoman, Turkmen, Turcoman
  2. the Turkic language spoken by the Turkoman
    Synonym(s): Turkmen, Turkoman, Turcoman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turkomen
n
  1. a republic in Asia to the east of the Caspian Sea and to the south of Kazakhstan and to the north of Iran; an Asian soviet from 1925 to 1991
    Synonym(s): Turkmenistan, Turkomen, Turkmen, Turkmenia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrosine
n
  1. an amino acid found in most proteins; a precursor of several hormones
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrosine kinase inhibitor
n
  1. a drug used in cases of chronic myeloid leukemia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrosinemia
n
  1. autosomal recessive defect in tyrosine metabolism resulting in liver and kidney disturbances and mental retardation
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Targum \Tar"gum\, n.; pl. {Targums}. Heb. {Targumim}. [Chald.
      targ[umac]m interpretation, fr. targ[c7]m to interpret. Cf.
      {Truchman}, and {Dragoman}.]
      A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old
      Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or
      dialect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Targum \Tar"gum\, n.; pl. {Targums}. Heb. {Targumim}. [Chald.
      targ[umac]m interpretation, fr. targ[c7]m to interpret. Cf.
      {Truchman}, and {Dragoman}.]
      A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old
      Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or
      dialect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Targumist \Tar"gum*ist\, n.
      The writer of a Targum; one versed in the Targums.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Targum \Tar"gum\, n.; pl. {Targums}. Heb. {Targumim}. [Chald.
      targ[umac]m interpretation, fr. targ[c7]m to interpret. Cf.
      {Truchman}, and {Dragoman}.]
      A translation or paraphrase of some portion of the Old
      Testament Scriptures in the Chaldee or Aramaic language or
      dialect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarquinish \Tar"quin*ish\, a.
      Like a Tarquin, a king of ancient Rome; proud; haughty;
      overbearing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarragon \Tar"ra*gon\, n. [Sp. taragona, Ar. tarkh[?]n; perhaps
      fr. Gr. [?] a dragon, or L. draco; cf. L. dracunculus
      tarragon. Cf. {Dragon}.] (Bot.)
      A plant of the genus {Artemisa} ({A. dracunculus}), much used
      in France for flavoring vinegar.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarsometatarsal \Tar`so*met`a*tar"sal\, a. (Anat.)
      (a) Of or pertaining to both the tarsus and metatarsus; as,
            the tarsometatarsal articulations.
      (b) Of or pertaining to the tarsometatarsus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tarsometatarsus \[d8]Tar`so*met`a*tar"sus\, n.; pl.
      {Tarsometatarsi}. [NL.] (Anat.)
      The large bone next the foot in the leg of a bird. It is
      formed by the union of the distal part of the tarsus with the
      metatarsus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Teraconic \Ter`a*con"ic\, a. [Terebic + citraconic.] (Chem.)
      Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained by the
      distillation of terebic acid, and homologous with citraconic
      acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leaf \Leaf\, n.; pl. {Leaves}. [OE. leef, lef, leaf, AS.
      le[a0]f; akin to S. l[?]f, OFries. laf, D. loof foliage, G.
      laub,OHG. loub leaf, foliage, Icel. lauf, Sw. l[94]f, Dan.
      l[94]v, Goth. laufs; cf. Lith. lapas. Cf. {Lodge}.]
      1. (Bot.) A colored, usually green, expansion growing from
            the side of a stem or rootstock, in which the sap for the
            use of the plant is elaborated under the influence of
            light; one of the parts of a plant which collectively
            constitute its foliage.
  
      Note: Such leaves usually consist of a blade, or lamina,
               supported upon a leafstalk or petiole, which, continued
               through the blade as the midrib, gives off woody ribs
               and veins that support the cellular texture. The
               petiole has usually some sort of an appendage on each
               side of its base, which is called the stipule. The
               green parenchyma of the leaf is covered with a thin
               epiderm pierced with closable microscopic openings,
               known as stomata.
  
      2. (Bot.) A special organ of vegetation in the form of a
            lateral outgrowth from the stem, whether appearing as a
            part of the foliage, or as a cotyledon, a scale, a bract,
            a spine, or a tendril.
  
      Note: In this view every part of a plant, except the root and
               the stem, is either a leaf, or is composed of leaves
               more or less modified and transformed.
  
      3. Something which is like a leaf in being wide and thin and
            having a flat surface, or in being attached to a larger
            body by one edge or end; as :
            (a) A part of a book or folded sheet containing two pages
                  upon its opposite sides.
            (b) A side, division, or part, that slides or is hinged,
                  as of window shutters, folding doors, etc.
            (c) The movable side of a table.
            (d) A very thin plate; as, gold leaf.
            (e) A portion of fat lying in a separate fold or layer.
            (f) One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.
  
      {Leaf beetle} (Zo[94]l.), any beetle which feeds upon leaves;
            esp., any species of the family {Chrysomelid[91]}, as the
            potato beetle and helmet beetle.
  
      {Leaf bridge}, a draw-bridge having a platform or leaf which
            swings vertically on hinges.
  
      {Leaf bud} (Bot.), a bud which develops into leaves or a
            leafy branch.
  
      {Leaf butterfly} (Zo[94]l.), any butterfly which, in the form
            and colors of its wings, resembles the leaves of plants
            upon which it rests; esp., butterflies of the genus
            {Kallima}, found in Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf crumpler} (Zo[94]l.), a small moth ({Phycis
            indigenella}), the larva of which feeds upon leaves of the
            apple tree, and forms its nest by crumpling and fastening
            leaves together in clusters.
  
      {Leaf cutter} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various species of wild
            bees of the genus {Megachile}, which cut rounded pieces
            from the edges of leaves, or the petals of flowers, to be
            used in the construction of their nests, which are made in
            holes and crevices, or in a leaf rolled up for the
            purpose. Among the common American species are {M. brevis}
            and {M. centuncularis}. Called also {rose-cutting bee}.
  
      {Leaf fat}, the fat which lies in leaves or layers within the
            body of an animal.
  
      {Leaf flea} (Zo[94]l.), a jumping plant louse of the family
            {Psyllid[91]}.
  
      {Leaf frog} (Zo[94]l.), any tree frog of the genus
            {Phyllomedusa}.
  
      {Leaf green}.(Bot.) See {Chlorophyll}.
  
      {Leaf hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any small jumping hemipterous
            insect of the genus {Tettigonia}, and allied genera. They
            live upon the leaves and twigs of plants. See {Live
            hopper}.
  
      {Leaf insect} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several genera and
            species of orthopterous insects, esp. of the genus
            {Phyllium}, in which the wings, and sometimes the legs,
            resemble leaves in color and form. They are common in
            Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf lard}, lard from leaf fat. See under {Lard}.
  
      {Leaf louse} (Zo[94]l.), an aphid.
  
      {Leaf metal}, metal in thin leaves, as gold, silver, or tin.
           
  
      {Leaf miner} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various small
            lepidopterous and dipterous insects, which, in the larval
            stages, burrow in and eat the parenchyma of leaves; as,
            the pear-tree leaf miner ({Lithocolletis geminatella}).
  
      {Leaf notcher} (Zo[94]l.), a pale bluish green beetle
            ({Artipus Floridanus}), which, in Florida, eats the edges
            of the leaves of orange trees.
  
      {Leaf roller} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any tortricid moth
            which makes a nest by rolling up the leaves of plants. See
            {Tortrix}.
  
      {Leaf scar} (Bot.), the cicatrix on a stem whence a leaf has
            fallen.
  
      {Leaf sewer} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth, whose caterpillar
            makes a nest by rolling up a leaf and fastening the edges
            together with silk, as if sewn; esp., {Phoxopteris
            nubeculana}, which feeds upon the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf sight}, a hinges sight on a firearm, which can be
            raised or folded down.
  
      {Leaf trace} (Bot.), one or more fibrovascular bundles, which
            may be traced down an endogenous stem from the base of a
            leaf.
  
      {Leaf tier} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth whose larva makes a
            nest by fastening the edges of a leaf together with silk;
            esp., {Teras cinderella}, found on the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf valve}, a valve which moves on a hinge.
  
      {Leaf wasp} (Zo[94]l.), a sawfiy.
  
      {To turn over a new leaf}, to make a radical change for the
            better in one's way of living or doing. [Colloq.]
  
                     They were both determined to turn over a new leaf.
                                                                              --Richardson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tercentenary \Ter*cen"te*na*ry\, a. [L. ter thirce + E.
      centenary.]
      Including, or relating to, an interval of three hundred
      years. -- n. The three hundredth anniversary of any event;
      also, a celebration of such an anniversary.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tercine \Ter"cine\, n. [F., from L. tertius the third.] (Bot.)
      A cellular layer derived from the nucleus of an ovule and
      surrounding the embryo sac. Cf. {Quintine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tergant \Ter"gant\, a. (Her.)
      Showing the back; as, the eagle tergant. [Written also
      {tergiant}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tergeminal \Ter*gem"i*nal\, Tergeminate \Ter*gem"i*nate\, a.
      [See {Tergeminous}.] (Bot.)
      Thrice twin; having three pairs of leaflets.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tergeminal \Ter*gem"i*nal\, Tergeminate \Ter*gem"i*nate\, a.
      [See {Tergeminous}.] (Bot.)
      Thrice twin; having three pairs of leaflets.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tergeminous \Ter*gem"i*nous\, a. [L. tergeminus; ter thrice +
      geminus doubled at birth, twin-born. Cf. {Trigeminous}.]
      Threefold; thrice-paired. --Blount.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tergant \Ter"gant\, a. (Her.)
      Showing the back; as, the eagle tergant. [Written also
      {tergiant}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Terrace \Ter"race\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Terraced}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Terracing}.]
      To form into a terrace or terraces; to furnish with a terrace
      or terraces, as, to terrace a garden, or a building. --Sir H.
      Wotton.
  
               Clermont's terraced height, and Esher's groves.
                                                                              --Thomson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Terrigenous \Ter*rig"e*nous\, a. [L. terrigena, terrigenus;
      terra the earth + genere, gignere, to bring forth.]
      Earthborn; produced by the earth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sanctus \Sanc"tus\, n. [L. sanctus, p. p. of sancire.]
      1. (Eccl.) A part of the Mass, or, in Protestant churches, a
            part of the communion service, of which the first words in
            Latin are Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus [Holy, holy, holy]; --
            called also {Tersanctus}.
  
      2. (Mus.) An anthem composed for these words.
  
      {Sanctus bell}, a small bell usually suspended in a bell cot
            at the apex of the nave roof, over the chancel arch, in
            medi[91]val churches, but a hand bell is now often used;
            -- so called because rung at the singing of the sanctus,
            at the conclusion of the ordinary of the Mass, and again
            at the elevation of the host. Called also {Mass bell},
            {sacring bell}, {saints' bell}, {sance-bell}, {sancte
            bell}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Terse \Terse\, a. [Compar. {Terser}; superl. {Tersest}.] [L.
      tersus, p. p. of tergere to rub or wipe off.]
      1. Appearing as if rubbed or wiped off; rubbed; smooth;
            polished. [Obs.]
  
                     Many stones, . . . although terse and smooth, have
                     not this power attractive.                  --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.
  
      2. Refined; accomplished; -- said of persons. [R. & Obs.]
            [bd]Your polite and terse gallants.[b8] --Massinger.
  
      3. Elegantly concise; free of superfluous words; polished to
            smoothness; as, terse language; a terse style.
  
                     Terse, luminous, and dignified eloquence.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
                     A poet, too, was there, whose verse Was tender,
                     musical, and terse.                           --Longfellow.
  
      Syn: Neat; concise; compact.
  
      Usage: {Terse}, {Concise}. Terse was defined by Johnson
                  [bd]cleanly written[b8], i. e., free from blemishes,
                  neat or smooth. Its present sense is [bd]free from
                  excrescences,[b8] and hence, compact, with smoothness,
                  grace, or elegance, as in the following lones of
                  Whitehead:
  
                           [bd]In eight terse lines has Ph[91]drus told (So
                           frugal were the bards of old) A tale of goats;
                           and closed with grace, Plan, moral, all, in that
                           short space.[b8] It differs from concise in not
                  implying, perhaps, quite as much condensation, but
                  chiefly in the additional idea of [bd]grace or
                  elegance.[b8] -- {Terse"ly}, adv. -- {Terse"ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Regent \Re"gent\, n. [F. r[82]gent. See {Regent}, a.]
      1. One who rules or reigns; a governor; a ruler. --Milton.
  
      2. Especially, one invested with vicarious authority; one who
            governs a kingdom in the minority, absence, or disability
            of the sovereign.
  
      3. One of a governing board; a trustee or overseer; a
            superintendent; a curator; as, the regents of the
            Smithsonian Institution.
  
      4. (Eng.Univ.) A resident master of arts of less than five
            years' standing, or a doctor of less than twwo. They were
            formerly privileged to lecture in the schools.
  
      {Regent bird} (Zo[94]l.), a beautiful Australian bower bird
            ({Sericulus melinus}). The male has the head, neck, and
            large patches on the wings, bright golden yellow, and the
            rest of the plumage deep velvety black; -- so called in
            honor of the Prince of Wales (afterward George IV.), who
            was Prince Regent in the reign of George III.
  
      {The Regents of the University of the State of New York}, the
            members of a corporate body called the University of New
            York. They have a certain supervisory power over the
            incorporated institution for Academic and higher education
            in the State.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tea \Tea\, n. [Chin. tsh[be], Prov. Chin. te: cf. F. th[82].]
      1. The prepared leaves of a shrub, or small tree ({Thea, [or]
            Camellia, Chinensis}). The shrub is a native of China, but
            has been introduced to some extent into some other
            countries.
  
      Note: Teas are classed as green or black, according to their
               color or appearance, the kinds being distinguished also
               by various other characteristic differences, as of
               taste, odor, and the like. The color, flavor, and
               quality are dependent upon the treatment which the
               leaves receive after being gathered. The leaves for
               green tea are heated, or roasted slightly, in shallow
               pans over a wood fire, almost immediately after being
               gathered, after which they are rolled with the hands
               upon a table, to free them from a portion of their
               moisture, and to twist them, and are then quickly
               dried. Those intended for black tea are spread out in
               the air for some time after being gathered, and then
               tossed about with the hands until they become soft and
               flaccid, when they are roasted for a few minutes, and
               rolled, and having then been exposed to the air for a
               few hours in a soft and moist state, are finally dried
               slowly over a charcoal fire. The operation of roasting
               and rolling is sometimes repeated several times, until
               the leaves have become of the proper color. The
               principal sorts of green tea are Twankay, the poorest
               kind; Hyson skin, the refuse of Hyson; Hyson, Imperial,
               and Gunpowder, fine varieties; and Young Hyson, a
               choice kind made from young leaves gathered early in
               the spring. Those of black tea are Bohea, the poorest
               kind; Congou; Oolong; Souchong, one of the finest
               varieties; and Pekoe, a fine-flavored kind, made
               chiefly from young spring buds. See {Bohea}, {Congou},
               {Gunpowder tea}, under {Gunpowder}, {Hyson}, {Oolong},
               and {Souchong}. --K. Johnson. Tomlinson.
  
