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   Tarawa-Makin
         n 1: battles in World War II in the Pacific (November 1943);
               United States Marines took the islands from the Japanese
               after bitter fighting [syn: {Tarawa}, {Makin}, {Tarawa-
               Makin}]

English Dictionary: Transiträumen by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarmac
n
  1. a paving material of tar and broken stone; mixed in a factory and shaped during paving
    Synonym(s): tarmacadam, tarmac
  2. a paved surface having compressed layers of broken rocks held together with tar
    Synonym(s): tarmacadam, tarmac, macadam
v
  1. surface with macadam; "macadam the road" [syn: macadamize, macadamise, tarmac]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarmacadam
n
  1. a paving material of tar and broken stone; mixed in a factory and shaped during paving
    Synonym(s): tarmacadam, tarmac
  2. a paved surface having compressed layers of broken rocks held together with tar
    Synonym(s): tarmacadam, tarmac, macadam
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarnish
n
  1. discoloration of metal surface caused by oxidation
v
  1. make dirty or spotty, as by exposure to air; also used metaphorically; "The silver was tarnished by the long exposure to the air"; "Her reputation was sullied after the affair with a married man"
    Synonym(s): tarnish, stain, maculate, sully, defile
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarnished plant bug
n
  1. widespread plant and fruit pest [syn: {tarnished plant bug}, Lygus lineolaris]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tarriance
n
  1. the act of tarrying
    Synonym(s): tarriance, lingering
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tauromachy
n
  1. the activity at a bullfight [syn: bullfighting, tauromachy]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tearing
adj
  1. marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid; "fierce loyalty"; "in a tearing rage"; "vehement dislike"; "violent passions"
    Synonym(s): fierce, tearing, vehement, violent, trigger-happy
n
  1. shedding tears [syn: lacrimation, lachrymation, tearing, watering]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tearing down
n
  1. complete destruction of a building [syn: razing, leveling, tearing down, demolishing]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Terence
n
  1. dramatist of ancient Rome (born in Greece) whose comedies were based on works by Menander (190?-159 BC)
    Synonym(s): Terence, Publius Terentius Afer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Terence Rattigan
n
  1. British playwright (1911-1977) [syn: Rattigan, {Terence Rattigan}, Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
termagant
n
  1. a scolding nagging bad-tempered woman [syn: shrew, termagant]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Termes
n
  1. type genus of the Termitidae [syn: Termes, {genus Termes}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
terms
n
  1. status with respect to the relations between people or groups; "on good terms with her in-laws"; "on a friendly footing"
    Synonym(s): footing, terms
  2. the amount of money needed to purchase something; "the price of gasoline"; "he got his new car on excellent terms"; "how much is the damage?"
    Synonym(s): price, terms, damage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
terra incognita
n
  1. an unknown and unexplored region; "they came like angels out the unknown"
    Synonym(s): unknown, unknown region, terra incognita
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Terramycin
n
  1. a yellow crystalline antibiotic (trademark Terramycin) obtained from a soil actinomycete; used to treat various bacterial and rickettsial infections
    Synonym(s): oxytetracycline, hydroxytetracycline, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, Terramycin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thereness
n
  1. real existence; "things are really there...capture the thereness of them"--Charles Hopkinson
  2. the state of being there--not here--in position
    Antonym(s): hereness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermic
adj
  1. relating to or associated with heat; "thermal movements of molecules"; "thermal capacity"; "thermic energy"; "the caloric effect of sunlight"
    Synonym(s): thermal, thermic, caloric
    Antonym(s): nonthermal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermic fever
n
  1. sudden prostration due to exposure to the sun or excessive heat
    Synonym(s): sunstroke, insolation, thermic fever, siriasis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermistor
n
  1. a semiconductor device made of materials whose resistance varies as a function of temperature; can be used to compensate for temperature variation in other components of a circuit
    Synonym(s): thermistor, thermal resistor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermoacidophile
n
  1. archaebacteria that thrive in strongly acidic environments at high temperatures
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermocautery
n
  1. cautery (destruction of tissue) by heat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermochemistry
n
  1. the branch of chemistry that studies the relation between chemical action and the amount of heat absorbed or generated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermocoagulation
n
  1. congealing tissue by heat (as by electric current)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermocouple
n
  1. a kind of thermometer consisting of two wires of different metals that are joined at both ends; one junction is at the temperature to be measured and the other is held at a fixed lower temperature; the current generated in the circuit is proportional to the temperature difference
    Synonym(s): thermocouple, thermocouple junction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermocouple junction
n
  1. a kind of thermometer consisting of two wires of different metals that are joined at both ends; one junction is at the temperature to be measured and the other is held at a fixed lower temperature; the current generated in the circuit is proportional to the temperature difference
    Synonym(s): thermocouple, thermocouple junction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermogram
n
  1. a graphical record produced by a thermograph
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermograph
n
  1. medical instrument that uses an infrared camera to reveal temperature variations on the surface of the body
  2. a thermometer that records temperature variations on a graph as a function of time
    Synonym(s): thermograph, thermometrograph
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermography
n
  1. diagnostic technique using a thermograph to record the heat produced by different parts of the body; used to study blood flow and to detect tumors
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermogravimeter
n
  1. a hydrometer that includes a thermometer [syn: thermohydrometer, thermogravimeter]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermogravimetric
adj
  1. of or relating to thermal hydrometry [syn: thermohydrometric, thermogravimetric]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermogravimetry
n
  1. the measurement of changes in weight as a function of changes in temperature used as a technique of chemically analyzing substances
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermojunction
n
  1. a junction between two dissimilar metals across which a voltage appears
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermos
n
  1. vacuum flask that preserves temperature of hot or cold drinks
    Synonym(s): thermos, thermos bottle, thermos flask
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermos bottle
n
  1. vacuum flask that preserves temperature of hot or cold drinks
    Synonym(s): thermos, thermos bottle, thermos flask
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermos flask
n
  1. vacuum flask that preserves temperature of hot or cold drinks
    Synonym(s): thermos, thermos bottle, thermos flask
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermoset
adj
  1. having the property of becoming permanently hard and rigid when heated or cured; "the phenol resins and plastics were the original synthetic thermosetting materials"
    Synonym(s): thermosetting, thermoset
    Antonym(s): thermoplastic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermosetting
adj
  1. having the property of becoming permanently hard and rigid when heated or cured; "the phenol resins and plastics were the original synthetic thermosetting materials"
    Synonym(s): thermosetting, thermoset
    Antonym(s): thermoplastic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermosetting compositions
n
  1. a material that hardens when heated and cannot be remolded
    Synonym(s): thermosetting compositions, thermosetting resin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermosetting resin
n
  1. a material that hardens when heated and cannot be remolded
    Synonym(s): thermosetting compositions, thermosetting resin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermosphere
n
  1. the atmospheric layer between the mesosphere and the exosphere
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermostat
n
  1. a regulator for automatically regulating temperature by starting or stopping the supply of heat
    Synonym(s): thermostat, thermoregulator
v
  1. control the temperature with a thermostat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermostatic
adj
  1. of or relating to a thermostat; "thermostatic control"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermostatically
adv
  1. by thermostat; in a thermostatic manner; "the temperature is thermostatically controlled"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thermostatics
n
  1. the aspect of thermodynamics concerned with thermal equilibrium
    Synonym(s): thermostatics, thermodynamics of equilibrium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thorny skate
n
  1. cold-water bottom fish with spines on the back; to 40 inches
    Synonym(s): thorny skate, Raja radiata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thrinax
n
  1. small to medium-sized fan palms [syn: Thrinax, {genus Thrinax}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thrinax keyensis
n
  1. small stocky fan palm of southern Florida and Cuba [syn: key palm, silvertop palmetto, silver thatch, Thrinax microcarpa, Thrinax morrisii, Thrinax keyensis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thrinax microcarpa
n
  1. small stocky fan palm of southern Florida and Cuba [syn: key palm, silvertop palmetto, silver thatch, Thrinax microcarpa, Thrinax morrisii, Thrinax keyensis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thrinax morrisii
n
  1. small stocky fan palm of southern Florida and Cuba [syn: key palm, silvertop palmetto, silver thatch, Thrinax microcarpa, Thrinax morrisii, Thrinax keyensis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thrinax parviflora
n
  1. small palm of southern Florida and West Indies closely resembling the silvertop palmetto
    Synonym(s): thatch palm, thatch tree, silver thatch, broom palm, Thrinax parviflora
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
throng
n
  1. a large gathering of people [syn: multitude, throng, concourse]
v
  1. press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium"
    Synonym(s): throng, mob, pack, pile, jam
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thronged
adj
  1. filled with great numbers crowded together; "I try to avoid the thronged streets and stores just before Christmas"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
throwing away
n
  1. getting rid something that is regarded as useless or undesirable
    Synonym(s): discard, throwing away
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
throwing board
n
  1. a device resembling a sling that is used in various primitive societies to propel a dart or spear
    Synonym(s): throwing stick, throwing board, spear thrower, dart thrower
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
throwing stick
n
  1. a device resembling a sling that is used in various primitive societies to propel a dart or spear
    Synonym(s): throwing stick, throwing board, spear thrower, dart thrower
  2. a curved piece of wood; when properly thrown will return to thrower
    Synonym(s): boomerang, throwing stick, throw stick
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thuringia
n
  1. a historical region of southern Germany
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thyromegaly
n
  1. abnormally enlarged thyroid gland; can result from underproduction or overproduction of hormone or from a deficiency of iodine in the diet
    Synonym(s): goiter, goitre, struma, thyromegaly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tiramisu
n
  1. an Italian dessert consisting of layers of sponge cake soaked with coffee and brandy or liqueur layered with mascarpone cheese and topped with grated chocolate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tiring
adj
  1. producing exhaustion; "an exhausting march"; "the visit was especially wearing"
    Synonym(s): exhausting, tiring, wearing, wearying
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
touring car
n
  1. large open car seating four with folding top [syn: {touring car}, phaeton, tourer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tourniquet
n
  1. bandage that stops the flow of blood from an artery by applying pressure
    Synonym(s): compression bandage, tourniquet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tower mustard
n
  1. or genus Arabis: erect cress widely distributed throughout Europe
    Synonym(s): tower mustard, tower cress, Turritis glabra, Arabis glabra
  2. European cress having stiff erect stems; sometimes placed in genus Turritis
    Synonym(s): tower cress, tower mustard, Arabis turrita
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
towering
adj
  1. of imposing height; especially standing out above others; "an eminent peak"; "lofty mountains"; "the soaring spires of the cathedral"; "towering icebergs"
    Synonym(s): eminent, lofty, soaring, towering
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
train set
n
  1. a toy consisting of small models of railroad trains and the track for them to run on
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
train station
n
  1. terminal where trains load or unload passengers or goods
    Synonym(s): railway station, railroad station, railroad terminal, train station, train depot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
traineeship
n
  1. financial aid that enables you to get trained for a specified job; "the bill provided traineeships in vocational rehabilitation"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trainmaster
n
  1. a railroad employer who is in charge of a railway yard
    Synonym(s): yardmaster, trainmaster, train dispatcher
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tramcar
n
  1. a four-wheeled wagon that runs on tracks in a mine; "a tramcar carries coal out of a coal mine"
    Synonym(s): tramcar, tram
  2. a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricity
    Synonym(s): streetcar, tram, tramcar, trolley, trolley car
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trance
n
  1. a psychological state induced by (or as if induced by) a magical incantation
    Synonym(s): enchantment, spell, trance
  2. a state of mind in which consciousness is fragile and voluntary action is poor or missing; a state resembling deep sleep
v
  1. attract; cause to be enamored; "She captured all the men's hearts"
    Synonym(s): capture, enamour, trance, catch, becharm, enamor, captivate, beguile, charm, fascinate, bewitch, entrance, enchant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trancelike
adj
  1. as if in a trance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranche
n
  1. a portion of something (especially money)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquil
adj
  1. (of a body of water) free from disturbance by heavy waves; "a ribbon of sand between the angry sea and the placid bay"; "the quiet waters of a lagoon"; "a lake of tranquil blue water reflecting a tranquil blue sky"; "a smooth channel crossing"; "scarcely a ripple on the still water"; "unruffled water"
    Synonym(s): placid, quiet, still, tranquil, smooth, unruffled
  2. not agitated; without losing self-possession; "spoke in a calm voice"; "remained calm throughout the uproar"; "he remained serene in the midst of turbulence"; "a serene expression on her face"; "she became more tranquil"; "tranquil life in the country"
    Synonym(s): calm, unagitated, serene, tranquil
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilising
adj
  1. tending to soothe or tranquilize; "valium has a tranquilizing effect"; "took a hot drink with sedative properties before going to bed"
    Synonym(s): ataractic, ataraxic, sedative, tranquilizing, tranquillizing, tranquilising, tranquillising
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquility
n
  1. a disposition free from stress or emotion [syn: repose, quiet, placidity, serenity, tranquillity, tranquility]
  2. an untroubled state; free from disturbances
    Synonym(s): tranquillity, tranquility, quiet
  3. a state of peace and quiet
    Synonym(s): tranquillity, tranquility, quietness, quietude
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilize
v
  1. make calm or still; "quiet the dragons of worry and fear"
    Synonym(s): calm, calm down, quiet, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise, quieten, lull, still
    Antonym(s): agitate, charge, charge up, commove, excite, rouse, turn on
  2. cause to be calm or quiet as by administering a sedative to; "The patient must be sedated before the operation"
    Synonym(s): sedate, calm, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise
    Antonym(s): arouse, brace, energise, energize, perk up, stimulate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilizer
n
  1. a drug used to reduce stress or tension without reducing mental clarity
    Synonym(s): tranquilizer, tranquillizer, tranquilliser, antianxiety agent, ataractic drug, ataractic agent, ataractic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilizing
adj
  1. tending to soothe or tranquilize; "valium has a tranquilizing effect"; "took a hot drink with sedative properties before going to bed"
    Synonym(s): ataractic, ataraxic, sedative, tranquilizing, tranquillizing, tranquilising, tranquillising
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillise
v
  1. make calm or still; "quiet the dragons of worry and fear"
    Synonym(s): calm, calm down, quiet, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise, quieten, lull, still
    Antonym(s): agitate, charge, charge up, commove, excite, rouse, turn on
  2. cause to be calm or quiet as by administering a sedative to; "The patient must be sedated before the operation"
    Synonym(s): sedate, calm, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise
    Antonym(s): arouse, brace, energise, energize, perk up, stimulate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilliser
n
  1. a drug used to reduce stress or tension without reducing mental clarity
    Synonym(s): tranquilizer, tranquillizer, tranquilliser, antianxiety agent, ataractic drug, ataractic agent, ataractic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillising
adj
  1. tending to soothe or tranquilize; "valium has a tranquilizing effect"; "took a hot drink with sedative properties before going to bed"
    Synonym(s): ataractic, ataraxic, sedative, tranquilizing, tranquillizing, tranquilising, tranquillising
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillity
n
  1. an untroubled state; free from disturbances [syn: tranquillity, tranquility, quiet]
  2. a state of peace and quiet
    Synonym(s): tranquillity, tranquility, quietness, quietude
  3. a disposition free from stress or emotion
    Synonym(s): repose, quiet, placidity, serenity, tranquillity, tranquility
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillize
v
  1. make calm or still; "quiet the dragons of worry and fear"
    Synonym(s): calm, calm down, quiet, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise, quieten, lull, still
    Antonym(s): agitate, charge, charge up, commove, excite, rouse, turn on
  2. cause to be calm or quiet as by administering a sedative to; "The patient must be sedated before the operation"
    Synonym(s): sedate, calm, tranquilize, tranquillize, tranquillise
    Antonym(s): arouse, brace, energise, energize, perk up, stimulate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillizer
n
  1. a drug used to reduce stress or tension without reducing mental clarity
    Synonym(s): tranquilizer, tranquillizer, tranquilliser, antianxiety agent, ataractic drug, ataractic agent, ataractic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquillizing
adj
  1. tending to soothe or tranquilize; "valium has a tranquilizing effect"; "took a hot drink with sedative properties before going to bed"
    Synonym(s): ataractic, ataraxic, sedative, tranquilizing, tranquillizing, tranquilising, tranquillising
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tranquilly
adv
  1. without emotional agitation; "tranquilly she went on with her work"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trans fatty acid
n
  1. a fatty acid that has been produced by hydrogenating an unsaturated fatty acid (and so changing its shape); found in processed foods such as margarine and fried foods and puddings and commercially baked goods and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trans-Alaska pipeline
n
  1. an oil pipeline that runs 800 miles from wells at Prudhoe Bay to the port of Valdez
    Synonym(s): Alaskan pipeline, trans- Alaska pipeline
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transact
v
  1. conduct business; "transact with foreign governments"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transactinide
adj
  1. of or belonging to the elements with atomic numbers greater than 103
n
  1. any of the artificially produced elements with atomic numbers greater than 103
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transaction
n
  1. the act of transacting within or between groups (as carrying on commercial activities); "no transactions are possible without him"; "he has always been honest is his dealings with me"
    Synonym(s): transaction, dealing, dealings
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transaction file
n
  1. (computer science) a computer file containing relatively transient data about a particular data processing task
    Synonym(s): transaction file, detail file
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transactional immunity
n
  1. a broader form of use immunity that also protects the witness from any prosecution brought about relating to transactions to which they gave testimony
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transactions
n
  1. a written account of what transpired at a meeting [syn: minutes, proceedings, transactions]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transactor
n
  1. someone who conducts or carries on business or negotiations
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transalpine
adj
  1. on or relating to or characteristic of the region or peoples beyond the Alps from Italy (or north of the Alps); "ancient transalpine Gaul was an area northwest of the Alps and included modern France and Belgium"; "Cracow was a transalpine university"
    Synonym(s): transalpine, ultramontane
n
  1. one living on or coming from the other side of the Alps from Italy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transaminase
n
  1. a class of transferases that catalyze transamination (that transfer an amino group from an amino acid to another compound)
    Synonym(s): transaminase, aminotransferase, aminopherase
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transaminate
v
  1. change (an amino group) by transferring it from one compound to another
  2. undergo transfer from one compound to another; "amino groups can transaminate"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transamination
n
  1. the process of transposing an amino group within a chemical compound
  2. the process of transfering an amino group from one compound to another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transatlantic
adj
  1. crossing the Atlantic Ocean; "transatlantic flight"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transcaucasia
n
  1. a geographical region to the south of the Caucasus Mountains and to the north of Turkey that comprises Georgia and Armenia and Azerbaijan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcend
v
  1. be greater in scope or size than some standard; "Their loyalty exceeds their national bonds"
    Synonym(s): exceed, transcend, surpass
  2. be superior or better than some standard; "She exceeded our expectations"; "She topped her performance of last year"
    Synonym(s): exceed, transcend, overstep, pass, go past, top
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendence
n
  1. a state of being or existence above and beyond the limits of material experience
    Synonym(s): transcendence, transcendency
  2. the state of excelling or surpassing or going beyond usual limits
    Synonym(s): transcendence, transcendency, superiority
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendency
n
  1. a state of being or existence above and beyond the limits of material experience
    Synonym(s): transcendence, transcendency
  2. the state of excelling or surpassing or going beyond usual limits
    Synonym(s): transcendence, transcendency, superiority
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendent
adj
  1. exceeding or surpassing usual limits especially in excellence
    Synonym(s): transcendent, surpassing
  2. beyond and outside the ordinary range of human experience or understanding; "the notion of any transcendent reality beyond thought"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendental
adj
  1. existing outside of or not in accordance with nature; "find transcendental motives for sublunary action"-Aldous Huxley
    Synonym(s): nonnatural, otherworldly, preternatural, transcendental
  2. of or characteristic of a system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendental number
n
  1. an irrational number that is not algebraic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendental philosophy
n
  1. any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
    Synonym(s): transcendentalism, transcendental philosophy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendentalism
n
  1. any system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual above the empirical and material
    Synonym(s): transcendentalism, transcendental philosophy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendentalist
n
  1. advocate of transcendentalism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcendentally
adv
  1. in a transcendental way or to a transcendental extent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcontinental
adj
  1. spanning or crossing or on the farther side of a continent; "transcontinental railway"; "transcontinental travelers"; "a transcontinental city"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcortical aphasia
n
  1. a general term for aphasia that results from lesions outside of Broca's area or Wernicke's area of the cerebral cortex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcribe
v
  1. write out from speech, notes, etc.; "Transcribe the oral history of this tribe"
  2. rewrite in a different script; "The Sanskrit text had to be transliterated"
    Synonym(s): transliterate, transcribe
  3. rewrite or arrange a piece of music for an instrument or medium other than that originally intended
  4. make a phonetic transcription of; "The anthropologist transcribed the sentences of the native informant"
  5. convert the genetic information in (a strand of DNA) into a strand of RNA, especially messenger RNA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcribed
adj
  1. recorded for broadcast; "a transcribed announcement"; "canned laughter"
    Synonym(s): canned, transcribed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcriber
n
  1. a person who translates written messages from one language to another
    Synonym(s): translator, transcriber
  2. someone who rewrites in a different script
  3. someone who represents the sounds of speech in phonetic notation
  4. someone who makes a written version of spoken material
  5. a musician who adapts a composition for particular voices or instruments or for another style of performance
    Synonym(s): arranger, adapter, transcriber
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcript
n
  1. something that has been transcribed; a written record (usually typewritten) of dictated or recorded speech; "he read a transcript of the interrogation"; "you can obtain a transcript of this radio program by sending a self- addressed envelope to the station"
  2. a reproduction of a written record (e.g. of a legal or school record)
    Synonym(s): transcript, copy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcriptase
n
  1. the enzyme that copies DNA into RNA [syn: transcriptase, RNA polymerase]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcription
n
  1. something written, especially copied from one medium to another, as a typewritten version of dictation
    Synonym(s): transcription, written text
  2. (genetics) the organic process whereby the DNA sequence in a gene is copied into mRNA; the process whereby a base sequence of messenger RNA is synthesized on a template of complementary DNA
  3. a sound or television recording (e.g., from a broadcast to a tape recording)
  4. the act of arranging and adapting a piece of music
    Synonym(s): arrangement, arranging, transcription
  5. the act of making a record (especially an audio record); "she watched the recording from a sound-proof booth"
    Synonym(s): recording, transcription
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcultural
adj
  1. extending through all human cultures; "a transcultural ideal of freedom embracing all the peoples of the world"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transcutaneous
adj
  1. through the unbroken skin; refers to medications applied directly to the skin (creams or ointments) or in time- release forms (skin patches); "transdermal estrogen"; "percutaneous absorption"
    Synonym(s): transdermal, transdermic, percutaneous, transcutaneous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transdermal
adj
  1. through the unbroken skin; refers to medications applied directly to the skin (creams or ointments) or in time- release forms (skin patches); "transdermal estrogen"; "percutaneous absorption"
    Synonym(s): transdermal, transdermic, percutaneous, transcutaneous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transdermal patch
n
  1. a medicated adhesive pad placed on the skin for absorption of a time released dose of medication into the bloodstream
    Synonym(s): transdermal patch, skin patch
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transdermic
adj
  1. through the unbroken skin; refers to medications applied directly to the skin (creams or ointments) or in time- release forms (skin patches); "transdermal estrogen"; "percutaneous absorption"
    Synonym(s): transdermal, transdermic, percutaneous, transcutaneous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transduce
v
  1. cause transduction (of energy forms)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transducer
n
  1. an electrical device that converts one form of energy into another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transducing vector
n
  1. a vector for delivering genes into cells [syn: {transducing vector}, gene delivery vector]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transduction
n
  1. (genetics) the process of transfering genetic material from one cell to another by a plasmid or bacteriophage
  2. the process whereby a transducer accepts energy in one form and gives back related energy in a different form; "the transduction of acoustic waves into voltages by a microphone"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transect
v
  1. cut across or divide transversely; "the trails transect the property"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transept
n
  1. structure forming the transverse part of a cruciform church; crosses the nave at right angles
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transeunt
adj
  1. of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind [syn: transeunt, transient]
    Antonym(s): immanent, subjective
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transexual
n
  1. a person who has undergone a sex change operation [syn: transsexual, transexual]
  2. a person whose sexual identification is entirely with the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transsexual, transexual
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer
n
  1. the act of moving something from one location to another
    Synonym(s): transportation, transport, transfer, transferral, conveyance
  2. someone who transfers or is transferred from one position to another; "the best student was a transfer from LSU"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transferee
  3. the act of transfering something from one form to another; "the transfer of the music from record to tape suppressed much of the background noise"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transference
  4. a ticket that allows a passenger to change conveyances
  5. application of a skill learned in one situation to a different but similar situation
    Synonym(s): transfer, transfer of training, carry-over
  6. transferring ownership
    Synonym(s): transfer, transference
v
  1. transfer somebody to a different position or location of work
    Synonym(s): transfer, reassign
  2. move from one place to another; "transfer the data"; "transmit the news"; "transfer the patient to another hospital"
  3. lift and reset in another soil or situation; "Transplant the young rice plants"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transfer
  4. move around; "transfer the packet from his trouser pockets to a pocket in his jacket"
    Synonym(s): transfer, shift
  5. cause to change ownership; "I transferred my stock holdings to my children"
  6. change from one vehicle or transportation line to another; "She changed in Chicago on her way to the East coast"
    Synonym(s): transfer, change
  7. send from one person or place to another; "transmit a message"
    Synonym(s): transmit, transfer, transport, channel, channelize, channelise
  8. shift the position or location of, as for business, legal, educational, or military purposes; "He removed his children to the countryside"; "Remove the troops to the forest surrounding the city"; "remove a case to another court"
    Synonym(s): remove, transfer
  9. transfer from one place or period to another; "The ancient Greek story was transplanted into Modern America"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transpose, transplant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer agent
n
  1. an agency (usually a bank) that is appointed by a corporation to keep records of its stock and bond owners and to resolve problems about certificates
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer of training
n
  1. application of a skill learned in one situation to a different but similar situation
    Synonym(s): transfer, transfer of training, carry-over
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer paper
n
  1. a paper that is coated with a preparation for transferring a design to another surface
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer payment
n
  1. a public expenditure (as for unemployment compensation or veteran's benefits) that is not for goods and services
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer RNA
n
  1. RNA molecules present in the cell (in at least 20 varieties, each variety capable of combining with a specific amino acid) that attach the correct amino acid to the protein chain that is being synthesized at the ribosome of the cell (according to directions coded in the mRNA)
    Synonym(s): transfer RNA, tRNA, acceptor RNA, soluble RNA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfer tax
n
  1. any tax levied on the passing of title to property
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferability
n
  1. the quality of being transferable or exchangeable; "sterling transferability affords a means of multilateral settlement for....trade between nondollar countries"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferable
adj
  1. capable of being moved or conveyed from one place to another
    Synonym(s): movable, moveable, transferable, transferrable, transportable
  2. legally transferable to the ownership of another; "negotiable bonds"
    Synonym(s): assignable, conveyable, negotiable, transferable, transferrable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferase
n
  1. any of various enzymes that move a chemical group from one compound to another compound
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferee
n
  1. (law) someone to whom a title or property is conveyed
  2. someone who transfers or is transferred from one position to another; "the best student was a transfer from LSU"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transferee
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transference
n
  1. (psychoanalysis) the process whereby emotions are passed on or displaced from one person to another; during psychoanalysis the displacement of feelings toward others (usually the parents) is onto the analyst
  2. transferring ownership
    Synonym(s): transfer, transference
  3. the act of transfering something from one form to another; "the transfer of the music from record to tape suppressed much of the background noise"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transference
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferer
n
  1. someone who transfers something [syn: transferer, transferrer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferor
n
  1. (law) someone who conveys a title or property to another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferrable
adj
  1. capable of being moved or conveyed from one place to another
    Synonym(s): movable, moveable, transferable, transferrable, transportable
  2. legally transferable to the ownership of another; "negotiable bonds"
    Synonym(s): assignable, conveyable, negotiable, transferable, transferrable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferral
n
  1. the act of moving something from one location to another
    Synonym(s): transportation, transport, transfer, transferral, conveyance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferred possession
n
  1. a possession whose ownership changes or lapses [syn: transferred property, transferred possession]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferred property
n
  1. a possession whose ownership changes or lapses [syn: transferred property, transferred possession]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferrer
n
  1. someone who transfers something [syn: transferer, transferrer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transferrin
n
  1. a globulin in blood plasma that carries iron [syn: transferrin, beta globulin, siderophilin]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transfiguration
n
  1. (Christianity) a church festival held in commemoration of the Transfiguration of Jesus
    Synonym(s): Transfiguration, Transfiguration Day, August 6
  2. (New Testament) the sudden emanation of radiance from the person of Jesus
    Synonym(s): Transfiguration, Transfiguration of Jesus
  3. a striking change in appearance or character or circumstances; "the metamorphosis of the old house into something new and exciting"
    Synonym(s): transfiguration, metamorphosis
  4. the act of transforming so as to exalt or glorify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transfiguration Day
n
  1. (Christianity) a church festival held in commemoration of the Transfiguration of Jesus
    Synonym(s): Transfiguration, Transfiguration Day, August 6
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transfiguration of Jesus
n
  1. (New Testament) the sudden emanation of radiance from the person of Jesus
    Synonym(s): Transfiguration, Transfiguration of Jesus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfigure
v
  1. elevate or idealize, in allusion to Christ's transfiguration
    Synonym(s): transfigure, glorify, spiritualize
  2. change completely the nature or appearance of; "In Kafka's story, a person metamorphoses into a bug"; "The treatment and diet transfigured her into a beautiful young woman"; "Jesus was transfigured after his resurrection"
    Synonym(s): metamorphose, transfigure, transmogrify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfix
v
  1. to render motionless, as with a fixed stare or by arousing terror or awe; "The snake charmer fascinates the cobra"
    Synonym(s): fascinate, transfix, grip, spellbind
  2. pierce with a sharp stake or point; "impale a shrimp on a skewer"
    Synonym(s): transfix, impale, empale, spike
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfixed
adj
  1. having your attention fixated as though by a spell [syn: fascinated, hypnotized, hypnotised, mesmerized, mesmerised, spellbound, spell-bound, transfixed]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transform
v
  1. subject to a mathematical transformation
  2. change or alter in form, appearance, or nature; "This experience transformed her completely"; "She transformed the clay into a beautiful sculpture"; "transubstantiate one element into another"
    Synonym(s): transform, transmute, transubstantiate
  3. change in outward structure or looks; "He transformed into a monster"; "The salesman metamorphosed into an ugly beetle"
    Synonym(s): transform, transmute, metamorphose
  4. change from one form or medium into another; "Braque translated collage into oil"
    Synonym(s): translate, transform
  5. convert (one form of energy) to another; "transform energy to light"
  6. change (a bacterial cell) into a genetically distinct cell by the introduction of DNA from another cell of the same or closely related species
  7. increase or decrease (an alternating current or voltage)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transformable
adj
  1. capable of being changed in substance as if by alchemy; "is lead really transmutable into gold?"; "ideas translatable into reality"
    Synonym(s): convertible, transformable, translatable, transmutable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transformation
n
  1. a qualitative change [syn: transformation, transmutation, shift]
  2. (mathematics) a function that changes the position or direction of the axes of a coordinate system
  3. a rule describing the conversion of one syntactic structure into another related syntactic structure
  4. (genetics) modification of a cell or bacterium by the uptake and incorporation of exogenous DNA
  5. the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"
    Synonym(s): transformation, translation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transformed
adj
  1. given a completely different form or appearance; "shocked to see the transformed landscape"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transformer
n
  1. an electrical device by which alternating current of one voltage is changed to another voltage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transforming gene
n
  1. a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cells
    Synonym(s): oncogene, transforming gene
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfuse
v
  1. impart gradually; "Her presence instilled faith into the children"; "transfuse love of music into the students"
    Synonym(s): instill, transfuse
  2. pour out of one vessel into another
  3. treat by applying evacuated cups to the patient's skin
    Synonym(s): cup, transfuse
  4. give a transfusion (e.g., of blood) to
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfusion
n
  1. the introduction of blood or blood plasma into a vein or artery
    Synonym(s): transfusion, blood transfusion
  2. the action of pouring a liquid from one vessel to another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transfusion reaction
n
  1. reaction of the body to a transfusion of blood that is not compatible with its own blood; an adverse reaction can range from fever and hives to renal failure and shock and death
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgender
adj
  1. involving a partial or full reversal of gender [syn: transgender, transgendered]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgendered
adj
  1. involving a partial or full reversal of gender [syn: transgender, transgendered]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgene
n
  1. an exogenous gene introduced into the genome of another organism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgress
v
  1. act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promises; "offend all laws of humanity"; "violate the basic laws or human civilization"; "break a law"; "break a promise"
    Synonym(s): transgress, offend, infract, violate, go against, breach, break
    Antonym(s): keep, observe
  2. spread over land, especially along a subsiding shoreline; "The sea transgresses along the West coast of the island"
  3. commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law
    Synonym(s): sin, transgress, trespass
  4. pass beyond (limits or boundaries)
    Synonym(s): transgress, trespass, overstep
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgression
n
  1. the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
    Synonym(s): transgression, evildoing
  2. the spreading of the sea over land as evidenced by the deposition of marine strata over terrestrial strata
  3. the action of going beyond or overstepping some boundary or limit
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transgressor
n
  1. someone who transgresses; someone who violates a law or command; "the way of transgressors is hard"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transience
n
  1. an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
    Synonym(s): transience, transiency, transitoriness
  2. the attribute of being brief or fleeting
    Synonym(s): brevity, briefness, transience
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transiency
n
  1. an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
    Synonym(s): transience, transiency, transitoriness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transient
adj
  1. of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind [syn: transeunt, transient]
    Antonym(s): immanent, subjective
  2. lasting a very short time; "the ephemeral joys of childhood"; "a passing fancy"; "youth's transient beauty"; "love is transitory but it is eternal"; "fugacious blossoms"
    Synonym(s): ephemeral, passing, short-lived, transient, transitory, fugacious
n
  1. one who stays for only a short time; "transient laborers"
  2. (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or load
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transient global amnesia
n
  1. memory disorder seen in middle aged and elderly persons; characterized by an episode of amnesia and bewilderment that lasts for several hours; person is otherwise alert and intellectually active
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transient ischemic attack
n
  1. brief episode in which the brain gets insufficient blood supply; symptoms depend on the site of the blockage
    Synonym(s): transient ischemic attack, TIA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transiently
adv
  1. for a very short time; "these three pions may actually be joined together transiently as a compound particle during the interchange process"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transistor
n
  1. a semiconductor device capable of amplification [syn: transistor, junction transistor, electronic transistor]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transistorise
v
  1. equip (an electronic circuit or device) with transistors
    Synonym(s): transistorize, transistorise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transistorised
adj
  1. (of an electronic device) equipped with transistors [syn: transistorized, transistorised]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transistorize
v
  1. equip (an electronic circuit or device) with transistors
    Synonym(s): transistorize, transistorise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transistorized
adj
  1. (of an electronic device) equipped with transistors [syn: transistorized, transistorised]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transit
n
  1. a surveying instrument for measuring horizontal and vertical angles, consisting of a small telescope mounted on a tripod
    Synonym(s): theodolite, transit
  2. a facility consisting of the means and equipment necessary for the movement of passengers or goods
    Synonym(s): transportation system, transportation, transit
  3. a journey usually by ship; "the outward passage took 10 days"
    Synonym(s): passage, transit
v
  1. make a passage or journey from one place to another; "The tourists moved through the town and bought up all the souvenirs;" "Some travelers pass through the desert"
    Synonym(s): transit, pass through, move through, pass across, pass over
  2. pass across (a sign or house of the zodiac) or pass across (the disk of a celestial body or the meridian of a place); "The comet will transit on September 11"
  3. revolve (the telescope of a surveying transit) about its horizontal transverse axis in order to reverse its direction
  4. cause or enable to pass through; "The canal will transit hundreds of ships every day"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transit declinometer
n
  1. an instrument for measuring magnetic declination [syn: declinometer, transit declinometer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transit instrument
n
  1. a telescope mounted on an axis running east and west and used to time the transit of a celestial body across the meridian
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transit line
n
  1. a line providing public transit
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transit zone
n
  1. a six million square mile area that includes the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern Pacific Ocean; includes the principal routes used by drug smugglers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transition
n
  1. the act of passing from one state or place to the next
    Synonym(s): passage, transition
  2. an event that results in a transformation
    Synonym(s): conversion, transition, changeover
  3. a change from one place or state or subject or stage to another
  4. a musical passage moving from one key to another
    Synonym(s): transition, modulation
  5. a passage that connects a topic to one that follows
v
  1. cause to convert or undergo a transition; "the company had to transition the old practices to modern technology"
  2. make or undergo a transition (from one state or system to another); "The airline transitioned to more fuel-efficient jets"; "The adagio transitioned into an allegro"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitional
adj
  1. of or relating to or characterized by transition; "adolescence is a transitional stage between childhood and adulthood"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitionally
adv
  1. as a transitional step or in a transitional manner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitive
adj
  1. designating a verb that requires a direct object to complete the meaning
    Antonym(s): intransitive
n
  1. a verb (or verb construction) that requires an object in order to be grammatical
    Synonym(s): transitive verb, transitive verb form, transitive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitive verb
n
  1. a verb (or verb construction) that requires an object in order to be grammatical
    Synonym(s): transitive verb, transitive verb form, transitive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitive verb form
n
  1. a verb (or verb construction) that requires an object in order to be grammatical
    Synonym(s): transitive verb, transitive verb form, transitive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitively
adv
  1. in a transitive manner; "you can use the verb `eat' transitively or intransitively"
    Antonym(s): intransitively
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitiveness
n
  1. the grammatical relation created by a transitive verb [syn: transitivity, transitiveness]
    Antonym(s): intransitiveness, intransitivity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitivise
v
  1. make transitive; "adding `out' to many verbs transitivizes them"
    Synonym(s): transitivize, transitivise
    Antonym(s): detransitivise, detransitivize, intransitivise, intransitivize
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitivity
n
  1. (logic and mathematics) a relation between three elements such that if it holds between the first and second and it also holds between the second and third it must necessarily hold between the first and third
  2. the grammatical relation created by a transitive verb
    Synonym(s): transitivity, transitiveness
    Antonym(s): intransitiveness, intransitivity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitivize
v
  1. make transitive; "adding `out' to many verbs transitivizes them"
    Synonym(s): transitivize, transitivise
    Antonym(s): detransitivise, detransitivize, intransitivise, intransitivize
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitorily
adv
  1. for a very brief time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitoriness
n
  1. an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
    Synonym(s): transience, transiency, transitoriness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transitory
adj
  1. lasting a very short time; "the ephemeral joys of childhood"; "a passing fancy"; "youth's transient beauty"; "love is transitory but it is eternal"; "fugacious blossoms"
    Synonym(s): ephemeral, passing, short-lived, transient, transitory, fugacious
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translatable
adj
  1. capable of being put into another form or style or language; "substances readily translatable to the American home table"; "his books are eminently translatable"
    Antonym(s): untranslatable
  2. capable of being changed in substance as if by alchemy; "is lead really transmutable into gold?"; "ideas translatable into reality"
    Synonym(s): convertible, transformable, translatable, transmutable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translate
v
  1. restate (words) from one language into another language; "I have to translate when my in-laws from Austria visit the U.S."; "Can you interpret the speech of the visiting dignitaries?"; "She rendered the French poem into English"; "He translates for the U.N."
    Synonym(s): translate, interpret, render
  2. change from one form or medium into another; "Braque translated collage into oil"
    Synonym(s): translate, transform
  3. make sense of a language; "She understands French"; "Can you read Greek?"
    Synonym(s): understand, read, interpret, translate
  4. bring to a certain spiritual state
  5. change the position of (figures or bodies) in space without rotation
  6. be equivalent in effect; "the growth in income translates into greater purchasing power"
  7. be translatable, or be translatable in a certain way; "poetry often does not translate"; "Tolstoy's novels translate well into English"
  8. subject to movement in which every part of the body moves parallel to and the same distance as every other point on the body
  9. express, as in simple and less technical language; "Can you translate the instructions in this manual for a layman?"; "Is there a need to translate the psychiatrist's remarks?"
  10. determine the amino-acid sequence of a protein during its synthesis by using information on the messenger RNA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translating program
n
  1. a program that translates one programming language into another
    Synonym(s): translator, translating program
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translation
n
  1. a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
    Synonym(s): translation, interlingual rendition, rendering, version
  2. a uniform movement without rotation
  3. the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"
    Synonym(s): transformation, translation
  4. (mathematics) a transformation in which the origin of the coordinate system is moved to another position but the direction of each axis remains the same
  5. (genetics) the process whereby genetic information coded in messenger RNA directs the formation of a specific protein at a ribosome in the cytoplasm
  6. rewording something in less technical terminology
  7. the act of uniform movement
    Synonym(s): translation, displacement
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translational
adj
  1. of or relating to uniform movement without rotation [ant: nontranslational]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translator
n
  1. a person who translates written messages from one language to another
    Synonym(s): translator, transcriber
  2. someone who mediates between speakers of different languages
    Synonym(s): interpreter, translator
  3. a program that translates one programming language into another
    Synonym(s): translator, translating program
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transliterate
v
  1. rewrite in a different script; "The Sanskrit text had to be transliterated"
    Synonym(s): transliterate, transcribe
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transliteration
n
  1. a transcription from one alphabet to another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translocate