      Note: [bd]No knowledge of . . . [tea] appears to have reached
               Europe till after the establishment of intercourse
               between Portugal and China in 1517. The Portuguese,
               however, did little towards the introduction of the
               herb into Europe, and it was not till the Dutch
               established themselves at Bantam early in 17th century,
               that these adventurers learned from the Chinese the
               habit of tea drinking, and brought it to Europe.[b8]
               --Encyc. Brit.
  
      2. A decoction or infusion of tea leaves in boiling water;
            as, tea is a common beverage.
  
      3. Any infusion or decoction, especially when made of the
            dried leaves of plants; as, sage tea; chamomile tea;
            catnip tea.
  
      4. The evening meal, at which tea is usually served; supper.
  
      {Arabian tea}, the leaves of {Catha edulis}; also (Bot.), the
            plant itself. See {Kat}.
  
      {Assam tea}, tea grown in Assam, in India, originally brought
            there from China about the year 1850.
  
      {Australian}, [or] {Botany Bay}, {tea} (Bot.), a woody
            clambing plant ({Smilax glycyphylla}).
  
      {Brazilian tea}.
            (a) The dried leaves of {Lantana pseodothea}, used in
                  Brazil as a substitute for tea.
            (b) The dried leaves of {Stachytarpheta mutabilis}, used
                  for adulterating tea, and also, in Austria, for
                  preparing a beverage.
  
      {Labrador tea}. (Bot.) See under {Labrador}.
  
      {New Jersey tea} (Bot.), an American shrub, the leaves of
            which were formerly used as a substitute for tea; redroot.
            See {Redroot}.
  
      {New Zealand tea}. (Bot.) See under {New Zealand}.
  
      {Oswego tea}. (Bot.) See {Oswego tea}.
  
      {Paraguay tea}, mate. See 1st {Mate}.
  
      {Tea board}, a board or tray for holding a tea set.
  
      {Tea bug} (Zo[94]l.), an hemipterous insect which injures the
            tea plant by sucking the juice of the tender leaves.
  
      {Tea caddy}, a small box for holding tea.
  
      {Tea chest}, a small, square wooden case, usually lined with
            sheet lead or tin, in which tea is imported from China.
  
      {Tea clam} (Zo[94]l.), a small quahaug. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tea garden}, a public garden where tea and other
            refreshments are served.
  
      {Tea plant} (Bot.), any plant, the leaves of which are used
            in making a beverage by infusion; specifically, {Thea
            Chinensis}, from which the tea of commerce is obtained.
  
      {Tea rose} (Bot.), a delicate and graceful variety of the
            rose ({Rosa Indica}, var. {odorata}), introduced from
            China, and so named from its scent. Many varieties are now
            cultivated.
  
      {Tea service}, the appurtenances or utensils required for a
            tea table, -- when of silver, usually comprising only the
            teapot, milk pitcher, and sugar dish.
  
      {Tea set}, a tea service.
  
      {Tea table}, a table on which tea furniture is set, or at
            which tea is drunk.
  
      {Tea taster}, one who tests or ascertains the quality of tea
            by tasting.
  
      {Tea tree} (Bot.), the tea plant of China. See {Tea plant},
            above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Theorize \The"o*rize\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Theorized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Theorizing}.] [Cf. F. th[82]oriser.]
      To form a theory or theories; to form opinions solely by
      theory; to speculate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thereagain \There"a*gain`\, adv.
      In opposition; against one's course. [Obs.]
  
               If that him list to stand thereagain.      --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Theriac \The"ri*ac\, d8Theriaca \[d8]The*ri"a*ca\, n. [L.
      theriaca an antidote against the bite of serpents, Gr. [?]:
      cf. F. th[82]riaque. See {Treacle}.]
      1. (Old Med.) An ancient composition esteemed efficacious
            against the effects of poison; especially, a certain
            compound of sixty-four drugs, prepared, pulverized, and
            reduced by means of honey to an electuary; -- called also
            {theriaca Andromachi}, and {Venice treacle}.
  
      2. Treacle; molasses. --British Pharm.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stethometer \Ste*thom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] chest + -meter.]
      (Physiol.)
      An apparatus for measuring the external movements of a given
      point of the chest wall, during respiration; -- also called
      {thoracometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thoracometer \Tho`ra*com"e*ter\, n. (Physiol.)
      Same as {Stethometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stethometer \Ste*thom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] chest + -meter.]
      (Physiol.)
      An apparatus for measuring the external movements of a given
      point of the chest wall, during respiration; -- also called
      {thoracometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thoracometer \Tho`ra*com"e*ter\, n. (Physiol.)
      Same as {Stethometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thoroughness \Thor"ough*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being thorough; completeness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thracian \Thra"cian\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Thrace, or its people. -- n. A native or
      inhabitant of Thrace.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrash \Thrash\, Thresh \Thresh\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Thrashed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thrashing}.] [OE.
      [thorn]reschen, [thorn]reshen, to beat, AS. [thorn]erscan,
      [thorn]rescan; akin to D. dorschen, OD. derschen, G.
      dreschen, OHG. dreskan, Icel. [thorn]reskja, Sw. tr[94]ska,
      Dan. t[91]rske, Goth. [thorn]riskan, Lith. traszketi to
      rattle, Russ. treskate to burst, crackle, tresk' a crash,
      OSlav. troska a stroke of lighting. Cf. {Thresh}.]
      1. To beat out grain from, as straw or husks; to beat the
            straw or husk of (grain) with a flail; to beat off, as the
            kernels of grain; as, to thrash wheat, rye, or oats; to
            thrash over the old straw.
  
                     The wheat was reaped, thrashed, and winnowed by
                     machines.                                          --H. Spencer.
  
      2. To beat soundly, as with a stick or whip; to drub.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrashing \Thrash"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Thrash}, v.
  
      {Thrashing floor}, {Threshing-floor}, [or] {Threshing floor},
            a floor or area on which grain is beaten out.
  
      {Thrashing machine}, a machine for separating grain from the
            straw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrashing \Thrash"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Thrash}, v.
  
      {Thrashing floor}, {Threshing-floor}, [or] {Threshing floor},
            a floor or area on which grain is beaten out.
  
      {Thrashing machine}, a machine for separating grain from the
            straw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrashing \Thrash"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Thrash}, v.
  
      {Thrashing floor}, {Threshing-floor}, [or] {Threshing floor},
            a floor or area on which grain is beaten out.
  
      {Thrashing machine}, a machine for separating grain from the
            straw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrasonical \Thra*son"ic*al\, a. [From Thrso, the name of a
      braggart soldier in Terence's [bd]Eunuch:[b8] cf. L.
      Thrasonianus.]
      Of or pertaining to Thraso; like, or becoming to, Thraso;
      bragging; boastful; vainglorious. -- {Thra*son"ic*al*ly},
      adv.
  
               C[91]sar's thrasonical brag of 'I came, saw, and
               overcame.'                                             --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrasonical \Thra*son"ic*al\, a. [From Thrso, the name of a
      braggart soldier in Terence's [bd]Eunuch:[b8] cf. L.
      Thrasonianus.]
      Of or pertaining to Thraso; like, or becoming to, Thraso;
      bragging; boastful; vainglorious. -- {Thra*son"ic*al*ly},
      adv.
  
               C[91]sar's thrasonical brag of 'I came, saw, and
               overcame.'                                             --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thresh \Thresh\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Threshed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Threshing}.]
      Same as {Thrash}.
  
               He would thresh, and thereto dike and delve. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrashing \Thrash"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Thrash}, v.
  
      {Thrashing floor}, {Threshing-floor}, [or] {Threshing floor},
            a floor or area on which grain is beaten out.
  
      {Thrashing machine}, a machine for separating grain from the
            straw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrashing \Thrash"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Thrash}, v.
  
      {Thrashing floor}, {Threshing-floor}, [or] {Threshing floor},
            a floor or area on which grain is beaten out.
  
      {Thrashing machine}, a machine for separating grain from the
            straw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrush \Thrush\, n. [OE. [thorn]rusche, AS. [thorn]rysce; akin
      to OHG. drosca, droscea, droscela, and E. throstle. Cf.
      {Throstle}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of singing birds
            belonging to {Turdus} and allied genera. They are noted
            for the sweetness of their songs.
  
      Note: Among the best-known European species are the song
               thrush or throstle ({Turdus musicus}), the missel
               thrush (see under {Missel}), the European redwing, and
               the blackbird. The most important American species are
               the wood thrush ({Turdus mustelinus}), Wilson's thrush
               ({T. fuscescens}), the hermit thrush (see under
               {Hermit}), Swainson's thrush ({T. Alici[91]}), and the
               migratory thrush, or American robin (see {Robin}).
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of singing birds
            more or less resembling the true thrushes in appearance or
            habits; as the thunderbird and the American brown thrush
            (or thrasher). See {Brown thrush}.
  
      {Ant thrush}. See {Ant thrush}, {Breve}, and {Pitta}.
  
      {Babbling thrush}, any one of numerous species of Asiatic
            timaline birds; -- called also {babbler}.
  
      {Fruit thrush}, any species of bulbul.
  
      {Shrike thrush}. See under {Shrike}.
  
      {Stone thrush}, the missel thrush; -- said to be so called
            from its marbled breast.
  
      {Thrush nightingale}. See {Nightingale}, 2.
  
      {Thrush tit}, any one of several species of Asiatic singing
            birds of the genus {Cochoa}. They are beautifully colored
            birds allied to the tits, but resembling thrushes in size
            and habits.
  
      {Water thrush}.
            (a) The European dipper.
            (b) An American warbler ({Seiurus Noveboracensis}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tierce-major \Tierce"-ma`jor\, n. [Cf. F. tierce majeure.] (Card
      Playing)
      See {Tierce}, 4.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tiresome \Tire"some\, a.
      Fitted or tending to tire; exhausted; wearisome; fatiguing;
      tedious; as, a tiresome journey; a tiresome discourse. --
      {Tire"some*ly}, adv. -- {Tire"some*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tiresome \Tire"some\, a.
      Fitted or tending to tire; exhausted; wearisome; fatiguing;
      tedious; as, a tiresome journey; a tiresome discourse. --
      {Tire"some*ly}, adv. -- {Tire"some*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tiresome \Tire"some\, a.
      Fitted or tending to tire; exhausted; wearisome; fatiguing;
      tedious; as, a tiresome journey; a tiresome discourse. --
      {Tire"some*ly}, adv. -- {Tire"some*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hearken \Heark"en\, v. t.
      1. To hear by listening. [Archaic]
  
                     [She] hearkened now and then Some little whispering
                     and soft groaning sound.                     --Spenser.
  
      2. To give heed to; to hear attentively. [Archaic]
  
                     The King of Naples . . . hearkens my brother's suit.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {To hearken out}, to search out. [Obs.]
  
                     If you find none, you must hearken out a vein and
                     buy.                                                   --B. Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Rack \Rack\, v. t.
      1. To extend by the application of force; to stretch or
            strain; specifically, to stretch on the rack or wheel; to
            torture by an engine which strains the limbs and pulls the
            joints.
  
                     He was racked and miserably tormented. --Pope.
  
      2. To torment; to torture; to affect with extreme pain or
            anguish.
  
                     Vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. To stretch or strain, in a figurative sense; hence, to
            harass, or oppress by extortion.
  
                     The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
                     They [landlords] rack a Scripture simile beyond the
                     true intent thereof.                           --Fuller.
  
                     Try what my credit can in Venice do; That shall be
                     racked even to the uttermost.            --Shak.
  
      4. (Mining) To wash on a rack, as metals or ore.
  
      5. (Naut.) To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns
            of yarn, marline, etc.
  
      {To rack one's brains} [or] {wits}, to exert them to the
            utmost for the purpose of accomplishing something.
  
      Syn: To torture; torment; rend; tear.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reckon \Reck"on\, v. i.
      1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in
            numbering or computing. --Shak.
  
      2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle;
            to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to
            adjust relations of desert or penalty.
  
                     [bd]Parfay,[b8] sayst thou, [bd]sometime he reckon
                     shall.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      {To reckon for}, to answer for; to pay the account for.
            [bd]If they fail in their bounden duty, they shall reckon
            for it one day.[b8] --Bp. Sanderson.
  
      {To reckon on} [or] {upon}, to count or depend on.
  
      {To reckon with}, to settle accounts or claims with; -- used
            literally or figuratively.
  
                     After a long time the lord of those servants cometh,
                     and reckoneth with them.                     --Matt. xxv.
                                                                              19.
  
      {To reckon without one's host}, to ignore in a calculation or
            arrangement the person whose assent is essential; hence,
            to reckon erroneously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reckon \Reck"on\, v. i.
      1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in
            numbering or computing. --Shak.
  
      2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle;
            to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to
            adjust relations of desert or penalty.
  
                     [bd]Parfay,[b8] sayst thou, [bd]sometime he reckon
                     shall.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      {To reckon for}, to answer for; to pay the account for.
            [bd]If they fail in their bounden duty, they shall reckon
            for it one day.[b8] --Bp. Sanderson.
  
      {To reckon on} [or] {upon}, to count or depend on.
  
      {To reckon with}, to settle accounts or claims with; -- used
            literally or figuratively.
  
                     After a long time the lord of those servants cometh,
                     and reckoneth with them.                     --Matt. xxv.
                                                                              19.
  
      {To reckon without one's host}, to ignore in a calculation or
            arrangement the person whose assent is essential; hence,
            to reckon erroneously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reckon \Reck"on\, v. i.
      1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in
            numbering or computing. --Shak.
  
      2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle;
            to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to
            adjust relations of desert or penalty.
  
                     [bd]Parfay,[b8] sayst thou, [bd]sometime he reckon
                     shall.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      {To reckon for}, to answer for; to pay the account for.
            [bd]If they fail in their bounden duty, they shall reckon
            for it one day.[b8] --Bp. Sanderson.
  
      {To reckon on} [or] {upon}, to count or depend on.
  
      {To reckon with}, to settle accounts or claims with; -- used
            literally or figuratively.
  
                     After a long time the lord of those servants cometh,
                     and reckoneth with them.                     --Matt. xxv.
                                                                              19.
  
      {To reckon without one's host}, to ignore in a calculation or
            arrangement the person whose assent is essential; hence,
            to reckon erroneously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reckon \Reck"on\, v. i.
      1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in
            numbering or computing. --Shak.
  
      2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle;
            to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to
            adjust relations of desert or penalty.
  
                     [bd]Parfay,[b8] sayst thou, [bd]sometime he reckon
                     shall.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      {To reckon for}, to answer for; to pay the account for.
            [bd]If they fail in their bounden duty, they shall reckon
            for it one day.[b8] --Bp. Sanderson.
  
      {To reckon on} [or] {upon}, to count or depend on.
  
      {To reckon with}, to settle accounts or claims with; -- used
            literally or figuratively.
  
                     After a long time the lord of those servants cometh,
                     and reckoneth with them.                     --Matt. xxv.
                                                                              19.
  
      {To reckon without one's host}, to ignore in a calculation or
            arrangement the person whose assent is essential; hence,
            to reckon erroneously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Work \Work\, v. t.
      1. To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to;
            to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor.
  
                     He could have told them of two or three gold mines,
                     and a silver mine, and given the reason why they
                     forbare to work them at that time.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Raleigh.
  
      2. To produce or form by labor; to bring forth by exertion or
            toil; to accomplish; to originate; to effect; as, to work
            wood or iron into a form desired, or into a utensil; to
            work cotton or wool into cloth.
  
                     Each herb he knew, that works or good or ill.
                                                                              --Harte.
  
      3. To produce by slow degrees, or as if laboriously; to bring
            gradually into any state by action or motion. [bd]Sidelong
            he works his way.[b8] --Milton.
  
                     So the pure, limpid stream, when foul with stains Of
                     rushing torrents and descending rains, Works itself
                     clear, and as it runs, refines, Till by degrees the
                     floating mirror shines.                     --Addison.
  
      4. To influence by acting upon; to prevail upon; to manage;
            to lead. [bd]Work your royal father to his ruin.[b8]
            --Philips.
  
      5. To form with a needle and thread or yarn; especially, to
            embroider; as, to work muslin.
  
      6. To set in motion or action; to direct the action of; to
            keep at work; to govern; to manage; as, to work a machine.
  
                     Knowledge in building and working ships.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.
  
                     Now, Marcus, thy virtue's the proof; Put forth thy
                     utmost strength, work every nerve.      --Addison.
  
                     The mariners all 'gan work the ropes, Where they
                     were wont to do.                                 --Coleridge.
  
      7. To cause to ferment, as liquor.
  
      {To work a passage} (Naut.), to pay for a passage by doing
            work.
  
      {To work double tides} (Naut.), to perform the labor of three
            days in two; -- a phrase which alludes to a practice of
            working by the night tide as well as by the day.
  
      {To work in}, to insert, introduce, mingle, or interweave by
            labor or skill.
  
      {To work into}, to force, urge, or insinuate into; as, to
            work one's self into favor or confidence.
  
      {To work off}, to remove gradually, as by labor, or a gradual
            process; as, beer works off impurities in fermenting.
  
      {To work out}.
            (a) To effect by labor and exertion. [bd]Work out your own
                  salvation with fear and trembling.[b8] --Phil. ii. 12.
            (b) To erase; to efface. [R.]
  
                           Tears of joy for your returning spilt, Work out
                           and expiate our former guilt.      --Dryden.
            (c) To solve, as a problem.
            (d) To exhaust, as a mine, by working.
  
      {To work up}.
            (a) To raise; to excite; to stir up; as, to work up the
                  passions to rage.
  
                           The sun, that rolls his chariot o'er their
                           heads, Works up more fire and color in their
                           cheeks.                                       --Addison.
            (b) To expend in any work, as materials; as, they have
                  worked up all the stock.
            (c) (Naut.) To make over or into something else, as yarns
                  drawn from old rigging, made into spun yarn, foxes,
                  sennit, and the like; also, to keep constantly at work
                  upon needless matters, as a crew in order to punish
                  them. --R. H. Dana, Jr.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Work \Work\, v. t.
      1. To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to;
            to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor.
  
                     He could have told them of two or three gold mines,
                     and a silver mine, and given the reason why they
                     forbare to work them at that time.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Raleigh.
  
      2. To produce or form by labor; to bring forth by exertion or
            toil; to accomplish; to originate; to effect; as, to work
            wood or iron into a form desired, or into a utensil; to
            work cotton or wool into cloth.
  
                     Each herb he knew, that works or good or ill.
                                                                              --Harte.
  
      3. To produce by slow degrees, or as if laboriously; to bring
            gradually into any state by action or motion. [bd]Sidelong
            he works his way.[b8] --Milton.
  
                     So the pure, limpid stream, when foul with stains Of
                     rushing torrents and descending rains, Works itself
                     clear, and as it runs, refines, Till by degrees the
                     floating mirror shines.                     --Addison.
  
      4. To influence by acting upon; to prevail upon; to manage;
            to lead. [bd]Work your royal father to his ruin.[b8]
            --Philips.
  
      5. To form with a needle and thread or yarn; especially, to
            embroider; as, to work muslin.
  
      6. To set in motion or action; to direct the action of; to
            keep at work; to govern; to manage; as, to work a machine.
  
                     Knowledge in building and working ships.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.
  
                     Now, Marcus, thy virtue's the proof; Put forth thy
                     utmost strength, work every nerve.      --Addison.
  
                     The mariners all 'gan work the ropes, Where they
                     were wont to do.                                 --Coleridge.
  
      7. To cause to ferment, as liquor.
  
      {To work a passage} (Naut.), to pay for a passage by doing
            work.
  
      {To work double tides} (Naut.), to perform the labor of three
            days in two; -- a phrase which alludes to a practice of
            working by the night tide as well as by the day.
  
      {To work in}, to insert, introduce, mingle, or interweave by
            labor or skill.
  
      {To work into}, to force, urge, or insinuate into; as, to
            work one's self into favor or confidence.
  
      {To work off}, to remove gradually, as by labor, or a gradual
            process; as, beer works off impurities in fermenting.
  
      {To work out}.
            (a) To effect by labor and exertion. [bd]Work out your own
                  salvation with fear and trembling.[b8] --Phil. ii. 12.
            (b) To erase; to efface. [R.]
  
                           Tears of joy for your returning spilt, Work out
                           and expiate our former guilt.      --Dryden.
            (c) To solve, as a problem.
            (d) To exhaust, as a mine, by working.
  
      {To work up}.
            (a) To raise; to excite; to stir up; as, to work up the
                  passions to rage.
  
                           The sun, that rolls his chariot o'er their
                           heads, Works up more fire and color in their
                           cheeks.                                       --Addison.
            (b) To expend in any work, as materials; as, they have
                  worked up all the stock.
            (c) (Naut.) To make over or into something else, as yarns
                  drawn from old rigging, made into spun yarn, foxes,
                  sennit, and the like; also, to keep constantly at work
                  upon needless matters, as a crew in order to punish
                  them. --R. H. Dana, Jr.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torchon lace \Tor"chon lace`\ [F. torchon a kind of coarse
      napkin.]
      a simple thread lace worked upon a pillow with coarse thread;
      also, a similar lace made by machinery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torchon paper \Tor"chon pa"per\ [F. papier torchon.]
      Paper with a rough surface; esp., handmade paper of great
      hardness for the use of painters in water colors.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion meter \Torsion meter\ (Mech.)
      An instrument for determining the torque on a shaft, and
      hence the horse power of an engine, esp. of a marine engine
      of high power, by measuring the amount of twist of a given
      length of the shaft. Called also {torsimeter}, {torsiometer},
      {torsometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion meter \Torsion meter\ (Mech.)
      An instrument for determining the torque on a shaft, and
      hence the horse power of an engine, esp. of a marine engine
      of high power, by measuring the amount of twist of a given
      length of the shaft. Called also {torsimeter}, {torsiometer},
      {torsometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion \Tor"sion\, n. [F., fr. LL. torsio, fr. L. torquere,
      tortum, to twist. See {Torture}.]
      1. The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being
            twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the
            exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or
            part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is
            held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
  
      2. (Mech.) That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of
            any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of
            rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.
  
      {Angle of torsion} (of a curve) (Geom.), the indefinitely
            small angle between two consecutive osculating planes of a
            curve of double curvature.
  
      {Moment of torsion} (Mech.) the moment of a pair of equal and
            opposite couples which tend to twist a body.
  
      {Torsion balance} (Physics.), an instrument for estimating
            very minute forces, as electric or magnetic attractions
            and repulsions, by the torsion of a very slender wire or
            fiber having at its lower extremity a horizontal bar or
            needle, upon which the forces act.
  
      {Torsion scale}, a scale for weighing in which the fulcra of
            the levers or beams are strained wires or strips acting by
            torsion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion \Tor"sion\, n. [F., fr. LL. torsio, fr. L. torquere,
      tortum, to twist. See {Torture}.]
      1. The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being
            twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the
            exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or
            part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is
            held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
  
      2. (Mech.) That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of
            any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of
            rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.
  
      {Angle of torsion} (of a curve) (Geom.), the indefinitely
            small angle between two consecutive osculating planes of a
            curve of double curvature.
  
      {Moment of torsion} (Mech.) the moment of a pair of equal and
            opposite couples which tend to twist a body.
  
      {Torsion balance} (Physics.), an instrument for estimating
            very minute forces, as electric or magnetic attractions
            and repulsions, by the torsion of a very slender wire or
            fiber having at its lower extremity a horizontal bar or
            needle, upon which the forces act.
  
      {Torsion scale}, a scale for weighing in which the fulcra of
            the levers or beams are strained wires or strips acting by
            torsion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion electrometer \Tor"sion e*lec*trom"e*ter\ (Elec.)
      A torsion balance used for measuring electric attraction or
      repulsion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion galvanometer \Torsion galvanometer\ (Elec.)
      A galvanometer in which current is measured by torsion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion head \Torsion head\
      That part of a torsion balance from which the wire or
      filament is suspended.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion indicator \Torsion indicator\
      An autographic torsion meter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion meter \Torsion meter\ (Mech.)
      An instrument for determining the torque on a shaft, and
      hence the horse power of an engine, esp. of a marine engine
      of high power, by measuring the amount of twist of a given
      length of the shaft. Called also {torsimeter}, {torsiometer},
      {torsometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion \Tor"sion\, n. [F., fr. LL. torsio, fr. L. torquere,
      tortum, to twist. See {Torture}.]
      1. The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being
            twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the
            exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or
            part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is
            held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
  
      2. (Mech.) That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of
            any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of
            rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.
  
      {Angle of torsion} (of a curve) (Geom.), the indefinitely
            small angle between two consecutive osculating planes of a
            curve of double curvature.
  
      {Moment of torsion} (Mech.) the moment of a pair of equal and
            opposite couples which tend to twist a body.
  
      {Torsion balance} (Physics.), an instrument for estimating
            very minute forces, as electric or magnetic attractions
            and repulsions, by the torsion of a very slender wire or
            fiber having at its lower extremity a horizontal bar or
            needle, upon which the forces act.
  
      {Torsion scale}, a scale for weighing in which the fulcra of
            the levers or beams are strained wires or strips acting by
            torsion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsional \Tor"sion*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to torsion; resulting from torsion, or the
      force with which a thread or wire returns to a state of rest
      after having been twisted round its axis; as, torsional
      force.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torsion meter \Torsion meter\ (Mech.)
      An instrument for determining the torque on a shaft, and
      hence the horse power of an engine, esp. of a marine engine
      of high power, by measuring the amount of twist of a given
      length of the shaft. Called also {torsimeter}, {torsiometer},
      {torsometer}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toryism \To"ry*ism\, n.
      The principles of the Tories.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trachinoid \Tra"chi*noid\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Of, pertaining to, or like, {Trachinus}, a genus of fishes
      which includes the weevers. See {Weever}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Permit \Per*mit"\, n. [Cf. Sp. palamida a kind of scombroid
      fish.]
      (a) A large pompano ({Trachinotus goodei}) of the West
            Indies, Florida, etc. It becomes about three feet long.
      (b) The round pompano. ({T. falcatus}). [Local, U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trachinoid \Tra"chi*noid\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Of, pertaining to, or like, {Trachinus}, a genus of fishes
      which includes the weevers. See {Weever}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: The two British species are the great, or greater,
               weever ({Trachinus draco}), which becomes a foot long
               (called also {gowdie}, {sea cat}, {stingbull}, and
               {weaverfish}), and the lesser weever ({T. vipera}),
               about half as large (called also {otter pike}, and
               {stingfish}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stingbull \Sting"bull`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The European greater weever fish ({Trachinus draco}), which
      is capable of inflicting severe wounds with the spinous rays
      of its dorsal fin. See {Weever}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Trachoma \[d8]Tra*cho"ma\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] roughness, fr.
      [?] rough.] (Med.)
      Granular conjunctivitis due to a specific micrococcus. --
      {Tra*chom"a*tous}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Crevalle \[d8]Cre`val*le"\ (kr?`v?l-l?"), n. [Prob. of same
      origin as cavally. See {Cavally}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The cavally or jurel. See {Cavally}, and {Jurel}.
      (b) The pompano ({Trachynotus Carolinus}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trace \Trace\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {traced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {tracing}.] [OF. tracier, F. tracer, from (assumed) LL.
      tractiare, fr.L. tractus, p. p. of trahere to draw. Cf.
      {Abstract}, {Attract}, {Contract}, {Portratt}, {Tract},
      {Trail}, {Train}, {Treat}. ]
      1. To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; especially,
            to copy, as a drawing or engraving, by following the lines
            and marking them on a sheet superimposed, through which
            they appear; as, to trace a figure or an outline; a traced
            drawing.
  
                     Some faintly traced features or outline of the
                     mother and the child, slowly lading into the
                     twilight of the woods.                        --Hawthorne.
  
      2. To follow by some mark that has been left by a person or
            thing which has preceded; to follow by footsteps, tracks,
            or tokens. --Cowper.
  
                     You may trace the deluge quite round the globe. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
                     I feel thy power . . . to trace the ways Of highest
                     agents.                                             --Milton.
  
      3. Hence, to follow the trace or track of.
  
                     How all the way the prince on footpace traced.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      4. To copy; to imitate.
  
                     That servile path thou nobly dost decline, Of
                     tracing word, and line by line.         --Denham.
  
      5. To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
  
                     We do tracethis alley up and down.      --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tracing \Tra"cing\, n.
      1. The act of one who traces; especially, the act of copying
            by marking on thin paper, or other transparent substance,
            the lines of a pattern placed beneath; also, the copy thus
            producted.
  