v
  1. transfer (a chromosomal segment) to a new position
  2. move from one place to another, especially of wild animals; "The endangered turtles were translocated to a safe environment"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translocation
n
  1. the transport of dissolved material within a plant
  2. (genetics) an exchange of chromosome parts; "translocations can result in serious congenital disorders"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translucence
n
  1. the quality of allowing light to pass diffusely [syn: translucence, translucency, semitransparency]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translucency
n
  1. the quality of allowing light to pass diffusely [syn: translucence, translucency, semitransparency]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translucent
adj
  1. allowing light to pass through diffusely; "translucent amber"; "semitransparent curtains at the windows"
    Synonym(s): translucent, semitransparent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translucent substance
n
  1. a material having the property of admitting light diffusely; a partly transparent material
    Synonym(s): transparent substance, translucent substance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translunar
adj
  1. situated beyond the moon or its orbit around the earth; "who can imagine a translunary visitor in Times Square?"
    Synonym(s): translunar, translunary, superlunar, superlunary
  2. unworldly or ethereal; "high translunary dreams"
    Synonym(s): translunar, translunary, superlunar, superlunary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
translunary
adj
  1. situated beyond the moon or its orbit around the earth; "who can imagine a translunary visitor in Times Square?"
    Synonym(s): translunar, translunary, superlunar, superlunary
  2. unworldly or ethereal; "high translunary dreams"
    Synonym(s): translunar, translunary, superlunar, superlunary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmigrante
n
  1. a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmigrate
v
  1. be born anew in another body after death; "Hindus believe that we transmigrate"
    Synonym(s): reincarnate, transmigrate
  2. move from one country or region to another and settle there; "Many Germans migrated to South America in the mid-19th century"; "This tribe transmigrated many times over the centuries"
    Synonym(s): migrate, transmigrate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmigration
n
  1. the passing of a soul into another body after death
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmissible
adj
  1. (of disease) capable of being transmitted by infection
    Synonym(s): catching, communicable, contagious, contractable, transmissible, transmittable
  2. occurring among members of a family usually by heredity; "an inherited disease"; "familial traits"; "genetically transmitted features"
    Synonym(s): familial, genetic, hereditary, inherited, transmitted, transmissible
  3. inherited or inheritable by established rules (usually legal rules) of descent; "ancestral home"; "ancestral lore"; "hereditary monarchy"; "patrimonial estate"; "transmissible tradition"
    Synonym(s): ancestral, hereditary, patrimonial, transmissible
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission
n
  1. the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
    Synonym(s): transmission, transmittal, transmitting
  2. communication by means of transmitted signals
  3. the fraction of radiant energy that passes through a substance
    Synonym(s): transmittance, transmission
  4. an incident in which an infectious disease is transmitted
    Synonym(s): infection, contagion, transmission
  5. the gears that transmit power from an automobile engine via the driveshaft to the live axle
    Synonym(s): transmission, transmission system
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission channel
n
  1. a path over which electrical signals can pass; "a channel is typically what you rent from a telephone company"
    Synonym(s): channel, transmission channel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission control protocol
n
  1. a protocol developed for the internet to get data from one network device to another; "TCP uses a retransmission strategy to insure that data will not be lost in transmission"
    Synonym(s): transmission control protocol, TCP
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission control protocol/internet protocol
n
  1. a set of protocols (including TCP) developed for the internet in the 1970s to get data from one network device to another
    Synonym(s): transmission control protocol/internet protocol, TCP/IP
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission density
n
  1. (physics) a measure of the extent to which a substance transmits light or other electromagnetic radiation
    Synonym(s): optical density, transmission density, photographic density, absorbance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission line
n
  1. a conductor for transmitting electrical or optical signals or electric power
    Synonym(s): cable, line, transmission line
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission mechanism
n
  1. any mechanism whereby an infectious agent is spread from a reservoir to a human being
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission shaft
n
  1. rotating shaft that transmits rotary motion from the engine to the differential
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission system
n
  1. the gears that transmit power from an automobile engine via the driveshaft to the live axle
    Synonym(s): transmission, transmission system
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmission time
n
  1. the coordinated universal time when a transmission is sent from Earth to a spacecraft or other celestial body
    Synonym(s): transmission time, TRM
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmit
v
  1. transfer to another; "communicate a disease" [syn: convey, transmit, communicate]
  2. transmit or serve as the medium for transmission; "Sound carries well over water"; "The airwaves carry the sound"; "Many metals conduct heat"
    Synonym(s): impart, conduct, transmit, convey, carry, channel
  3. broadcast over the airwaves, as in radio or television; "We cannot air this X-rated song"
    Synonym(s): air, send, broadcast, beam, transmit
  4. send from one person or place to another; "transmit a message"
    Synonym(s): transmit, transfer, transport, channel, channelize, channelise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmittable
adj
  1. (of disease) capable of being transmitted by infection
    Synonym(s): catching, communicable, contagious, contractable, transmissible, transmittable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmittal
n
  1. the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
    Synonym(s): transmission, transmittal, transmitting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmittance
n
  1. the fraction of radiant energy that passes through a substance
    Synonym(s): transmittance, transmission
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmitted
adj
  1. occurring among members of a family usually by heredity; "an inherited disease"; "familial traits"; "genetically transmitted features"
    Synonym(s): familial, genetic, hereditary, inherited, transmitted, transmissible
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmitter
n
  1. someone who transmits a message; "return to sender" [syn: sender, transmitter]
  2. any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
    Synonym(s): vector, transmitter
  3. set used to broadcast radio or tv signals
    Synonym(s): transmitter, sender
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmitting
n
  1. the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
    Synonym(s): transmission, transmittal, transmitting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmitting aerial
n
  1. an electrical device that sends or receives radio or television signals
    Synonym(s): antenna, aerial, transmitting aerial
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmogrification
n
  1. the act of changing into a different form or appearance (especially a fantastic or grotesque one); "the transmogrification of the prince into a porcupine"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmogrify
v
  1. change completely the nature or appearance of; "In Kafka's story, a person metamorphoses into a bug"; "The treatment and diet transfigured her into a beautiful young woman"; "Jesus was transfigured after his resurrection"
    Synonym(s): metamorphose, transfigure, transmogrify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmontane
adj
  1. on or coming from the other side of the mountains (from the speaker); "the transmontane section of the state"; "tramontane winds"
    Synonym(s): tramontane, transmontane
    Antonym(s): cismontane
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmundane
adj
  1. existing or extending beyond the physical world; "whatever of transmundane...insight...we may carry"- William James
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmutability
n
  1. the quality of being commutable [syn: commutability, transmutability]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmutable
adj
  1. capable of being changed in substance as if by alchemy; "is lead really transmutable into gold?"; "ideas translatable into reality"
    Synonym(s): convertible, transformable, translatable, transmutable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmutation
n
  1. an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
    Synonym(s): transmutation, transubstantiation
  2. a qualitative change
    Synonym(s): transformation, transmutation, shift
  3. (physics) the change of one chemical element into another (as by nuclear decay or radioactive bombardment); "the transmutation of base metals into gold proved to be impossible"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transmute
v
  1. change in outward structure or looks; "He transformed into a monster"; "The salesman metamorphosed into an ugly beetle"
    Synonym(s): transform, transmute, metamorphose
  2. change or alter in form, appearance, or nature; "This experience transformed her completely"; "She transformed the clay into a beautiful sculpture"; "transubstantiate one element into another"
    Synonym(s): transform, transmute, transubstantiate
  3. alter the nature of (elements)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transnational
adj
  1. involving or operating in several nations or nationalities; "multinational corporations"; "transnational terrorist networks"
    Synonym(s): multinational, transnational
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transoceanic
adj
  1. on or from the other side of an ocean; "transoceanic crossing"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transom
n
  1. a window above a door that is usually hinged to a horizontal crosspiece over the door
    Synonym(s): transom, transom window, fanlight
  2. a horizontal crosspiece across a window or separating a door from a window over it
    Synonym(s): transom, traverse
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transom window
n
  1. a window above a door that is usually hinged to a horizontal crosspiece over the door
    Synonym(s): transom, transom window, fanlight
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transonic
adj
  1. (of speed) having or caused by speed approximately equal to that of sound in air at sea level; "a sonic boom"
    Synonym(s): sonic, transonic
    Antonym(s): subsonic, supersonic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transorbital lobotomy
n
  1. a method of performing prefrontal lobotomy in which the surgical knife is inserted above the eyeball and moved to cut brain fibers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparence
n
  1. permitting the free passage of electromagnetic radiation
    Synonym(s): transparency, transparence
    Antonym(s): opacity
  2. the quality of being clear and transparent
    Synonym(s): transparency, transparence, transparentness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparency
n
  1. permitting the free passage of electromagnetic radiation
    Synonym(s): transparency, transparence
    Antonym(s): opacity
  2. the quality of being clear and transparent
    Synonym(s): transparency, transparence, transparentness
  3. picture consisting of a positive photograph or drawing on a transparent base; viewed with a projector
    Synonym(s): foil, transparency
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparent
adj
  1. transmitting light; able to be seen through with clarity; "the cold crystalline water of melted snow"; "crystal clear skies"; "could see the sand on the bottom of the limpid pool"; "lucid air"; "a pellucid brook"; "transparent crystal"
    Synonym(s): crystalline, crystal clear, limpid, lucid, pellucid, transparent
  2. so thin as to transmit light; "a hat with a diaphanous veil"; "filmy wings of a moth"; "gauzy clouds of dandelion down"; "gossamer cobwebs"; "sheer silk stockings"; "transparent chiffon"; "vaporous silks"
    Synonym(s): diaphanous, filmy, gauzy, gauze-like, gossamer, see-through, sheer, transparent, vaporous, vapourous, cobwebby
  3. free of deceit
    Synonym(s): guileless, transparent
  4. easily understood or seen through (because of a lack of subtlety); "a transparent explanation"; "a transparent lie"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparent gem
n
  1. a gemstone having the property of transmitting light without serious diffusion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparent quartz
n
  1. a clear quartz used in making electronic and optical equipment
    Synonym(s): rock crystal, transparent quartz
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparent substance
n
  1. a material having the property of admitting light diffusely; a partly transparent material
    Synonym(s): transparent substance, translucent substance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparently
adv
  1. so as to be easily understood or seen through; "his transparently lucid prose"; "his transparently deceitful behavior"
  2. so as to allow the passage of light; "the red brilliance of the claret shines transparently in our glasses"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transparentness
n
  1. the quality of being clear and transparent [syn: transparency, transparence, transparentness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpirate
v
  1. pass through the tissue or substance or its pores or interstices, as of gas
    Synonym(s): transpire, transpirate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpiration
n
  1. the passage of gases through fine tubes because of differences in pressure or temperature
  2. the process of giving off or exhaling water vapor through the skin or mucous membranes
  3. the emission of water vapor from the leaves of plants
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpire
v
  1. pass through the tissue or substance or its pores or interstices, as of gas
    Synonym(s): transpire, transpirate
  2. exude water vapor; "plants transpire"
  3. come to light; become known; "It transpired that she had worked as spy in East Germany"
  4. come about, happen, or occur; "Several important events transpired last week"
  5. give off (water) through the skin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpiring
adj
  1. that is passing through; "transpiring gas"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplacental
adj
  1. occurring through or by way of the placenta; "transplacental passage of nutrients"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplant
n
  1. (surgery) tissue or organ transplanted from a donor to a recipient; in some cases the patient can be both donor and recipient
    Synonym(s): graft, transplant
  2. an operation moving an organ from one organism (the donor) to another (the recipient); "he had a kidney transplant"; "the long-term results of cardiac transplantation are now excellent"; "a child had a multiple organ transplant two months ago"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transplantation, organ transplant
  3. the act of removing something from one location and introducing it in another location; "the transplant did not flower until the second year"; "too frequent transplanting is not good for families"; "she returned to Alabama because she could not bear transplantation"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transplantation, transplanting
v
  1. lift and reset in another soil or situation; "Transplant the young rice plants"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transfer
  2. be transplantable; "These delicate plants do not transplant easily"
  3. place the organ of a donor into the body of a recipient
    Synonym(s): transplant, graft
  4. transfer from one place or period to another; "The ancient Greek story was transplanted into Modern America"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transpose, transplant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplantable
adj
  1. capable of being transplanted
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplantation
n
  1. an operation moving an organ from one organism (the donor) to another (the recipient); "he had a kidney transplant"; "the long-term results of cardiac transplantation are now excellent"; "a child had a multiple organ transplant two months ago"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transplantation, organ transplant
  2. the act of removing something from one location and introducing it in another location; "the transplant did not flower until the second year"; "too frequent transplanting is not good for families"; "she returned to Alabama because she could not bear transplantation"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transplantation, transplanting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplanter
n
  1. a gardener who moves plants to new locations
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transplanting
n
  1. the act of removing something from one location and introducing it in another location; "the transplant did not flower until the second year"; "too frequent transplanting is not good for families"; "she returned to Alabama because she could not bear transplantation"
    Synonym(s): transplant, transplantation, transplanting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpolar
adj
  1. extending across or crossing either pole; "transpolar air routes"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transponder
n
  1. electrical device designed to receive a specific signal and automatically transmit a specific reply
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transport
n
  1. something that serves as a means of transportation [syn: conveyance, transport]
  2. an exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes
  3. the commercial enterprise of moving goods and materials
    Synonym(s): transportation, shipping, transport
  4. a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion; "listening to sweet music in a perfect rapture"- Charles Dickens
    Synonym(s): ecstasy, rapture, transport, exaltation, raptus
  5. a mechanism that transports magnetic tape across the read/write heads of a tape playback/recorder
    Synonym(s): tape drive, tape transport, transport
  6. the act of moving something from one location to another
    Synonym(s): transportation, transport, transfer, transferral, conveyance
v
  1. move something or somebody around; usually over long distances
  2. move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"
    Synonym(s): transport, carry
  3. hold spellbound
    Synonym(s): enchant, enrapture, transport, enthrall, ravish, enthral, delight
    Antonym(s): disenchant, disillusion
  4. transport commercially
    Synonym(s): transport, send, ship
  5. send from one person or place to another; "transmit a message"
    Synonym(s): transmit, transfer, transport, channel, channelize, channelise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transport ship
n
  1. a ship for carrying soldiers or military equipment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transportable
adj
  1. capable of being moved or conveyed from one place to another
    Synonym(s): movable, moveable, transferable, transferrable, transportable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transportation
n
  1. a facility consisting of the means and equipment necessary for the movement of passengers or goods
    Synonym(s): transportation system, transportation, transit
  2. the act of moving something from one location to another
    Synonym(s): transportation, transport, transfer, transferral, conveyance
  3. the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance
    Synonym(s): fare, transportation
  4. the United States federal department that institutes and coordinates national transportation programs; created in 1966
    Synonym(s): Department of Transportation, Transportation, DoT
  5. the commercial enterprise of moving goods and materials
    Synonym(s): transportation, shipping, transport
  6. the act of expelling a person from their native land; "men in exile dream of hope"; "his deportation to a penal colony"; "the expatriation of wealthy farmers"; "the sentence was one of transportation for life"
    Synonym(s): exile, deportation, expatriation, transportation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transportation company
n
  1. a company providing transportation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transportation Secretary
n
  1. the person who holds the secretaryship of the Department of Transportation; "Johnson appointed Alan S. Boyd as the first Transportation Secretary"
    Synonym(s): Secretary of Transportation, Transportation Secretary
  2. the position of the head of the Department of Transportation; "the post of Transportation Secretary was created in 1966"
    Synonym(s): Secretary of Transportation, Transportation Secretary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transportation Security Administration
n
  1. an agency established in 2001 to safeguard United States transportation systems and insure safe air travel
    Synonym(s): Transportation Security Administration, TSA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transportation system
n
  1. a facility consisting of the means and equipment necessary for the movement of passengers or goods
    Synonym(s): transportation system, transportation, transit
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transporter
n
  1. a long truck for carrying motor vehicles [syn: transporter, car transporter]
  2. a crane for moving material with dispatch as in loading and unloading ships
  3. a moving belt that transports objects (as in a factory)
    Synonym(s): conveyer belt, conveyor belt, conveyer, conveyor, transporter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transposability
n
  1. ability to change sequence [syn: permutability, permutableness, transposability]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transposable
adj
  1. capable of changing sequence [syn: transposable, permutable]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transpose
n
  1. a matrix formed by interchanging the rows and columns of a given matrix
v
  1. change the order or arrangement of; "Dyslexics often transpose letters in a word"
    Synonym(s): permute, commute, transpose
  2. transfer from one place or period to another; "The ancient Greek story was transplanted into Modern America"
    Synonym(s): transfer, transpose, transplant
  3. cause to change places; "interchange this screw for one of a smaller size"
    Synonym(s): counterchange, transpose, interchange
  4. transfer a quantity from one side of an equation to the other side reversing its sign, in order to maintain equality
  5. put (a piece of music) into another key
  6. exchange positions without a change in value; "These operators commute with each other"
    Synonym(s): commute, transpose
  7. change key; "Can you transpose this fugue into G major?"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transposed
adj
  1. turned about in order or relation; "transposed letters"
    Synonym(s): converse, reversed, transposed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transposition
n
  1. any abnormal position of the organs of the body [syn: transposition, heterotaxy]
  2. an event in which one thing is substituted for another; "the replacement of lost blood by a transfusion of donor blood"
    Synonym(s): substitution, permutation, transposition, replacement, switch
  3. (genetics) a kind of mutation in which a chromosomal segment is transfered to a new position on the same or another chromosome
  4. (mathematics) the transfer of a quantity from one side of an equation to the other along with a change of sign
  5. (electricity) a rearrangement of the relative positions of power lines in order to minimize the effects of mutual capacitance and inductance; "he wrote a textbook on the electrical effects of transposition"
  6. the act of reversing the order or place of
    Synonym(s): transposition, reversal
  7. (music) playing in a different key from the key intended; moving the pitch of a piece of music upwards or downwards
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transposon
n
  1. a segment of DNA that can become integrated at many different sites along a chromosome (especially a segment of bacterial DNA that can be translocated as a whole)
    Synonym(s): transposon, jumping gene
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transsexual
adj
  1. overwhelmingly desirous of being, or completely identifying with, the opposite sex
n
  1. a person who has undergone a sex change operation [syn: transsexual, transexual]
  2. a person whose sexual identification is entirely with the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transsexual, transexual
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transsexual surgery
n
  1. surgical procedures and hormonal treatments designed to alter a person's sexual characteristics so that the resemble those of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): sex-change operation, transsexual surgery
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transsexualism
n
  1. condition in which a person assumes the identity and permanently acts the part of the gender opposite to his or her biological sex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transship
v
  1. transfer for further transportation from one ship or conveyance to another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transshipment
n
  1. the transfer from one conveyance to another for shipment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transshipment center
n
  1. a port where merchandise can be imported and then exported without paying import duties; "Bahrain has been an entrepot of trade between Arabia and India since the second millennium BC"
    Synonym(s): entrepot, transshipment center
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transubstantiate
v
  1. change (the Eucharist bread and wine) into the body and blood of Christ
  2. change or alter in form, appearance, or nature; "This experience transformed her completely"; "She transformed the clay into a beautiful sculpture"; "transubstantiate one element into another"
    Synonym(s): transform, transmute, transubstantiate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transubstantiation
n
  1. the Roman Catholic doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and the wine changes into the substance of the body and blood of Christ when consecrated in the Eucharist
  2. an act that changes the form or character or substance of something
    Synonym(s): transmutation, transubstantiation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transudate
n
  1. a substance that transudes [syn: transudate, transudation]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transudation
n
  1. a substance that transudes [syn: transudate, transudation]
  2. the process of exuding; the slow escape of liquids from blood vessels through pores or breaks in the cell membranes
    Synonym(s): exudation, transudation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transude
v
  1. release (a liquid) in drops or small quantities; "exude sweat through the pores"
    Synonym(s): exude, exudate, transude, ooze out, ooze
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transuranic
adj
  1. having an atomic number greater than 92
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transuranic element
n
  1. any element having an atomic number greater than 92 (which is the atomic number of uranium); all are radioactive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transurethral resection of the prostate
n
  1. removal of significant amounts of prostate tissue (as in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia)
    Synonym(s): transurethral resection of the prostate, TURP
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transvaal
n
  1. a province of northeastern South Africa originally inhabited by Africans who spoke Bantu; colonized by the Boers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transvaal daisy
n
  1. widely cultivated South African perennial having flower heads with orange to flame-colored rays
    Synonym(s): Barberton daisy, Transvaal daisy, Gerbera jamesonii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transvaal kafferboom
n
  1. small semi-evergreen tree of South Africa having dense clusters of clear scarlet flowers and red seeds
    Synonym(s): kaffir boom, Transvaal kafferboom, Erythrina lysistemon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transversal
adj
  1. extending or lying across; in a crosswise direction; at right angles to the long axis; "cross members should be all steel"; "from the transverse hall the stairway ascends gracefully"; "transversal vibrations"; "transverse colon"
    Synonym(s): cross(a), transverse, transversal, thwartwise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transversally
adv
  1. in a transverse manner; "they were cut transversely"
    Synonym(s): transversely, transversally
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse
adj
  1. extending or lying across; in a crosswise direction; at right angles to the long axis; "cross members should be all steel"; "from the transverse hall the stairway ascends gracefully"; "transversal vibrations"; "transverse colon"
    Synonym(s): cross(a), transverse, transversal, thwartwise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse colon
n
  1. the part of the large intestine that extends across the abdominal cavity and joins the ascending to the descending colon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse flute
n
  1. a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender tube closed at one end with finger holes on one end and an opening near the closed end across which the breath is blown
    Synonym(s): flute, transverse flute
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse muscle of abdomen
n
  1. a flat muscle with transverse fibers that forms the anterior and lateral walls of the abdominal cavity
    Synonym(s): transversus abdominis muscle, transverse muscle of abdomen, musculus transversalis abdominis, transversus abdominis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse process
n
  1. one of two processes that extend from each vertebra and provide the point of articulation for the ribs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transverse sinus
n
  1. a paired dural sinus; terminates in the sigmoid sinus [syn: transverse sinus, sinus transversus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transversely
adv
  1. in a transverse manner; "they were cut transversely"
    Synonym(s): transversely, transversally
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transversus abdominis
n
  1. a flat muscle with transverse fibers that forms the anterior and lateral walls of the abdominal cavity
    Synonym(s): transversus abdominis muscle, transverse muscle of abdomen, musculus transversalis abdominis, transversus abdominis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transversus abdominis muscle
n
  1. a flat muscle with transverse fibers that forms the anterior and lateral walls of the abdominal cavity
    Synonym(s): transversus abdominis muscle, transverse muscle of abdomen, musculus transversalis abdominis, transversus abdominis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transvestic
adj
  1. receiving sexual gratification from wearing clothing of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transvestic, transvestite
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transvestism
n
  1. the practice of adopting the clothes or the manner or the sexual role of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transvestism, transvestitism, cross dressing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transvestite
adj
  1. receiving sexual gratification from wearing clothing of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transvestic, transvestite
n
  1. someone who adopts the dress or manner or sexual role of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transvestite, cross-dresser
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
transvestitism
n
  1. the practice of adopting the clothes or the manner or the sexual role of the opposite sex
    Synonym(s): transvestism, transvestitism, cross dressing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transylvania
n
  1. a historical plateau region in northwestern Romania that is separated from the rest of the country by the Transylvanian Alps; originally part of Hungary; incorporated into Romania at the end of World War I
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Transylvanian Alps
n
  1. a range of the southern Carpathian Mountains extending across central Romania
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench
n
  1. a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earth
  2. a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floor
    Synonym(s): trench, deep, oceanic abyss
  3. any long ditch cut in the ground
v
  1. impinge or infringe upon; "This impinges on my rights as an individual"; "This matter entrenches on other domains"
    Synonym(s): impinge, encroach, entrench, trench
  2. fortify by surrounding with trenches; "He trenched his military camp"
  3. cut or carve deeply into; "letters trenched into the stone"
  4. set, plant, or bury in a trench; "trench the fallen soldiers"; "trench the vegetables"
  5. cut a trench in, as for drainage; "ditch the land to drain it"; "trench the fields"
    Synonym(s): trench, ditch
  6. dig a trench or trenches; "The National Guardsmen were sent out to trench"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench coat
n
  1. a military style raincoat; belted with deep pockets
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench fever
n
  1. marked by pain in muscles and joints and transmitted by lice
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench foot
n
  1. resembling frostbite but without freezing; resulting from exposure to cold and wet
    Synonym(s): trench foot, immersion foot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench knife
n
  1. a knife with a double-edged blade for hand-to-hand fighting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench mortar
n
  1. a muzzle-loading high-angle gun with a short barrel that fires shells at high elevations for a short range
    Synonym(s): mortar, howitzer, trench mortar
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench mouth
n
  1. an acute communicable infection of the respiratory tract and mouth marked by ulceration of the mucous membrane
    Synonym(s): Vincent's angina, Vincent's infection, trench mouth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trench warfare
n
  1. a struggle (usually prolonged) between competing entities in which neither side is able to win; "the hope that his superior campaigning skills would make a difference evaporated in the realization that electioneering had become a form of trench warfare"
  2. a type of armed combat in which the opposing troops fight from trenches that face each other; "instead of the war ending quickly, it became bogged down in trench warfare"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trenchancy
n
  1. keenness and forcefulness of thought or expression or intellect
    Synonym(s): incisiveness, trenchancy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trenchant
adj
  1. having keenness and forcefulness and penetration in thought, expression, or intellect; "searching insights"; "trenchant criticism"
    Synonym(s): searching, trenchant
  2. characterized by or full of force and vigor; "a hard-hitting expose"; "a trenchant argument"
    Synonym(s): hard-hitting, trenchant
  3. clearly or sharply defined to the mind; "clear-cut evidence of tampering"; "Claudius was the first to invade Britain with distinct...intentions of conquest"; "trenchant distinctions between right and wrong"
    Synonym(s): clear-cut, distinct, trenchant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trenchantly
adv
  1. in a vigorous and effective manner; "he defended his client's civil rights trenchantly"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trencher
n
  1. someone who digs trenches
  2. a wooden board or platter on which food is served or carved
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trencherman
n
  1. a person who is devoted to eating and drinking to excess
    Synonym(s): glutton, gourmand, gourmandizer, trencherman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trenching spade
n
  1. a hand shovel carried by infantrymen for digging trenches
    Synonym(s): entrenching tool, trenching spade
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triamcinolone
n
  1. a synthetic corticosteroid (trade names Aristocort or Aristopak or Kenalog) used as an anti-inflammatory agent
    Synonym(s): triamcinolone, Aristocort, Aristopak, Kenalog
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangle
n
  1. a three-sided polygon [syn: triangle, trigon, trilateral]
  2. something approximating the shape of a triangle; "the coastline of Chile and Argentina and Brazil forms two legs of a triangle"
  3. a small northern constellation near Perseus between Andromeda and Aries
    Synonym(s): Triangulum, Triangle
  4. any of various triangular drafting instruments used to draw straight lines at specified angles
  5. a percussion instrument consisting of a metal bar bent in the shape of an open triangle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangular
adj
  1. having three angles; forming or shaped like a triangle; "a triangular figure"; "a triangular pyrimid has a triangle for a base"
  2. having three sides; "a trilateral figure"
    Synonym(s): trilateral, triangular, three-sided
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangular bandage
n
  1. bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck
    Synonym(s): sling, scarf bandage, triangular bandage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangular prism
n
  1. a prism whose bases are triangles
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangularity
n
  1. the property of being shaped like a triangle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangulate
adj
  1. composed of or marked with triangles
v
  1. divide into triangles or give a triangular form to; "triangulate the piece of cardboard"
  2. measure by using trigonometry; "triangulate the angle"
  3. survey by triangulation; "The land surveyor worked by triangulating the plot"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
triangulation
n
  1. a trigonometric method of determining the position of a fixed point from the angles to it from two fixed points a known distance apart; useful in navigation
  2. a method of surveying; the area is divided into triangles and the length of one side and its angles with the other two are measured, then the lengths of the other sides can be calculated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Triangulum
n
  1. a small northern constellation near Perseus between Andromeda and Aries
    Synonym(s): Triangulum, Triangle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Triangulum Australe
n
  1. a small bright constellation in the polar region of the southern hemisphere near Circinus and Apus
    Synonym(s): Triangulum Australe, Southern Triangle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trimester
n
  1. a period of three months; especially one of the three three-month periods into which human pregnancy is divided
  2. one of three divisions of an academic year
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trimness
n
  1. a state of arrangement or appearance; "in good trim" [syn: trim, trimness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trimox
n
  1. an antibiotic; a semisynthetic oral penicillin (trade names Amoxil and Larotid and Polymox and Trimox and Augmentin) used to treat bacterial infections
    Synonym(s): amoxicillin, Amoxil, Larotid, Polymox, Trimox, Augmentin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trinectes
n
  1. a genus of Soleidae
    Synonym(s): Trinectes, genus Trinectes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trinectes maculatus
n
  1. useless as food; in coastal streams from Maine to Texas and Panama
    Synonym(s): hogchoker, Trinectes maculatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tringa
n
  1. a genus of Scolopacidae
    Synonym(s): Tringa, genus Tringa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tringa flavipes
n
  1. a variety of yellowlegs [syn: lesser yellowlegs, {Tringa flavipes}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tringa melanoleuca
n
  1. a variety of yellowlegs [syn: greater yellowlegs, {Tringa melanoleuca}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tringa nebularia
n
  1. large European sandpiper with greenish legs [syn: greenshank, Tringa nebularia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tringa totanus
n
  1. a common Old World wading bird with long red legs [syn: redshank, Tringa totanus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trinket
n
  1. cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing [syn: bangle, bauble, gaud, gewgaw, novelty, fallal, trinket]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trinketry
n
  1. trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trinuclear
adj
  1. having three nuclei [syn: trinucleate, trinuclear, trinucleated]
    Antonym(s): binuclear, binucleate, binucleated, mononuclear, mononucleate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trinucleate
adj
  1. having three nuclei [syn: trinucleate, trinuclear, trinucleated]
    Antonym(s): binuclear, binucleate, binucleated, mononuclear, mononucleate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trinucleated
adj
  1. having three nuclei [syn: trinucleate, trinuclear, trinucleated]
    Antonym(s): binuclear, binucleate, binucleated, mononuclear, mononucleate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trionychidae
n
  1. soft-shelled turtles [syn: Trionychidae, {family Trionychidae}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trionyx
n
  1. type genus of the Trionychidae [syn: Trionyx, {genus Trionyx}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trionyx muticus
n
  1. river turtle of Mississippi basin; prefers running water
    Synonym(s): smooth softshell, Trionyx muticus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Trionyx spiniferus
n
  1. river turtle of western United States with a warty shell; prefers quiet water
    Synonym(s): spiny softshell, Trionyx spiniferus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trounce
v
  1. beat severely with a whip or rod; "The teacher often flogged the students"; "The children were severely trounced"
    Synonym(s): flog, welt, whip, lather, lash, slash, strap, trounce
  2. come out better in a competition, race, or conflict; "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"; "We beat the competition"; "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"
    Synonym(s): beat, beat out, crush, shell, trounce, vanquish
  3. censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"
    Synonym(s): call on the carpet, take to task, rebuke, rag, trounce, reproof, lecture, reprimand, jaw, dress down, call down, scold, chide, berate, bawl out, remonstrate, chew out, chew up, have words, lambaste, lambast
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trouncing
n
  1. a sound defeat [syn: thrashing, walloping, debacle, drubbing, slaughter, trouncing, whipping]
  2. the act of inflicting corporal punishment with repeated blows
    Synonym(s): beating, thrashing, licking, drubbing, lacing, trouncing, whacking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
troy ounce
n
  1. a unit of apothecary weight equal to 480 grains or one twelfth of a pound
    Synonym(s): ounce, troy ounce, apothecaries' ounce
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truancy
n
  1. failure to attend (especially school) [syn: truancy, hooky]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
true mahogany
n
  1. mahogany tree of West Indies [syn: true mahogany, {Cuban mahogany}, Dominican mahogany, Swietinia mahogani]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trueness
n
  1. conformity to reality or actuality; "they debated the truth of the proposition"; "the situation brought home to us the blunt truth of the military threat"; "he was famous for the truth of his portraits"; "he turned to religion in his search for eternal verities"
    Synonym(s): truth, the true, verity, trueness
    Antonym(s): falseness, falsity
  2. the quality of being loyal
    Synonym(s): loyalty, trueness
    Antonym(s): disloyalty
  3. exactness of adjustment; "I marveled at the trueness of his aim"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncate
adj
  1. terminating abruptly by having or as if having an end or point cut off; "a truncate leaf"; "truncated volcanic mountains"; "a truncated pyramid"
    Synonym(s): truncate, truncated
v
  1. replace a corner by a plane
  2. approximate by ignoring all terms beyond a chosen one; "truncate a series"
  3. make shorter as if by cutting off; "truncate a word"; "Erosion has truncated the ridges of the mountains"
    Synonym(s): truncate, cut short
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncated
adj
  1. cut short in duration; "the abbreviated speech"; "her shortened life was clearly the result of smoking"; "an unsatisfactory truncated conversation"
    Synonym(s): abbreviated, shortened, truncated
  2. terminating abruptly by having or as if having an end or point cut off; "a truncate leaf"; "truncated volcanic mountains"; "a truncated pyramid"
    Synonym(s): truncate, truncated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncated cone
n
  1. a frustum formed from a cone
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncated pyramid
n
  1. a frustum formed from a pyramid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncation
n
  1. the property of being truncated or short [syn: shortness, truncation]
  2. the replacement of an edge or solid angle (as in cutting a gemstone) by a plane (especially by a plane that is equally inclined to the adjacent faces)
  3. the act of cutting short; "it is an obvious truncation of the verse"; "they were sentenced to a truncation of their limbs"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncation error
n
  1. (mathematics) a miscalculation that results from cutting off a numerical calculation before it is finished
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncheon
n
  1. a short stout club used primarily by policemen [syn: truncheon, nightstick, baton, billy, billystick, billy club]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Truncocolumella
n
  1. a genus of fungi belonging to the family Rhizopogonaceae
    Synonym(s): Truncocolumella, genus Truncocolumella
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Truncocolumella citrina
n
  1. a fungus with a round yellow to orange fruiting body that is found on the surface of the ground or partially buried; has a distinctive sterile column extending into the spore- bearing tissue
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncus atrioventricularis
n
  1. a bundle of modified heart muscle that transmits the cardiac impulse from the atrioventricular node to the ventricles causing them to contract
    Synonym(s): atrioventricular bundle, bundle of His, atrioventricular trunk, truncus atrioventricularis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncus celiacus
n
  1. an artery that originates from the abdominal aorta just below the diaphragm and branches into the left gastric artery and the common hepatic artery and the splenic artery
    Synonym(s): celiac trunk, celiac artery, truncus celiacus, arteria celiaca
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
truncus pulmonalis
n
  1. the artery that carries venous blood from the right ventricle of the heart and divides into the right and left pulmonary arteries
    Synonym(s): pulmonary trunk, truncus pulmonalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk
n
  1. the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber
    Synonym(s): trunk, tree trunk, bole
  2. luggage consisting of a large strong case used when traveling or for storage
  3. the body excluding the head and neck and limbs; "they moved their arms and legs and bodies"
    Synonym(s): torso, trunk, body
  4. compartment in an automobile that carries luggage or shopping or tools; "he put his golf bag in the trunk"
    Synonym(s): luggage compartment, automobile trunk, trunk
  5. a long flexible snout as of an elephant
    Synonym(s): proboscis, trunk
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk call
n
  1. a telephone call made outside the local calling area; "I talked to her by long distance"
    Synonym(s): long distance, long-distance call, trunk call
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk hose
n
  1. puffed breeches of the 16th and 17th centuries usually worn over hose
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk lid
n
  1. hinged lid for a trunk
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk line
n
  1. line that is the main route on a railway [syn: {trunk line}, trunk route]
  2. a telephone line connecting two exchanges directly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk road
n
  1. a highway
    Synonym(s): highroad, trunk road
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunk route
n
  1. line that is the main route on a railway [syn: {trunk line}, trunk route]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunkfish
n
  1. any of numerous small tropical fishes having body and head encased in bony plates
    Synonym(s): boxfish, trunkfish
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trunks
n
  1. trousers that end at or above the knee [syn: short pants, shorts, trunks]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trying
adj
  1. hard to endure; "fell upon trying times"
  2. extremely irritating to the nerves; "nerve-racking noise"; "the stressful days before a war"; "a trying day at the office"
    Synonym(s): nerve-racking, nerve-wracking, stressful, trying
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
trying on
n
  1. putting clothes on to see whether they fit [syn: fitting, try-on, trying on]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turing
n
  1. English mathematician who conceived of the Turing machine and broke German codes during World War II (1912-1954)
    Synonym(s): Turing, Alan Turing, Alan Mathison Turing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turing machine
n
  1. a hypothetical computer with an infinitely long memory tape
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turn signal
n
  1. a blinking light on a motor vehicle that indicates the direction in which the vehicle is about to turn
    Synonym(s): blinker, turn signal, turn indicator, trafficator
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turncoat
n
  1. a disloyal person who betrays or deserts his cause or religion or political party or friend etc.
    Synonym(s): deserter, apostate, renegade, turncoat, recreant, ratter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turncock
n
  1. one employed to control water supply by turning water mains on and off
  2. faucet consisting of a rotating device for regulating flow of a liquid
    Synonym(s): stopcock, cock, turncock
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turnicidae
n
  1. small Old World birds resembling but not related to true quail
    Synonym(s): Turnicidae, family Turnicidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turnix
n
  1. type genus of the Turnicidae: button quail [syn: Turnix, genus Turnix]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Turnix sylvatica
n
  1. a variety of button quail having stripes [syn: {striped button quail}, Turnix sylvatica]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turnkey
n
  1. someone who guards prisoners [syn: prison guard, jailer, jailor, gaoler, screw, turnkey]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turnspit
n
  1. a roasting spit that can be turned
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turnstile
n
  1. a gate consisting of a post that acts as a pivot for rotating arms; set in a passageway for controlling the persons entering
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
turnstone
n
  1. migratory shorebirds of the plover family that turn over stones in searching for food
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannic
adj
  1. characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute rule; having absolute sovereignty; "an authoritarian regime"; "autocratic government"; "despotic rulers"; "a dictatorial rule that lasted for the duration of the war"; "a tyrannical government"
    Synonym(s): authoritarian, autocratic, dictatorial, despotic, tyrannic, tyrannical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannical
adj
  1. marked by unjust severity or arbitrary behavior; "the oppressive government"; "oppressive laws"; "a tyrannical parent"; "tyrannous disregard of human rights"
    Synonym(s): oppressive, tyrannical, tyrannous
  2. characteristic of an absolute ruler or absolute rule; having absolute sovereignty; "an authoritarian regime"; "autocratic government"; "despotic rulers"; "a dictatorial rule that lasted for the duration of the war"; "a tyrannical government"
    Synonym(s): authoritarian, autocratic, dictatorial, despotic, tyrannic, tyrannical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannicide
n
  1. killing a tyrant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannise
v
  1. rule a country as a tyrant [syn: tyrannize, tyrannise, grind down]
  2. rule or exercise power over (somebody) in a cruel and autocratic manner; "her husband and mother-in-law tyrannize her"
    Synonym(s): tyrannize, tyrannise, domineer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannize
v
  1. rule a country as a tyrant [syn: tyrannize, tyrannise, grind down]
  2. rule or exercise power over (somebody) in a cruel and autocratic manner; "her husband and mother-in-law tyrannize her"
    Synonym(s): tyrannize, tyrannise, domineer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannosaur
n
  1. large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur having enormous teeth with knifelike serrations; may have been a scavenger rather than an active predator; later Cretaceous period in North America
    Synonym(s): tyrannosaur, tyrannosaurus, Tyrannosaurus rex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannosaurus
n
  1. large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur having enormous teeth with knifelike serrations; may have been a scavenger rather than an active predator; later Cretaceous period in North America
    Synonym(s): tyrannosaur, tyrannosaurus, Tyrannosaurus rex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tyrannosaurus rex
n
  1. large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur having enormous teeth with knifelike serrations; may have been a scavenger rather than an active predator; later Cretaceous period in North America
    Synonym(s): tyrannosaur, tyrannosaurus, Tyrannosaurus rex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tyrannous
adj
  1. marked by unjust severity or arbitrary behavior; "the oppressive government"; "oppressive laws"; "a tyrannical parent"; "tyrannous disregard of human rights"
    Synonym(s): oppressive, tyrannical, tyrannous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tyrannus
n
  1. type genus of the Tyrannidae: tyrant flycatchers [syn: Tyrannus, genus Tyrannus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tyrannus domenicensis domenicensis
n
  1. a kingbird that breeds in the southeastern United States and winters in tropical America; similar to but larger than the eastern kingbird
    Synonym(s): grey kingbird, gray kingbird, petchary, Tyrannus domenicensis domenicensis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tyrannus tyrannus
n
  1. large American flycatcher [syn: kingbird, {Tyrannus tyrannus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tyrannus vociferans
n
  1. a kingbird seen in the southwestern United States; largely grey with a yellow abdomen
    Synonym(s): Cassin's kingbird, Tyrannus vociferans
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taranis \Tar"a*nis\, n. [L. taranis, from the Celtic; cf. W. &
      Corn. taran thunder.] (Myth.)
      A Celtic divinity, regarded as the evil principle, but
      confounded by the Romans with Jupiter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tare \Tare\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tared}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Taring}.]
      To ascertain or mark the tare of (goods).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taring \Tar"ing\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The common tern; -- called also {tarret}, and {tarrock}.
      [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnish \Tar"nish\, v. i.
      To lose luster; to become dull; as, gilding will tarnish in a
      foul air.
  