      2. A regular path or track; a course.
  
      {Tracing cloth}, {Tracing paper}, specially prepared
            transparent cloth or paper, which enables a drawing or
            print to be clearly seen through it, and so allows the use
            of a pen or pencil to produce a facsimile by following the
            lines of the original placed beneath.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trace \Trace\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {traced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {tracing}.] [OF. tracier, F. tracer, from (assumed) LL.
      tractiare, fr.L. tractus, p. p. of trahere to draw. Cf.
      {Abstract}, {Attract}, {Contract}, {Portratt}, {Tract},
      {Trail}, {Train}, {Treat}. ]
      1. To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; especially,
            to copy, as a drawing or engraving, by following the lines
            and marking them on a sheet superimposed, through which
            they appear; as, to trace a figure or an outline; a traced
            drawing.
  
                     Some faintly traced features or outline of the
                     mother and the child, slowly lading into the
                     twilight of the woods.                        --Hawthorne.
  
      2. To follow by some mark that has been left by a person or
            thing which has preceded; to follow by footsteps, tracks,
            or tokens. --Cowper.
  
                     You may trace the deluge quite round the globe. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
                     I feel thy power . . . to trace the ways Of highest
                     agents.                                             --Milton.
  
      3. Hence, to follow the trace or track of.
  
                     How all the way the prince on footpace traced.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      4. To copy; to imitate.
  
                     That servile path thou nobly dost decline, Of
                     tracing word, and line by line.         --Denham.
  
      5. To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
  
                     We do tracethis alley up and down.      --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tracing \Tra"cing\, n.
      1. The act of one who traces; especially, the act of copying
            by marking on thin paper, or other transparent substance,
            the lines of a pattern placed beneath; also, the copy thus
            producted.
  
      2. A regular path or track; a course.
  
      {Tracing cloth}, {Tracing paper}, specially prepared
            transparent cloth or paper, which enables a drawing or
            print to be clearly seen through it, and so allows the use
            of a pen or pencil to produce a facsimile by following the
            lines of the original placed beneath.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tracing \Tra"cing\, n.
      1. The act of one who traces; especially, the act of copying
            by marking on thin paper, or other transparent substance,
            the lines of a pattern placed beneath; also, the copy thus
            producted.
  
      2. A regular path or track; a course.
  
      {Tracing cloth}, {Tracing paper}, specially prepared
            transparent cloth or paper, which enables a drawing or
            print to be clearly seen through it, and so allows the use
            of a pen or pencil to produce a facsimile by following the
            lines of the original placed beneath.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tracing \Tra"cing\, n.
      1. The act of one who traces; especially, the act of copying
            by marking on thin paper, or other transparent substance,
            the lines of a pattern placed beneath; also, the copy thus
            producted.
  
      2. A regular path or track; a course.
  
      {Tracing cloth}, {Tracing paper}, specially prepared
            transparent cloth or paper, which enables a drawing or
            print to be clearly seen through it, and so allows the use
            of a pen or pencil to produce a facsimile by following the
            lines of the original placed beneath.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Track \Track\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {tracked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {tracking}.]
      To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the
      marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in
      the snow.
  
               It was often found impossible to track the robbers to
               their retreats among the hills and morasses.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      2. (Naut.) To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a
            line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to
            tow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trackman \Track"man\, n.; pl. {-men}. (Railroads)
      One employed on work on the track; specif., a trackwalker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trackmaster \Track"mas`ter\, n. (Railroad)
      One who has charge of the track; -- called also {roadmaster}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tragi-comic \Trag`i-com"ic\, Tragi-comical \Trag`i-com"ic*al\,
      a. [Cf. F. tragi-comique.]
      Of or pertaining to tragi-comedy; partaking of grave and
      comic scenes. -- {Trag`-com"ic*al*ly}, adv.
  
               Julian felt toward him that tragi-comic sensation which
               makes us pity the object which excites it not the less
               that we are somewhat inclined to laugh amid our
               sympathy.                                                --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trashiness \Trash"i*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being trashy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trash \Trash\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trashed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trashing}.]
      1. To free from trash, or worthless matter; hence, to lop; to
            crop, as to trash the rattoons of sugar cane. --B.
            Edwards.
  
      2. To treat as trash, or worthless matter; hence, to spurn,
            humiliate, or crush. [Obs.]
  
      3. To hold back by a trash or leash, as a dog in pursuing
            game; hence, to retard, encumber, or restrain; to clog; to
            hinder vexatiously. [R.] --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Treason \Trea"son\, n. [OE. tresun, treisun, traisoun, OF.
      tra[8b]son, F. trahison, L. traditio a giving up, a
      delivering up, fr. tradere to give up, betray. See {Traitor},
      and cf. {Tradition}.]
      1. The offense of attempting to overthrow the government of
            the state to which the offender owes allegiance, or of
            betraying the state into the hands of a foreign power;
            disloyalty; treachery.
  
                     The treason of the murthering in the bed. --Chaucer.
  
      Note: In monarchies, the killing of the sovereign, or an
               attempt to take his life, is treason. In England, to
               imagine or compass the death of the king, or of the
               queen consort, or of the heir apparent to the crown, is
               high treason, as are many other offenses created by
               statute. In the United States, treason is confined to
               the actual levying of war against the United States, or
               to an adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and
               comfort.
  
      2. Loosely, the betrayal of any trust or confidence;
            treachery; perfidy.
  
                     If he be false, she shall his treason see.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
      {Petit treason}. See under {Petit}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Treasonable \Trea"son*a*ble\, a.
      Pertaining to treason; consisting of treason; involving the
      crime of treason, or partaking of its guilt.
  
               Most men's heads had been intoxicated with imaginations
               of plots and treasonable practices.         --Clarendon.
  
      Syn: Treacherous; traitorous; perfidious; insidious.
               --{Trea"son*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trea"son*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Treasonable \Trea"son*a*ble\, a.
      Pertaining to treason; consisting of treason; involving the
      crime of treason, or partaking of its guilt.
  
               Most men's heads had been intoxicated with imaginations
               of plots and treasonable practices.         --Clarendon.
  
      Syn: Treacherous; traitorous; perfidious; insidious.
               --{Trea"son*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trea"son*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Treasonable \Trea"son*a*ble\, a.
      Pertaining to treason; consisting of treason; involving the
      crime of treason, or partaking of its guilt.
  
               Most men's heads had been intoxicated with imaginations
               of plots and treasonable practices.         --Clarendon.
  
      Syn: Treacherous; traitorous; perfidious; insidious.
               --{Trea"son*a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trea"son*a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Treasonous \Trea"son*ous\, a.
      Treasonable. --Shak.
  
               The treasonous book of the Court of King James.
                                                                              --Pepys.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trecentist \Tre*cen"tist\, n.
      A member of the trecento, or an imitator of its
      characteristics.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trechometer \Tre*chom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] to run + -meter.]
      An odometer for vehicles. --Knight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tree \Tree\ (tr[emac]), n. [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre[a2],
      tre[a2]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[emac], OS. treo,
      trio, Icel. tr[emac], Dan. tr[91], Sw. tr[84], tr[84]d, Goth.
      triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr.
      dry^s a tree, oak, do`ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru
      tree, wood, d[be]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad},
      {Germander}, {Tar}, n., {Trough}.]
      1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size
            (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single
            trunk.
  
      Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case,
               is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree,
               fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
  
      2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as
            resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and
            branches; as, a genealogical tree.
  
      3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber;
            -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree,
            chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  
      4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  
                     [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts
                                                                              x. 39.
  
      5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
                     In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of
                     silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2
                                                                              Tim. ii. 20).
  
      6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent
            forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
            See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.
  
      {Tree bear} (Zo[94]l.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tree beetle} (Zo[94]l.) any one of numerous species of
            beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as
            the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the
            goldsmith beetle.
  
      {Tree bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of,
            trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma},
            {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.
  
      {Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus
            musang}).
  
      {Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus
            alba}). See {Melilot}.
  
      {Tree crab} (Zo[94]l.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.
  
      {Tree creeper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris},
            and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.
  
      {Tree cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a nearly white arboreal American
            cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud
            stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.
  
      {Tree crow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera,
            intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail
            is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
  
      {Tree dove} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of East
            Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and
            allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly
            arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
  
      {Tree duck} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of ducks
            belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks
            have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are
            arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical
            parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
  
      {Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight
            trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even
            higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most
            of the existing species are tropical.
  
      {Tree fish} (Zo[94]l.), a California market fish
            ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).
  
      {Tree frog}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Same as {Tree toad}.
            (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs
                  belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied
                  genera of the family {Ranid[91]}. Their toes are
                  furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog
                  (see under {Flying}) is an example.
  
      {Tree goose} (Zo[94]l.), the bernicle goose.
  
      {Tree hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on
            the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by
            sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the
            prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the
            form of a spine or crest.
  
      {Tree jobber} (Zo[94]l.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]
  
      {Tree kangaroo}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Kangaroo}.
  
      {Tree lark} (Zo[94]l.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Tree lizard} (Zo[94]l.), any one of a group of Old World
            arboreal lizards ({Dendrosauria}) comprising the
            chameleons.
  
      {Tree lobster}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.
  
      {Tree louse} (Zo[94]l.), any aphid; a plant louse.
  
      {Tree moss}. (Bot.)
            (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
            (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
                 
  
      {Tree mouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyin[91]}. They have
            long claws and habitually live in trees.
  
      {Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.
  
      {Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.
  
      {Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus
            glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and
            greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
  
      {Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor
            vit[91].
  
      {Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium
            proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or
            among its flowers.
  
      {Tree oyster} (Zo[94]l.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea
            folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree;
            -- called also {raccoon oyster}.
  
      {Tree pie} (Zo[94]l.), any species of Asiatic birds of the
            genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the
            magpie.
  
      {Tree pigeon} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and
            Australia, and belonging to {Megaloprepia}, {Carpophaga},
            and allied genera.
  
      {Tree pipit}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Pipit}.
  
      {Tree porcupine} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging
            to the genera {Ch[91]tomys} and {Sphingurus}. They have an
            elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on
            the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed
            with bristles. One South American species ({S. villosus})
            is called also {couiy}; another ({S. prehensilis}) is
            called also {c[oe]ndou}.
  
      {Tree rat} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of large
            ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera
            {Capromys} and {Plagiodon}. They are allied to the
            porcupines.
  
      {Tree serpent} (Zo[94]l.), a tree snake.
  
      {Tree shrike} (Zo[94]l.), a bush shrike.
  
      {Tree snake} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            snakes of the genus {Dendrophis}. They live chiefly among
            the branches of trees, and are not venomous.
  
      {Tree sorrel} (Bot.), a kind of sorrel ({Rumex Lunaria})
            which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears
            greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and
            Teneriffe.
  
      {Tree sparrow} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of small
            arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow
            ({Spizella monticola}), and the common European species
            ({Passer montanus}).
  
      {Tree swallow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            swallows of the genus {Hylochelidon} which lay their eggs
            in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and
            adjacent regions. Called also {martin} in Australia.
  
      {Tree swift} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of swifts
            of the genus {Dendrochelidon} which inhabit the East
            Indies and Southern Asia.
  
      {Tree tiger} (Zo[94]l.), a leopard.
  
      {Tree toad} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            amphibians belonging to {Hyla} and allied genera of the
            family {Hylid[91]}. They are related to the common frogs
            and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into
            suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and
            leaves of trees. Only one species ({Hyla arborea}) is
            found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and
            Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United
            States ({H. versicolor}) is noted for the facility with
            which it changes its colors. Called also {tree frog}. See
            also {Piping frog}, under {Piping}, and {Cricket frog},
            under {Cricket}.
  
      {Tree warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            arboreal warblers belonging to {Phylloscopus} and allied
            genera.
  
      {Tree wool} (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of
            pine trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Snake \Snake\, n. [AS. snaca; akin to LG. snake, schnake, Icel.
      sn[be]kr, sn[?]kr, Dan. snog, Sw. snok; of uncertain origin.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent,
      whether harmless or venomous. See {Ophidia}, and {Serpent}.
  
      Note: Snakes are abundant in all warm countries, and much the
               larger number are harmless to man.
  
      {Blind snake}, {Garter snake}, {Green snake}, {King snake},
      {Milk snake}, {Rock snake}, {Water snake}, etc. See under
            {Blind}, {Garter}, etc.
  
      {Fetich snake} (Zo[94]l.), a large African snake ({Python
            Seb[91]}) used by the natives as a fetich.
  
      {Ringed snake} (Zo[94]l.), a common European columbrine snake
            ({Tropidonotus natrix}).
  
      {Snake eater}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The markhoor.
      (b) The secretary bird.
  
      {Snake fence}, a worm fence (which see). [U.S.]
  
      {Snake fly} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            neuropterous insects of the genus {Rhaphidia}; -- so
            called because of their large head and elongated neck and
            prothorax.
  
      {Snake gourd} (Bot.), a cucurbitaceous plant ({Trichosanthes
            anguina}) having the fruit shorter and less snakelike than
            that of the serpent cucumber.
  
      {Snake killer}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The secretary bird.
      (b) The chaparral cock.
  
      {Snake moss} (Bot.), the common club moss ({Lycopodium
            clavatum}). See {Lycopodium}.
  
      {Snake nut} (Bot.), the fruit of a sapindaceous tree
            ({Ophiocaryon paradoxum}) of Guiana, the embryo of which
            resembles a snake coiled up.
  
      {Tree snake} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            colubrine snakes which habitually live in trees,
            especially those of the genus {Dendrophis} and allied
            genera.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tree \Tree\ (tr[emac]), n. [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre[a2],
      tre[a2]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[emac], OS. treo,
      trio, Icel. tr[emac], Dan. tr[91], Sw. tr[84], tr[84]d, Goth.
      triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr.
      dry^s a tree, oak, do`ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru
      tree, wood, d[be]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad},
      {Germander}, {Tar}, n., {Trough}.]
      1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size
            (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single
            trunk.
  
      Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case,
               is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree,
               fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
  
      2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as
            resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and
            branches; as, a genealogical tree.
  
      3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber;
            -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree,
            chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  
      4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  
                     [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts
                                                                              x. 39.
  
      5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
                     In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of
                     silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2
                                                                              Tim. ii. 20).
  
      6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent
            forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
            See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.
  
      {Tree bear} (Zo[94]l.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tree beetle} (Zo[94]l.) any one of numerous species of
            beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as
            the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the
            goldsmith beetle.
  
      {Tree bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of,
            trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma},
            {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.
  
      {Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus
            musang}).
  
      {Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus
            alba}). See {Melilot}.
  
      {Tree crab} (Zo[94]l.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.
  
      {Tree creeper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris},
            and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.
  
      {Tree cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a nearly white arboreal American
            cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud
            stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.
  
      {Tree crow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera,
            intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail
            is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
  
      {Tree dove} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of East
            Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and
            allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly
            arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
  
      {Tree duck} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of ducks
            belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks
            have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are
            arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical
            parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
  
      {Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight
            trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even
            higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most
            of the existing species are tropical.
  
      {Tree fish} (Zo[94]l.), a California market fish
            ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).
  
      {Tree frog}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Same as {Tree toad}.
            (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs
                  belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied
                  genera of the family {Ranid[91]}. Their toes are
                  furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog
                  (see under {Flying}) is an example.
  
      {Tree goose} (Zo[94]l.), the bernicle goose.
  
      {Tree hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on
            the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by
            sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the
            prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the
            form of a spine or crest.
  
      {Tree jobber} (Zo[94]l.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]
  
      {Tree kangaroo}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Kangaroo}.
  
      {Tree lark} (Zo[94]l.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Tree lizard} (Zo[94]l.), any one of a group of Old World
            arboreal lizards ({Dendrosauria}) comprising the
            chameleons.
  
      {Tree lobster}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.
  
      {Tree louse} (Zo[94]l.), any aphid; a plant louse.
  
      {Tree moss}. (Bot.)
            (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
            (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
                 
  
      {Tree mouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyin[91]}. They have
            long claws and habitually live in trees.
  
      {Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.
  
      {Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.
  
      {Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus
            glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and
            greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
  
      {Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor
            vit[91].
  
      {Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium
            proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or
            among its flowers.
  
      {Tree oyster} (Zo[94]l.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea
            folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree;
            -- called also {raccoon oyster}.
  
      {Tree pie} (Zo[94]l.), any species of Asiatic birds of the
            genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the
            magpie.
  
      {Tree pigeon} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and
            Australia, and belonging to {Megaloprepia}, {Carpophaga},
            and allied genera.
  
      {Tree pipit}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Pipit}.
  
      {Tree porcupine} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging
            to the genera {Ch[91]tomys} and {Sphingurus}. They have an
            elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on
            the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed
            with bristles. One South American species ({S. villosus})
            is called also {couiy}; another ({S. prehensilis}) is
            called also {c[oe]ndou}.
  
      {Tree rat} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of large
            ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera
            {Capromys} and {Plagiodon}. They are allied to the
            porcupines.
  
      {Tree serpent} (Zo[94]l.), a tree snake.
  
      {Tree shrike} (Zo[94]l.), a bush shrike.
  
      {Tree snake} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            snakes of the genus {Dendrophis}. They live chiefly among
            the branches of trees, and are not venomous.
  
      {Tree sorrel} (Bot.), a kind of sorrel ({Rumex Lunaria})
            which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears
            greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and
            Teneriffe.
  
      {Tree sparrow} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of small
            arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow
            ({Spizella monticola}), and the common European species
            ({Passer montanus}).
  
      {Tree swallow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            swallows of the genus {Hylochelidon} which lay their eggs
            in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and
            adjacent regions. Called also {martin} in Australia.
  
      {Tree swift} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of swifts
            of the genus {Dendrochelidon} which inhabit the East
            Indies and Southern Asia.
  
      {Tree tiger} (Zo[94]l.), a leopard.
  
      {Tree toad} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            amphibians belonging to {Hyla} and allied genera of the
            family {Hylid[91]}. They are related to the common frogs
            and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into
            suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and
            leaves of trees. Only one species ({Hyla arborea}) is
            found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and
            Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United
            States ({H. versicolor}) is noted for the facility with
            which it changes its colors. Called also {tree frog}. See
            also {Piping frog}, under {Piping}, and {Cricket frog},
            under {Cricket}.
  
      {Tree warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            arboreal warblers belonging to {Phylloscopus} and allied
            genera.
  
      {Tree wool} (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of
            pine trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trek \Trek\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Trekked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trekking}.] [Written also {treck}.] [D. trekken. See
      {Track}, n.] [South Africa]
      1. To draw or haul a load, as oxen.
  
      2. To travel, esp. by ox wagon; to go from place to place; to
            migrate. [Chiefly South Africa]
  
                     One of the motives which induced the Boers of 1836
                     to trek out of the Colony.                  --James Bryce.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trekometer \Trek*om"e*ter\, n. [Cf. {Trechometer}.] (Mil.)
      A field range finger used in the British service.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Triacontahedral \Tri`a*con`ta*he"dral\, a. [Gr. [?] thirty + [?]
      seat, base.]
      Having thirty sides.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Triaconter \Tri"a*con`ter\, n. [Gr. [?], fr. [?] thirty.] (Gr.
      Antiq.)
      A vessel with thirty banks of oars, or, as some say, thirty
      ranks of rowers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricennarious \Tri`cen*na"ri*ous\, a.
      Of or pertaining to thirty years; tricennial. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricennial \Tri*cen"ni*al\, a. [L. tricennium thirty years;
      triginta thirty + annus year: cf. L. tricennalis.]
      Of or pertaining to thirty years; consisting of thirty years;
      occurring once in every thirty years.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricentenary \Tri*cen"te*na*ry\, a. [Pref. tri- + centenary.]
      Including, or relating to, the interval of three hundred
      years; tercentenary. -- n. A period of three centuries, or
      three hundred years, also, the three-hundredth anniversary of
      any event; a tercentenary.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Trichina \[d8]Tri*chi"na\ (-n[adot]), n.; pl. {Trichin[91]}.
      [NL., fr. Gr. [?] hairy, made of hair, fr. tri`x, tricho`s,
      hair.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A small, slender nematoid worm ({Trichina spiralis}) which,
      in the larval state, is parasitic, often in immense numbers,
      in the voluntary muscles of man, the hog, and many other
      animals. When insufficiently cooked meat containing the
      larv[91] is swallowed by man, they are liberated and rapidly
      become adult, pair, and the ovoviviparous females produce in
      a short time large numbers of young which find their way into
      the muscles, either directly, or indirectly by means of the
      blood. Their presence in the muscles and the intestines in
      large numbers produces trichinosis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Trichina \[d8]Tri*chi"na\ (-n[adot]), n.; pl. {Trichin[91]}.
      [NL., fr. Gr. [?] hairy, made of hair, fr. tri`x, tricho`s,
      hair.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A small, slender nematoid worm ({Trichina spiralis}) which,
      in the larval state, is parasitic, often in immense numbers,
      in the voluntary muscles of man, the hog, and many other
      animals. When insufficiently cooked meat containing the
      larv[91] is swallowed by man, they are liberated and rapidly
      become adult, pair, and the ovoviviparous females produce in
      a short time large numbers of young which find their way into
      the muscles, either directly, or indirectly by means of the
      blood. Their presence in the muscles and the intestines in
      large numbers produces trichinosis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichinize \Trich"i*nize\, v. t.
      To render trichinous; to affect with trichin[91]; -- chiefly
      used in the past participle; as, trichinized pork.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichinoscope \Tri*chi"no*scope\, n. [Trichina + -scope.]
      An apparatus for the detection of trichin[91] in the flesh of
      animals, as of swine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichinous \Trich"i*nous\, a.
      Of or pertaining to trichin[91] or trichinosis; affected
      with, or containing, trichin[91]; as, trichinous meat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sporangiophore \Spo*ran"gi*o*phore\, n. [Sporangium + Gr. [?] to
      bear.] (Bot.)
      The axis or receptacle in certain ferns (as {Trichomanes}),
      which bears the sporangia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichomanes \Tri*chom"a*nes\, n. [L., a kind of plant, from Gr.
      [?].] (Bot.)
      Any fern of the genus {Trichomanes}. The fronds are very
      delicate and often translucent, and the sporangia are borne
      on threadlike receptacles rising from the middle of
      cup-shaped marginal involucres. Several species are common in
      conservatories; two are native in the United States.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichomatose \Tri*chom"a*tose`\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], a growth of
      hair.] (Med.)
      Affected with a disease which causes agglutination and
      matting together; -- said of the hair when affected with
      plica. See {Plica}, 1.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichome \Trich"ome\, n. [See {Trichomatose}.] (Bot.)
      A hair on the surface of leaf or stem, or any modification of
      a hair, as a minute scale, or star, or gland. The sporangia
      of ferns are believed to be of the nature of trichomes. --
      {Tri*chom"a*tous}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trichome \Trich"ome\, n. [See {Trichomatose}.] (Bot.)
      A hair on the surface of leaf or stem, or any modification of
      a hair, as a minute scale, or star, or gland. The sporangia
      of ferns are believed to be of the nature of trichomes. --
      {Tri*chom"a*tous}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trickiness \Trick"i*ness\, n.
      The quality of being tricky.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trick \Trick\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tricked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tricking}.]
      1. To deceive by cunning or artifice; to impose on; to
            defraud; to cheat; as, to trick another in the sale of a
            horse.
  
      2. To dress; to decorate; to set off; to adorn fantastically;
            -- often followed by up, off, or out. [bd] Trick her off
            in air.[b8] --Pope.
  
                     People lavish it profusely in tricking up their
                     children in fine clothes, and yet starve their
                     minds.                                                --Locke.
  
                     They are simple, but majestic, records of the
                     feelings of the poet; as little tricked out for the
                     public eye as his diary would have been. --Macaulay.
  
      3. To draw in outline, as with a pen; to delineate or
            distinguish without color, as arms, etc., in heraldry.
  
                     They forget that they are in the statutes: . . .
                     there they are tricked, they and their pedigrees.
                                                                              --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricking \Trick"ing\, a.
      Given to tricks; tricky. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricking \Trick"ing\, n.
      Dress; ornament. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trickment \Trick"ment\, n.
      Decoration. [Obs.] [bd] No trickments but my tears.[b8]
      --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tricksiness \Trick"si*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being tricksy; trickiness. --G.
      Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigamist \Trig"a*mist\, n. [See {Trigamy}.]
      One who has been married three times; also, one who has three
      husbands or three wives at the same time.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigamous \Trig"a*mous\, a. [L. trigamus a thrice-married man,
      Gr. [?] thrice married; [?] (see {Tri-}) + [?] marriage: cf.
      F. trigame.] (Bot.)
      Having three sorts of flowers in the same head, -- male,
      female, and hermaphrodite, or perfect, flowers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigamy \Trig"a*my\, n. [L. trigamia,Gr. [?]: cf. F. trigamie.
      See {Trigamous}.]
      The act of marrying, or the state of being married, three
      times; also, the offense of having three husbands or three
      wives at the same time.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigeminal \Tri*gem"i*nal\, a. [See {Trigeminous}.] (Anat.)
      Of, pertaining to, or designating, the fifth pair of cranial
      nerves, which divide on each side of the head into three main
      branches distributed to the orbits, jaws, and parts of the
      mouth; trifacial.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigeminous \Tri*gem"i*nous\, a. [L. trigeminus born three
      together; tri- (see {Tri-}) + geminus twin. Cf.
      {Tergeminous}.]
      Born three together; being one of three born at the same
      birth; also, threefold. --E. Phillip[?].

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigenic \Tri*gen"ic\, a. [Pref. tri- + gen- + -ic. So named in
      reference to its composition, it being supposed to contain
      the radicals of three molecules of cyanic acid.] (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid, {C4H7N3O2},
      obtained, by the action of the vapor of cyanic acid on cold
      aldehyde, as a white crystalline substance having a slightly
      acid taste and faint smell; -- called also {ethidene- [or]
      ethylidene-biuret}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigintal \Tri*gin`tal\, n. [LL. trigintate, fr. L. triginta
      thirty. See {Trental}.] (R. C. Ch.)
      A trental.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Peep \Peep\, n.
      1. The cry of a young chicken; a chirp.
  
      2. First outlook or appearance.
  
                     Oft have we seen him at the peep of dawn. --Gray.
  
      3. A sly look; a look as through a crevice, or from a place
            of concealment.
  
                     To take t' other peep at the stars.   --Swift.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any small sandpiper, as the least sandpiper ({Trigna
                  minutilla}).
            (b) The European meadow pipit ({Anthus pratensis}).
  
      {Peep show}, a small show, or object exhibited, which is
            viewed through an orifice or a magnifying glass.
  
      {Peep-o'-day boys}, the Irish insurgents of 1784; -- so
            called from their visiting the house of the loyal Irish at
            day break in search of arms. [Cant]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigness \Trig"ness\, n. [See {Trig} trim, neat.]
      The quality or state of being trig; smartness; neatness.
  
               Their spars had no man-of-war trigness.   --Kane.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigon \Tri"gon\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The cutting region of the crown of an upper molar, usually
      the anterior part. That of a lower molar is the

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigon \Tri"gon\, n. [L. trigonum, Gr. [?]; [?] (see {Tri-}) +
      [?] a corner, angle: cf. F. trigone.]
      1. A figure having three angles; a triangle.
  
      2. (Astrol.)
            (a) A division consisting of three signs.
            (b) Trine, an aspect of two planets distant 120 degrees
                  from each other. --Hutton.
  
      3. (Gr. & Rom. Antiq.)
            (a) A kind of triangular lyre or harp.
            (b) A kind of game at ball played by three persons
                  standing at the angular points of a triangle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonal \Trig"o*nal\, a.
      Having three angles, or corners; triangular; as, a trigonal
      stem, one having tree prominent longitudinal angles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trisoctahedron \Tris*oc`ta*he"dron\, n. [Gr. [?] thrice + FE.
      octahedron.] (Crystallog.)
      A solid of the isometric system bounded by twenty-four equal
      faces, three corresponding to each face of an octahedron.
  
      {Tetragonal trisoctahedron}, a trisoctahedron each face of
            which is a quadrilateral; called also {trapezohedron} and
            {icositetrahedron}.
  
      {Trigonal trisoctahedron}, a trisoctahedron each face of
            which is an isosceles triangle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fenugreek \Fen"u*greek\ (? [or] ?), n. [L. faenum Graecum, lit.,
      Greek hay: cf. F. fenugrec. Cf. {Fennel}.] (Bot.)
      A plant ({trigonella F[d2]num Gr[91]cum}) cultivated for its
      strong-smelling seeds, which are [bd]now only used for giving
      false importance to horse medicine and damaged hay.[b8] --J.
      Smith (Pop. Names of Plants, 1881).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bird's-foot \Bird's"-foot`\, n. (Bot.)
      A papilionaceous plant, the {Ornithopus}, having a curved,
      cylindrical pod tipped with a short, clawlike point.
  