               Till thy fresh glories, which now shine so bright, Grow
               stale and tarnish with our daily sight.   --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnish \Tar"nish\, n.
      1. The quality or state of being tarnished; stain; soil;
            blemish.
  
      2. (Min.) A thin film on the surface of a metal, usually due
            to a slight alteration of the original color; as, the
            steel tarnish in columbite.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnish \Tar"nish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tarnished}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tarnishing}.] [F. ternir, fr. OHG. tarnen to darken,
      to conceal, hide; akin to OS. dernian to hide, AS. dernan,
      dyrnan, OHG. tarni hidden, OS. derni, AS. derne, dyrne. Cf.
      {Dern}, a., and see {-ish}.]
      To soil, or change the appearance of, especially by an
      alternation induced by the air, or by dust, or the like; to
      diminish, dull, or destroy the luster of; to sully; as, to
      tarnish a metal; to tarnish gilding; to tarnish the purity of
      color. [bd]Tarnished lace.[b8] --Fuller. Used also
      figuratively; as, to tarnish one's honor.
  
      Syn: To sully; stain; dim.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnish \Tar"nish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tarnished}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tarnishing}.] [F. ternir, fr. OHG. tarnen to darken,
      to conceal, hide; akin to OS. dernian to hide, AS. dernan,
      dyrnan, OHG. tarni hidden, OS. derni, AS. derne, dyrne. Cf.
      {Dern}, a., and see {-ish}.]
      To soil, or change the appearance of, especially by an
      alternation induced by the air, or by dust, or the like; to
      diminish, dull, or destroy the luster of; to sully; as, to
      tarnish a metal; to tarnish gilding; to tarnish the purity of
      color. [bd]Tarnished lace.[b8] --Fuller. Used also
      figuratively; as, to tarnish one's honor.
  
      Syn: To sully; stain; dim.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnisher \Tar"nish*er\, n.
      One who, or that which, tarnishes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarnish \Tar"nish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tarnished}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tarnishing}.] [F. ternir, fr. OHG. tarnen to darken,
      to conceal, hide; akin to OS. dernian to hide, AS. dernan,
      dyrnan, OHG. tarni hidden, OS. derni, AS. derne, dyrne. Cf.
      {Dern}, a., and see {-ish}.]
      To soil, or change the appearance of, especially by an
      alternation induced by the air, or by dust, or the like; to
      diminish, dull, or destroy the luster of; to sully; as, to
      tarnish a metal; to tarnish gilding; to tarnish the purity of
      color. [bd]Tarnished lace.[b8] --Fuller. Used also
      figuratively; as, to tarnish one's honor.
  
      Syn: To sully; stain; dim.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarriance \Tar"ri*ance\, n.
      The act or time of tarrying; delay; lateness. [Archaic]
      --Shak.
  
               And after two days' tarriance there, returned.
                                                                              --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tar \Tar\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tarred}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tarring}.]
      To smear with tar, or as with tar; as, to tar ropes; to tar
      cloth.
  
      {To tar and feather a person}. See under {Feather}, v. t.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tarry \Tar"ry\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Tarried}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tarrying}.] [OE. tarien to irritate (see {Tarre}); but with
      a change of sense probably due to confusion with OE. targen
      to delay, OF. targier, fr. (assumed) LL. tardicare, fr. L.
      tardare to make slow, to tarry, fr. tardus slow. Cf.
      {Tardy}.]
      1. To stay or remain behind; to wait.
  
                     Tarry ye for us, until we come again. --Ex. xxiv.
                                                                              14.
  
      2. To delay; to put off going or coming; to loiter.
  
                     Come down unto me, tarry not.            --Gen. xic. 9.
  
                     One tarried here, there hurried one.   --Emerson.
  
      3. To stay; to abide; to continue; to lodge.
  
                     Tarry all night, and wash your feet.   --Gen. xix. 2.
  
      Syn: To abide; continue; lodge; await; loiter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tauromachian \Tau`ro*ma"chi*an\, a. [See {Tauromachy}.]
      Of or pertaining to bullfights. -- n. A bullfighter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tauromachy \Tau*rom"a*chy\, n. [Gr. tayromachi`a; tay^ros bull +
      ma`chh fight.]
      Bullfighting.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tear \Tear\ (t[acir]r), v. t. [imp. {Tore} (t[omac]r), ((Obs.
      {Tare}) (t[acir]r); p. p. {Torn} (t[omac]rn); p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tearing}.] [OE. teren, AS. teran; akin to OS. farterian to
      destroy, D. teren to consume, G. zerren to pull, to tear,
      zehren to consume, Icel. t[91]ra, Goth. gata[a1]ran to
      destroy, Lith. dirti to flay, Russ. drate to pull, to tear,
      Gr. de`rein to flay, Skr. dar to burst. [fb]63. Cf. {Darn},
      {Epidermis}, {Tarre}, {Tirade}.]
      1. To separate by violence; to pull apart by force; to rend;
            to lacerate; as, to tear cloth; to tear a garment; to tear
            the skin or flesh.
  
                     Tear him to pieces; he's a conspirator. --Shak.
  
      2. Hence, to divide by violent measures; to disrupt; to rend;
            as, a party or government torn by factions.
  
      3. To rend away; to force away; to remove by force; to
            sunder; as, a child torn from its home.
  
                     The hand of fate Hath torn thee from me. --Addison.
  
      4. To pull with violence; as, to tear the hair.
  
      5. To move violently; to agitate. [bd]Once I loved torn
            ocean's roar.[b8] --Byron.
  
      {To tear a cat}, to rant violently; to rave; -- especially
            applied to theatrical ranting. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To tear down}, to demolish violently; to pull or pluck down.
           
  
      {To tear off}, to pull off by violence; to strip.
  
      {To tear out}, to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear
            out the eyes.
  
      {To tear up}, to rip up; to remove from a fixed state by
            violence; as, to tear up a floor; to tear up the
            foundation of government or order.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Termagancy \Ter"ma*gan*cy\, n.
      The quality or state of being termagant; turbulence;
      tumultuousness; as, a violent termagancy of temper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Termagant \Ter"ma*gant\, n. [OE. Trivigant, Termagant, Termagant
      (in sense 1), OF. Tervagan; cf. It. Trivigante.]
      1. An imaginary being supposed by the Christians to be a
            Mohammedan deity or false god. He is represented in the
            ancient moralities, farces, and puppet shows as extremely
            vociferous and tumultous. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [bd]And
            oftentimes by Termagant and Mahound [Mahomet] swore.[b8]
            --Spenser.
  
                     The lesser part on Christ believed well, On
                     Termagant the more, and on Mahound.   --Fairfax.
  
      2. A boisterous, brawling, turbulent person; -- formerly
            applied to both sexes, now only to women.
  
                     This terrible termagant, this Nero, this Pharaoh.
                                                                              --Bale (1543).
  
                     The slave of an imperious and reckless termagant.
                                                                              --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Termagant \Ter"ma*gant\, a.
      Tumultuous; turbulent; boisterous; furious; quarrelsome;
      scolding. -- {Ter"ma*gant*ly}, adv.
  
               A termagant, imperious, prodigal, profligate wench.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Termagant \Ter"ma*gant\, a.
      Tumultuous; turbulent; boisterous; furious; quarrelsome;
      scolding. -- {Ter"ma*gant*ly}, adv.
  
               A termagant, imperious, prodigal, profligate wench.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Term \Term\, n. [F. terme, L. termen, -inis, terminus, a
      boundary limit, end; akin to Gr. [?], [?]. See {Thrum} a
      tuft, and cf. {Terminus}, {Determine}, {Exterminate}.]
      1. That which limits the extent of anything; limit;
            extremity; bound; boundary.
  
                     Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they
                     two are as nature's two terms, or boundaries.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
      2. The time for which anything lasts; any limited time; as, a
            term of five years; the term of life.
  
      3. In universities, schools, etc., a definite continuous
            period during which instruction is regularly given to
            students; as, the school year is divided into three terms.
  
      4. (Geom.) A point, line, or superficies, that limits; as, a
            line is the term of a superficies, and a superficies is
            the term of a solid.
  
      5. (Law) A fixed period of time; a prescribed duration; as:
            (a) The limitation of an estate; or rather, the whole time
                  for which an estate is granted, as for the term of a
                  life or lives, or for a term of years.
            (b) A space of time granted to a debtor for discharging
                  his obligation.
            (c) The time in which a court is held or is open for the
                  trial of causes. --Bouvier.
  
      Note: In England, there were formerly four terms in the year,
               during which the superior courts were open: Hilary
               term, beginning on the 11th and ending on the 31st of
               January; Easter term, beginning on the 15th of April,
               and ending on the 8th of May; Trinity term, beginning
               on the 22d day of May, and ending on the 12th of June;
               Michaelmas term, beginning on the 2d and ending on the
               25th day of November. The rest of the year was called
               vacation. But this division has been practically
               abolished by the Judicature Acts of 1873, 1875, which
               provide for the more convenient arrangement of the
               terms and vacations. In the United States, the terms to
               be observed by the tribunals of justice are prescribed
               by the statutes of Congress and of the several States.
  
      6. (Logic) The subject or the predicate of a proposition; one
            of the three component parts of a syllogism, each one of
            which is used twice.
  