      {Bird's-foot trefoil}. (Bot.)
      (a) A genus of plants ({Lotus}) with clawlike pods. {L.
            corniculatas}, with yellow flowers, is very common in
            Great Britain.
      (b) the related plant, {Trigonella ornithopodioides}, is also
            European.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonid \Tri"go*nid\ Trigonodont \Trig"o*no*dont`\, a. [See
      {Trigon}; {Odonto}.]
      See {Trituberculy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Fer-de-lance \[d8]Fer`-de-lance"\, n. [F., the iron of a
      lance, lance head.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A large, venomous serpent ({Trigonocephalus lanceolatus}

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonocerous \Trig`o*noc"er*ous\, a. [Gr. [?] triangle + [?]
      horn.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Having horns with three angles, like those of some species of
      goats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonid \Tri"go*nid\ Trigonodont \Trig"o*no*dont`\, a. [See
      {Trigon}; {Odonto}.]
      See {Trituberculy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: Co[94]rdinates are of several kinds, consisting in some
               of the different cases, of the following elements,
               namely:
            (a) (Geom. of Two Dimensions) The abscissa and ordinate of
                  any point, taken together; as the abscissa PY and
                  ordinate PX of the point P (Fig. 2, referred to the
                  co[94]rdinate axes AY and AX.
            (b) Any radius vector PA (Fig. 1), together with its angle
                  of inclination to a fixed line, APX, by which any
                  point A in the same plane is referred to that fixed
                  line, and a fixed point in it, called the pole, P.
            (c) (Geom. of Three Dimensions) Any three lines, or
                  distances, PB, PC, PD (Fig. 3), taken parallel to
                  three co[94]rdinate axes, AX, AY, AZ, and measured
                  from the corresponding co[94]rdinate fixed planes,
                  YAZ, XAZ, XAY, to any point in space, P, whose
                  position is thereby determined with respect to these
                  planes and axes.
            (d) A radius vector, the angle which it makes with a fixed
                  plane, and the angle which its projection on the plane
                  makes with a fixed line line in the plane, by which
                  means any point in space at the free extremity of the
                  radius vector is referred to that fixed plane and
                  fixed line, and a fixed point in that line, the pole
                  of the radius vector.
  
      {Cartesian co[94]rdinates}. See under {Cartesian}.
  
      {Geographical co[94]rdinates}, the latitude and longitude of
            a place, by which its relative situation on the globe is
            known. The height of the above the sea level constitutes a
            third co[94]rdinate.
  
      {Polar co[94]rdinates}, co[94]rdinates made up of a radius
            vector and its angle of inclination to another line, or a
            line and plane; as those defined in
            (b) and
            (d) above.
  
      {Rectangular co[94]rdinates}, co[94]rdinates the axes of
            which intersect at right angles.
  
      {Rectilinear co[94]rdinates}, co[94]rdinates made up of right
            lines. Those defined in
            (a) and
            (c) above are called also {Cartesian co[94]rdinates}.
  
      {Trigonometrical} [or] {Spherical co[94]rdinates}, elements
            of reference, by means of which the position of a point on
            the surface of a sphere may be determined with respect to
            two great circles of the sphere.
  
      {Trilinear co[94]rdinates}, co[94]rdinates of a point in a
            plane, consisting of the three ratios which the three
            distances of the point from three fixed lines have one to
            another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Function \Func"tion\, n. [L. functio, fr. fungi to perform,
      execute, akin to Skr. bhuj to enjoy, have the use of: cf. F.
      fonction. Cf. {Defunct}.]
      1. The act of executing or performing any duty, office, or
            calling; per formance. [bd]In the function of his public
            calling.[b8] --Swift.
  
      2. (Physiol.) The appropriate action of any special organ or
            part of an animal or vegetable organism; as, the function
            of the heart or the limbs; the function of leaves, sap,
            roots, etc.; life is the sum of the functions of the
            various organs and parts of the body.
  
      3. The natural or assigned action of any power or faculty, as
            of the soul, or of the intellect; the exertion of an
            energy of some determinate kind.
  
                     As the mind opens, and its functions spread. --Pope.
  
      4. The course of action which peculiarly pertains to any
            public officer in church or state; the activity
            appropriate to any business or profession.
  
                     Tradesmen . . . going about their functions. --Shak.
  
                     The malady which made him incapable of performing
                     his regal functions.                           --Macaulay.
  
      5. (Math.) A quantity so connected with another quantity,
            that if any alteration be made in the latter there will be
            a consequent alteration in the former. Each quantity is
            said to be a function of the other. Thus, the
            circumference of a circle is a function of the diameter.
            If x be a symbol to which different numerical values can
            be assigned, such expressions as x^{2}, 3^{x}, Log. x, and
            Sin. x, are all functions of x.
  
      {Algebraic function}, a quantity whose connection with the
            variable is expressed by an equation that involves only
            the algebraic operations of addition, subtraction,
            multiplication, division, raising to a given power, and
            extracting a given root; -- opposed to transcendental
            function.
  
      {Arbitrary function}. See under {Arbitrary}.
  
      {Calculus of functions}. See under {Calculus}.
  
      {Carnot's function} (Thermo-dynamics), a relation between the
            amount of heat given off by a source of heat, and the work
            which can be done by it. It is approximately equal to the
            mechanical equivalent of the thermal unit divided by the
            number expressing the temperature in degrees of the air
            thermometer, reckoned from its zero of expansion.
  
      {Circular functions}. See {Inverse trigonometrical functions}
            (below). -- Continuous function, a quantity that has no
            interruption in the continuity of its real values, as the
            variable changes between any specified limits.
  
      {Discontinuous function}. See under {Discontinuous}.
  
      {Elliptic functions}, a large and important class of
            functions, so called because one of the forms expresses
            the relation of the arc of an ellipse to the straight
            lines connected therewith.
  
      {Explicit function}, a quantity directly expressed in terms
            of the independently varying quantity; thus, in the
            equations y = 6x^{2}, y = 10 -x^{3}, the quantity y is an
            explicit function of x.
  
      {Implicit function}, a quantity whose relation to the
            variable is expressed indirectly by an equation; thus, y
            in the equation x^{2} + y^{2} = 100 is an implicit
            function of x.
  
      {Inverse trigonometrical functions}, [or] {Circular
      function}, the lengths of arcs relative to the sines,
            tangents, etc. Thus, AB is the arc whose sine is BD, and
            (if the length of BD is x) is written sin ^{-1}x, and so
            of the other lines. See {Trigonometrical function}
            (below). Other transcendental functions are the
            exponential functions, the elliptic functions, the gamma
            functions, the theta functions, etc.
  
      {One-valued function}, a quantity that has one, and only one,
            value for each value of the variable. -- {Transcendental
      functions}, a quantity whose connection with the variable
            cannot be expressed by algebraic operations; thus, y in
            the equation y = 10^{x} is a transcendental function of x.
            See {Algebraic function} (above). -- {Trigonometrical
      function}, a quantity whose relation to the variable is the
            same as that of a certain straight line drawn in a circle
            whose radius is unity, to the length of a corresponding
            are of the circle. Let AB be an arc in a circle, whose
            radius OA is unity let AC be a quadrant, and let OC, DB,
            and AF be drawnpependicular to OA, and EB and CG parallel
            to OA, and let OB be produced to G and F. E Then BD is the
            sine of the arc AB; OD or EB is the cosine, AF is the
            tangent, CG is the cotangent, OF is the secant OG is the
            cosecant, AD is the versed sine, and CE is the coversed
            sine of the are AB. If the length of AB be represented by
            x (OA being unity) then the lengths of Functions. these
            lines (OA being unity) are the trigonometrical functions
            of x, and are written sin x, cos x, tan x (or tang x), cot
            x, sec x, cosec x, versin x, coversin x. These quantities
            are also considered as functions of the angle BOA.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Survey \Sur"vey\, n. [Formerly accentuated universally on the
      last syllable, and still so accented by many speakers.]
      1. The act of surveying; a general view, as from above.
  
                     Under his proud survey the city lies. --Sir J.
                                                                              Denham.
  
      2. A particular view; an examination, especially an official
            examination, of all the parts or particulars of a thing,
            with a design to ascertain the condition, quantity, or
            quality; as, a survey of the stores of a ship; a survey of
            roads and bridges; a survey of buildings.
  
      3. The operation of finding the contour, dimensions,
            position, or other particulars of, as any part of the
            earth's surface, whether land or water; also, a measured
            plan and description of any portion of country, or of a
            road or line through it.
  
      {Survey of dogs}. See {Court of regard}, under {Regard}.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}, a survey of a portion of country by
            measuring a single base, and connecting it with various
            points in the tract surveyed by a series of triangles, the
            angles of which are carefully measured, the relative
            positions and distances of all parts being computed from
            these data.
  
      Syn: Review; retrospect; examination; prospect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometric \Trig`o*no*met"ric\, Trigonometrical
   \Trig`o*no*met"ric*al\, [Cf. F. trigonom[82]trique.]
      Of or pertaining to trigonometry; performed by the rules of
      trigonometry. --{Trig`o*no*met"ric*al*ly}, adv.
  
      {Trigonometrical curve}, a curve one of whose co[94]rdinates
            is a trigonometric function of the other.
  
      {Trigonometrical function}. See under {Function}.
  
      {Trigonometrical lines}, lines which are employed in solving
            the different cases of plane and spherical trigonometry,
            as sines, tangents, secants, and the like. These lines, or
            the lengths of them, are trigonometrical functions of the
            arcs and angles to which they belong.
  
      {Trigonometrical survey}. See under {Survey}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonometry \Trig`o*nom"e*try\, n.; pl. {-tries}. [Gr. [?] a
      triangle + -metry: cf. F. trigonom[82]trie. See {Trigon}.]
      1. That branch of mathematics which treats of the relations
            of the sides and angles of triangles, which the methods of
            deducing from certain given parts other required parts,
            and also of the general relations which exist between the
            trigonometrical functions of arcs or angles.
  
      2. A treatise in this science.
  
      {Analytical trigonometry}, that branch of trigonometry which
            treats of the relations and properties of the
            trigonometrical functions.
  
      {Plane trigonometry}, and {Spherical trigonometry}, those
            branches of trigonometry in which its principles are
            applied to plane triangles and spherical triangles
            respectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mathematics \Math`e*mat"ics\, n. [F. math[82]matiques, pl., L.
      mathematica, sing., Gr. [?] (sc. [?]) science. See
      {Mathematic}, and {-ics}.]
      That science, or class of sciences, which treats of the exact
      relations existing between quantities or magnitudes, and of
      the methods by which, in accordance with these relations,
      quantities sought are deducible from other quantities known
      or supposed; the science of spatial and quantitative
      relations.
  
      Note: Mathematics embraces three departments, namely: 1.
               {Arithmetic}. 2. {Geometry}, including {Trigonometry}
               and {Conic Sections}. 3. {Analysis}, in which letters
               are used, including {Algebra}, {Analytical Geometry},
               and {Calculus}. Each of these divisions is divided into
               pure or abstract, which considers magnitude or quantity
               abstractly, without relation to matter; and mixed or
               applied, which treats of magnitude as subsisting in
               material bodies, and is consequently interwoven with
               physical considerations.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigonous \Trig"o*nous\, a. [L. trigonus, Gr. [?]. See
      {Trigon}.]
      Same as {Trigonal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigyn \Tri"gyn\, n. (Bot.)
      Any one of the Trigynia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigynian \Tri*gyn"i*an\, Trigynous \Trig"y*nous\, a. (Bot.)
      Having three pistils or styles; of or pertaining to the
      Trigynia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigynian \Tri*gyn"i*an\, Trigynous \Trig"y*nous\, a. (Bot.)
      Having three pistils or styles; of or pertaining to the
      Trigynia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trisnitrate \Tris*ni"trate\, n. [Gr. [?] thrice + E. nitrate.]
      (Chem.)
      A nitrate formed from three molecules of nitric acid; also,
      less properly, applied to certain basic nitrates; as,
      trisnitrate of bismuth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trochanteric \Tro`chan*ter"ic\, a. (Anat.)
      Of or pertaining to one or both of the trochanters.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trochantine \Tro*chan"tine\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The second joint of the leg of an insect, -- often united
      with the coxa.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Troching \Tro"ching\, n. [OF. troche cluster, group; cf. F.
      trochure a surantler, troch[82]e branches of a seedling,
      trochet cluster of flowers or fruits.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the small branches of a stag's antler.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trochometer \Tro*chom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] a wheel + -meter.]
      A contrivance for computing the revolutions of a wheel; an
      odometer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trogon \Tro"gon\, n. [NL.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous species of beautiful tropical birds
      belonging to the family {Trogonid[91]}. They are noted for
      the brilliant colors and the resplendent luster of their
      plumage.
  
      Note: Some of the species have a train of long brilliant
               feathers lying over the tail and consisting of the
               upper tail coverts. Unlike other birds having two toes
               directed forward and two backward, they have the inner
               toe turned backward. A few species are found in Africa
               and India, but the greater number, including the most
               brilliant species, are found in tropical America. See
               Illust. of {Quesal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Quesal \Que*sal"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The long-tailed, or resplendent, trogon ({Pharomachus
      mocinno}, formerly {Trogon resplendens}), native of Southern
      Mexico and Central America. Called also {quetzal}, and
      {golden trogon}.
  
      Note: The male is remarkable for the brilliant metallic green
               and gold colors of his plumage, and for his extremely
               long plumes, which often exceed three feet in length.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trogonoid \Tro"gon*oid\, a. [Trogon + -oid.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Like or pertaining to the trogons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trojan \Tro"jan\, n.
      One who shows the pluck, endurance, determined energy, or the
      like, attributed to the defenders of Troy; -- used chiefly or
      only in the phrase {like a Trojan}; as, he endured the pain
      like a Trojan; he studies like a Trojan.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trojan \Tro"jan\, a. [L. Trojanus, fr. Troja, Troia, Troy, from
      Tros, Gr. Trw`s, Trwo`s, Tros, the mythical founder of Troy.]
      Of or pertaining to ancient Troy or its inhabitants. -- n. A
      native or inhabitant of Troy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truchman \Truch"man\, n. [Cf. F. trucheman. See {Dragoman}.]
      An interpreter. See {Dragoman}. [Obs.]
  
               And after, by the tongue, Her truchman, she reports the
               mind's each throw.                                 --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truck \Truck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trucked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {trucking}.] [OE. trukken,F. troquer; akin to Sp. & Pg.
      trocar; of uncertain origin.]
      To exchange; to give in exchange; to barter; as, to truck
      knives for gold dust.
  
               We will begin by supposing the international trade to
               be in form, what it always is in reality, an actual
               trucking of one commodity against another. --J. S.
                                                                              Mill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trucking \Truck"ing\, n.
      The business of conveying goods on trucks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truck \Truck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trucked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {trucking}.] [OE. trukken,F. troquer; akin to Sp. & Pg.
      trocar; of uncertain origin.]
      To exchange; to give in exchange; to barter; as, to truck
      knives for gold dust.
  