                     The subject and predicate of a proposition are,
                     after Aristotle, together called its terms or
                     extremes.                                          --Sir W.
                                                                              Hamilton.
  
      Note: The predicate of the conclusion is called the major
               term, because it is the most general, and the subject
               of the conclusion is called the minor term, because it
               is less general. These are called the extermes; and the
               third term, introduced as a common measure between
               them, is called the mean or middle term. Thus in the
               following syllogism, -- Every vegetable is combustible;
               Every tree is a vegetable; Therefore every tree is
               combustible, - combustible, the predicate of the
               conclusion, is the major term; tree is the minor term;
               vegetable is the middle term.
  
      7. A word or expression; specifically, one that has a
            precisely limited meaning in certain relations and uses,
            or is peculiar to a science, art, profession, or the like;
            as, a technical term. [bd]Terms quaint of law.[b8]
            --Chaucer.
  
                     In painting, the greatest beauties can not always be
                     expressed for want of terms.               --Dryden.
  
      8. (Arch.) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on the top with the
            figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr; -- called
            also {terminal figure}. See {Terminus}, n., 2 and 3.
  
      Note: The pillar part frequently tapers downward, or is
               narrowest at the base. Terms rudely carved were
               formerly used for landmarks or boundaries. --Gwilt.
  
      9. (Alg.) A member of a compound quantity; as, a or b in a +
            b; ab or cd in ab - cd.
  
      10. pl. (Med.) The menses.
  
      11. pl. (Law) Propositions or promises, as in contracts,
            which, when assented to or accepted by another, settle
            the contract and bind the parties; conditions.
  
      12. (Law) In Scotland, the time fixed for the payment of
            rents.
  
      Note: Terms legal and conventional in Scotland correspond to
               quarter days in England and Ireland. There are two
               legal terms -- Whitsunday, May 15, and Martinmas, Nov.
               11; and two conventional terms -- Candlemas, Feb. 2,
               and Lammas day, Aug. 1. --Mozley & W.
  
      13. (Naut.) A piece of carved work placed under each end of
            the taffrail. --J. Knowels.
  
      {In term}, in set terms; in formal phrase. [Obs.]
  
                     I can not speak in term.                     --Chaucer.
  
      {Term fee} (Law)
            (a), a fee by the term, chargeable to a suitor, or by law
                  fixed and taxable in the costs of a cause for each or
                  any term it is in court.
  
      {Terms of a proportion} (Math.), the four members of which it
            is composed.
  
      {To bring to terms}, to compel (one) to agree, assent, or
            submit; to force (one) to come to terms.
  
      {To make terms}, to come to terms; to make an agreement: to
            agree.
  
      Syn: Limit; bound; boundary; condition; stipulation; word;
               expression.
  
      Usage: {Term}, {Word}. These are more frequently interchanged
                  than almost any other vocables that occur of the
                  language. There is, however, a difference between them
                  which is worthy of being kept in mind. Word is
                  generic; it denotes an utterance which represents or
                  expresses our thoughts and feelings. Term originally
                  denoted one of the two essential members of a
                  proposition in logic, and hence signifies a word of
                  specific meaning, and applicable to a definite class
                  of objects. Thus, we may speak of a scientific or a
                  technical term, and of stating things in distinct
                  terms. Thus we say, [bd]the term minister literally
                  denotes servant;[b8] [bd]an exact definition of terms
                  is essential to clearness of thought;[b8] [bd]no term
                  of reproach can sufficiently express my
                  indignation;[b8] [bd]every art has its peculiar and
                  distinctive terms,[b8] etc. So also we say, [bd]purity
                  of style depends on the choice of words, and precision
                  of style on a clear understanding of the terms
                  used.[b8] Term is chiefly applied to verbs, nouns, and
                  adjectives, these being capable of standing as terms
                  in a logical proposition; while prepositions and
                  conjunctions, which can never be so employed, are
                  rarely spoken of as terms, but simply as words.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tern \Tern\, a. [L. pl. terni three each, three; akin to tres
      three. See {Three}, and cf. {Trine}.]
      Threefold; triple; consisting of three; ternate.
  
      {Tern flowers} (Bot.), flowers growing three and three
            together.
  
      {Tern leaves} (Bot.), leaves arranged in threes, or three by
            three, or having three in each whorl or set.
  
      {Tern peduncles} (Bot.), three peduncles growing together
            from the same axis.
  
      {Tern schooner} (Naut.), a three-masted schooner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Terrienniak \Ter`ri*en"ni*ak\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The arctic fox.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tharms \Tharms\, n. pl. [AS. [ed]earm a gut; akin to D. & G.
      darm, Icel. [ed]armr, Sw. & Dan. tarm. [fb]53.]
      Twisted guts. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] --Ascham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comether \Co*meth"er\, n. [Prob. dial. pron. of come hither,
      used in calling cows, etc.] [Dial. or Colloq., Brit.]
      1. Matter; affair.
  
      2. Friendly communication or association.
  
      {To put} {the, [or] one's}, {comether on}, to exercise
            persuasion upon; to get under one's influence; to beguile;
            to wheedle.
  
                     How does ut come about, sorr, that whin a man has
                     put the comether on wan woman he's sure bound to put
                     ut on another?                                    --Kipling.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
            (b) See under 1st {File}.
  
      {The ranks}, the order or grade of common soldiers; as, to
            reduce a noncommissioned officer to the ranks.
  
      {To fill the ranks}, to supply the whole number, or a
            competent number.
  
      {To take rank of}, to have precedence over, or to have the
            right of taking a higher place than.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ring \Ring\, n. [AS. hring, hrinc; akin to Fries. hring, D. & G.
      ring, OHG. ring, hring, Icel. hringr, DAn. & SW. ring; cf.
      Russ. krug'. Cf. {Harangue}, {Rank} a row,{Rink}.]
      A circle, or a circular line, or anything in the form of a
      circular line or hoop.
  
      2. Specifically, a circular ornament of gold or other
            precious material worn on the finger, or attached to the
            ear, the nose, or some other part of the person; as, a
            wedding ring.
  
                     Upon his thumb he had of gold a ring. --Chaucer.
  
                     The dearest ring in Venice will I give you. --Shak.
  
      3. A circular area in which races are or run or other sports
            are performed; an arena.
  
                     Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring, Where
                     youthful charioteers contend for glory. --E. Smith.
  
      4. An inclosed space in which pugilists fight; hence,
            figuratively, prize fighting. [bd]The road was an
            institution, the ring was an institution.[b8] --Thackeray.
  
      5. A circular group of persons.
  
                     And hears the Muses in a ring Aye round about Jove's
                     alter sing.                                       --Milton.
  
      6. (Geom.)
            (a) The plane figure included between the circumferences
                  of two concentric circles.
            (b) The solid generated by the revolution of a circle, or
                  other figure, about an exterior straight line (as an
                  axis) lying in the same plane as the circle or other
                  figure.
  
      7. (Astron. & Navigation) An instrument, formerly used for
            taking the sun's altitude, consisting of a brass ring
            suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through
            which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the
            graduated inner surface opposite.
  
      8. (Bot.) An elastic band partly or wholly encircling the
            spore cases of ferns. See Illust. of {Sporangium}.
  
      9. A clique; an exclusive combination of persons for a
            selfish purpose, as to control the market, distribute
            offices, obtain contracts, etc.
  
                     The ruling ring at Constantinople.      --E. A.
                                                                              Freeman.
  
      {Ring armor}, armor composed of rings of metal. See {Ring
            mail}, below, and {Chain mail}, under {Chain}.
  
      {Ring blackbird} (Zo[94]l.), the ring ousel.
  
      {Ring canal} (Zo[94]l.), the circular water tube which
            surrounds the esophagus of echinoderms.
  
      {Ring dotterel}, [or] {Ringed dotterel}. (Zo[94]l.) See
            {Dotterel}, and Illust. of {Pressiroster}.
  
      {Ring dropper}, a sharper who pretends to have found a ring
            (dropped by himself), and tries to induce another to buy
            it as valuable, it being worthless.
  
      {Ring fence}. See under {Fence}.
  
      {Ring finger}, the third finger of the left hand, or the next
            the little finger, on which the ring is placed in
            marriage.
  
      {Ring formula} (Chem.), a graphic formula in the shape of a
            closed ring, as in the case of benzene, pyridine, etc. See
            Illust. under {Benzene}.
  
      {Ring mail}, a kind of mail made of small steel rings sewed
            upon a garment of leather or of cloth.
  
      {Ring micrometer}. (Astron.) See {Circular micrometer}, under
            {Micrometer}.
  
      {Saturn's rings}. See {Saturn}.
  
      {Ring ousel}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Ousel}.
  
      {Ring parrot} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World parrakeets having a red ring around the neck,
            especially {Pal[91]ornis torquatus}, common in India, and
            {P. Alexandri} of {Java}.
  
      {Ring plover}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The ringed dotterel.
            (b) Any one of several small American plovers having a
                  dark ring around the neck, as the semipalmated plover
                  ({[92]gialitis semipalmata}).
  
      {Ring snake} (Zo[94]l.), a small harmless American snake
            ({Diadophis punctatus}) having a white ring around the
            neck. The back is ash-colored, or sage green, the belly of
            an orange red.
  
      {Ring stopper}. (Naut.) See under {Stopper}.
  
      {Ring thrush} (Zo[94]l.), the ring ousel.
  
      {The prize ring}, the ring in which prize fighters contend;
            prize fighters, collectively.
  
      {The ring}.
            (a) The body of sporting men who bet on horse races.
                  [Eng.]
            (b) The prize ring.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Theoremic \The`o*rem"ic\, a.
      Theorematic. --Grew.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermic \Ther"mic\, a. [Gr. [?] heat.]
      Of or pertaining to heat; due to heat; thermal; as, thermic
      lines.
  
      {Thermic balance}. See {Bolometer}.
  
      {Thermic fever} (Med.), the condition of fever produced by
            sunstroke. See {Sunstroke}.
  
      {Thermic weight}. (Mech.) Same as {Heat weight}, under
            {Heat}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermic \Ther"mic\, a. [Gr. [?] heat.]
      Of or pertaining to heat; due to heat; thermal; as, thermic
      lines.
  
      {Thermic balance}. See {Bolometer}.
  
      {Thermic fever} (Med.), the condition of fever produced by
            sunstroke. See {Sunstroke}.
  
      {Thermic weight}. (Mech.) Same as {Heat weight}, under
            {Heat}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bolometer \Bo*lom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] a stroke, ray + -meter.]
      (Physics)
      An instrument for measuring minute quantities of radiant
      heat, especially in different parts of the spectrum; --
      called also {actinic balance}, {thermic balance}. --S. P.
      Langley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermic \Ther"mic\, a. [Gr. [?] heat.]
      Of or pertaining to heat; due to heat; thermal; as, thermic
      lines.
  
      {Thermic balance}. See {Bolometer}.
  
      {Thermic fever} (Med.), the condition of fever produced by
            sunstroke. See {Sunstroke}.
  
      {Thermic weight}. (Mech.) Same as {Heat weight}, under
            {Heat}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bolometer \Bo*lom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] a stroke, ray + -meter.]
      (Physics)
      An instrument for measuring minute quantities of radiant
      heat, especially in different parts of the spectrum; --
      called also {actinic balance}, {thermic balance}. --S. P.
      Langley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermic \Ther"mic\, a. [Gr. [?] heat.]
      Of or pertaining to heat; due to heat; thermal; as, thermic
      lines.
  
      {Thermic balance}. See {Bolometer}.
  
      {Thermic fever} (Med.), the condition of fever produced by
            sunstroke. See {Sunstroke}.
  
      {Thermic weight}. (Mech.) Same as {Heat weight}, under
            {Heat}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermic \Ther"mic\, a. [Gr. [?] heat.]
      Of or pertaining to heat; due to heat; thermal; as, thermic
      lines.
  
      {Thermic balance}. See {Bolometer}.
  
      {Thermic fever} (Med.), the condition of fever produced by
            sunstroke. See {Sunstroke}.
  
      {Thermic weight}. (Mech.) Same as {Heat weight}, under
            {Heat}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermocautery \Ther`mo*cau"ter*y\, n. [Thermo- + cautery.]
      (Surg.)
      Cautery by the application of heat.
  
      {Paquelin's thermocautery}, thermocautery by means of a
            hollow platinum point, which is kept constantly hot by the
            passage through it of benzine vapor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermochemic \Ther`mo*chem"ic\, Thermochemical
   \Ther`mo*chem"ic*al\, a. (Chem. Physics)
      Of or pertaining to thermochemistry; obtained by, or employed
      in, thermochemistry.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermochemic \Ther`mo*chem"ic\, Thermochemical
   \Ther`mo*chem"ic*al\, a. (Chem. Physics)
      Of or pertaining to thermochemistry; obtained by, or employed
      in, thermochemistry.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermochemistry \Ther`mo*chem"is*try\, n. [Thermo- + chemistry.]
      That branch of chemical science which includes the
      investigation of the various relations existing between
      chemical action and that manifestation of force termed heat,
      or the determination of the heat evolved by, or employed in,
      chemical actions.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermochroic \Ther`mo*chro"ic\, a. [Thermo- + Gr. [?], [?],
      color.]
      Pert. to or designating heat rays that have undergone
      selective absorption and are therefore analogous to colored
      light rays.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermochrosy \Ther*moch"ro*sy\, n. [Thermo- + Gr. [?] coloring.]
      (Physics)
      The property possessed by heat of being composed, like light,
      of rays of different degrees of refrangibility, which are
      unequal in rate or degree of transmission through diathermic
      substances.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermocouple \Ther"mo*cou`ple\, n.
      A thermoelectric couple.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermocurrent \Ther"mo*cur`rent\, n. (Physics)
      A current developed or set in motion by heat; specif., an
      electric current, in a heterogeneous circuit, due to
      differences of temperature between the junctions of the
      substances of which the circuit is composed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermocurrent \Ther"mo*cur`rent\, n. [Thermo- + current.]
      (Physics)
      A current, as of electricity, developed, or set in motion, by
      the action of heat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermogen \Ther"mo*gen\, n. [Thermo- + -gen.] (Old Chem.)
      Caloric; heat; regarded as a material but imponderable
      substance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermogenic \Ther`mo*gen"ic\, a. (Physiol.)
      Relating to heat, or to the production of heat; producing
      heat; thermogenous; as, the thermogenic tissues.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermogenous \Ther*mog"e*nous\, a. [Thermo- + -genous.]
      (Physiol.)
      Producing heat; thermogenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermogram \Ther"mo*gram\, n. (Physics)
      The trace or record made by means of a thermograph.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermograph \Ther"mo*graph\, n. [Thermo- + -graph.] (Physics)
      An instrument for automatically recording indications of the
      variation of temperature.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermography \Ther*mog"ra*phy\, n. [Thermo- + -graphy.]
      Any process of writing involving the use of heat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermojunction \Ther`mo*junc"tion\, n. (Elec.)
      A junction of two dissimilar conductors used to produce a
      thermoelectric current, as in one form of pyrometer; a
      thermocouple.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermoscope \Ther"mo*scope\, n. [Thermo- + -scope.] (Physics)
      An instrument for indicating changes of temperature without
      indicating the degree of heat by which it is affected;
      especially, an instrument contrived by Count Rumford which,
      as modified by Professor Leslie, was afterward called the
      differential thermometer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermoscopic \Ther`mo*scop"ic\, a. (Physics)
      Of or pertaining to the thermoscope; made by means of the
      thermoscope; as, thermoscopic observations.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermosiphon \Ther`mo*si"phon\, n.
      An arrangement of siphon tubes for assisting circulation in a
      liquid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermostable \Ther`mo*sta"ble\, a. [Thermo- + stable fixed.]
      (Physiol. Chem.)
      Capable of being heated to or somewhat above 55[f8] C.
      without loss of special properties; -- said of immune
      substances, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermostat \Ther"mo*stat\, n. [Thermo- + Gr. [?] to make to
      stand.] (Physics)
      A self-acting apparatus for regulating temperature by the
      unequal expansion of different metals, liquids, or gases by
      heat, as in opening or closing the damper of a stove, or the
      like, as the heat becomes greater or less than is desired.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermostatic \Ther`mo*stat"ic\, a. (Physics)
      Of or pertaining to the thermostat; made or effected by means
      of the thermostat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thermosystaltic \Ther`mo*sys*tal"tic\, a. [Thermo- + systaltic.]
      (Physiol.)
      Influenced in its contraction by heat or cold; -- said of a
      muscle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thorny \Thorn"y\, a. [Compar. {Thornier}; superl. {Thorniest}.]
      [Cf. AS. [thorn]orniht.]
      1. Full of thorns or spines; rough with thorns; spiny; as, a
            thorny wood; a thorny tree; a thorny crown.
  
      2. Like a thorn or thorns; hence, figuratively, troublesome;
            vexatious; harassing; perplexing. [bd]The thorny point of
            bare distress.[b8] --Shak.
  
                     The steep and thorny way to heaven.   --Shak.
  
      {Thorny rest-harrow} (Bot.), rest-harrow.
  
      {Thorny trefoil}, a prickly plant of the genus {Fagonia} ({F.
            Cretica}, etc.).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thornset \Thorn"set`\, a.
      Set with thorns. --Dyer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Oyster \Oys"ter\, n. [OF. oistre, F. hu[8c]tre, L. ostrea,
      ostreum, Gr. 'o`streon; prob. akin to 'ostre`on bone, the
      oyster being so named from its shell. Cf. {Osseous},
      {Ostracize}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) Any marine bivalve mollusk of the genus Ostrea.
            They are usually found adhering to rocks or other fixed
            objects in shallow water along the seacoasts, or in
            brackish water in the mouth of rivers. The common European
            oyster ({Ostrea edulis}), and the American oyster ({Ostrea
            Virginiana}), are the most important species.
  
      2. A name popularly given to the delicate morsel contained in
            a small cavity of the bone on each side of the lower part
            of the back of a fowl.
  
      {Fresh-water oyster} (Zo[94]l.), any species of the genus
            {Etheria}, and allied genera, found in rivers of Africa
            and South America. They are irregular in form, and attach
            themselves to rocks like oysters, but they have a pearly
            interior, and are allied to the fresh-water mussels.
  
      {Oyster bed}, a breeding place for oysters; a place in a
            tidal river or other water on or near the seashore, where
            oysters are deposited to grow and fatten for market. See
            1st {Scalp}, n.
  
      {Oyster catcher} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            wading birds of the genus {H[91]matopus}, which frequent
            seashores and feed upon shellfish. The European species
            ({H. ostralegus}), the common American species ({H.
            palliatus}), and the California, or black, oyster catcher
            ({H. Bachmani}) are the best known.
  
      {Oyster crab} (Zo[94]l.) a small crab ({Pinnotheres ostreum})
            which lives as a commensal in the gill cavity of the
            oyster.
  
      {Oyster dredge}, a rake or small dragnet of bringing up
            oyster from the bottom of the sea.
  
      {Oyster fish}. ({Zo[94]l}.)
            (a) The tautog.
            (b) The toadfish.
  
      {Oyster plant}. (Bot.)
            (a) A plant of the genus {Tragopogon} ({T. porrifolius}),
                  the root of which, when cooked, somewhat resembles the
                  oyster in taste; salsify; -- called also {vegetable
                  oyster}.
            (b) A plant found on the seacoast of Northern Europe,
                  America and Asia ({Mertensia maritima}), the fresh
                  leaves of which have a strong flavor of oysters.
  
      {Oyster plover}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Oyster catcher}, above.
           
  
      {Oyster shell} (Zo[94]l.), the shell of an oyster.
  
      {Oyster wench}, {Oyster wife}, {Oyster women}, a women who
            deals in oysters.
  
      {Pearl oyster}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Pearl}.
  
      {Thorny oyster} (Zo[94]l.), any spiny marine shell of the
            genus {Spondylus}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thring \Thring\, v. t. & i. [imp. {Throng}.] [AS. [thorn]ringan.
      See {Throng}.]
      To press, crowd, or throng. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thring \Thring\, v. t. & i. [imp. {Throng}.] [AS. [thorn]ringan.
      See {Throng}.]
      To press, crowd, or throng. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Thronged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Thronging}.]
      To crowd together; to press together into a close body, as a
      multitude of persons; to gather or move in multitudes.
  
               I have seen the dumb men throng to see him. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, n. [OE. [thorn]rong, [thorn]rang, AS.
      ge[thorn]rang, fr. [thorn]ringan to crowd, to press; akin to
      OS. thringan, D. & G. dringen, OHG. dringan, Icel.
      [thorn]ryngva, [thorn]r[94]ngva, Goth. [thorn]riehan, D. & G.
      drang a throng, press, Icel. [thorn]r[94]ng a throng, Lith.
      trenkti to jolt, tranksmas a tumult. Cf. {Thring}.]
      1. A multitude of persons or of living beings pressing or
            pressed into a close body or assemblage; a crowd.
  
      2. A great multitude; as, the heavenly throng.
  
      Syn: {Throng}, {Multitude}, {Crowd}.
  
      Usage: Any great number of persons form a multitude; a throng
                  is a large number of persons who are gathered or are
                  moving together in a collective body; a crowd is
                  composed of a large or small number of persons who
                  press together so as to bring their bodies into
                  immediate or inconvenient contact. A dispersed
                  multitude; the throngs in the streets of a city; the
                  crowd at a fair or a street fight. But these
                  distinctions are not carefully observed.
  
                           So, with this bold opposer rushes on This
                           many-headed monster, multitude.   --Daniel.
  
                           Not to know me argues yourselves unknown, The
                           lowest of your throng.                  --Milton.
  
                           I come from empty noise, and tasteless pomp,
                           From crowds that hide a monarch from himself.
                                                                              --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, v. t.
      1. To crowd, or press, as persons; to oppress or annoy with a
            crowd of living beings.
  
                     Much people followed him, and thronged him. --Mark
                                                                              v. 24.
  
      2. To crowd into; to fill closely by crowding or pressing
            into, as a hall or a street. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, a.
      Thronged; crowded; also, much occupied; busy. [Obs. or Prov.
      Eng.] --Bp. Sanderson.
  
               To the intent the sick . . . should not lie too throng.
                                                                              --Robynson
                                                                              (More's
                                                                              Utopia).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Thronged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Thronging}.]
      To crowd together; to press together into a close body, as a
      multitude of persons; to gather or move in multitudes.
  
               I have seen the dumb men throng to see him. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throng \Throng\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Thronged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Thronging}.]
      To crowd together; to press together into a close body, as a
      multitude of persons; to gather or move in multitudes.
  
               I have seen the dumb men throng to see him. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throngly \Throng"ly\, adv.
      In throngs or crowds. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throw \Throw\, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown}
      (thr[omac]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen,
      [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[be]wan to
      twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG.
      dr[be]jan, L. terebra an auger, gimlet, Gr. [?] to bore, to
      turn, [?] to pierce, [?] a hole. Cf. {Thread}, {Trite},
      {Turn}, v. t.]
      1. To fling, cast, or hurl with a certain whirling motion of
            the arm, to throw a ball; -- distinguished from to toss,
            or to bowl.
  
      2. To fling or cast in any manner; to drive to a distance
            from the hand or from an engine; to propel; to send; as,
            to throw stones or dust with the hand; a cannon throws a
            ball; a fire engine throws a stream of water to extinguish
            flames.
  
      3. To drive by violence; as, a vessel or sailors may be
            thrown upon a rock.
  
      4. (Mil.) To cause to take a strategic position; as, he threw
            a detachment of his army across the river.
  
      5. To overturn; to prostrate in wrestling; as, a man throws
            his antagonist.
  
      6. To cast, as dice; to venture at dice.
  
                     Set less than thou throwest.               --Shak.
  
      7. To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.
  
                     O'er his fair limbs a flowery vest he threw. --Pope.
  
      8. To divest or strip one's self of; to put off.
  
                     There the snake throws her enameled skin. --Shak.
  
      9. (Pottery) To form or shape roughly on a throwing engine,
            or potter's wheel, as earthen vessels.
  
      10. To give forcible utterance to; to cast; to vent.
  
                     I have thrown A brave defiance in King Henry's
                     teeth.                                             --Shak.
  
      11. To bring forth; to produce, as young; to bear; -- said
            especially of rabbits.
  
      12. To twist two or more filaments of, as silk, so as to form
            one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction
            contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; --
            sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by
            which silk is prepared for the weaver. --Tomlinson.
  
      {To throw away}.
            (a) To lose by neglect or folly; to spend in vain; to
                  bestow without a compensation; as, to throw away
                  time; to throw away money.
            (b) To reject; as, to throw away a good book, or a good
                  offer.
  
      {To throw back}.
            (a) To retort; to cast back, as a reply.
            (b) To reject; to refuse.
            (c) To reflect, as light.
  
      {To throw by}, to lay aside; to discard; to neglect as
            useless; as, to throw by a garment.
  
      {To throw down}, to subvert; to overthrow; to destroy; as, to
            throw down a fence or wall.
  
      {To throw in}.
            (a) To inject, as a fluid.
            (b) To put in; to deposit with others; to contribute; as,
                  to throw in a few dollars to help make up a fund; to
                  throw in an occasional comment.
            (c) To add without enumeration or valuation, as something
                  extra to clinch a bargain.
  
      {To throw off}.
            (a) To expel; to free one's self from; as, to throw off a
                  disease.
            (b) To reject; to discard; to abandon; as, to throw off
                  all sense of shame; to throw off a dependent.
            (c) To make a start in a hunt or race. [Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throwing \Throw"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Throwing engine}, {Throwing mill}, {Throwing table}, [or]
      {Throwing wheel} (Pottery), a machine on which earthenware is
            first rudely shaped by the hand of the potter from a mass
            of clay revolving rapidly on a disk or table carried by a
            vertical spindle; a potter's wheel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throwing \Throw"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Throwing engine}, {Throwing mill}, {Throwing table}, [or]
      {Throwing wheel} (Pottery), a machine on which earthenware is
            first rudely shaped by the hand of the potter from a mass
            of clay revolving rapidly on a disk or table carried by a
            vertical spindle; a potter's wheel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throwing \Throw"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Throwing engine}, {Throwing mill}, {Throwing table}, [or]
      {Throwing wheel} (Pottery), a machine on which earthenware is
            first rudely shaped by the hand of the potter from a mass
            of clay revolving rapidly on a disk or table carried by a
            vertical spindle; a potter's wheel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throw \Throw\, v. i.
  
      {To throw back}, to revert to an ancestral type or character.
            [bd]A large proportion of the steerage passengers throw
            back to their Darwinian ancestry.[b8] --The Century.
   Throwing stick \Throw"ing stick`\ (Anthropol.)
      An instrument used by various savage races for throwing a
      spear; -- called also {throw stick} and {spear thrower}. One
      end of the stick receives the butt of the spear, as upon a
      hook or thong, and the other end is grasped with the hand,
      which also holds the spear, toward the middle, above it with
      the finger and thumb, the effect being to bring the place of
      support nearer the center of the spear, and practically
      lengthen the arm in the act of throwing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throwing \Throw"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Throwing engine}, {Throwing mill}, {Throwing table}, [or]
      {Throwing wheel} (Pottery), a machine on which earthenware is
            first rudely shaped by the hand of the potter from a mass
            of clay revolving rapidly on a disk or table carried by a
            vertical spindle; a potter's wheel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Throwing \Throw"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Throwing engine}, {Throwing mill}, {Throwing table}, [or]
      {Throwing wheel} (Pottery), a machine on which earthenware is
            first rudely shaped by the hand of the potter from a mass
            of clay revolving rapidly on a disk or table carried by a
            vertical spindle; a potter's wheel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrown \Thrown\,
      a. & p. p. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Thrown silk}, silk thread consisting of two or more singles
            twisted together like a rope, in a direction contrary to
            that in which the singles of which it is composed are
            twisted. --M'Culloch.
  
      {Thrown singles}, silk thread or cord made by three processes
            of twisting, first into singles, two or more of which are
            twisted together making dumb singles, and several of these
            twisted together to make thrown singles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrown \Thrown\,
      a. & p. p. from {Throw}, v.
  
      {Thrown silk}, silk thread consisting of two or more singles
            twisted together like a rope, in a direction contrary to
            that in which the singles of which it is composed are
            twisted. --M'Culloch.
  
      {Thrown singles}, silk thread or cord made by three processes
            of twisting, first into singles, two or more of which are
            twisted together making dumb singles, and several of these
            twisted together to make thrown singles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrum \Thrum\, n. [OE. thrum, throm; akin to OD. drom, D. dreum,
      G. trumm, lump, end, fragment, OHG. drum end, Icel.
      [?]r[94]mr edge, brim, and L. terminus a limit, term. Cf.
      {Term}.] [Written also {thrumb}.]
      1. One of the ends of weaver's threads; hence, any soft,
            short threads or tufts resembling these.
  
      2. Any coarse yarn; an unraveled strand of rope.
  
      3. (Bot.) A threadlike part of a flower; a stamen.
  
      4. (Mining) A shove out of place; a small displacement or
            fault along a seam.
  
      5. (Naut.) A mat made of canvas and tufts of yarn.
  
      {Thrum cap}, a knitted cap. --Halliwell.
  
      {Thrum hat}, a hat made of coarse woolen cloth. --Minsheu.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thuringian \Thu*rin"gi*an\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Thuringia, a country in Germany, or its
      people. -- n. A native, or inhabitant of Thuringia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thuringite \Thu*rin"gite\, n. [From Thuringia, where it is
      found.] (Min.)
      A mineral occurring as an aggregation of minute scales having
      an olive-green color and pearly luster. It is a hydrous
      silicate of aluminia and iron.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tire \Tire\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Tired}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tiring}.] [OE. teorien to become weary, to fail, AS. teorian
      to be tired, be weary, to tire, exhaust; perhaps akin to E.
      tear to rend, the intermediate sense being, perhaps, to wear
      out; or cf. E. tarry.]
      To become weary; to be fatigued; to have the strength fail;
      to have the patience exhausted; as, a feeble person soon
      tires.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tiring-house \Tir"ing-house`\, n. [For attiring house.]
      A tiring-room. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tiring-room \Tir"ing-room`\, n. [For attiring room.]
      The room or place where players dress for the stage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tyronism \Ty"ro*nism\, n.
      The state of being a tyro, or beginner. [Written also
      {tironism}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arms \Arms\, n. pl. [OE. armes, F. arme, pl. armes, fr. L. arma,
      pl., arms, orig. fittings, akin to armus shoulder, and E.
      arm. See {Arm}, n.]
      1. Instruments or weapons of offense or defense.
  
                     He lays down his arms, but not his wiles. --Milton.
  
                     Three horses and three goodly suits of arms.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      2. The deeds or exploits of war; military service or science.
            [bd]Arms and the man I sing.[b8] --Dryden.
  