               We will begin by supposing the international trade to
               be in form, what it always is in reality, an actual
               trucking of one commodity against another. --J. S.
                                                                              Mill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trucking \Truck"ing\, n.
      The business of conveying goods on trucks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truckman \Truck"man\, n.; pl. {Truckmen}.
      1. [From {Truck} barter.] One who does business in the way of
            barter or exchange.
  
      2. [From {Truck} a carriage.] One who drives a truck, or
            whose business is the conveyance of goods on trucks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truckman \Truck"man\, n.; pl. {Truckmen}.
      1. [From {Truck} barter.] One who does business in the way of
            barter or exchange.
  
      2. [From {Truck} a carriage.] One who drives a truck, or
            whose business is the conveyance of goods on trucks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Dermis \[d8]Der"mis\, n. [NL. See {Derm}.] (Anat.)
      The deep sensitive layer of the skin beneath the scarfskin or
      epidermis; -- called also {true skin}, {derm}, {derma},
      {corium}, {cutis}, and {enderon}. See {Skin}, and Illust. in
      Appendix.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trugging-house \Trug"ging-house`\, n. [See {Trug}, n., 2.]
      A brothel. [Obs.] --Robert Greene.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truism \Tru"ism\, n. [From {True}.]
      An undoubted or self-evident truth; a statement which is
      pliantly true; a proposition needing no proof or argument; --
      opposed to falsism.
  
               Trifling truisms clothed in great, swelling words. --J.
                                                                              P. Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truismatic \Tru`is*mat"ic\, a.
      Of or pertaining to truisms; consisting of truisms. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trusion \Tru"sion\, n. [L. trudere, trusum, to thrust, shove:
      cf. F. trusion.]
      The act of pushing or thrusting. [R.] --Bentley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truss \Truss\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trussed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trussing}.] [F. trousser. See {Truss}, n.]
      1. To bind or pack close; to make into a truss. --Shak.
  
                     It [his hood] was trussed up in his wallet.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
      2. To take fast hold of; to seize and hold firmly; to pounce
            upon. [Obs.]
  
                     Who trussing me as eagle doth his prey. --Spenser.
  
      3. To strengthen or stiffen, as a beam or girder, by means of
            a brace or braces.
  
      4. To skewer; to make fast, as the wings of a fowl to the
            body in cooking it.
  
      5. To execute by hanging; to hang; -- usually with up.
            [Slang.] --Sir W. Scott.
  
      {To truss a person} [or] {one's self}, to adjust and fasten
            the clothing of; especially, to draw tight and tie the
            laces of garments. [Obs.] [bd]Enter Honeysuckle, in his
            nightcap, trussing himself.[b8] --J. Webster (1607).
  
      {To truss up}, to strain; to make close or tight.
  
      {Trussed beam}, a beam which is stiffened by a system of
            braces constituting a truss of which the beam is a chord.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trussing \Truss"ing\, n.
      1. (Arch. & Engin.) The timbers, etc., which form a truss,
            taken collectively. --Weale.
  
      2. (Arch. & Engin.) The art of stiffening or bracing a set of
            timbers, or the like, by putting in struts, ties, etc.,
            till it has something of the character of a truss.
  
      3. The act of a hawk, or other bird of prey, in seizing its
            quarry, and soaring with it into air. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turacin \Tu"ra*cin\, n. (Physiol.) (Chem.)
      A red or crimson pigment obtained from certain feathers of
      several species of turacou; whence the name. It contains
      nearly six per cent of copper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turcoman \Tur"co*man\, n.; pl. {Turcomans}.
      1. A member of a tribe of Turanians inhabiting a region east
            of the Caspian Sea.
  
      2. A Turcoman carpet.
  
      {Turcoman carpet} [or] {rug}, a kind of carpet or rug
            supposed to be made by the Turcomans.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turcoman \Tur"co*man\, n.; pl. {Turcomans}.
      1. A member of a tribe of Turanians inhabiting a region east
            of the Caspian Sea.
  
      2. A Turcoman carpet.
  
      {Turcoman carpet} [or] {rug}, a kind of carpet or rug
            supposed to be made by the Turcomans.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turcoman \Tur"co*man\, n.; pl. {Turcomans}.
      1. A member of a tribe of Turanians inhabiting a region east
            of the Caspian Sea.
  
      2. A Turcoman carpet.
  
      {Turcoman carpet} [or] {rug}, a kind of carpet or rug
            supposed to be made by the Turcomans.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turgent \Tur"gent\, a. [L. turgens, -entis, p. pr. of turgere to
      swell.]
      1. Rising into a tumor, or a puffy state; swelling; tumid;
            as, turgent humors.
  
      2. Inflated; bombastic; turgid; pompous.
  
                     Recompensed with turgent titles.         --Burton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turkey \Tur"key\, n.; pl. {Turkeys}. [So called because it was
      formerly erroneously believed that it came originally from
      Turkey: cf. F. Turquie Turkey. See {Turk}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any large American gallinaceous bird belonging to the genus
      {Meleagris}, especially the North American wild turkey
      ({Meleagris gallopavo}), and the domestic turkey, which was
      probably derived from the Mexican wild turkey, but had been
      domesticated by the Indians long before the discovery of
      America.
  
      Note: The Mexican wild turkey is now considered a variety of
               the northern species (var. Mexicana). Its tall feathers
               and coverts are tipped with white instead of brownish
               chestnut, and its flesh is white. The Central American,
               or ocellated, turkey ({M. ocellata}) is more elegantly
               colored than the common species. See under {Ocellated}.
               The Australian, or native, turkey is a bustard
               ({Choriotis australis}). See under {Native}.
  
      {Turkey beard} (Bot.), a name of certain American perennial
            liliaceous herbs of the genus {Xerophyllum}. They have a
            dense tuft of hard, narrowly linear radical leaves, and a
            long raceme of small whitish flowers. Also called
            {turkey's beard}.
  
      {Turkey berry} (Bot.), a West Indian name for the fruit of
            certain kinds of nightshade ({Solanum mammosum}, and {S.
            torvum}).
  
      {Turkey bird} (Zo[94]l.), the wryneck. So called because it
            erects and ruffles the feathers of its neck when
            disturbed. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Turkey buzzard} (Zo[94]l.), a black or nearly black buzzard
            ({Cathartes aura}), abundant in the Southern United
            States. It is so called because its naked and warty head
            and neck resemble those of a turkey. Its is noted for its
            high and graceful flight. Called also {turkey vulture}.
  
      {Turkey cock} (Zo[94]l.), a male turkey.
  
      {Turkey hen} (Zo[94]l.), a female turkey.
  
      {Turkey pout} (Zo[94]l.), a young turkey. [R.]
  
      {Turkey vulture} (Zo[94]l.), the turkey buzzard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turkoman \Tur"ko*man\, n.; pl. {Turkomans}.
      Same as {Turcoman}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turkoman \Tur"ko*man\, n.; pl. {Turkomans}.
      Same as {Turcoman}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tyrociny \Ty"ro*cin*y\, n. [L. tirocinium first service or
      trial, fr. tiro. See {Tyro}.]
      The state of being a tyro, or beginner; apprenticeship.
      [Obs.] --Blount.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tyrosin \Tyr"o*sin\, n. [Gr. [?] cheese.] (Physiol. Chem.)
      A white crystalline nitrogenous substance

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   present in small amount in the pancreas and spleen, and formed
   in large quantity from the decomposition of proteid matter by
   various means, -- as by pancreatic digestion, by putrefaction as
   of cheese, by the action of boiling acids, etc. Chemically, it
   consists of oxyphenol and amidopropionic acid, and by
   decomposition yields oxybenzoic acid, or some other benzol
   derivative. [Written also {tyrosine}.]

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tarzan, TX
      Zip code(s): 79783

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tarzana, CA
      Zip code(s): 91356

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Terry County, TX (county, FIPS 445)
      Location: 33.17111 N, 102.33885 W
      Population (1990): 13218 (5296 housing units)
      Area: 2304.8 sq km (land), 2.7 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Thayer County, NE (county, FIPS 169)
      Location: 40.17627 N, 97.59432 W
      Population (1990): 6635 (3017 housing units)
      Area: 1488.2 sq km (land), 2.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Throckmorton, TX (town, FIPS 72896)
      Location: 33.18170 N, 99.17994 W
      Population (1990): 1036 (554 housing units)
      Area: 4.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 76483

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Throckmorton County, TX (county, FIPS 447)
      Location: 33.18362 N, 99.21498 W
      Population (1990): 1880 (1106 housing units)
      Area: 2363.1 sq km (land), 8.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tierras Nuevas Poniente, PR (comunidad, FIPS 82187)
      Location: 18.46386 N, 66.48901 W
      Population (1990): 1688 (583 housing units)
      Area: 2.4 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Trigg County, KY (county, FIPS 221)
      Location: 36.80560 N, 87.87504 W
      Population (1990): 10361 (5284 housing units)
      Area: 1148.3 sq km (land), 97.8 sq km (water)

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   throwaway account n.   1. An inexpensive Internet account
   purchased on a legitimate {ISP} for the the sole purpose of spewing
   {spam}. 2. An inexpensive Internet account obtained for the sole
   purpose of doing something which requires a valid email address but
   being able to ignore spam since the user will not look at the
   account again.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Trojan horse n.   [coined by MIT-hacker-turned-NSA-spook Dan
   Edwards] A malicious, security-breaking program that is disguised as
   something benign, such as a directory lister, archiver, game, or (in
   one notorious 1990 case on the Mac) a program to find and destroy
   viruses!   See {back door}, {virus}, {worm}, {phage}, {mockingbird}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   theory change
  
      The study of methods used to
      incorporate new information into a {knowledge base} when the
      new information may conflict with existing information.
  
      {Belief revision} is one area of theory change.
  
      [Others?]
  
      (1995-03-20)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   There's More Than One Way To Do It
  
      One of the design principles of Perl.   The
      Perl {man page} ends with a note:
  
      The Perl motto is "There's more than one way to do it."
      Divining how many more is left as an exercise to the reader.
  
      (2001-03-15)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   thrashing
  
      {thrash}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tracking
  
      The spacing between {characters} in a line of {text}.
      This is defined when a {font} is designed but can often be
      altered in order to change the appearance of the text or for
      special effects.
  
      Tracking should not be confused with {kerning} which deals
      with the spacing between certain pairs of characters.
  
      See also {leading}.
  
      (1996-06-07)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TRIGMAN
  
      A system for {symbolic mathematics}, especially celestial
      mechanics.
  
      (1994-12-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Trojan horse
  
      (Coined by
      {MIT}-hacker-turned-NSA-spook Dan Edwards) A malicious,
      security-breaking program that is disguised as something
      benign, such as a directory lister, archiver, game, or (in one
      notorious 1990 case on the Mac) a program to find and destroy
      {virus}es!   A Trojan horse is similar to a {back door}.
  
      See also {RFC 1135}, {worm}, {phage}, {mockingbird}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-03-21)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Threshing
      See {AGRICULTURE}.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Trachonitis
      a rugged region, corresponds to the Heb. Argob (q.v.), the Greek
      name of a region on the east of Jordan (Luke 3:1); one of the
      five Roman provinces into which that district was divided. It
      was in the tetrarchy of Philip, and is now called the Lejah.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Trachonitis, stony
  

From The CIA World Factbook (1995) [world95]:
   Turkmenistan
  
   Turkmenistan:Geography
  
   Location: Central Asia, bordering the Caspian Sea, between Iran and
   Kazakhstan
  
   Map references: Commonwealth of Independent States - Central Asian
   States
  
   Area:
   total area: 488,100 sq km
   land area: 488,100 sq km
   comparative area: slightly larger than California
  
   Land boundaries: total 3,736 km, Afghanistan 744 km, Iran 992 km,
   Kazakhstan 379 km, Uzbekistan 1,621 km
  
   Coastline: 0 km
   note: Turkmenistan borders the Caspian Sea (1,768 km)
  
   Maritime claims: none; landlocked
  
   International disputes: Caspian Sea boundaries are not yet determined
  
   Climate: subtropical desert
  
   Terrain: flat-to-rolling sandy desert with dunes rising to mountains
   in the south; low mountains along border with Iran; borders Caspian
   Sea in west
  
   Natural resources: petroleum, natural gas, coal, sulphur, salt
  
   Land use:
   arable land: 2%
   permanent crops: 0%
   meadows and pastures: 69%
   forest and woodland: 0%
   other: 29%
  
   Irrigated land: 12,450 sq km (1990)
  
   Environment:
   current issues: contamination of soil and groundwater with
   agricultural chemicals, pesticides; salinization, water-logging of
   soil due to poor irrigation methods; Caspian Sea pollution; diversion
   of a large share of the flow of the Amu Darya into irrigation
   contributes to that river's inability to replenish the Aral Sea;
   desertification
   natural hazards: NA
   international agreements: party to - Ozone Layer Protection
  
   Note: landlocked
  
   Turkmenistan:People
  
   Population: 4,075,316 (July 1995 est.)
  
   Age structure:
   0-14 years: 40% (female 798,620; male 821,550)
   15-64 years: 56% (female 1,155,392; male 1,128,844)
   65 years and over: 4% (female 105,424; male 65,486) (July 1995 est.)
  
   Population growth rate: 1.97% (1995 est.)
  
   Birth rate: 29.93 births/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Death rate: 7.34 deaths/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Net migration rate: -2.92 migrant(s)/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Infant mortality rate: 68.5 deaths/1,000 live births (1995 est.)
  
   Life expectancy at birth:
   total population: 65.35 years
   male: 61.85 years
   female: 69.02 years (1995 est.)
  
   Total fertility rate: 3.72 children born/woman (1995 est.)
  