      3. (Law) Anything which a man takes in his hand in anger, to
            strike or assault another with; an aggressive weapon.
            --Cowell. Blackstone.
  
      4. (Her.) The ensigns armorial of a family, consisting of
            figures and colors borne in shields, banners, etc., as
            marks of dignity and distinction, and descending from
            father to son.
  
      5. (Falconry) The legs of a hawk from the thigh to the foot.
            --Halliwell.
  
      {Bred to arms}, educated to the profession of a soldier.
  
      {In arms}, armed for war; in a state of hostility.
  
      {Small arms}, portable firearms known as muskets, rifles,
            carbines, pistols, etc.
  
      {A stand of arms}, a complete set for one soldier, as a
            musket, bayonet, cartridge box and belt; frequently, the
            musket and bayonet alone.
  
      {To arms}! a summons to war or battle.
  
      {Under arms}, armed and equipped and in readiness for battle,
            or for a military parade.
  
      {Arm's end},
  
      {Arm's length},
  
      {Arm's reach}. See under {Arm}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ring \Ring\ (r[icr]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[acr]ng) or {Rung}
      (r[ucr]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS.
      hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD.
      ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.]
      1. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic
            body; as, to ring a bell.
  
      2. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound.
  
                     The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, Hath
                     rung night's yawning peal.                  --Shak.
  
      3. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
  
      {To ring a peal}, to ring a set of changes on a chime of
            bells.
  
      {To ring the changes upon}. See under {Change}.
  
      {To ring in} [or] {out}, to usher, attend on, or celebrate,
            by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and
            ring in the new. --Tennyson.
  
      {To ring the bells backward}, to sound the chimes, reversing
            the common order; -- formerly done as a signal of alarm or
            danger. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Peal \Peal\, n. [An abbrev. of F. appel a call, appeal, ruffle
      of a drum, fr. appeller to call, L. appellare. See {Appeal}.]
      1. A loud sound, or a succession of loud sounds, as of bells,
            thunder, cannon, shouts, of a multitude, etc. [bd]A fair
            peal of artillery.[b8] --Hayward.
  
                     Whether those peals of praise be his or no. --Shak.
  
                     And a deep thunder, peal on peal, afar. --Byron.
  
      2. A set of bells tuned to each other according to the
            diatonic scale; also, the changes rung on a set of bells.
  
      {To ring a peal}. See under {Ring}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ring \Ring\ (r[icr]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[acr]ng) or {Rung}
      (r[ucr]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS.
      hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD.
      ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.]
      1. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic
            body; as, to ring a bell.
  
      2. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound.
  
                     The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, Hath
                     rung night's yawning peal.                  --Shak.
  
      3. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
  
      {To ring a peal}, to ring a set of changes on a chime of
            bells.
  
      {To ring the changes upon}. See under {Change}.
  
      {To ring in} [or] {out}, to usher, attend on, or celebrate,
            by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and
            ring in the new. --Tennyson.
  
      {To ring the bells backward}, to sound the chimes, reversing
            the common order; -- formerly done as a signal of alarm or
            danger. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ring \Ring\ (r[icr]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[acr]ng) or {Rung}
      (r[ucr]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS.
      hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD.
      ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.]
      1. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic
            body; as, to ring a bell.
  
      2. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound.
  
                     The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, Hath
                     rung night's yawning peal.                  --Shak.
  
      3. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
  
      {To ring a peal}, to ring a set of changes on a chime of
            bells.
  
      {To ring the changes upon}. See under {Change}.
  
      {To ring in} [or] {out}, to usher, attend on, or celebrate,
            by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and
            ring in the new. --Tennyson.
  
      {To ring the bells backward}, to sound the chimes, reversing
            the common order; -- formerly done as a signal of alarm or
            danger. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Change \Change\, n. [F. change, fr. changer. See {Change}. v.
      t.]
      1. Any variation or alteration; a passing from one state or
            form to another; as, a change of countenance; a change of
            habits or principles.
  
                     Apprehensions of a change of dynasty. --Hallam.
  
                     All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till
                     my change come.                                 --Job xiv. 14.
  
      2. A succesion or substitution of one thing in the place of
            another; a difference; novelty; variety; as, a change of
            seasons.
  
                     Our fathers did for change to France repair.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     The ringing grooves of change.            --Tennyson.
  
      3. A passing from one phase to another; as, a change of the
            moon.
  
      4. Alteration in the order of a series; permutation.
  
      5. That which makes a variety, or may be substituted for
            another.
  
                     Thirty change (R.V. changes) of garments. --Judg.
                                                                              xiv. 12.
  
      6. Small money; the money by means of which the larger coins
            and bank bills are made available in small dealings;
            hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a
            coin or note exceeding the sum due.
  
      7. [See {Exchange}.] A place where merchants and others meet
            to transact business; a building appropriated for
            mercantile transactions. [Colloq. for Exchange.]
  
      8. A public house; an alehouse. [Scot.]
  
                     They call an alehouse a change.         --Burt.
  
      9. (Mus.) Any order in which a number of bells are struck,
            other than that of the diatonic scale.
  
                     Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing.
                                                                              --Holder.
  
      {Change of life}, the period in the life of a woman when
            menstruation and the capacity for conception cease,
            usually occurring between forty-five and fifty years of
            age.
  
      {Change ringing}, the continual production, without
            repetition, of changes on bells, See def. 9. above.
  
      {Change wheel} (Mech.), one of a set of wheels of different
            sizes and number of teeth, that may be changed or
            substituted one for another in machinery, to produce a
            different but definite rate of angular velocity in an
            axis, as in cutting screws, gear, etc.
  
      {To ring the changes on}, to present the same facts or
            arguments in variety of ways.
  
      Syn: Variety; variation; alteration; mutation; transition;
               vicissitude; innovation; novelty; transmutation;
               revolution; reverse.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ring \Ring\ (r[icr]ng), v. t. [imp. {Rang} (r[acr]ng) or {Rung}
      (r[ucr]ng); p. p. {Rung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ringing}.] [AS.
      hringan; akin to Icel. hringja, Sw. ringa, Dan. ringe, OD.
      ringhen, ringkelen. [root]19.]
      1. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic
            body; as, to ring a bell.
  
      2. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound.
  
                     The shard-borne beetle, with his drowsy hums, Hath
                     rung night's yawning peal.                  --Shak.
  
      3. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
  
      {To ring a peal}, to ring a set of changes on a chime of
            bells.
  
      {To ring the changes upon}. See under {Change}.
  
      {To ring in} [or] {out}, to usher, attend on, or celebrate,
            by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and
            ring in the new. --Tennyson.
  
      {To ring the bells backward}, to sound the chimes, reversing
            the common order; -- formerly done as a signal of alarm or
            danger. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heart \Heart\, n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to
      OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel.
      hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[a1]rt[?], Lith. szirdis, Russ.
      serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. [?], [?] [?][?][?][?]. Cf.
      {Accord}, {Discord}, {Cordial}, 4th {Core}, {Courage}.]
      1. (Anat.) A hollow, muscular organ, which, by contracting
            rhythmically, keeps up the circulation of the blood.
  
                     Why does my blood thus muster to my heart! --Shak.
  
      Note: In adult mammals and birds, the heart is
               four-chambered, the right auricle and ventricle being
               completely separated from the left auricle and
               ventricle; and the blood flows from the systematic
               veins to the right auricle, thence to the right
               ventricle, from which it is forced to the lungs, then
               returned to the left auricle, thence passes to the left
               ventricle, from which it is driven into the systematic
               arteries. See Illust. under {Aorta}. In fishes there
               are but one auricle and one ventricle, the blood being
               pumped from the ventricle through the gills to the
               system, and thence returned to the auricle. In most
               amphibians and reptiles, the separation of the auricles
               is partial or complete, and in reptiles the ventricles
               also are separated more or less completely. The
               so-called lymph hearts, found in many amphibians,
               reptiles, and birds, are contractile sacs, which pump
               the lymph into the veins.
  
      2. The seat of the affections or sensibilities, collectively
            or separately, as love, hate, joy, grief, courage, and the
            like; rarely, the seat of the understanding or will; --
            usually in a good sense, when no epithet is expressed; the
            better or lovelier part of our nature; the spring of all
            our actions and purposes; the seat of moral life and
            character; the moral affections and character itself; the
            individual disposition and character; as, a good, tender,
            loving, bad, hard, or selfish heart.
  
                     Hearts are dust, hearts' loves remain. --Emerson.
  
      3. The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and
            within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or
            system; the source of life and motion in any organization;
            the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of
            energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country,
            of a tree, etc.
  
                     Exploits done in the heart of France. --Shak.
  
                     Peace subsisting at the heart Of endless agitation.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      4. Courage; courageous purpose; spirit.
  
                     Eve, recovering heart, replied.         --Milton.
  
                     The expelled nations take heart, and when they fly
                     from one country invade another.         --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      5. Vigorous and efficient activity; power of fertile
            production; condition of the soil, whether good or bad.
  
                     That the spent earth may gather heart again.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      6. That which resembles a heart in shape; especially, a
            roundish or oval figure or object having an obtuse point
            at one end, and at the other a corresponding indentation,
            -- used as a symbol or representative of the heart.
  
      7. One of a series of playing cards, distinguished by the
            figure or figures of a heart; as, hearts are trumps.
  
      8. Vital part; secret meaning; real intention.
  
                     And then show you the heart of my message. --Shak.
  
      9. A term of affectionate or kindly and familiar address.
            [bd]I speak to thee, my heart.[b8] --Shak.
  
      Note: Heart is used in many compounds, the most of which need
               no special explanation; as, heart-appalling,
               heart-breaking, heart-cheering, heart-chilled,
               heart-expanding, heart-free, heart-hardened,
               heart-heavy, heart-purifying, heart-searching,
               heart-sickening, heart-sinking, heart-stirring,
               heart-touching, heart-wearing, heart-whole,
               heart-wounding, heart-wringing, etc.
  
      {After one's own heart}, conforming with one's inmost
            approval and desire; as, a friend after my own heart.
  
                     The Lord hath sought him a man after his own heart.
                                                                              --1 Sam. xiii.
                                                                              14.
  
      {At heart}, in the inmost character or disposition; at
            bottom; really; as, he is at heart a good man.
  
      {By heart}, in the closest or most thorough manner; as, to
            know or learn by heart. [bd]Composing songs, for fools to
            get by heart[b8] (that is, to commit to memory, or to
            learn thoroughly). --Pope.
  
      {For my heart}, for my life; if my life were at stake. [Obs.]
            [bd]I could not get him for my heart to do it.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {Heart bond} (Masonry), a bond in which no header stone
            stretches across the wall, but two headers meet in the
            middle, and their joint is covered by another stone laid
            header fashion. --Knight.
  
      {Heart and hand}, with enthusiastic co[94]peration.
  
      {Heart hardness}, hardness of heart; callousness of feeling;
            moral insensibility. --Shak.
  
      {Heart heaviness}, depression of spirits. --Shak.
  
      {Heart point} (Her.), the fess point. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      {Heart rising}, a rising of the heart, as in opposition.
  
      {Heart shell} (Zo[94]l.), any marine, bivalve shell of the
            genus {Cardium} and allied genera, having a heart-shaped
            shell; esp., the European {Isocardia cor}; -- called also
            {heart cockle}.
  
      {Heart sickness}, extreme depression of spirits.
  
      {Heart and soul}, with the utmost earnestness.
  
      {Heart urchin} (Zo[94]l.), any heartshaped, spatangoid sea
            urchin. See {Spatangoid}.
  
      {Heart wheel}, a form of cam, shaped like a heart. See {Cam}.
           
  
      {In good heart}, in good courage; in good hope.
  
      {Out of heart}, discouraged.
  
      {Poor heart}, an exclamation of pity.
  
      {To break the heart of}.
            (a) To bring to despair or hopeless grief; to cause to be
                  utterly cast down by sorrow.
            (b) To bring almost to completion; to finish very nearly;
                  -- said of anything undertaken; as, he has broken the
                  heart of the task.
  
      {To find in the heart}, to be willing or disposed. [bd]I
            could find in my heart to ask your pardon.[b8] --Sir P.
            Sidney.
  
      {To have at heart}, to desire (anything) earnestly.
  
      {To have in the heart}, to purpose; to design or intend to
            do.
  
      {To have the heart in the mouth}, to be much frightened.
  
      {To lose heart}, to become discouraged.
  
      {To lose one's heart}, to fall in love.
  
      {To set the heart at rest}, to put one's self at ease.
  
      {To set the heart upon}, to fix the desires on; to long for
            earnestly; to be very fond of.
  
      {To take heart of grace}, to take courage.
  
      {To take to heart}, to grieve over.
  
      {To wear one's heart upon one's sleeve}, to expose one's
            feelings or intentions; to be frank or impulsive.
  
      {With all one's whole heart}, very earnestly; fully;
            completely; devotedly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wrinkle \Wrin"kle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wrinkled}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Wrinkling}.]
      1. To contract into furrows and prominences; to make a
            wrinkle or wrinkles in; to corrugate; as, wrinkle the skin
            or the brow. [bd]Sport that wrinkled Care derides.[b8]
            --Milton.
  
                     Her wrinkled form in black and white arrayed.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
      2. Hence, to make rough or uneven in any way.
  
                     A keen north wind that, blowing dry, Wrinkled the
                     face of deluge, as decayed.               --Milton.
  
                     Then danced we on the wrinkled sand.   --Bryant.
  
      {To wrinkle at}, to sneer at. [Obs.] --Marston.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torinese \To`rin*ese"\, a. [It.]
      Of or pertaining to Turin. -- n. sing. & pl. A native or
      inhabitant of Turin; collectively, the people of Turin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torrens system \Tor"rens sys`tem\
      A system of registration of titles to land (as distinct from
      registration of deeds) introduced into South Australia by the
      Real Property (or Torrens) Act (act 15 of 1857-58), drafted
      by Sir Robert Torrens (1814-84). Its essential feature is the
      guaranty by the government of properly registered titles. The
      system has been generally adopted in Australia and British
      Columbia, and in its original or a modified form in some
      other countries, including some States of the United States.
      Hence
  
      {Torrens title}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Torrens system \Tor"rens sys`tem\
      A system of registration of titles to land (as distinct from
      registration of deeds) introduced into South Australia by the
      Real Property (or Torrens) Act (act 15 of 1857-58), drafted
      by Sir Robert Torrens (1814-84). Its essential feature is the
      guaranty by the government of properly registered titles. The
      system has been generally adopted in Australia and British
      Columbia, and in its original or a modified form in some
      other countries, including some States of the United States.
      Hence
  
      {Torrens title}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tour \Tour\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Toured}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Touring}.]
      To make a tourm; as, to tour throught a country. --T. Hughes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Touring car \Tour"ing car\
      An automobile designed for touring; specif., a roomy car, not
      a limousine, for five or more passengers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tourniquet \Tour"ni*quet\, n. [F., fr. tourner to turn.] (Surg.)
      An instrument for arresting hemorrhage. It consists
      essentially of a pad or compress upon which pressure is made
      by a band which is tightened by a screw or other means.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tower \Tow"er\, n. [OE. tour,tor,tur, F. tour, L. turris; akin
      to Gr. [?]; cf. W. twr a tower, Ir. tor a castle, Gael. torr
      a tower, castle. Cf. {Tor}, {Turret}.]
      1. (Arch.)
            (a) A mass of building standing alone and insulated,
                  usually higher than its diameter, but when of great
                  size not always of that proportion.
            (b) A projection from a line of wall, as a fortification,
                  for purposes of defense, as a flanker, either or the
                  same height as the curtain wall or higher.
            (c) A structure appended to a larger edifice for a special
                  purpose, as for a belfry, and then usually high in
                  proportion to its width and to the height of the rest
                  of the edifice; as, a church tower.
  
      2. A citadel; a fortress; hence, a defense.
  
                     Thou hast been a shelter for me, and a strong tower
                     from the enemy.                                 --Ps. lxi. 3.
  
      3. A headdress of a high or towerlike form, fashionable about
            the end of the seventeenth century and until 1715; also,
            any high headdress.
  
                     Lay trains of amorous intrigues In towers, and
                     curls, and periwigs.                           --Hudibras.
  
      4. High flight; elevation. [Obs.] --Johnson.
  
      {Gay Lussac's tower} (Chem.), a large tower or chamber used
            in the sulphuric acid process, to absorb (by means of
            concentrated acid) the spent nitrous fumes that they may
            be returned to the Glover's tower to be reemployed. See
            {Sulphuric acid}, under {Sulphuric}, and {Glover's tower},
            below.
  
      {Glover's tower} (Chem.), a large tower or chamber used in
            the manufacture of sulphuric acid, to condense the crude
            acid and to deliver concentrated acid charged with nitrous
            fumes. These fumes, as a catalytic, effect the conversion
            of sulphurous to sulphuric acid. See {Sulphuric acid},
            under {Sulphuric}, and {Gay Lussac's tower}, above.
  
      {Round tower}. See under {Round}, a.
  
      {Shot tower}. See under {Shot}.
  
      {Tower bastion} (Fort.), a bastion of masonry, often with
            chambers beneath, built at an angle of the interior
            polygon of some works.
  
      {Tower mustard} (Bot.), the cruciferous plant {Arabis
            perfoliata}.
  
      {Tower of London}, a collection of buildings in the eastern
            part of London, formerly containing a state prison, and
            now used as an arsenal and repository of various objects
            of public interest.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tower \Tow"er\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {towered}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {towering}.]
      To rise and overtop other objects; to be lofty or very high;
      hence, to soar.
  
               On the other side an high rock towered still.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
               My lord protector's hawks do tower so well. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Towering \Tow"er*ing\, a.
      1. Very high; elevated; rising aloft; as, a towering height.
            --Pope.
  
      2. Hence, extreme; violent; surpassing.
  
                     A man agitated by a towering passion. --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tower \Tow"er\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {towered}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {towering}.]
      To rise and overtop other objects; to be lofty or very high;
      hence, to soar.
  
               On the other side an high rock towered still.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
               My lord protector's hawks do tower so well. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Towering \Tow"er*ing\, a.
      1. Very high; elevated; rising aloft; as, a towering height.
            --Pope.
  
      2. Hence, extreme; violent; surpassing.
  
                     A man agitated by a towering passion. --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tram \Tram\, n. [Prov. E. tram a coal wagon, the shaft of a cart
      or carriage, a beam or bar; probably of Scand, origin; cf.
      OSw. tr[86]m, trum, a beam, OD. drom, Prov. & OHG. tram.]
      1. A four-wheeled truck running on rails, and used in a mine,
            as for carrying coal or ore.
  
      2. The shaft of a cart. [Prov. Eng.] --De Quincey.
  
      3. One of the rails of a tramway.
  
      4. A car on a horse railroad. [Eng.]
  
      {Tram car}, a car made to run on a tramway, especially a
            street railway car.
  
      {Tram plate}, a flat piece of iron laid down as a rail.
  
      {Tram pot} (Milling), the step and support for the lower end
            of the spindle of a millstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trance \Trance\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trancing}.]
      1. To entrance.
  
                     And three I left him tranced.            --Shak.
  
      2. To pass over or across; to traverse. [Poetic]
  
                     Trance the world over.                        --Beau. & Fl.
  
                     When thickest dark did trance the sky. --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trance \Trance\, n. [F. transe fright, in OF. also, trance or
      swoon, fr. transir to chill, benumb, to be chilled, to
      shiver, OF. also, to die, L. transire to pass over, go over,
      pass away, cease; trans across, over + ire to go; cf. L.
      transitus a passing over. See {Issue}, and cf. {Transit}.]
      1. A tedious journey. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell.
  
      2. A state in which the soul seems to have passed out of the
            body into another state of being, or to be rapt into
            visions; an ecstasy.
  
                     And he became very hungry, and would have eaten; but
                     while they made ready, he fell into a trance.
                                                                              --Acts. x. 10.
  
                     My soul was ravished quite as in a trance.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      3. (Med.) A condition, often simulating death, in which there
            is a total suspension of the power of voluntary movement,
            with abolition of all evidences of mental activity and the
            reduction to a minimum of all the vital functions so that
            the patient lies still and apparently unconscious of
            surrounding objects, while the pulsation of the heart and
            the breathing, although still present, are almost or
            altogether imperceptible.
  
                     He fell down in a trance.                  --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trance \Trance\, v. i.
      To pass; to travel. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trance \Trance\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trancing}.]
      1. To entrance.
  
                     And three I left him tranced.            --Shak.
  
      2. To pass over or across; to traverse. [Poetic]
  
                     Trance the world over.                        --Beau. & Fl.
  
                     When thickest dark did trance the sky. --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Etter pike \Et"ter pike`\, n. [Cf. {Atter}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The stingfish, or lesser weever ({Tranchinus vipera}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trance \Trance\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Trancing}.]
      1. To entrance.
  
                     And three I left him tranced.            --Shak.
  
      2. To pass over or across; to traverse. [Poetic]
  
                     Trance the world over.                        --Beau. & Fl.
  
                     When thickest dark did trance the sky. --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trancscendent \Tranc*scend"ent\, n.
      That which surpasses or is supereminent; that which is very
      excellent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trancscendental \Tranc`scen*den"tal\, a. [Cf. F. transcendantal,
      G. transcendental.]
      1. Supereminent; surpassing others; as, transcendental being
            or qualities.
  
      2. (Philos.) In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that
            which can be determined a priori in regard to the
            fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is
            transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is
            does not transcend all human knowledge, or become
            transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or
            necessary conditions of experience which, though affording
            the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that
            contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
  
      3. Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation,
            imagery, or diction.
  
      Note: In mathematics, a quantity is said to be transcendental
               relative to another quantity when it is expressed as a
               transcendental function of the latter; thus, a^{x},
               10^{2x}, log x, sin x, tan x, etc., are transcendental
               relative to x.
  
      {Transcendental curve} (Math.), a curve in which one ordinate
            is a transcendental function of the other.
  
      {Transcendental equation} (Math.), an equation into which a
            transcendental function of one of the unknown or variable
            quantities enters.
  
      {Transcendental function}. (Math.) See under {Function}.
  
      Syn: {Transcendental}, {Empirical}.
  
      Usage: These terms, with the corresponding nouns,
                  transcendentalism and empiricism, are of comparatively
                  recent origin. Empirical refers to knowledge which is
                  gained by the experience of actual phenomena, without
                  reference to the principles or laws to which they are
                  to be referred, or by which they are to be explained.
                  Transcendental has reference to those beliefs or
                  principles which are not derived from experience, and
                  yet are absolutely necessary to make experience
                  possible or useful. Such, in the better sense of the
                  term, is the transcendental philosophy, or
                  transcendentalism. Each of these words is also used in
                  a bad sense, empiricism applying to that one-sided
                  view of knowledge which neglects or loses sight of the
                  truths or principles referred to above, and trusts to
                  experience alone; transcendentalism, to the opposite
                  extreme, which, in its deprecation of experience,
                  loses sight of the relations which facts and phenomena
                  sustain to principles, and hence to a kind of
                  philosophy, or a use of language, which is vague,
                  obscure, fantastic, or extravagant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranect \Tran"ect\, n. [Cf. {Traject}.]
      A ferry. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trangram \Tran"gram\, n. [OE. trangrain a strange thing,
      trangame a toy. See {Tangram}.]
      Something intricately contrived; a contrived; a puzzle. [Cant
      & Obs.] --Arbuthnot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquil \Tran"quil\, a. [L. tranquillus; probably fr. trans
      across, over + a word akin to quietus quiet: cf. F.
      tranquille. See {Quiet}.]
      Quiet; calm; undisturbed; peaceful; not agitated; as, the
      atmosphere is tranquil; the condition of the country is
      tranquil.
  
               A style clear, tranquil, easy to follow. --De Quincey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilization \Tran`quil*i*za"tion\, Tranquillization
   \Tran`quil*li*za"tion\, n.
      The act of tranquilizing, or the state of being tranquilized.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizer \Tran"quil*i`zer\, Tranquillizer \Tran"quil*li`zer\
   ,   n.
      One who, or that which, tranquilizes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizing \Tran"quil*i`zing\, Tranquillizing
   \Tran"quil*li`zing\, a.
      Making tranquil; calming. [bd] The tranquilizing power of
      time.[b8] --Wordsworth. -- {Tran"quil*i`zing*ly} or
      {Tran"quil*li`zing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizing \Tran"quil*i`zing\, Tranquillizing
   \Tran"quil*li`zing\, a.
      Making tranquil; calming. [bd] The tranquilizing power of
      time.[b8] --Wordsworth. -- {Tran"quil*i`zing*ly} or
      {Tran"quil*li`zing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquillity \Tran*quil"li*ty\, n. [F. tranquillit[82], L.
      tranquillitas.]
      The quality or state of being tranquil; calmness; composure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilization \Tran`quil*i*za"tion\, Tranquillization
   \Tran`quil*li*za"tion\, n.
      The act of tranquilizing, or the state of being tranquilized.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizer \Tran"quil*i`zer\, Tranquillizer \Tran"quil*li`zer\
   ,   n.
      One who, or that which, tranquilizes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizing \Tran"quil*i`zing\, Tranquillizing
   \Tran"quil*li`zing\, a.
      Making tranquil; calming. [bd] The tranquilizing power of
      time.[b8] --Wordsworth. -- {Tran"quil*i`zing*ly} or
      {Tran"quil*li`zing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilize \Tran"quil*ize\, Tranquillize \Tran"quil*lize\, v.
      t. [imp. & p. p. {Tranquilized}or {Tranquilliized}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tranquilizing}or {Tranquillizing}.] [Cf. F.
      tranquilliser.]
      To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to
      make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed
      by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.
  
      Syn: To quiet; compose; still; soothe; appease; calm; pacify.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilizing \Tran"quil*i`zing\, Tranquillizing
   \Tran"quil*li`zing\, a.
      Making tranquil; calming. [bd] The tranquilizing power of
      time.[b8] --Wordsworth. -- {Tran"quil*i`zing*ly} or
      {Tran"quil*li`zing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilly \Tran"quil*ly\, adv.
      In a tranquil manner; calmly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranquilness \Tran"quil*ness\, n.
      Quality or state of being tranquil.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trans- \Trans-\ [L. trans across, over.]
      A prefix, signifying over, beyond, through and through, on
      the other side, as in transalpine, beyond the Alps;
      transform, to form through and through, that is, anew,
      transfigure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transact \Trans*act"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transacted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transacting}.] [L. transactus, p. p. of transigere.
      See {Transaction}.]
      To carry through; to do; perform; to manage; as, to transact
      commercial business; to transact business by an agent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transact \Trans*act"\, v. i.
      To conduct matters; to manage affairs. [R.] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transact \Trans*act"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transacted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transacting}.] [L. transactus, p. p. of transigere.
      See {Transaction}.]
      To carry through; to do; perform; to manage; as, to transact
      commercial business; to transact business by an agent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transact \Trans*act"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transacted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transacting}.] [L. transactus, p. p. of transigere.
      See {Transaction}.]
      To carry through; to do; perform; to manage; as, to transact
      commercial business; to transact business by an agent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transaction \Trans*ac"tion\, n. [L. transactio, fr. transigere,
      transactum, to drive through, carry through, accomplish,
      transact; trans across, over + agere to drive; cf. F.
      transaction. See {Act}, {Agent}.]
      1. The doing or performing of any business; management of any
            affair; performance.
  
      2. That which is done; an affair; as, the transactions on the
            exchange.
  
      3. (Civil Law) An adjustment of a dispute between parties by
            mutual agreement.
  
      {Transaction of a society}, the published record of what it
            has done or accomplished.
  
      Syn: Proceeding; action; process.
  
      Usage: {Transaction}, {Proceeding}. A transaction is
                  something already done and completed; a proceeding is
                  either something which is now going on, or, if ended,
                  is still contemplated with reference to its progress
                  or successive stages.
  
      Note: [bd] We the word proceeding in application to an affray
               in the street, and the word transaction to some
               commercial negotiation that has been carried on between
               certain persons. The proceeding marks the manner of
               proceeding, as when we speak of the proceedings in a
               court of law. The transaction marks the business
               transacted; as, the transactions on the Exchange.[b8]
               --Crabb.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transaction \Trans*ac"tion\, n. [L. transactio, fr. transigere,
      transactum, to drive through, carry through, accomplish,
      transact; trans across, over + agere to drive; cf. F.
      transaction. See {Act}, {Agent}.]
      1. The doing or performing of any business; management of any
            affair; performance.
  
      2. That which is done; an affair; as, the transactions on the
            exchange.
  
      3. (Civil Law) An adjustment of a dispute between parties by
            mutual agreement.
  
      {Transaction of a society}, the published record of what it
            has done or accomplished.
  
      Syn: Proceeding; action; process.
  
      Usage: {Transaction}, {Proceeding}. A transaction is
                  something already done and completed; a proceeding is
                  either something which is now going on, or, if ended,
                  is still contemplated with reference to its progress
                  or successive stages.
  
      Note: [bd] We the word proceeding in application to an affray
               in the street, and the word transaction to some
               commercial negotiation that has been carried on between
               certain persons. The proceeding marks the manner of
               proceeding, as when we speak of the proceedings in a
               court of law. The transaction marks the business
               transacted; as, the transactions on the Exchange.[b8]
               --Crabb.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transactor \Trans*act"or\, n. [L.]
      One who transacts, performs, or conducts any business.
      --Derham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transalpine \Trans*al"pine\, a. [L. transalpinus; trans across,
      beyond + Alpinus Alpine, from Alpes the Alps: cf. F.
      transalpin.]
      Being on the farther side of the Alps in regard to Rome, that
      is, on the north or west side of the Alps; of or pertaining
      to the region or the people beyond the Alps; as, transalpine
      Gaul; -- opposed to {cisalpine}. [bd] Transalpine garbs.[b8]
      --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transalpine \Trans*al"pine\, n.
      A native or inhabitant of a country beyond the Alps, that is,
      out of Italy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transanimate \Trans*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transanimated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transanimating}.] [Trans- +
      animate.]
      To animate with a soul conveyed from another body. [R.] --Bp.
      J. King (1608).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transanimate \Trans*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transanimated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transanimating}.] [Trans- +
      animate.]
      To animate with a soul conveyed from another body. [R.] --Bp.
      J. King (1608).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transanimate \Trans*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transanimated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transanimating}.] [Trans- +
      animate.]
      To animate with a soul conveyed from another body. [R.] --Bp.
      J. King (1608).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transanimation \Trans*an`i*ma"tion\, n. [Cf. F. transanimation.]
      The conveyance of a soul from one body to another. [R.]
      --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transatlantic \Trans`at*lan"tic\, a. [Pref. trans- + Atlantic:
      cf. F. transatlantique.]
      1. Lying or being beyond the Atlantic Ocean.
  
      Note: When used by a person in Europe or Africa,
               transatlantic signifies being in America; when by a
               person in America, it denotes being or lying in Europe
               or Africa, especially the former.
  