   Nationality:
   noun: Turkmen(s)
   adjective: Turkmen
  
   Ethnic divisions: Turkmen 73.3%, Russian 9.8%, Uzbek 9%, Kazakh 2%,
   other 5.9%
  
   Religions: Muslim 87%, Eastern Orthodox 11%, unknown 2%
  
   Languages: Turkmen 72%, Russian 12%, Uzbek 9%, other 7%
  
   Literacy: age 15 and over can read and write (1989)
   total population: 98%
   male: 99%
   female: 97%
  
   Labor force: 1.642 million (January 1994)
   by occupation: agriculture and forestry 44%, industry and construction
   20%, other 36% (1992)
  
   Turkmenistan:Government
  
   Names:
   conventional long form: none
   conventional short form: Turkmenistan
   local long form: none
   local short form: Turkmenistan
   former: Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic
  
   Digraph: TX
  
   Type: republic
  
   Capital: Ashgabat
  
   Administrative divisions: 5 welayatlar (singular - welayat): Ahal
   Welayaty (Ashgabat), Balkan Welayaty (Nebitdag), Dashhowuz Welayaty
   (formerly Tashauz), Lebap Welayaty (Charjew), Mary Welayaty
   note: names in parentheses are administrative centers when name
   differs from welayat name
  
   Independence: 27 October 1991 (from the Soviet Union)
  
   National holiday: Independence Day, 27 October (1991)
  
   Constitution: adopted 18 May 1992
  
   Legal system: based on civil law system
  
   Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
  
   Executive branch:
   chief of state: President Saparmurad NIYAZOV (since NA October 1990);
   election last held 21 June 1992 (next to be held NA 2002); results -
   Saparmurad NIYAZOV 99.5% (ran unopposed); note - a 15 January 1994
   referendum extended NIYAZOV's term an additional five years until 2002
   (99.99% approval)
   head of government: Prime Minister (vacant); Deputy Prime Ministers
   Orazgeldi AYDOGDIYEV (since NA), Babamurad BAZAROV (since NA), Khekim
   ISHANOV (since NA), Valeriy OTCHERTSOV (since NA), Yagmur OVEZOV
   (since NA), Matkarim RAJAPOV (since NA), Abad RIZAYEVA (since NA),
   Rejep SAPAROV (since NA), Boris SHIKHMURADOV (since NA), Batyr
   SARJAYEV (since NA)
   cabinet: Council of Ministers
  
   Legislative branch: under 1992 constitution there are two
   parliamentary bodies, a unicameral People's Council (Halk Maslahaty -
   having more than 100 members and meeting infrequently) and a 50-member
   unicameral Assembly (Majlis)
   Assembly (Majlis): elections last held 11 December 1994 (next to be
   held NA); results - percent of vote by party NA; seats - (50 total)
   Democratic Party 45, other 5; note - all 50 preapproved by President
   NIYAZOV
  
   Judicial branch: Supreme Court
  
   Political parties and leaders: Democratic Party of Turkmenistan,
   Saparmurad NIYAZOV; Party for Democratic Development, Durdymurat
   HOJA-MUKHAMMED, chairman; Agzybirlik, Nurberdy NURMAMEDOV, cochairman,
   Hubayberdi HALLIYEV, cochairman
   note: formal opposition parties are outlawed; unofficial, small
   opposition movements exist underground or in foreign countries
  
   Member of: CCC, CIS, EBRD, ECE, ECO, ESCAP, IBRD, ICAO, IDB, ILO, IMF,
   IMO, INTELSAT (nonsignatory user), IOC, ISO (correspondent), ITU,
   NACC, OIC, OSCE, PFP, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UPU, WHO, WMO, WTO
  
   Diplomatic representation in US:
   chief of mission: Ambassador Khalil UGUR
   chancery: 1511 K Street NW, Suite 412, Washington, DC 20005
   telephone: [1] (202) 737-4800
   FAX: [1] (202) 737-1152
  
   US diplomatic representation:
   chief of mission: Ambassador Joseph S. HULINGS III
   embassy: 6 Teheran Street, Yubilenaya Hotel, Ashgabat
   mailing address: use embassy street address
   telephone: [7] (3632) 24-49-25, 24-49-22
   FAX: [7] (3632) 25-53-79
  
   Flag: green field, including a vertical stripe on the hoist side, with
   a claret vertical stripe in between containing five white, black, and
   orange carpet guls (an assymetrical design used in producing rugs)
   associated with five different tribes; a white crescent and five white
   stars in the upper left corner to the right of the carpet guls
  
   Economy
  
   Overview: Turkmenistan is largely desert country with nomadic cattle
   raising, intensive agriculture in irrigated oases, and huge gas and
   oil resources. Half its irrigated land is planted in cotton making it
   the world's tenth largest producer. It also has the world's fifth
   largest reserves of natural gas and significant oil resources. Until
   the end of 1993, Turkmenistan had experienced less economic disruption
   than other former Soviet states because its economy received a boost
   from higher prices for oil and gas and a sharp increase in hard
   currency earnings. In 1994, Russia's refusal to export Turkmen gas to
   hard currency markets and mounting debts of its major customers in the
   former USSR for gas deliveries contributed to a sharp fall in
   industrial production and caused the budget to shift from a surplus to
   a slight deficit. Furthermore, with an authoritarian ex-Communist
   regime in power and a tribally-based social structure, Turkmenistan
   has taken a cautious approach to economic reform, hoping to use gas
   and cotton sales to sustain its inefficient economy. With the onset of
   economic hard times, even cautious moves toward economic restructuring
   and privatization have slowed down. For 1995, Turkmenistan will face
   continuing constraints on its earnings because of its customers'
   inability to pay for their gas and a low average cotton crop in 1994.
   Turkmenistan is working hard to open new gas export channels through
   Iran and Turkey, but these may take many years to realize.
  
   National product: GDP - purchasing power parity - $13.1 billion (1994
   estimate as extrapolated from World Bank estimate for 1992)
  
   National product real growth rate: -24% (1994 est.)
  
   National product per capita: $3,280 (1994 est.)
  
   Inflation rate (consumer prices): 25% per month (1994)
  
   Unemployment rate: NA
  
   Budget:
   revenues: $NA
   expenditures: $NA, including capital expenditures of $NA
  
   Exports: $382 million to states outside the FSU (1994)
   commodities: natural gas, cotton, petroleum products, electricity,
   textiles, carpets
   partners: Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Georgia,
   Azerbaijan, Armenia, Eastern Europe, Turkey, Argentina
  
   Imports: $304 million from states outside the FSU (1994)
   commodities: machinery and parts, grain and food, plastics and rubber,
   consumer durables, textiles
   partners: Russia, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkey
  
   External debt: NEGL
  
   Industrial production: growth rate -25% (1994)
  
   Electricity:
   capacity: 2,480,000 kW
   production: 10.5 billion kWh
   consumption per capita: 2,600 kWh (1994)
  
   Industries: natural gas, oil, petroleum products, textiles, food
   processing
  
   Agriculture: cotton, grain, animal husbandry
  
   Illicit drugs: illicit cultivator of cannabis and opium poppy; mostly
   for CIS consumption; limited government eradication program; used as
   transshipment point for illicit drugs from Southwest Asia to Western
   Europe
  
   Economic aid:
   recipient: Turkmenistan has received about $200 million in bilateral
   aid credits
  
   Currency: Turkmenistan introduced its national currency, the manat, on
   1 November 1993
  
   Exchange rates: manats per US$1 - multiple rate system: 10 (official)
   and 230 (permitted in transactions between the government and
   individuals)
  
   Fiscal year: calendar year
  
   Turkmenistan:Transportation
  
   Railroads:
   total: 2,120 km in common carrier service; does not include industrial
   lines
   broad gauge: 2,120 km 1.520-m gauge (1990)
  
   Highways:
   total: 23,000 km
   paved and graveled: 18,300 km
   unpaved: earth 4,700 km (1990)
  
   Pipelines: crude oil 250 km; natural gas 4,400 km
  
   Ports: Turkmenbashi (formerly Krasnowodsk)
  
   Airports:
   total: 64
   with paved runways 2,438 to 3,047 m: 13
   with paved runways 1,524 to 2,437 m: 8
   with paved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 1
   with unpaved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 7
   with unpaved runways under 914 m: 35
  
   Turkmenistan:Communications
  
   Telephone system: NA telephones; only 7.5 telephones/100 persons
   (1991); poorly developed
   local: NA
   intercity: NA
   international: linked by cable and microwave to other CIS republics
   and to other countries by leased connections to the Moscow
   international gateway switch; a new telephone link from Ashgabat to
   Iran has been established; a new exchange in Ashgabat switches
   international traffic through Turkey via INTELSAT; 1 Orbita and 1
   INTELSAT earth station
  
   Radio:
   broadcast stations: AM NA, FM NA, shortwave NA
   radios: NA
  
   Television:
   broadcast stations: NA
   televisions: NA
  
   Turkmenistan:Defense Forces
  
   Branches: National Guard, Republic Security Forces (internal and
   border troops), Joint Command Turkmenistan/Russia (Ground, Air, and
   Air Defense)
  
   Manpower availability: males age 15-49 993,321; males fit for military
   service 810,392; males reach military age (18) annually 40,430 (1995
   est.)
  
   Defense expenditures: $NA, NA% of GDP
  
  
  

From The CIA World Factbook (1995) [world95]:
   Turks And Caicos Islands
  
   (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:Geography
  
   Location: Caribbean, two island groups in the North Atlantic Ocean,
   southeast of The Bahamas
  
   Map references: Central America and the Caribbean
  
   Area:
   total area: 430 sq km
   land area: 430 sq km
   comparative area: slightly less than 2.5 times the size of Washington,
   DC
  
   Land boundaries: 0 km
  
   Coastline: 389 km
  
   Maritime claims:
   exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm
   territorial sea: 12 nm
  
   International disputes: none
  
   Climate: tropical; marine; moderated by trade winds; sunny and
   relatively dry
  
   Terrain: low, flat limestone; extensive marshes and mangrove swamps
  
   Natural resources: spiny lobster, conch
  
   Land use:
   arable land: 2%
   permanent crops: 0%
   meadows and pastures: 0%
   forest and woodland: 0%
   other: 98%
  
   Irrigated land: NA sq km
  
   Environment:
   current issues: limited natural fresh water resources, private
   cisterns collect rainwater
   natural hazards: frequent hurricanes
   international agreements: NA
  
   Note: 30 islands (eight inhabited)
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:People
  
   Population: 13,941 (July 1995 est.)
  
   Age structure:
   0-14 years: NA
   15-64 years: NA
   65 years and over: NA
  
   Population growth rate: 2.41% (1995 est.)
  
   Birth rate: 13.46 births/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Death rate: 5.16 deaths/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Net migration rate: 15.83 migrant(s)/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Infant mortality rate: 12.63 deaths/1,000 live births (1995 est.)
  
   Life expectancy at birth:
   total population: 75.37 years
   male: 73.44 years
   female: 77.04 years (1995 est.)
  
   Total fertility rate: 2.3 children born/woman (1995 est.)
  
   Nationality:
   noun: none
   adjective: none
  
   Ethnic divisions: African
  
   Religions: Baptist 41.2%, Methodist 18.9%, Anglican 18.3%, Seventh-Day
   Adventist 1.7%, other 19.9% (1980)
  
   Languages: English (official)
  
   Literacy: age 15 and over has ever attended school (1970)
   total population: 98%
   male: 99%
   female: 98%
  
   Labor force: NA
   by occupation: majority engaged in fishing and tourist industries;
   some subsistence agriculture
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:Government
  
   Names:
   conventional long form: none
   conventional short form: Turks and Caicos Islands
  
   Digraph: TK
  
   Type: dependent territory of the UK
  
   Capital: Grand Turk
  
   Administrative divisions: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   Independence: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   National holiday: Constitution Day, 30 August (1976)
  
   Constitution: introduced 30 August 1976, suspended in 1986, restored
   and revised 5 March 1988
  
   Legal system: based on laws of England and Wales with a small number
   adopted from Jamaica and The Bahamas
  
   Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
  
   Executive branch:
   chief of state: Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1953),
   represented by Governor Martin BOURKE (since NA February 1993)
   head of government: Chief Minister Derek H. TAYLOR (since 31 January
   1995)
   cabinet: Executive Council; consists of three ex-officio members and
   five appointed by the governor from the Legislative Council
  
   Legislative branch: unicameral
   Legislative Council: elections last held 31 January 1995 (next to be
   held by NA 2000); results - percent of vote by party NA; seats - (20
   total, 13 elected) PDM 8, PNP 4, independent (Norman SAUNDERS) 1
  
   Judicial branch: Supreme Court
  
   Political parties and leaders: Progressive National Party (PNP),
   Washington MISSICK; People's Democratic Movement (PDM), Derek H.
   TAYLOR; National Democratic Alliance (NDA), Ariel MISSICK
  
   Member of: CARICOM (associate), CDB, INTERPOL (subbureau)
  
   Diplomatic representation in US: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   US diplomatic representation: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   Flag: blue with the flag of the UK in the upper hoist-side quadrant
   and the colonial shield centered on the outer half of the flag; the
   shield is yellow and contains a conch shell, lobster, and cactus
  
   Economy
  
   Overview: The economy is based on fishing, tourism, and offshore
   banking. Only subsistence farming - corn, cassava, citrus, and beans -
   exists on the Caicos Islands, so that most foods, as well as nonfood
   products, must be imported.
  
   National product: GDP - purchasing power parity - $80.8 million (1992
   est.)
  
   National product real growth rate: -1.5% (1992)
  
   National product per capita: $6,000 (1992 est.)
  
   Inflation rate (consumer prices): NA%
  
   Unemployment rate: 12% (1992)
  
   Budget:
   revenues: $20.3 million
   expenditures: $44 million, including capital expenditures of $23.9
   million (1989 est.)
  
   Exports: $6.8 million (f.o.b., 1993)
   commodities: lobster, dried and fresh conch, conch shells
   partners: US, UK
  
   Imports: $42.8 million (1993)
   commodities: food and beverages, tobacco, clothing, manufactures,
   construction materials
   partners: US, UK
  
   External debt: $NA
  
   Industrial production: growth rate NA%
  
   Electricity:
   capacity: 9,050 kW
   production: 11.1 million kWh
   consumption per capita: 860 kWh (1992)
  
   Industries: fishing, tourism, offshore financial services
  
   Agriculture: subsistence farming prevails, based on corn and beans;
   fishing more important than farming; not self-sufficient in food
  
   Illicit drugs: transshipment point for South American narcotics
   destined for the US
  
   Economic aid:
   recipient: Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral
   commitments (1970-89), $110 million
  
   Currency: 1 United States dollar (US$) = 100 cents
  
   Exchange rates: US currency is used
  
   Fiscal year: calendar year
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:Transportation
  
   Railroads: 0 km
  
   Highways:
   total: 121 km (including 24 km tarmac)
   paved: NA
   unpaved: NA
  
   Ports: Cockburn Harbour, Grand Turk, Providenciales, Salt Cay
  
   Merchant marine: none
  
   Airports:
   total: 7
   with paved runways 1,524 to 2,437 m: 3
   with paved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 1
   with paved runways under 914 m: 1
   with unpaved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 2
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:Communications
  
   Telephone system: 1,446 telephones; fair cable and radio services
   local: NA
   intercity: NA
   international: 2 submarine cables; 1 INTELSAT (Atlantic Ocean) earth
   station
  
   Radio:
   broadcast stations: AM 3, FM 0, shortwave 0
   radios: NA
  
   Television:
   broadcast stations: NA
   televisions: NA
  
   Turks And Caicos Islands:Defense Forces
  
   Note: defense is the responsibility of the UK
  
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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