      2. Crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transaudient \Trans*au"di*ent\, a. [See {Trans-}, and
      {Audient}.]
      Permitting the passage of sound. [R.] --Lowell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcalency \Trans*ca"len*cy\, n.
      The quality or state of being transcalent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcalent \Trans*ca"lent\, a. [Pref. trans- + L. calens, p.
      pr. of calere to grow warm.]
      Pervious to, or permitting the passage of, heat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcend \Tran*scend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcended}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transcending}.] [L. transcendere, transcensum;
      trans beyond, over + scandere to climb. See {Scan}.]
      1. To rise above; to surmount; as, lights in the heavens
            transcending the region of the clouds. --Howell.
  
      2. To pass over; to go beyond; to exceed.
  
                     Such popes as shall transcend their limits. --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcend \Tran*scend"\ (tr[acr]n*s[cr]nd"), v. i.
      1. To climb; to mount. [Obs.]
  
      2. To be transcendent; to excel. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcend \Tran*scend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcended}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transcending}.] [L. transcendere, transcensum;
      trans beyond, over + scandere to climb. See {Scan}.]
      1. To rise above; to surmount; as, lights in the heavens
            transcending the region of the clouds. --Howell.
  
      2. To pass over; to go beyond; to exceed.
  
                     Such popes as shall transcend their limits. --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendence \Tran*scend"ence\ (-[eit]ns), Transcendency
   \Tran*scend"en*cy\ (-[eit]n*s[ycr]), [Cf. L. transcendentia, F.
      transcendance.]
      1. The quality or state of being transcendent; superior
            excellence; supereminence.
  
                     The Augustinian theology rests upon the
                     transcendence of Deity at its controlling principle.
                                                                              --A. V. G.
                                                                              Allen.
  
      2. Elevation above truth; exaggeration. [Obs.]
  
                     [bd]Where transcendencies are more allowed.[b8]
                                                                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendence \Tran*scend"ence\ (-[eit]ns), Transcendency
   \Tran*scend"en*cy\ (-[eit]n*s[ycr]), [Cf. L. transcendentia, F.
      transcendance.]
      1. The quality or state of being transcendent; superior
            excellence; supereminence.
  
                     The Augustinian theology rests upon the
                     transcendence of Deity at its controlling principle.
                                                                              --A. V. G.
                                                                              Allen.
  
      2. Elevation above truth; exaggeration. [Obs.]
  
                     [bd]Where transcendencies are more allowed.[b8]
                                                                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendent \Tran*scend"ent\, a. [L. transcendens, -entis, p.
      pr. of transcendere to transcend: cf. F. transcendant, G.
      transcendent.]
      1. Very excellent; superior or supreme in excellence;
            surpassing others; as, transcendent worth; transcendent
            valor.
  
                     Clothed with transcendent brightness. --Milton.
  
      2. (Kantian Philos.) Transcending, or reaching beyond, the
            limits of human knowledge; -- applied to affirmations and
            speculations concerning what lies beyond the reach of the
            human intellect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendental \Tran`scen*den"tal\, n.
      A transcendentalist. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trancscendental \Tranc`scen*den"tal\, a. [Cf. F. transcendantal,
      G. transcendental.]
      1. Supereminent; surpassing others; as, transcendental being
            or qualities.
  
      2. (Philos.) In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that
            which can be determined a priori in regard to the
            fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is
            transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is
            does not transcend all human knowledge, or become
            transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or
            necessary conditions of experience which, though affording
            the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that
            contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
  
      3. Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation,
            imagery, or diction.
  
      Note: In mathematics, a quantity is said to be transcendental
               relative to another quantity when it is expressed as a
               transcendental function of the latter; thus, a^{x},
               10^{2x}, log x, sin x, tan x, etc., are transcendental
               relative to x.
  
      {Transcendental curve} (Math.), a curve in which one ordinate
            is a transcendental function of the other.
  
      {Transcendental equation} (Math.), an equation into which a
            transcendental function of one of the unknown or variable
            quantities enters.
  
      {Transcendental function}. (Math.) See under {Function}.
  
      Syn: {Transcendental}, {Empirical}.
  
      Usage: These terms, with the corresponding nouns,
                  transcendentalism and empiricism, are of comparatively
                  recent origin. Empirical refers to knowledge which is
                  gained by the experience of actual phenomena, without
                  reference to the principles or laws to which they are
                  to be referred, or by which they are to be explained.
                  Transcendental has reference to those beliefs or
                  principles which are not derived from experience, and
                  yet are absolutely necessary to make experience
                  possible or useful. Such, in the better sense of the
                  term, is the transcendental philosophy, or
                  transcendentalism. Each of these words is also used in
                  a bad sense, empiricism applying to that one-sided
                  view of knowledge which neglects or loses sight of the
                  truths or principles referred to above, and trusts to
                  experience alone; transcendentalism, to the opposite
                  extreme, which, in its deprecation of experience,
                  loses sight of the relations which facts and phenomena
                  sustain to principles, and hence to a kind of
                  philosophy, or a use of language, which is vague,
                  obscure, fantastic, or extravagant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trancscendental \Tranc`scen*den"tal\, a. [Cf. F. transcendantal,
      G. transcendental.]
      1. Supereminent; surpassing others; as, transcendental being
            or qualities.
  
      2. (Philos.) In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that
            which can be determined a priori in regard to the
            fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is
            transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is
            does not transcend all human knowledge, or become
            transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or
            necessary conditions of experience which, though affording
            the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that
            contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
  
      3. Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation,
            imagery, or diction.
  
      Note: In mathematics, a quantity is said to be transcendental
               relative to another quantity when it is expressed as a
               transcendental function of the latter; thus, a^{x},
               10^{2x}, log x, sin x, tan x, etc., are transcendental
               relative to x.
  
      {Transcendental curve} (Math.), a curve in which one ordinate
            is a transcendental function of the other.
  
      {Transcendental equation} (Math.), an equation into which a
            transcendental function of one of the unknown or variable
            quantities enters.
  
      {Transcendental function}. (Math.) See under {Function}.
  
      Syn: {Transcendental}, {Empirical}.
  
      Usage: These terms, with the corresponding nouns,
                  transcendentalism and empiricism, are of comparatively
                  recent origin. Empirical refers to knowledge which is
                  gained by the experience of actual phenomena, without
                  reference to the principles or laws to which they are
                  to be referred, or by which they are to be explained.
                  Transcendental has reference to those beliefs or
                  principles which are not derived from experience, and
                  yet are absolutely necessary to make experience
                  possible or useful. Such, in the better sense of the
                  term, is the transcendental philosophy, or
                  transcendentalism. Each of these words is also used in
                  a bad sense, empiricism applying to that one-sided
                  view of knowledge which neglects or loses sight of the
                  truths or principles referred to above, and trusts to
                  experience alone; transcendentalism, to the opposite
                  extreme, which, in its deprecation of experience,
                  loses sight of the relations which facts and phenomena
                  sustain to principles, and hence to a kind of
                  philosophy, or a use of language, which is vague,
                  obscure, fantastic, or extravagant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trancscendental \Tranc`scen*den"tal\, a. [Cf. F. transcendantal,
      G. transcendental.]
      1. Supereminent; surpassing others; as, transcendental being
            or qualities.
  
      2. (Philos.) In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that
            which can be determined a priori in regard to the
            fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is
            transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is
            does not transcend all human knowledge, or become
            transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or
            necessary conditions of experience which, though affording
            the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that
            contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
  
      3. Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation,
            imagery, or diction.
  
      Note: In mathematics, a quantity is said to be transcendental
               relative to another quantity when it is expressed as a
               transcendental function of the latter; thus, a^{x},
               10^{2x}, log x, sin x, tan x, etc., are transcendental
               relative to x.
  
      {Transcendental curve} (Math.), a curve in which one ordinate
            is a transcendental function of the other.
  
      {Transcendental equation} (Math.), an equation into which a
            transcendental function of one of the unknown or variable
            quantities enters.
  
      {Transcendental function}. (Math.) See under {Function}.
  
      Syn: {Transcendental}, {Empirical}.
  
      Usage: These terms, with the corresponding nouns,
                  transcendentalism and empiricism, are of comparatively
                  recent origin. Empirical refers to knowledge which is
                  gained by the experience of actual phenomena, without
                  reference to the principles or laws to which they are
                  to be referred, or by which they are to be explained.
                  Transcendental has reference to those beliefs or
                  principles which are not derived from experience, and
                  yet are absolutely necessary to make experience
                  possible or useful. Such, in the better sense of the
                  term, is the transcendental philosophy, or
                  transcendentalism. Each of these words is also used in
                  a bad sense, empiricism applying to that one-sided
                  view of knowledge which neglects or loses sight of the
                  truths or principles referred to above, and trusts to
                  experience alone; transcendentalism, to the opposite
                  extreme, which, in its deprecation of experience,
                  loses sight of the relations which facts and phenomena
                  sustain to principles, and hence to a kind of
                  philosophy, or a use of language, which is vague,
                  obscure, fantastic, or extravagant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Function \Func"tion\, n. [L. functio, fr. fungi to perform,
      execute, akin to Skr. bhuj to enjoy, have the use of: cf. F.
      fonction. Cf. {Defunct}.]
      1. The act of executing or performing any duty, office, or
            calling; per formance. [bd]In the function of his public
            calling.[b8] --Swift.
  
      2. (Physiol.) The appropriate action of any special organ or
            part of an animal or vegetable organism; as, the function
            of the heart or the limbs; the function of leaves, sap,
            roots, etc.; life is the sum of the functions of the
            various organs and parts of the body.
  
      3. The natural or assigned action of any power or faculty, as
            of the soul, or of the intellect; the exertion of an
            energy of some determinate kind.
  
                     As the mind opens, and its functions spread. --Pope.
  
      4. The course of action which peculiarly pertains to any
            public officer in church or state; the activity
            appropriate to any business or profession.
  
                     Tradesmen . . . going about their functions. --Shak.
  
                     The malady which made him incapable of performing
                     his regal functions.                           --Macaulay.
  
      5. (Math.) A quantity so connected with another quantity,
            that if any alteration be made in the latter there will be
            a consequent alteration in the former. Each quantity is
            said to be a function of the other. Thus, the
            circumference of a circle is a function of the diameter.
            If x be a symbol to which different numerical values can
            be assigned, such expressions as x^{2}, 3^{x}, Log. x, and
            Sin. x, are all functions of x.
  
      {Algebraic function}, a quantity whose connection with the
            variable is expressed by an equation that involves only
            the algebraic operations of addition, subtraction,
            multiplication, division, raising to a given power, and
            extracting a given root; -- opposed to transcendental
            function.
  
      {Arbitrary function}. See under {Arbitrary}.
  
      {Calculus of functions}. See under {Calculus}.
  
      {Carnot's function} (Thermo-dynamics), a relation between the
            amount of heat given off by a source of heat, and the work
            which can be done by it. It is approximately equal to the
            mechanical equivalent of the thermal unit divided by the
            number expressing the temperature in degrees of the air
            thermometer, reckoned from its zero of expansion.
  
      {Circular functions}. See {Inverse trigonometrical functions}
            (below). -- Continuous function, a quantity that has no
            interruption in the continuity of its real values, as the
            variable changes between any specified limits.
  
      {Discontinuous function}. See under {Discontinuous}.
  
      {Elliptic functions}, a large and important class of
            functions, so called because one of the forms expresses
            the relation of the arc of an ellipse to the straight
            lines connected therewith.
  
      {Explicit function}, a quantity directly expressed in terms
            of the independently varying quantity; thus, in the
            equations y = 6x^{2}, y = 10 -x^{3}, the quantity y is an
            explicit function of x.
  
      {Implicit function}, a quantity whose relation to the
            variable is expressed indirectly by an equation; thus, y
            in the equation x^{2} + y^{2} = 100 is an implicit
            function of x.
  
      {Inverse trigonometrical functions}, [or] {Circular
      function}, the lengths of arcs relative to the sines,
            tangents, etc. Thus, AB is the arc whose sine is BD, and
            (if the length of BD is x) is written sin ^{-1}x, and so
            of the other lines. See {Trigonometrical function}
            (below). Other transcendental functions are the
            exponential functions, the elliptic functions, the gamma
            functions, the theta functions, etc.
  
      {One-valued function}, a quantity that has one, and only one,
            value for each value of the variable. -- {Transcendental
      functions}, a quantity whose connection with the variable
            cannot be expressed by algebraic operations; thus, y in
            the equation y = 10^{x} is a transcendental function of x.
            See {Algebraic function} (above). -- {Trigonometrical
      function}, a quantity whose relation to the variable is the
            same as that of a certain straight line drawn in a circle
            whose radius is unity, to the length of a corresponding
            are of the circle. Let AB be an arc in a circle, whose
            radius OA is unity let AC be a quadrant, and let OC, DB,
            and AF be drawnpependicular to OA, and EB and CG parallel
            to OA, and let OB be produced to G and F. E Then BD is the
            sine of the arc AB; OD or EB is the cosine, AF is the
            tangent, CG is the cotangent, OF is the secant OG is the
            cosecant, AD is the versed sine, and CE is the coversed
            sine of the are AB. If the length of AB be represented by
            x (OA being unity) then the lengths of Functions. these
            lines (OA being unity) are the trigonometrical functions
            of x, and are written sin x, cos x, tan x (or tang x), cot
            x, sec x, cosec x, versin x, coversin x. These quantities
            are also considered as functions of the angle BOA.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendentalism \Tran`scen*den"tal*ism\, n. [Cf. F.
      transcendantalisme, G. transcendentalismus.]
      1. (Kantian Philos.) The transcending, or going beyond,
            empiricism, and ascertaining a priori the fundamental
            principles of human knowledge.
  
      Note: As Schelling and Hegel claim to have discovered the
               absolute identity of the objective and subjective in
               human knowledge, or of things and human conceptions of
               them, the Kantian distinction between transcendent and
               transcendental ideas can have no place in their
               philosophy; and hence, with them, transcendentalism
               claims to have a true knowledge of all things, material
               and immaterial, human and divine, so far as the mind is
               capable of knowing them. And in this sense the word
               transcendentalism is now most used. It is also
               sometimes used for that which is vague and illusive in
               philosophy.
  
      2. Ambitious and imaginative vagueness in thought, imagery,
            or diction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendentalist \Tran`scen*den"tal*ist\, n. [Cf. F.
      transcendantaliste.]
      One who believes in transcendentalism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendentality \Tran`scen*den*tal"i*ty\, n.
      The quality or state of being transcendental.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendentally \Tran`scen*den"tal*ly\, adv.
      In a transcendental manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendently \Tran*scend"ent*ly\, adv.
      In a transcendent manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcendentness \Tran*scend"ent*ness\, n.
      Same as {Transcendence}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcend \Tran*scend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcended}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transcending}.] [L. transcendere, transcensum;
      trans beyond, over + scandere to climb. See {Scan}.]
      1. To rise above; to surmount; as, lights in the heavens
            transcending the region of the clouds. --Howell.
  
      2. To pass over; to go beyond; to exceed.
  
                     Such popes as shall transcend their limits. --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcension \Tran*scen"sion\, n. [See {Transcend}.]
      The act of transcending, or surpassing; also, passage over.
      [Obs.] --Chapman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcolate \Trans"co*late\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcolated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcolating}.] [Pref. trans- + L. colare,
      colatum, to filter, to strain.]
      To cause to pass through a sieve or colander; to strain, as
      through a sieve. [Obs.] --Harvey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcolate \Trans"co*late\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcolated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcolating}.] [Pref. trans- + L. colare,
      colatum, to filter, to strain.]
      To cause to pass through a sieve or colander; to strain, as
      through a sieve. [Obs.] --Harvey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcolate \Trans"co*late\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transcolated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcolating}.] [Pref. trans- + L. colare,
      colatum, to filter, to strain.]
      To cause to pass through a sieve or colander; to strain, as
      through a sieve. [Obs.] --Harvey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcolation \Trans`co*la"tion\, n.
      Act of transcolating, or state of being transcolated. [Obs.]
      --Bp. Stillingfleet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcontinental \Trans*con`ti*nen"tal\, a. [Pref. trans- +
      continental.]
      Extending or going across a continent; as, a transcontinental
      railroad or journey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcorporate \Trans*cor"po*rate\, v. i. [Pref. trans- +
      corporate.]
      To transmigrate. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcribbler \Tran*scrib"bler\ (tr[acr]n*skr[icr]b"bl[etil]r),
      n.
      A transcriber; -- used in contempt.
  
               He [Aristotle] has suffered vastly from the
               transcribblers, as all authors of great brevity
               necessarily must.                                    --Gray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcribe \Tran*scribe"\ (tr[acr]n*skr[imac]b"), v. t. [imp. &
      p. p. {Transcribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcribing}.] [L.
      transcribere, transcriptum; trans across, over + scribere to
      write. See {Scribe}.]
      To write over again, or in the same words; to copy; as, to
      transcribe Livy or Tacitus; to transcribe a letter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcribe \Tran*scribe"\ (tr[acr]n*skr[imac]b"), v. t. [imp. &
      p. p. {Transcribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcribing}.] [L.
      transcribere, transcriptum; trans across, over + scribere to
      write. See {Scribe}.]
      To write over again, or in the same words; to copy; as, to
      transcribe Livy or Tacitus; to transcribe a letter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcriber \Tran*scrib"er\ (-[etil]r), n.
      One who transcribes, or writes from a copy; a copier; a
      copyist.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcribe \Tran*scribe"\ (tr[acr]n*skr[imac]b"), v. t. [imp. &
      p. p. {Transcribed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transcribing}.] [L.
      transcribere, transcriptum; trans across, over + scribere to
      write. See {Scribe}.]
      To write over again, or in the same words; to copy; as, to
      transcribe Livy or Tacitus; to transcribe a letter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcript \Tran"script\ (tr[acr]n"skr[icr]pt), n. [L.
      transcriptum, neut. of transcriptus, p. p. of transcribere.
      See {Transcribe}.]
      1. That which has been transcribed; a writing or composition
            consisting of the same words as the original; a written
            copy.
  
                     The decalogue of Moses was but a transcript.
                                                                              --South.
  
      2. A copy of any kind; an imitation.
  
                     The Grecian learning was but a transcript of the
                     Chaldean and Egyptian.                        --Glanvill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcription \Tran*scrip"tion\ (tr[acr]n*skr[icr]p"sh[ucr]n),
      n. [Cf. F. transcription, L. transcriptio a transfer.]
      1. The act or process of transcribing, or copying; as,
            corruptions creep into books by repeated transcriptions.
  
      2. A copy; a transcript. --Walton.
  
      3. (Mus.) An arrangement of a composition for some other
            instrument or voice than that for which it was originally
            written, as the translating of a song, a vocal or
            instrumental quartet, or even an orchestral work, into a
            piece for the piano; an adaptation; an arrangement; -- a
            name applied by modern composers for the piano to a more
            or less fanciful and ornate reproduction on their own
            instrument of a song or other piece not originally
            intended for it; as, Liszt's transcriptions of songs by
            Schubert.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcriptive \Tran*scrip"tive\ (-t[icr]v), a.
      Done as from a copy; having the style or appearance of a
      transcription. [R.] -- {Tran*scrip"tive*ly}, adv. [R.] --Sir
      T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcriptive \Tran*scrip"tive\ (-t[icr]v), a.
      Done as from a copy; having the style or appearance of a
      transcription. [R.] -- {Tran*scrip"tive*ly}, adv. [R.] --Sir
      T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcur \Trans*cur"\, v. i. [L. transcurrere, transcursum;
      trans across, over + currere to run.]
      To run or rove to and fro. [Obs.] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcurrence \Trans*cur"rence\, n. [L. transcurrens, p. pr. of
      transcurrere.]
      A roving hither and thither.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transcursion \Trans*cur"sion\, n. [Cf. L. transcursio a passing
      over. See {Transcur}.]
      A rambling or ramble; a passage over bounds; an excursion.
      [Obs.] --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transdialect \Trans*di"a*lect\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + dialect.]
      To change or translate from one dialect into another. [R.]
      --Bp. Warburton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transduction \Trans*duc"tion\, n. [L. transducere, traducere,
      -dictum, to lead across or over. See {Traduce}.]
      The act of conveying over. [R.] --Entick.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transe \Transe\, n.
      See {Trance}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transelement \Trans*el"e*ment\, Transelementate
   \Trans*el`e*men"tate\, v. t. [Pref. trans- element.]
      To change or transpose the elements of; to transubstantiate.
      [Obs.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transelement \Trans*el"e*ment\, Transelementate
   \Trans*el`e*men"tate\, v. t. [Pref. trans- element.]
      To change or transpose the elements of; to transubstantiate.
      [Obs.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transelementation \Trans*el`e*men*ta"tion\, n. [Cf. F.
      trans[82]l[82]mentation.] (Eccl.)
      Transubstantiation. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transenne \Tran"senne\, n.
      A transom. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transept \Tran"sept\, n. [Pref. trans- + L. septum an inclosure.
      See {Septum}.] (Arch.)
      The transversal part of a church, which crosses at right
      angles to the greatest length, and between the nave and
      choir. In the basilicas, this had often no projection at its
      two ends. In Gothic churches these project these project
      greatly, and should be called the arms of the transept. It is
      common, however, to speak of the arms themselves as the
      transepts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transexion \Tran*sex"ion\, n. [Pref. trans- + L. sexus sex.]
      Change of sex. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfeminate \Trans*fem"i*nate\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + L.
      femina woman.]
      To change into a woman, as a man. [Obs. & R.] --Sir T.
      Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans"fer\, n.
      1. The act of transferring, or the state of being
            transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one
            place or person to another.
  
      2. (Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either
            real or personal, from one person to another, whether by
            sale, by gift, or otherwise.
  
                     I shall here only consider it as a transfer of
                     property.                                          --Burke.
  
      3. That which is transferred. Specifically:
            (a) A picture, or the like, removed from one body or
                  ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one
                  piece of canvas to another. --Fairholt.
            (b) A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on
                  another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
            (c) (Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of
                  troops, and placed in another.
  
      4. (Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a
            unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side
            of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding
            region upon the other side.
  
      {Transfer day}, one of the days fixed by the Bank of England
            for the transfer, free of charge, of bank stock and
            government funds. These days are the first five business
            days in the week before three o'clock. Transfers may be
            made on Saturdays on payment of a fee of 2s. 6d.
            --Bithell.
  
      {Transfer office}, an office or department where transfers of
            stocks, etc., are made.
  
      {Transfer paper}, a prepared paper used by draughtsmen,
            engravers, lithographers, etc., for transferring
            impressions.
  
      {Transfer table}. (Railroad) Same as {Traverse table}. See
            under {Traverse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans*fer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transferred}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transferring}.] [L. transferre; trans across, over
      + ferre to bear: cf. F. transf[82]rer. See {Bear} to carry.]
      1. To convey from one place or person another; to transport,
            remove, or cause to pass, to another place or person; as,
            to transfer the laws of one country to another; to
            transfer suspicion.
  
      2. To make over the possession or control of; to pass; to
            convey, as a right, from one person to another; to give;
            as, the title to land is transferred by deed.
  
      3. To remove from one substance or surface to another; as, to
            transfer drawings or engravings to a lithographic stone.
            --Tomlinson.
  
      Syn: To sell; give; alienate; estrange; sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans"fer\, n.
      1. The act of transferring, or the state of being
            transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one
            place or person to another.
  
      2. (Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either
            real or personal, from one person to another, whether by
            sale, by gift, or otherwise.
  
                     I shall here only consider it as a transfer of
                     property.                                          --Burke.
  
      3. That which is transferred. Specifically:
            (a) A picture, or the like, removed from one body or
                  ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one
                  piece of canvas to another. --Fairholt.
            (b) A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on
                  another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
            (c) (Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of
                  troops, and placed in another.
  
      4. (Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a
            unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side
            of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding
            region upon the other side.
  
      {Transfer day}, one of the days fixed by the Bank of England
            for the transfer, free of charge, of bank stock and
            government funds. These days are the first five business
            days in the week before three o'clock. Transfers may be
            made on Saturdays on payment of a fee of 2s. 6d.
            --Bithell.
  
      {Transfer office}, an office or department where transfers of
            stocks, etc., are made.
  
      {Transfer paper}, a prepared paper used by draughtsmen,
            engravers, lithographers, etc., for transferring
            impressions.
  
      {Transfer table}. (Railroad) Same as {Traverse table}. See
            under {Traverse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans"fer\, n.
      1. The act of transferring, or the state of being
            transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one
            place or person to another.
  
      2. (Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either
            real or personal, from one person to another, whether by
            sale, by gift, or otherwise.
  
                     I shall here only consider it as a transfer of
                     property.                                          --Burke.
  
      3. That which is transferred. Specifically:
            (a) A picture, or the like, removed from one body or
                  ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one
                  piece of canvas to another. --Fairholt.
            (b) A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on
                  another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
            (c) (Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of
                  troops, and placed in another.
  
      4. (Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a
            unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side
            of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding
            region upon the other side.
  
      {Transfer day}, one of the days fixed by the Bank of England
            for the transfer, free of charge, of bank stock and
            government funds. These days are the first five business
            days in the week before three o'clock. Transfers may be
            made on Saturdays on payment of a fee of 2s. 6d.
            --Bithell.
  
      {Transfer office}, an office or department where transfers of
            stocks, etc., are made.
  
      {Transfer paper}, a prepared paper used by draughtsmen,
            engravers, lithographers, etc., for transferring
            impressions.
  
      {Transfer table}. (Railroad) Same as {Traverse table}. See
            under {Traverse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans"fer\, n.
      1. The act of transferring, or the state of being
            transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one
            place or person to another.
  
      2. (Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either
            real or personal, from one person to another, whether by
            sale, by gift, or otherwise.
  
                     I shall here only consider it as a transfer of
                     property.                                          --Burke.
  
      3. That which is transferred. Specifically:
            (a) A picture, or the like, removed from one body or
                  ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one
                  piece of canvas to another. --Fairholt.
            (b) A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on
                  another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
            (c) (Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of
                  troops, and placed in another.
  
      4. (Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a
            unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side
            of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding
            region upon the other side.
  
      {Transfer day}, one of the days fixed by the Bank of England
            for the transfer, free of charge, of bank stock and
            government funds. These days are the first five business
            days in the week before three o'clock. Transfers may be
            made on Saturdays on payment of a fee of 2s. 6d.
            --Bithell.
  
      {Transfer office}, an office or department where transfers of
            stocks, etc., are made.
  
      {Transfer paper}, a prepared paper used by draughtsmen,
            engravers, lithographers, etc., for transferring
            impressions.
  
      {Transfer table}. (Railroad) Same as {Traverse table}. See
            under {Traverse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans"fer\, n.
      1. The act of transferring, or the state of being
            transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one
            place or person to another.
  
      2. (Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either
            real or personal, from one person to another, whether by
            sale, by gift, or otherwise.
  
                     I shall here only consider it as a transfer of
                     property.                                          --Burke.
  
      3. That which is transferred. Specifically:
            (a) A picture, or the like, removed from one body or
                  ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one
                  piece of canvas to another. --Fairholt.
            (b) A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on
                  another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
            (c) (Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of
                  troops, and placed in another.
  
      4. (Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a
            unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side
            of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding
            region upon the other side.
  
      {Transfer day}, one of the days fixed by the Bank of England
            for the transfer, free of charge, of bank stock and
            government funds. These days are the first five business
            days in the week before three o'clock. Transfers may be
            made on Saturdays on payment of a fee of 2s. 6d.
            --Bithell.
  
      {Transfer office}, an office or department where transfers of
            stocks, etc., are made.
  
      {Transfer paper}, a prepared paper used by draughtsmen,
            engravers, lithographers, etc., for transferring
            impressions.
  
      {Transfer table}. (Railroad) Same as {Traverse table}. See
            under {Traverse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferability \Trans*fer`a*bil"i*ty\, n.
      The quality or state of being transferable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferable \Trans*fer"a*ble\ (?; 277), a. [Cf. F.
      transf[82]rable.]
      1. Capable of being transferred or conveyed from one place or
            person to another.
  
      2. Negotiable, as a note, bill of exchange, or other evidence
            of property, that may be conveyed from one person to
            another by indorsement or other writing; capable of being
            transferred with no loss of value; as, the stocks of most
            public companies are transferable; some tickets are not
            transferable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferee \Trans`fer*ee"\, n.
      The person to whom a transfer in made.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transference \Trans"fer*ence\, n.
      The act of transferring; conveyance; passage; transfer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferography \Trans`fer*og"ra*phy\, n. [Transfer + -graphy.]
      The act or process of copying inscriptions, or the like, by
      making transfers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans*fer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transferred}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transferring}.] [L. transferre; trans across, over
      + ferre to bear: cf. F. transf[82]rer. See {Bear} to carry.]
      1. To convey from one place or person another; to transport,
            remove, or cause to pass, to another place or person; as,
            to transfer the laws of one country to another; to
            transfer suspicion.
  
      2. To make over the possession or control of; to pass; to
            convey, as a right, from one person to another; to give;
            as, the title to land is transferred by deed.
  
      3. To remove from one substance or surface to another; as, to
            transfer drawings or engravings to a lithographic stone.
            --Tomlinson.
  
      Syn: To sell; give; alienate; estrange; sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferrence \Trans*fer"rence\, n.
      See {Transference}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferrer \Trans*fer"rer\, n.
      One who makes a transfer or conveyance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transferrible \Trans*fer"ri*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transferred; transferable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfer \Trans*fer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transferred}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transferring}.] [L. transferre; trans across, over
      + ferre to bear: cf. F. transf[82]rer. See {Bear} to carry.]
      1. To convey from one place or person another; to transport,
            remove, or cause to pass, to another place or person; as,
            to transfer the laws of one country to another; to
            transfer suspicion.
  
      2. To make over the possession or control of; to pass; to
            convey, as a right, from one person to another; to give;
            as, the title to land is transferred by deed.
  
      3. To remove from one substance or surface to another; as, to
            transfer drawings or engravings to a lithographic stone.
            --Tomlinson.
  
      Syn: To sell; give; alienate; estrange; sequester.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfigurate \Trans*fig"u*rate\, v. t.
      To transfigure; to transform. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfiguratien \Trans*fig`u*ra"tien\, n. [L. transfiguratio:
      cf. transfiguration.]
      1. A change of form or appearance; especially, the
            supernatural change in the personal appearance of our
            Savior on the mount.
  
      2. (Eccl.) A feast held by some branches of the Christian
            church on the 6th of August, in commemoration of the
            miraculous change above mentioned.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfigure \Trans*fig"ure\ (?; 135), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transfigured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transfiguring}.] [F.
      transfigurer, L. transfigurare, transfiguratum; trans across,
      over + figurare to form, shape. See {Figure}, v. t.]
      1. To change the outward form or appearance of; to
            metamorphose; to transform.
  
      2. Especially, to change to something exalted and glorious;
            to give an ideal form to.
  
                     [Jesus] was transfigured before them; and his face
                     did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as
                     the light.                                          --Matt. xvii.
                                                                              2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfigure \Trans*fig"ure\ (?; 135), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transfigured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transfiguring}.] [F.
      transfigurer, L. transfigurare, transfiguratum; trans across,
      over + figurare to form, shape. See {Figure}, v. t.]
      1. To change the outward form or appearance of; to
            metamorphose; to transform.
  
      2. Especially, to change to something exalted and glorious;
            to give an ideal form to.
  
                     [Jesus] was transfigured before them; and his face
                     did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as
                     the light.                                          --Matt. xvii.
                                                                              2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfigure \Trans*fig"ure\ (?; 135), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transfigured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transfiguring}.] [F.
      transfigurer, L. transfigurare, transfiguratum; trans across,
      over + figurare to form, shape. See {Figure}, v. t.]
      1. To change the outward form or appearance of; to
            metamorphose; to transform.
  
      2. Especially, to change to something exalted and glorious;
            to give an ideal form to.
  
                     [Jesus] was transfigured before them; and his face
                     did shine as the sun, and his raiment was white as
                     the light.                                          --Matt. xvii.
                                                                              2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfix \Trans*fix"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfixed}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transfixing}.] [L. transfixus, p. p. of transfigure
      to transfix; trans across, through + figere to fix, fasten.
      See {Fix}.]
      To pierce through, as with a pointed weapon; to impale; as,
      to transfix one with a dart.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfix \Trans*fix"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfixed}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transfixing}.] [L. transfixus, p. p. of transfigure
      to transfix; trans across, through + figere to fix, fasten.
      See {Fix}.]
      To pierce through, as with a pointed weapon; to impale; as,
      to transfix one with a dart.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfix \Trans*fix"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfixed}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transfixing}.] [L. transfixus, p. p. of transfigure
      to transfix; trans across, through + figere to fix, fasten.
      See {Fix}.]
      To pierce through, as with a pointed weapon; to impale; as,
      to transfix one with a dart.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfixion \Trans*fix"ion\, n.
      The act of transfixing, or the state of being transfixed, or
      pierced. --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfluent \Trans"flu*ent\, a. [Pref. trans- + fluent.]
      1. Flowing or running across or through; as, a transfluent
            stream.
  
      2. (Her.) Passing or flowing through a bridge; -- said of
            water. --Wright.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transflux \Trans"flux\, n. [Pref. trans- + flux.]
      A flowing through, across, or beyond. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transforate \Trans"fo*rate\, v. t. [L. transforatus, p. p. of
      transforare to pierce through; trans through + forare to
      bore.]
      To bore through; to perforate. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transform \Trans*form"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transformed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transforming}.] [L. transformare,
      transformatum; trans across, over + formare to from: cf. F.
      transformer. See {Form}, v. t.]
      1. To change the form of; to change in shape or appearance;
            to metamorphose; as, a caterpillar is ultimately
            transformed into a butterfly.
  
                     Love may transform me to an oyster.   --Shak.
  
      2. To change into another substance; to transmute; as, the
            alchemists sought to transform lead into gold.
  
      3. To change in nature, disposition, heart, character, or the
            like; to convert.
  
                     Be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind.
                                                                              --Rom. xii. 2.
  
      4. (Math.) To change, as an algebraic expression or
            geometrical figure, into another from without altering its
            value.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transform \Trans*form"\, v. i.
      To be changed in form; to be metamorphosed. [R.]
  
               His hair transforms to down.                  --Addison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformable \Trans*form"a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transformed or changed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformation \Trans`for*ma"tion\, n. [L. transformatio: cf.
      transformation.]
      The act of transforming, or the state of being transformed;
      change of form or condition. Specifically:
      (a) (Biol.) Any change in an organism which alters its
            general character and mode of life, as in the development
            of the germ into the embryo, the egg into the animal, the
            larva into the insect (metamorphosis), etc.; also, the
            change which the histological units of a tissue are prone
            to undergo. See {Metamorphosis}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformative \Trans*form"a*tive\, a. [Cf. F. transformatif.]
      Having power, or a tendency, to transform.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transform \Trans*form"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transformed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transforming}.] [L. transformare,
      transformatum; trans across, over + formare to from: cf. F.
      transformer. See {Form}, v. t.]
      1. To change the form of; to change in shape or appearance;
            to metamorphose; as, a caterpillar is ultimately
            transformed into a butterfly.
  
                     Love may transform me to an oyster.   --Shak.
  
      2. To change into another substance; to transmute; as, the
            alchemists sought to transform lead into gold.
  
      3. To change in nature, disposition, heart, character, or the
            like; to convert.
  
                     Be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind.
                                                                              --Rom. xii. 2.
  
      4. (Math.) To change, as an algebraic expression or
            geometrical figure, into another from without altering its
            value.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformer \Trans*form"er\, n.
  
      {Multiple transformer}. (Elec.)
      (a) A transformer connected in multiple or in parallel with
            the primary circuit.
      (b) A transformer with more than one primary or more than one
            secondary coil.
  
      {Parallel transformer} (Elec.), a transformer connected in
            parallel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformer \Trans*form"er\, n.
      One who, or that which, transforms. Specif. (Elec.), an
      apparatus for producing from a given electrical current
      another current of different voltage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transform \Trans*form"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transformed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transforming}.] [L. transformare,
      transformatum; trans across, over + formare to from: cf. F.
      transformer. See {Form}, v. t.]
      1. To change the form of; to change in shape or appearance;
            to metamorphose; as, a caterpillar is ultimately
            transformed into a butterfly.
  
                     Love may transform me to an oyster.   --Shak.
  
      2. To change into another substance; to transmute; as, the
            alchemists sought to transform lead into gold.
  
      3. To change in nature, disposition, heart, character, or the
            like; to convert.
  
                     Be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind.
                                                                              --Rom. xii. 2.
  
      4. (Math.) To change, as an algebraic expression or
            geometrical figure, into another from without altering its
            value.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transformism \Trans*form"ism\, n. [F. transformisme.] (Biol.)
      The hypothesis, or doctrine, that living beings have
      originated by the modification of some other previously
      existing forms of living matter; -- opposed to abiogenesis.
      --Huxley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfreight \Trans*freight"\, v. i.
      To transfrete. [Obs.] --Waterhouse.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfrete \Trans*frete"\, v. i. [L. transfretare; trans across,
      over + fretum a strait: cf. OF. transfreter.]
      To pass over a strait or narrow sea. [Written also
      {transfreight}.] [Obs.] --E. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfreight \Trans*freight"\, v. i.
      To transfrete. [Obs.] --Waterhouse.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfrete \Trans*frete"\, v. i. [L. transfretare; trans across,
      over + fretum a strait: cf. OF. transfreter.]
      To pass over a strait or narrow sea. [Written also
      {transfreight}.] [Obs.] --E. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfretation \Trans`fre*ta"tion\, n. [L. transfretatio. See
      {Transfrete}.]
      The act of passing over a strait or narrow sea. [Obs.] --Sir
      J. Davies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfrete \Trans*frete"\, v. i. [L. transfretare; trans across,
      over + fretum a strait: cf. OF. transfreter.]
      To pass over a strait or narrow sea. [Written also
      {transfreight}.] [Obs.] --E. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfuge \Trans"fuge\, Transfugitive \Trans*fu"gi*tive\, n. [L.
      transfuga; trans across, over + fugere to flee.]
      One who flees from one side to another; hence, a deserter; a
      turncoat; an apostate. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfuge \Trans"fuge\, Transfugitive \Trans*fu"gi*tive\, n. [L.
      transfuga; trans across, over + fugere to flee.]
      One who flees from one side to another; hence, a deserter; a
      turncoat; an apostate. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfund \Trans*fund"\, v. t. [L. transfundere; trans over,
      across + fundere to pour, pour out. See {Found} to cast, and
      cf. {Transfuse}.]
      To pour from one vessel into another; to transfuse. [Obs.]
      --Barrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfuse \Trans*fuse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfused}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transfusing}.] [L. transfusus, p. p. of
      transfundere: cf. F. transfuser. See {Transfund}.]
      1. To pour, as liquid, out of one vessel into another; to
            transfer by pouring.
  
      2. (Med.) To transfer, as blood, from the veins or arteries
            of one man or animal to those of another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfuse \Trans*fuse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfused}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transfusing}.] [L. transfusus, p. p. of
      transfundere: cf. F. transfuser. See {Transfund}.]
      1. To pour, as liquid, out of one vessel into another; to
            transfer by pouring.
  
      2. (Med.) To transfer, as blood, from the veins or arteries
            of one man or animal to those of another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfusible \Trans*fu"si*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transfused; transferable by transfusion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfuse \Trans*fuse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transfused}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transfusing}.] [L. transfusus, p. p. of
      transfundere: cf. F. transfuser. See {Transfund}.]
      1. To pour, as liquid, out of one vessel into another; to
            transfer by pouring.
  
      2. (Med.) To transfer, as blood, from the veins or arteries
            of one man or animal to those of another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfusion \Trans*fu"sion\, n. [L. transfusio: cf. F.
      transfusion.]
      1. The act of transfusing, or pouring, as liquor, out of one
            vessel into another. --Howell.
  
      2. (Med.) The act or operation of transferring the blood of
            one man or animal into the vascular system of another;
            also, the introduction of any fluid into the blood
            vessels, or into a cavity of the body from which it can
            readily be adsorbed into the vessels; intrafusion; as, the
            peritoneal transfusion of milk.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transfusive \Trans*fu"sive\, a.
      Tending to transfuse; having power to transfuse.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgress \Trans*gress"\, v. i.
      To offend against the law; to sin.
  
               Who transgressed in the thing accursed.   --I Chron. ii.
                                                                              7.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgress \Trans*gress"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transgressed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transgressing}.] [Cf. F. transgresser. See
      {Transgression}.]
      1. To pass over or beyond; to surpass. [R.]
  
                     Surpassing common faith, transgressing nature's law.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, to overpass, as any prescribed as the [?]imit of
            duty; to break or violate, as a law, civil or moral.
  
                     For man will hearken to his glozing lies, And easily
                     transgress the sole command.               --Milton.
  
      3. To offend against; to vex. [Obs.]
  
                     Why give you peace to this imperate beast That hath
                     so long transgressed you ?                  --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgress \Trans*gress"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transgressed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transgressing}.] [Cf. F. transgresser. See
      {Transgression}.]
      1. To pass over or beyond; to surpass. [R.]
  
                     Surpassing common faith, transgressing nature's law.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, to overpass, as any prescribed as the [?]imit of
            duty; to break or violate, as a law, civil or moral.
  
                     For man will hearken to his glozing lies, And easily
                     transgress the sole command.               --Milton.
  
      3. To offend against; to vex. [Obs.]
  
                     Why give you peace to this imperate beast That hath
                     so long transgressed you ?                  --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgress \Trans*gress"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transgressed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transgressing}.] [Cf. F. transgresser. See
      {Transgression}.]
      1. To pass over or beyond; to surpass. [R.]
  
                     Surpassing common faith, transgressing nature's law.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, to overpass, as any prescribed as the [?]imit of
            duty; to break or violate, as a law, civil or moral.
  
                     For man will hearken to his glozing lies, And easily
                     transgress the sole command.               --Milton.
  
      3. To offend against; to vex. [Obs.]
  
                     Why give you peace to this imperate beast That hath
                     so long transgressed you ?                  --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgression \Trans*gres"sion\, n. [L. transgressio a going
      across, going over, transgression of the law, from
      transgredi, transgressus, to step across, go over; trans
      over, across + gradi to step, walk: cf. F. transgression. See
      {Grade}.]
      The act of transgressing, or of passing over or beyond any
      law, civil or moral; the violation of a law or known
      principle of rectitude; breach of command; fault; offense;
      crime; sin.
  
               Forgive thy people . . . all their transgressions
               wherein they have transgressed against thee. --I Kings
                                                                              viii. 50.
  
               What rests, but that the mortal sentence pass On his
               transgression, death denounced that day ? --Milton.
  
               The transgression is in the stealer.      --Shak.
  
      Syn: Fault; offense; crime; infringement; misdemeanor;
               misdeed; affront; sin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgressional \Trans*gres"sion*al\, a.
      Of pertaining to transgression; involving a transgression.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgressive \Trans*gress"ive\, a. [Cf. L. transgressivus
      passing over into another class. F. transgressif.]
      Disposed or tending to transgress; faulty; culpable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgressively \Trans*gress"ive*ly\, adv.
  
               Adam, perhaps, . . . from the transgressive infirmities
               of himself, might have erred alone.         --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.
   Transgressor \Trans*gress"or\, n. [L.: cf. F. transgresseur.]
      One who transgresses; one who breaks a law, or violates a
      command; one who violates any known rule or principle of
      rectitude; a sinner.
  
               The way of transgressors is hard.            --Prov. xiii.
                                                                              15.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transgressively \Trans*gress"ive*ly\, adv.
  
               Adam, perhaps, . . . from the transgressive infirmities
               of himself, might have erred alone.         --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.
   Transgressor \Trans*gress"or\, n. [L.: cf. F. transgresseur.]
      One who transgresses; one who breaks a law, or violates a
      command; one who violates any known rule or principle of
      rectitude; a sinner.
  
               The way of transgressors is hard.            --Prov. xiii.
                                                                              15.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhape \Tran*shape"\, v. t.
      To transshape. [R.] --J. Webster (1623).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshape \Trans*shape"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transshaped}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transshaping}.] [Pref. trans- + shape.]
      To change into another shape or form; to transform. [Written
      also {transhape}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhape \Tran*shape"\, v. t.
      To transshape. [R.] --J. Webster (1623).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshape \Trans*shape"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transshaped}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transshaping}.] [Pref. trans- + shape.]
      To change into another shape or form; to transform. [Written
      also {transhape}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranship \Tran*ship"\, v. t.
      Same as {Transship}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transship \Trans*ship"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + ship.]
      To transfer from one ship or conveyance to another. [Written
      also {tranship}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tranship \Tran*ship"\, v. t.
      Same as {Transship}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transship \Trans*ship"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + ship.]
      To transfer from one ship or conveyance to another. [Written
      also {tranship}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhipment \Tran*ship"ment\, n.
      Same as {Transshipment}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshipment \Trans*ship"ment\, n.
      The act of transshipping, or transferring, as goods, from one
      ship or conveyance to another. [Written also {transhipment}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhipment \Tran*ship"ment\, n.
      Same as {Transshipment}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshipment \Trans*ship"ment\, n.
      The act of transshipping, or transferring, as goods, from one
      ship or conveyance to another. [Written also {transhipment}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhuman \Trans*hu"man\, a. [Pref. trans- + human.]
      More than human; superhuman. [R.]
  
               Words may not tell of that transhuman change. --H. F.
                                                                              Cary.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transhumanize \Trans*hu"man*ize\, v. t.
      To make more than human; to purity; to elevate above
      humanity. [R.]
  
               Souls purified by sorrow and self-denial,
               transhumanized to the divine abstraction of pure
               contemplation.                                       --Lowell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transience \Tran"sience\, Transiency \Tran"sien*cy\, n.
      The quality of being transient; transientness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transience \Tran"sience\, Transiency \Tran"sien*cy\, n.
      The quality of being transient; transientness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transient \Tran"sient\, n.
      That which remains but for a brief time. --Glanvill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transient \Tran"sient\, a. [L. transiens, -entis, p. pr. of
      transire, transitum, to go or pass over. See {Trance}.]
      1. Passing before the sight or perception, or, as it were,
            moving over or across a space or scene viewed, and then
            disappearing; hence, of short duration; not permanent; not
            lasting or durable; not stationary; passing; fleeting;
            brief; transitory; as, transient pleasure. [bd]Measured
            this transient world.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Hasty; momentary; imperfect; brief; as, a transient view
            of a landscape.
  
      3. Staying for a short time; not regular or permanent; as, a
            transient guest; transient boarders. [Colloq. U. S.]
  
      Syn: {Transient}, {Transitory}, {Fleeting}.
  
      Usage: Transient represents a thing as brief at the best;
                  transitory, as liable at any moment to pass away.
                  Fleeting goes further, and represents it as in the act
                  of taking its flight. Life is transient; its joys are
                  transitory; its hours are fleeting.
  
                           What is loose love? A transient gust. --Pope
  
                           If [we love] transitory things, which soon
                           decay, Age must be loveliest at the latest day.
                                                                              --Donne.
  
                           O fleeting joys Of Paradise, dear bought with
                           lasting woes.                              --Milton.
                  -- {Tran"sient*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"sient*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transient \Tran"sient\, a. [L. transiens, -entis, p. pr. of
      transire, transitum, to go or pass over. See {Trance}.]
      1. Passing before the sight or perception, or, as it were,
            moving over or across a space or scene viewed, and then
            disappearing; hence, of short duration; not permanent; not
            lasting or durable; not stationary; passing; fleeting;
            brief; transitory; as, transient pleasure. [bd]Measured
            this transient world.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Hasty; momentary; imperfect; brief; as, a transient view
            of a landscape.
  
      3. Staying for a short time; not regular or permanent; as, a
            transient guest; transient boarders. [Colloq. U. S.]
  
      Syn: {Transient}, {Transitory}, {Fleeting}.
  
      Usage: Transient represents a thing as brief at the best;
                  transitory, as liable at any moment to pass away.
                  Fleeting goes further, and represents it as in the act
                  of taking its flight. Life is transient; its joys are
                  transitory; its hours are fleeting.
  
                           What is loose love? A transient gust. --Pope
  
                           If [we love] transitory things, which soon
                           decay, Age must be loveliest at the latest day.
                                                                              --Donne.
  
                           O fleeting joys Of Paradise, dear bought with
                           lasting woes.                              --Milton.
                  -- {Tran"sient*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"sient*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transient \Tran"sient\, a. [L. transiens, -entis, p. pr. of
      transire, transitum, to go or pass over. See {Trance}.]
      1. Passing before the sight or perception, or, as it were,
            moving over or across a space or scene viewed, and then
            disappearing; hence, of short duration; not permanent; not
            lasting or durable; not stationary; passing; fleeting;
            brief; transitory; as, transient pleasure. [bd]Measured
            this transient world.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Hasty; momentary; imperfect; brief; as, a transient view
            of a landscape.
  
      3. Staying for a short time; not regular or permanent; as, a
            transient guest; transient boarders. [Colloq. U. S.]
  
      Syn: {Transient}, {Transitory}, {Fleeting}.
  
      Usage: Transient represents a thing as brief at the best;
                  transitory, as liable at any moment to pass away.
                  Fleeting goes further, and represents it as in the act
                  of taking its flight. Life is transient; its joys are
                  transitory; its hours are fleeting.
  
                           What is loose love? A transient gust. --Pope
  
                           If [we love] transitory things, which soon
                           decay, Age must be loveliest at the latest day.
                                                                              --Donne.
  
                           O fleeting joys Of Paradise, dear bought with
                           lasting woes.                              --Milton.
                  -- {Tran"sient*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"sient*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transilience \Tran*sil"i*ence\, Transiliency \Tran*sil"i*en*cy\,
      n. [L. transiliens, p. pr. of transilire to leap across or
      over; trans across, over + salire to leap.]
      A leap across or from one thing to another. [R.] [bd]An
      unadvised transiliency.[b8] --Glanvill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transilience \Tran*sil"i*ence\, Transiliency \Tran*sil"i*en*cy\,
      n. [L. transiliens, p. pr. of transilire to leap across or
      over; trans across, over + salire to leap.]
      A leap across or from one thing to another. [R.] [bd]An
      unadvised transiliency.[b8] --Glanvill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transisthmian \Trans*isth"mi*an\, a.
      Extending across an isthmus, as at Suez or Panama.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, v. t. (Astron.)
      To pass over the disk of (a heavenly body).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transit \Trans"it\, n. [L. transitus, from transire to go over:
      cf. F. transit. See {Transient}.]
      1. The act of passing; passage through or over.
  
                     In France you are now . . . in the transit from one
                     form of government to another.            --Burke.
  
      2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the
            transit of goods through a country.
  
      3. A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the
            Nicaragua transit. --E. G. Squier.
  
      4. (Astron.)
            (a) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place, or through the field of a telescope.
            (b) The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a
                  larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a
                  satellite or its shadow across the disk of its
                  primary.
  
      5. An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors
            and engineers; -- called also {transit compass}, and
            {surveyor's transit}.
  
      Note: The surveyor's transit differs from the theodolite in
               having the horizontal axis attached directly to the
               telescope which is not mounted in Y's and can be turned
               completely over about the axis.
  
      {Lower transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is below the polar
            axis.
  
      {Surveyor's transit}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit circle} (Astron.), a transit instrument with a
            graduated circle attached, used for observing the time of
            transit and the declination at one observation. See
            {Circle}, n., 3.
  
      {Transit compass}. See {Transit}, 5, above.
  
      {Transit duty}, a duty paid on goods that pass through a
            country.
  
      {Transit instrument}. (Astron.)
            (a) A telescope mounted at right angles to a horizontal
                  axis, on which it revolves with its line of
                  collimation in the plane of the meridian, -- used in
                  connection with a clock for observing the time of
                  transit of a heavenly body over the meridian of a
                  place.
            (b) (Surv.) A surveyor's transit. See {Transit}, 5, above.
                 
  
      {Transit trade} (Com.), the business conected with the
            passage of goods through a country to their destination.
           
  
      {Upper transit} (Astron.), the passage of a heavenly body
            across that part of the meridian which is above the polar
            axis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transition \Tran*si"tion\, n. [L. transitio: cf. F. transition.
      See {Transient}.]
      1. Passage from one place or state to another; charge; as,
            the transition of the weather from hot to cold.
  
                     There is no death, what seems so is transition.
                                                                              --Longfellow.
  
      2. (Mus.) A direct or indirect passing from one key to
            another; a modulation.
  
      3. (Rhet.) A passing from one subject to another.
  
                     [He] with transition sweet, new speech resumes.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      4. (Biol.) Change from one form to another.
  
      Note: This word is sometimes pronounced tran*sish"un; but
               according to Walker, Smart, and most other authorities,
               the customary and preferable pronunciation is
               tran*sizh"un, although this latter mode violates
               analogy. Other authorities say tran*zish"un.
  
      {Transition rocks} (Geol.), a term formerly applied to the
            lowest uncrystalline stratified rocks (graywacke) supposed
            to contain no fossils, and so called because thought to
            have been formed when the earth was passing from an
            uninhabitable to a habitable state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transition \Tran*si"tion\, n. [L. transitio: cf. F. transition.
      See {Transient}.]
      1. Passage from one place or state to another; charge; as,
            the transition of the weather from hot to cold.
  
                     There is no death, what seems so is transition.
                                                                              --Longfellow.
  
      2. (Mus.) A direct or indirect passing from one key to
            another; a modulation.
  
      3. (Rhet.) A passing from one subject to another.
  
                     [He] with transition sweet, new speech resumes.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      4. (Biol.) Change from one form to another.
  
      Note: This word is sometimes pronounced tran*sish"un; but
               according to Walker, Smart, and most other authorities,
               the customary and preferable pronunciation is
               tran*sizh"un, although this latter mode violates
               analogy. Other authorities say tran*zish"un.
  
      {Transition rocks} (Geol.), a term formerly applied to the
            lowest uncrystalline stratified rocks (graywacke) supposed
            to contain no fossils, and so called because thought to
            have been formed when the earth was passing from an
            uninhabitable to a habitable state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transition zone \Tran*si"tion zone\ (Biogeography)
      The zone lying between the Boreal and Sonoran zones of North
      America. It includes an eastern or humid subdivision and a
      western arid one of corresponding temperature comprising the
      northern Great Plains and the lower slopes of the mountains
      of the western United States and Mexico. Called also {Neutral
      zone}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitional \Tran*si"tion*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to transition; involving or denoting
      transition; as, transitional changes; transitional stage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitionary \Tran*si"tion*a*ry\, a.
      Transitional.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitive \Tran"si*tive\, a. [L. transitivus: cf. F. transitif.
      See {Transient}.]
      1. Having the power of making a transit, or passage. [R.]
            --Bacon.
  
      2. Effected by transference of signification.
  
                     By far the greater part of the transitive or
                     derivative applications of words depend on casual
                     and unaccountable caprices of the feelings or the
                     fancy.                                                --Stewart.
  
      3. (Gram.) Passing over to an object; expressing an action
            which is not limited to the agent or subject, but which
            requires an object to complete the sense; as, a transitive
            verb, for example, he holds the book. --
            {Tran"si*tive*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"si*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitive \Tran"si*tive\, a. [L. transitivus: cf. F. transitif.
      See {Transient}.]
      1. Having the power of making a transit, or passage. [R.]
            --Bacon.
  
      2. Effected by transference of signification.
  
                     By far the greater part of the transitive or
                     derivative applications of words depend on casual
                     and unaccountable caprices of the feelings or the
                     fancy.                                                --Stewart.
  
      3. (Gram.) Passing over to an object; expressing an action
            which is not limited to the agent or subject, but which
            requires an object to complete the sense; as, a transitive
            verb, for example, he holds the book. --
            {Tran"si*tive*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"si*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitive \Tran"si*tive\, a. [L. transitivus: cf. F. transitif.
      See {Transient}.]
      1. Having the power of making a transit, or passage. [R.]
            --Bacon.
  
      2. Effected by transference of signification.
  
                     By far the greater part of the transitive or
                     derivative applications of words depend on casual
                     and unaccountable caprices of the feelings or the
                     fancy.                                                --Stewart.
  
      3. (Gram.) Passing over to an object; expressing an action
            which is not limited to the agent or subject, but which
            requires an object to complete the sense; as, a transitive
            verb, for example, he holds the book. --
            {Tran"si*tive*ly}, adv. -- {Tran"si*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitorily \Tran"si*to*ri*ly\, adv.
      In a transitory manner; with brief continuance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitoriness \Tran"si*to*ri*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being transitory; speedy passage or
      departure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitory \Tran"si*to*ry\, a. [L. transitorius: cf. F.
      transitoire. See {Transient}.]
      Continuing only for a short time; not enduring; fleeting;
      evanescent.
  
               Comfort and succor all those who, in this transitory
               life, are in trouble.                              --Bk. of Com.
                                                                              Prayer.
  
               It was not the transitory light of a comet, which
               shines and glows for a wile, and then . . . vanishes
               into nothing.                                          --South.
  
      {Transitory action} (Law), an action which may be brought in
            any county, as actions for debt, and the like; -- opposed
            to local action. --Blackstone. Bouvier.
  
      Syn: transient; short-lived; brief. See {Transient}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transitory \Tran"si*to*ry\, a. [L. transitorius: cf. F.
      transitoire. See {Transient}.]
      Continuing only for a short time; not enduring; fleeting;
      evanescent.
  
               Comfort and succor all those who, in this transitory
               life, are in trouble.                              --Bk. of Com.
                                                                              Prayer.
  
               It was not the transitory light of a comet, which
               shines and glows for a wile, and then . . . vanishes
               into nothing.                                          --South.
  
      {Transitory action} (Law), an action which may be brought in
            any county, as actions for debt, and the like; -- opposed
            to local action. --Blackstone. Bouvier.
  
      Syn: transient; short-lived; brief. See {Transient}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translatable \Trans*lat"a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being translated, or rendered into another
      language.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translate \Trans*late"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Translated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Translating}.] [f. translatus, used as p. p. of
      transferre to transfer, but from a different root. See
      {Trans-}, and {Tolerate}, and cf. {Translation}.]
      1. To bear, carry, or remove, from one place to another; to
            transfer; as, to translate a tree. [Archaic] --Dryden.
  
                     In the chapel of St. Catharine of Sienna, they show
                     her head- the rest of her body being translated to
                     Rome.                                                --Evelyn.
  
      2. To change to another condition, position, place, or
            office; to transfer; hence, to remove as by death.
  
      3. To remove to heaven without a natural death.
  
                     By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not
                     see death; and was not found, because God had
                     translatedhim.                                    --Heb. xi. 5.
  
      4. (Eccl.) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
            [bd]Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, when the king would have
            translated him from that poor bishopric to a better, . . .
            refused.[b8] --Camden.
  
      5. To render into another language; to express the sense of
            in the words of another language; to interpret; hence, to
            explain or recapitulate in other words.
  
                     Translating into his own clear, pure, and flowing
                     language, what he found in books well known to the
                     world, but too bulky or too dry for boys and girls.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      6. To change into another form; to transform.
  
                     Happy is your grace, That can translatethe
                     stubbornness of fortune Into so quiet and so sweet a
                     style.                                                --Shak.
  
      7. (Med.) To cause to remove from one part of the body to
            another; as, to translate a disease.
  
      8. To cause to lose senses or recollection; to entrance.
            [Obs.] --J. Fletcher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translate \Trans*late\, v. i.
      To make a translation; to be engaged in translation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translate \Trans*late"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Translated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Translating}.] [f. translatus, used as p. p. of
      transferre to transfer, but from a different root. See
      {Trans-}, and {Tolerate}, and cf. {Translation}.]
      1. To bear, carry, or remove, from one place to another; to
            transfer; as, to translate a tree. [Archaic] --Dryden.
  
                     In the chapel of St. Catharine of Sienna, they show
                     her head- the rest of her body being translated to
                     Rome.                                                --Evelyn.
  
      2. To change to another condition, position, place, or
            office; to transfer; hence, to remove as by death.
  
      3. To remove to heaven without a natural death.
  
                     By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not
                     see death; and was not found, because God had
                     translatedhim.                                    --Heb. xi. 5.
  
      4. (Eccl.) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
            [bd]Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, when the king would have
            translated him from that poor bishopric to a better, . . .
            refused.[b8] --Camden.
  
      5. To render into another language; to express the sense of
            in the words of another language; to interpret; hence, to
            explain or recapitulate in other words.
  
                     Translating into his own clear, pure, and flowing
                     language, what he found in books well known to the
                     world, but too bulky or too dry for boys and girls.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      6. To change into another form; to transform.
  
                     Happy is your grace, That can translatethe
                     stubbornness of fortune Into so quiet and so sweet a
                     style.                                                --Shak.
  
      7. (Med.) To cause to remove from one part of the body to
            another; as, to translate a disease.
  
      8. To cause to lose senses or recollection; to entrance.
            [Obs.] --J. Fletcher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translate \Trans*late"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Translated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Translating}.] [f. translatus, used as p. p. of
      transferre to transfer, but from a different root. See
      {Trans-}, and {Tolerate}, and cf. {Translation}.]
      1. To bear, carry, or remove, from one place to another; to
            transfer; as, to translate a tree. [Archaic] --Dryden.
  
                     In the chapel of St. Catharine of Sienna, they show
                     her head- the rest of her body being translated to
                     Rome.                                                --Evelyn.
  
      2. To change to another condition, position, place, or
            office; to transfer; hence, to remove as by death.
  
      3. To remove to heaven without a natural death.
  
                     By faith Enoch was translated, that he should not
                     see death; and was not found, because God had
                     translatedhim.                                    --Heb. xi. 5.
  
      4. (Eccl.) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
            [bd]Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, when the king would have
            translated him from that poor bishopric to a better, . . .
            refused.[b8] --Camden.
  
      5. To render into another language; to express the sense of
            in the words of another language; to interpret; hence, to
            explain or recapitulate in other words.
  
                     Translating into his own clear, pure, and flowing
                     language, what he found in books well known to the
                     world, but too bulky or too dry for boys and girls.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      6. To change into another form; to transform.
  
                     Happy is your grace, That can translatethe
                     stubbornness of fortune Into so quiet and so sweet a
                     style.                                                --Shak.
  
      7. (Med.) To cause to remove from one part of the body to
            another; as, to translate a disease.
  
      8. To cause to lose senses or recollection; to entrance.
            [Obs.] --J. Fletcher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translation \Trans*la"tion\, n. [F. translation, L. translatio a
      transferring, translation, version. See {Translate}, and cf.
      {Tralation}.]
      1. The act of translating, removing, or transferring;
            removal; also, the state of being translated or removed;
            as, the translation of Enoch; the translation of a bishop.
  
      2. The act of rendering into another language;
            interpretation; as, the translation of idioms is
            difficult.
  
      3. That which is obtained by translating something a version;
            as, a translation of the Scriptures.
  
      4. (Rhet.) A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a
            metaphor; a tralation. [Obs.] --B. Jonson.
  
      5. (Metaph.) Transfer of meaning by association; association
            of ideas. --A. Tucker.
  
      6. (Kinematics) Motion in which all the points of the moving
            body have at any instant the same velocity and direction
            of motion; -- opposed to rotation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translatitious \Trans`la*ti"tious\, a. [See {Tralatitious}.]
      Metaphorical; tralatitious; also, foreign; exotic. [Obs.]
      --Evelyn.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translative \Trans*lat"ive\, a. [L. translativus that is to be
      transferred: cf. F. translatif.]
      tropical; figurative; as, a translative sense. [R.]
      --Puttenham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translator \Trans*lat"or\, n. [L. translator: cf. F.
      translateur.]
      1. One who translates; esp., one who renders into another
            language; one who expresses the sense of words in one
            language by equivalent words in another.
  
      2. (Teleg.) A repeating instrument. [Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translatorship \Trans*lat"or*ship\, n.
      The office or dignity of a translator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translatory \Trans*lat"o*ry\, a.
      Serving to translate; transferring. [R.] --Arbuthnot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translatress \Trans*lat"ress\, n.
      A woman who translates.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translavation \Trans`la*va"tion\, n. [Pref. trans- + L. lavatio,
      -onis, washing.]
      A laving or lading from one vessel to another. [Obs.]
      --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transliterate \Trans*lit"er*ate\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + L.
      litera, littera letter.]
      To express or represent in the characters of another
      alphabet; as, to transliterate Sanskrit words by means of
      English letters. --A. J. Ellis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transliteration \Trans*lit`er*a"tion\, n.
      The act or product of transliterating, or of expressing words
      of a language by means of the characters of another alphabet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translocation \Trans`lo*ca"tion\, n. [Pref. trans- + location.]
      removal of things from one place to another; substitution of
      one thing for another.
  
               There happened certain translocations at the deluge.
                                                                              --Woodward.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translucence \Trans*lu"cence\, Translucency \Trans*lu"cen*cy\,
      n.
      The quality or state of being translucent; clearness; partial
      transparency. --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translucence \Trans*lu"cence\, Translucency \Trans*lu"cen*cy\,
      n.
      The quality or state of being translucent; clearness; partial
      transparency. --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translucent \Trans*lu"cent\, a. [L. translucens, -entis, p. pr.
      of translucere to shine through; trans across, through =
      lucere to shine. See {Lucid}.]
      1. Transmitting rays of light without permitting objects to
            be distinctly seen; partially transparent.
  
      2. Transparent; clear. [Poetic] [bd]Fountain or fresh current
            . . . translucent, pure.[b8] --Milton.
  
                     Replenished from the cool, translucent springs.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
      Syn: {Translucent}, {Transparent}.
  
      Usage: A thing is translucent when it merely admits the
                  passage of light, without enabling us to distinguish
                  the color and outline of objects through it; it is
                  transparent when we can clearly discern objects placed
                  on the other side of it. Glass, water, etc., are
                  transparent; ground glass is translucent; a
                  translucent style.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translucently \Trans*lu"cent*ly\, adv.
      In a translucent manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translucid \Trans*lu"cid\, a. [L. translucidus; trans across,
      through + lucidus lucid: cf. F. translucide. See
      {Translucent}.]
      Translucent. [R.] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Translunary \Trans"lu*na*ry\, a. [Pref. trans- + L. luna moon.]
      Being or lying beyond the moon; hence, ethereal; -- opposed
      to sublunary. [Obs.]
  
               Marlowe, bathed in the Thespian springs, Had in him
               those brave, translunary things That the first poets
               had.                                                      --Drayton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmarine \Trans`ma*rine"\, a. [L. transmarinus; trans beyond
      + marinus marine: cf. F. transmarin. See {Marine}.]
      Lying or being beyond the sea. --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmeable \Trans"me*a*ble\, Transmeatable \Trans`me*at"a*ble\,
      a. [L. transmeabilis.]
      Capable of being passed over or traversed; passable. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmeable \Trans"me*a*ble\, Transmeatable \Trans`me*at"a*ble\,
      a. [L. transmeabilis.]
      Capable of being passed over or traversed; passable. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmeate \Trans"me*ate\, v. t. [L. transmeatus, p. p. of
      transmeare to pass across; trans across, over + meare to go.]
      To pass over or beyond. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmeation \Trans`me*a"tion\, n.
      The act of transmeating; a passing through or beyond. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmew \Trans*mew"\, v. t. & i. [F. transmuer, L. transmutare.
      See {Transmute}.]
      To transmute; to transform; to metamorphose. [Archaic]
      --Chaucer. Spenser.
  
               To transmew thyself from a holy hermit into a sinful
               forester.                                                --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigrant \Trans"mi*grant\, a. [L. transmigrans, p. pr. See
      {Transmigrate}.]
      Migrating or passing from one place or state to another;
      passing from one residence to another. -- n. One who
      transmigrates.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigrate \Trans"mi*grate\, v. i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transmigrated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transmigrating}.] [L.
      transmigrare, transmigratum; trans across + migrare to
      migrate. See {Migrate}.]
      1. To pass from one country or jurisdiction to another for
            the purpose of residence, as men or families; to migrate.
  
      2. To pass from one body or condition into another.
  
                     Their may transmigrate into each other. --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigrate \Trans"mi*grate\, v. i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transmigrated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transmigrating}.] [L.
      transmigrare, transmigratum; trans across + migrare to
      migrate. See {Migrate}.]
      1. To pass from one country or jurisdiction to another for
            the purpose of residence, as men or families; to migrate.
  
      2. To pass from one body or condition into another.
  
                     Their may transmigrate into each other. --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigrate \Trans"mi*grate\, v. i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Transmigrated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Transmigrating}.] [L.
      transmigrare, transmigratum; trans across + migrare to
      migrate. See {Migrate}.]
      1. To pass from one country or jurisdiction to another for
            the purpose of residence, as men or families; to migrate.
  
      2. To pass from one body or condition into another.
  
                     Their may transmigrate into each other. --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigration \Trans`mi*gra"tion\, n. [F. transmigration, L.
      transmigratio.]
      1. The act of passing from one country to another; migration.
  
      2. The passing of the soul at death into another mortal body;
            metempsychosis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigrator \Trans"mi*gra`tor\, n.
      One who transmigrates. --J. Ellis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmigratory \Trans*mi"gra*to*ry\, a.
      Passing from one body or state to another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmissibility \Trans*mis`si*bil"i*ty\, n. [Cf. F.
      transmissibilit[82].]
      The quality of being transmissible.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmissible \Trans*mis"si*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transmissible.]
      Capable of being transmitted from one to another; capable of
      being passed through any body or substance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmission \Trans*mis"sion\, n. [L. transmissio; cf. F.
      transmission. See {Transmit}.]
      1. The act of transmitting, or the state of being
            transmitted; as, the transmission of letters, writings,
            papers, news, and the like, from one country to another;
            the transmission of rights, titles, or privileges, from
            father to son, or from one generation to another.
  
      2. (Law) The right possessed by an heir or legatee of
            transmitting to his successor or successors any
            inheritance, legacy, right, or privilege, to which he is
            entitled, even if he should die without enjoying or
            exercising it.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmission dynamometer \Trans*mis"sion dy`na*mom"e*ter\
      (Mach.)
      A dynamometer in which power is measured, without being
      absorbed or used up, during transmission.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmissionist \Trans*mis"sion*ist\, n.
      An adherent of a theory, the
  
      {transmission theory}, that the brain serves to
            [bd]transmit,[b8] rather than to originate, conclusions,
            and hence that consciousness may exist independently of
            the brain.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmissionist \Trans*mis"sion*ist\, n.
      An adherent of a theory, the
  
      {transmission theory}, that the brain serves to
            [bd]transmit,[b8] rather than to originate, conclusions,
            and hence that consciousness may exist independently of
            the brain.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmissive \Trans*mis"sive\, a.
      Capable of being transmitted; derived, or handed down, from
      one to another.
  
               Itself a sun, it with transmissive light Enlivens
               worlds denied to human sight.                  --Prior.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmit \Trans*mit"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmitted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transmitting}.] [L. transmittere, transmissum;
      trans across, over + mittere to send: cf. F. transmettre. See
      {Missile}.]
      1. To cause to pass over or through; to communicate by
            sending; to send from one person or place to another; to
            pass on or down as by inheritance; as, to transmit a
            memorial; to transmit dispatches; to transmit money, or
            bills of exchange, from one country to another.
  
                     The ancientest fathers must be next removed, as
                     Clement of Alexandria, and that Eusebian book of
                     evangelic preparation, transmitting our ears through
                     a hoard of heathenish obscenities to receive the
                     gospel.                                             --Milton.
  
                     The scepter of that kingdom continued to be
                     transmitted in the dynasty of Castile. --Prescott.
  
      2. To suffer to pass through; as, glass transmits light;
            metals transmit, or conduct, electricity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmittal \Trans*mit"tal\, n.
      Transmission. --Swift.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmittance \Trans*mit"tance\, n.
      Transmission.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmit \Trans*mit"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmitted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transmitting}.] [L. transmittere, transmissum;
      trans across, over + mittere to send: cf. F. transmettre. See
      {Missile}.]
      1. To cause to pass over or through; to communicate by
            sending; to send from one person or place to another; to
            pass on or down as by inheritance; as, to transmit a
            memorial; to transmit dispatches; to transmit money, or
            bills of exchange, from one country to another.
  
                     The ancientest fathers must be next removed, as
                     Clement of Alexandria, and that Eusebian book of
                     evangelic preparation, transmitting our ears through
                     a hoard of heathenish obscenities to receive the
                     gospel.                                             --Milton.
  
                     The scepter of that kingdom continued to be
                     transmitted in the dynasty of Castile. --Prescott.
  
      2. To suffer to pass through; as, glass transmits light;
            metals transmit, or conduct, electricity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmitter \Trans*mit"ter\, n.
      One who, or that which, transmits; specifically, that portion
      of a telegraphic or telephonic instrument by means of which a
      message is sent; -- opposed to {receiver}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmittible \Trans*mit"ti*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transmitted; transmissible.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmit \Trans*mit"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmitted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Transmitting}.] [L. transmittere, transmissum;
      trans across, over + mittere to send: cf. F. transmettre. See
      {Missile}.]
      1. To cause to pass over or through; to communicate by
            sending; to send from one person or place to another; to
            pass on or down as by inheritance; as, to transmit a
            memorial; to transmit dispatches; to transmit money, or
            bills of exchange, from one country to another.
  
                     The ancientest fathers must be next removed, as
                     Clement of Alexandria, and that Eusebian book of
                     evangelic preparation, transmitting our ears through
                     a hoard of heathenish obscenities to receive the
                     gospel.                                             --Milton.
  
                     The scepter of that kingdom continued to be
                     transmitted in the dynasty of Castile. --Prescott.
  
      2. To suffer to pass through; as, glass transmits light;
            metals transmit, or conduct, electricity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmogrification \Trans*mog`ri*fi*ca"tion\, n.
      The act of transmogrifying, or the state of being
      transmogrified; transformation. [Colloq.]
  
               Clive, who wrote me about the transmogrification of our
               schoolfellow, an attorney's son.            --Thackeray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmogrify \Trans*mog"ri*fy\, v. t. [A humorous coinage.]
      To change into a different shape; to transform. [Colloq.]
      --Fielding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmove \Trans*move"\, v. t. [Pref. trans + move.]
      To move or change from one state into another; to transform.
      [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutability \Trans*mu`ta*bil"i*ty\, n. [Cf. F.
      transmutabilit[82].]
      The quality of being transmutable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutable \Trans*mut"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transmutable. See
      {Transmute}.]
      Capable of being transmuted or changed into a different
      substance, or into into something of a different form a
      nature; transformable.
  
               The fluids and solids of an animal body are easily
               transmutable into one another.               --Arbuthnot.
      -- {Trans*mut"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trans*mut"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutable \Trans*mut"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transmutable. See
      {Transmute}.]
      Capable of being transmuted or changed into a different
      substance, or into into something of a different form a
      nature; transformable.
  
               The fluids and solids of an animal body are easily
               transmutable into one another.               --Arbuthnot.
      -- {Trans*mut"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trans*mut"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutable \Trans*mut"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transmutable. See
      {Transmute}.]
      Capable of being transmuted or changed into a different
      substance, or into into something of a different form a
      nature; transformable.
  
               The fluids and solids of an animal body are easily
               transmutable into one another.               --Arbuthnot.
      -- {Trans*mut"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Trans*mut"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutation \Trans`mu*ta"tion\, n. [F. transmutation, L.
      transmutatio. See {Transmute}.]
      1. The act of transmuting, or the state of being transmuted;
            as, the transmutation of metals.
  
      2. (Geom.) The change or reduction of one figure or body into
            another of the same area or solidity, but of a different
            form, as of a triangle into a square. [R.]
  
      3. (Biol.) The change of one species into another, which is
            assumed to take place in any development theory of life;
            transformism. --Bacon.
  
      {Transmutation of metals} (Alchem.), the conversion of base
            metals into gold or silver, a process often attempted by
            the alchemists. See {Alchemy}, and {Philosopher's stone},
            under {Philosopher}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutation \Trans`mu*ta"tion\, n. [F. transmutation, L.
      transmutatio. See {Transmute}.]
      1. The act of transmuting, or the state of being transmuted;
            as, the transmutation of metals.
  
      2. (Geom.) The change or reduction of one figure or body into
            another of the same area or solidity, but of a different
            form, as of a triangle into a square. [R.]
  
      3. (Biol.) The change of one species into another, which is
            assumed to take place in any development theory of life;
            transformism. --Bacon.
  
      {Transmutation of metals} (Alchem.), the conversion of base
            metals into gold or silver, a process often attempted by
            the alchemists. See {Alchemy}, and {Philosopher's stone},
            under {Philosopher}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutationist \Trans`mu*ta"tion*ist\, n.
      One who believes in the transmutation of metals or of
      species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmute \Trans*mute"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transmuting}.] [L. transmutare, transmutatum;
      trans across + mutare to change. See {Mutable}, and cf.
      {Transmew}.]
      To change from one nature, form, or substance, into another;
      to transform.
  
               The caresses of parents and the blandishments of
               friends transmute us into idols.            --Buckminster.
  
               Transmuting sorrow into golden joy Free from alloy.
                                                                              --H. Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmute \Trans*mute"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transmuting}.] [L. transmutare, transmutatum;
      trans across + mutare to change. See {Mutable}, and cf.
      {Transmew}.]
      To change from one nature, form, or substance, into another;
      to transform.
  
               The caresses of parents and the blandishments of
               friends transmute us into idols.            --Buckminster.
  
               Transmuting sorrow into golden joy Free from alloy.
                                                                              --H. Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmuter \Trans*mut"er\, n.
      One who transmutes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmute \Trans*mute"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transmuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transmuting}.] [L. transmutare, transmutatum;
      trans across + mutare to change. See {Mutable}, and cf.
      {Transmew}.]
      To change from one nature, form, or substance, into another;
      to transform.
  
               The caresses of parents and the blandishments of
               friends transmute us into idols.            --Buckminster.
  
               Transmuting sorrow into golden joy Free from alloy.
                                                                              --H. Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transmutual \Trans*mu"tu*al\ (?; 135), a. [Pref. trans +
      mutual.]
      Reciprocal; commutual. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transnatation \Trans`na*ta"tion\, n. [L. transnatare to swim
      over; trans across, over + natare to swim.]
      The act of swimming across, as a river.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transnature \Trans*na"ture\ (?; 135), v. t. [Pref. trans- +
      nature.]
      To transfer or transform the nature of. [Obs.]
  
               We are transelemented, or transnatured.   --Jewel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transom \Tran"som\, n. [Probably fr. L. transtrum a crossbeam,
      transom, from trans across. Cf. {Trestle}.]
      1. (Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or
            between a door and a window above it. Transom is the
            horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an
            opening. See Illust. of {Mullion}.
  
      2. (Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the
            stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the
            stern structure; -- called also {transsummer}.
  
      3. (Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of
            some gun carriages.
  
      4. (Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff. --Chambers.
  
      5. (Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side
            frames of a truck with each other.
  
      {Transom knees} (Shipbuilding), knees bolted to the transoms
            and after timbers.
  
      {Transom window}. (Arch.)
            (a) A window divided horizontally by a transom or
                  transoms.
            (b) A window over a door, with a transom between.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transom \Tran"som\, n. [Probably fr. L. transtrum a crossbeam,
      transom, from trans across. Cf. {Trestle}.]
      1. (Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or
            between a door and a window above it. Transom is the
            horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an
            opening. See Illust. of {Mullion}.
  
      2. (Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the
            stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the
            stern structure; -- called also {transsummer}.
  
      3. (Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of
            some gun carriages.
  
      4. (Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff. --Chambers.
  
      5. (Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side
            frames of a truck with each other.
  
      {Transom knees} (Shipbuilding), knees bolted to the transoms
            and after timbers.
  
      {Transom window}. (Arch.)
            (a) A window divided horizontally by a transom or
                  transoms.
            (b) A window over a door, with a transom between.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transom \Tran"som\, n. [Probably fr. L. transtrum a crossbeam,
      transom, from trans across. Cf. {Trestle}.]
      1. (Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or
            between a door and a window above it. Transom is the
            horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an
            opening. See Illust. of {Mullion}.
  
      2. (Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the
            stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the
            stern structure; -- called also {transsummer}.
  
      3. (Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of
            some gun carriages.
  
      4. (Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff. --Chambers.
  
      5. (Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side
            frames of a truck with each other.
  
      {Transom knees} (Shipbuilding), knees bolted to the transoms
            and after timbers.
  
      {Transom window}. (Arch.)
            (a) A window divided horizontally by a transom or
                  transoms.
            (b) A window over a door, with a transom between.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpadane \Trans"pa*dane`\, a. [L. transpadanus; trans across
      + Padus the Po.]
      Lying or being on the further side of the river Po with
      reference to Rome, that is, on the north side; -- opposed to
      cispadane.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpalatine \Trans*pal"a*tine\, a. [Pref. trans- + palatine.]
      (Anat.)
      Situated beyond or outside the palatine bone; -- said of a
      bone in the skull of some reptiles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpare \Trans*pare"\, v. t. & i. [See {Transparent}.]
      To be, or cause to be, transparent; to appear, or cause to
      appear, or be seen, through something. [Obs.] --Stirling.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparence \Trans*par"ence\, n. [Cf. F. transparence.]
      The quality or state of being transparent; transparency.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparency \Trans*par"en*cy\, n.; pl. {Transparencies}. [Cf.
      F. transparence.]
      1. The quality or condition of being transparent;
            transparence.
  
      2. That which is transparent; especially, a picture painted
            on thin cloth or glass, or impressed on porcelain, or the
            like, to be viewed by natural or artificial light, which
            shines through it. --Fairholt.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparency \Trans*par"en*cy\, n.; pl. {Transparencies}. [Cf.
      F. transparence.]
      1. The quality or condition of being transparent;
            transparence.
  
      2. That which is transparent; especially, a picture painted
            on thin cloth or glass, or impressed on porcelain, or the
            like, to be viewed by natural or artificial light, which
            shines through it. --Fairholt.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparent \Trans*par"ent\, a. [F., from LL. transparens,
      -entis, p. pr. of transparere to be transparent; L. trans
      across, through + parere to appear. See {Appear}.]
      1. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that
            bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light;
            diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent
            diamond; -- opposed to {opaque}. [bd]Transparent elemental
            air.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Admitting the passage of light; open; porous; as, a
            transparent veil. --Dryden.
  
      Syn: Translucent; pellucid; clear; bright; limpid; lucid;
               diaphanous. See {Translucent}. -- {Trans*par"ent*ly},
               adv. -- {Trans*par"ent*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Slate \Slate\, n. [OE. slat, OF. esclat a shiver, splinter, F.
      [82]clat, fr. OF. esclater to shiver, to chip, F. [82]clater,
      fr. OHG. sliezen to tear, slit, split, fr. sl[c6]zan to slit,
      G. schleissen. See {Slit}, v. t., and cf. {Eclat}.]
      1. (Min.) An argillaceous rock which readily splits into thin
            plates; argillite; argillaceous schist.
  
      2. Any rock or stone having a slaty structure.
  
      3. A prepared piece of such stone. Especially:
            (a) A thin, flat piece, for roofing or covering houses,
                  etc.
            (b) A tablet for writing upon.
  
      4. An artificial material, resembling slate, and used for the
            above purposes.
  
      5. A thin plate of any material; a flake. [Obs.]
  
      6. (Politics) A list of candidates, prepared for nomination
            or for election; a list of candidates, or a programme of
            action, devised beforehand. [Cant, U.S.] --Bartlett.
  
      {Adhesive slate} (Min.), a kind of slate of a greenish gray
            color, which absorbs water rapidly, and adheres to the
            tongue; whence the name.
  
      {Aluminous slate}, [or] {Alum slate} (Min.), a kind of slate
            containing sulphate of alumina, -- used in the manufacture
            of alum.
  
      {Bituminous slate} (Min.), a soft species of sectile clay
            slate, impregnated with bitumen.
  
      {Hornblende slate} (Min.), a slaty rock, consisting
            essentially of hornblende and feldspar, useful for
            flagging on account of its toughness.
  
      {Slate ax} [or] {axe}, a mattock with an ax end, used in
            shaping slates for roofs, and making holes in them for the
            nails.
  
      {Slate clay} (Geol.), an indurated clay, forming one of the
            alternating beds of the coal measures, consisting of an
            infusible compound of alumina and silica, and often used
            for making fire bricks. --Tomlinson.
  
      {Slate globe}, a globe the surface of which is made of an
            artificial slatelike material.
  
      {Slate pencil}, a pencil of slate, or of soapstone, used for
            writing on a slate.
  
      {Slate rocks} (Min.), rocks which split into thin lamin[91],
            not necessarily parallel to the stratification; foliated
            rocks.
  
      {Slate spar} (Min.), a variety of calcite of silvery white
            luster and of a slaty structure.
  
      {Transparent slate}, a plate of translucent material, as
            ground glass, upon which a copy of a picture, placed
            beneath it, can be made by tracing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparent \Trans*par"ent\, a. [F., from LL. transparens,
      -entis, p. pr. of transparere to be transparent; L. trans
      across, through + parere to appear. See {Appear}.]
      1. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that
            bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light;
            diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent
            diamond; -- opposed to {opaque}. [bd]Transparent elemental
            air.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Admitting the passage of light; open; porous; as, a
            transparent veil. --Dryden.
  
      Syn: Translucent; pellucid; clear; bright; limpid; lucid;
               diaphanous. See {Translucent}. -- {Trans*par"ent*ly},
               adv. -- {Trans*par"ent*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transparent \Trans*par"ent\, a. [F., from LL. transparens,
      -entis, p. pr. of transparere to be transparent; L. trans
      across, through + parere to appear. See {Appear}.]
      1. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that
            bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light;
            diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent
            diamond; -- opposed to {opaque}. [bd]Transparent elemental
            air.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. Admitting the passage of light; open; porous; as, a
            transparent veil. --Dryden.
  
      Syn: Translucent; pellucid; clear; bright; limpid; lucid;
               diaphanous. See {Translucent}. -- {Trans*par"ent*ly},
               adv. -- {Trans*par"ent*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpass \Trans*pass"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + pass: cf. LL.
      transpassare. Cf. {Trespass}.]
      To pass over; as, Alexander transpassed the river. [Obs.]
      --J. Gregory.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpass \Trans*pass"\, v. i.
      To pass by; to pass away. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpassable \Trans*pass"a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transpassed, or crossed over. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpatronize \Trans*pat"ron*ize\, v. t. [Trans- + patronize.]
      To transfer the patronage of. [Obs.] --Warner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpeciate \Tran*spe"ci*ate\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + L. species
      form.]
      To change from one species to another; to transform. [Obs.]
  
               Power to transpeciate a man into a horse. --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpicuous \Tran*spic"u*ous\, a. [L. transpicere to see or
      look through + specere, spicere, to see. Cf. {Conspicuous}.]
      Transparent; pervious to the sight. [R.] [bd]The wide,
      transpicuous air.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpierce \Trans*pierce"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transpierced};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transpiercing}.] [Pref. trans- + pierce: cf.
      F. transpercer.]
      To pierce through; to penetrate; to permeate; to pass
      through.
  
               The sides transpierced return a rattling sound.
                                                                              --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpierce \Trans*pierce"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transpierced};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transpiercing}.] [Pref. trans- + pierce: cf.
      F. transpercer.]
      To pierce through; to penetrate; to permeate; to pass
      through.
  
               The sides transpierced return a rattling sound.
                                                                              --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpierce \Trans*pierce"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transpierced};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transpiercing}.] [Pref. trans- + pierce: cf.
      F. transpercer.]
      To pierce through; to penetrate; to permeate; to pass
      through.
  
               The sides transpierced return a rattling sound.
                                                                              --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpirable \Tran*spir"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transpirable.]
      Capable of being transpired, or of transpiring.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpiration \Tran`spi*ra"tion\, n. [F. transpiration.]
      1. (Physiol.) The act or process of transpiring or excreting
            in the form of vapor; exhalation, as through the skin or
            other membranes of the body; as, pulmonary transpiration,
            or the excretion of aqueous vapor from the lungs.
            Perspiration is a form of transpiration. --Cudworth.
  
      2. (bot.) The evaporation of water, or exhalation of aqueous
            vapor, from cells and masses of tissue.
  
      3. (Physics) The passing of gases through fine tubes, porous
            substances, or the like; as, transpiration through
            membranes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpiratory \Tran*spir"a*to*ry\, a.
      Of or relating to transpiration.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpire \Tran*spire"\, v. t.
      1. (Physiol.) To excrete through the skin; to give off in the
            form of vapor; to exhale; to perspire.
  
      2. (Bot.) To evaporate (moisture) from living cells.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpire \Tran*spire"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transpired}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transpiring}.] [F. transpirer; L. trans across,
      through + spirare to breathe. See {Spirit}.]
      1. (Physiol.) To pass off in the form of vapor or insensible
            perspiration; to exhale.
  
      2. (Bot.) To evaporate from living cells.
  
      3. To escape from secrecy; to become public; as, the
            proceedings of the council soon transpired.
  
                     The story of Paulina's and Maximilian's mutual
                     attachment had transpired through many of the
                     travelers.                                          --De Quincey.
  
      4. To happen or come to pass; to occur.
  
      Note: This sense of the word, which is of comparatively
               recent introduction, is common in the United States,
               especially in the language of conversation and of
               newspaper writers, and is used to some extent in
               England. Its use, however, is censured by critics of
               both countries.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpire \Tran*spire"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transpired}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transpiring}.] [F. transpirer; L. trans across,
      through + spirare to breathe. See {Spirit}.]
      1. (Physiol.) To pass off in the form of vapor or insensible
            perspiration; to exhale.
  
      2. (Bot.) To evaporate from living cells.
  
      3. To escape from secrecy; to become public; as, the
            proceedings of the council soon transpired.
  
                     The story of Paulina's and Maximilian's mutual
                     attachment had transpired through many of the
                     travelers.                                          --De Quincey.
  
      4. To happen or come to pass; to occur.
  
      Note: This sense of the word, which is of comparatively
               recent introduction, is common in the United States,
               especially in the language of conversation and of
               newspaper writers, and is used to some extent in
               England. Its use, however, is censured by critics of
               both countries.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpire \Tran*spire"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transpired}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transpiring}.] [F. transpirer; L. trans across,
      through + spirare to breathe. See {Spirit}.]
      1. (Physiol.) To pass off in the form of vapor or insensible
            perspiration; to exhale.
  
      2. (Bot.) To evaporate from living cells.
  
      3. To escape from secrecy; to become public; as, the
            proceedings of the council soon transpired.
  
                     The story of Paulina's and Maximilian's mutual
                     attachment had transpired through many of the
                     travelers.                                          --De Quincey.
  
      4. To happen or come to pass; to occur.
  
      Note: This sense of the word, which is of comparatively
               recent introduction, is common in the United States,
               especially in the language of conversation and of
               newspaper writers, and is used to some extent in
               England. Its use, however, is censured by critics of
               both countries.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplace \Trans*place"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplaced}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transplacing}.] [Pref. trans- + place.]
      To remove across some space; to put in an opposite or another
      place. [R.]
  
               It [an obelisk] was transplaced . . . from the left
               side of the Vatican into a more eminent place. --Bp.
                                                                              Wilkins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplace \Trans*place"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplaced}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transplacing}.] [Pref. trans- + place.]
      To remove across some space; to put in an opposite or another
      place. [R.]
  
               It [an obelisk] was transplaced . . . from the left
               side of the Vatican into a more eminent place. --Bp.
                                                                              Wilkins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplace \Trans*place"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplaced}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transplacing}.] [Pref. trans- + place.]
      To remove across some space; to put in an opposite or another
      place. [R.]
  
               It [an obelisk] was transplaced . . . from the left
               side of the Vatican into a more eminent place. --Bp.
                                                                              Wilkins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplant \Trans*plant"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplanted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transplanting}.] [F. transplanter, L.
      transplantare; trans across, over + plantare to plant. See
      {Plant}.]
      1. To remove, and plant in another place; as, to transplant
            trees. --Dryden.
  
      2. To remove, and settle or establish for residence in
            another place; as, to transplant inhabitants.
  
                     Being transplanted out of his cold, barren diocese
                     of St. David into a warmer climate.   --Clarendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplantation \Trans`plan*ta"tion\, n. [Cf. F.
      transplantation.]
      1. The act of transplanting, or the state of being
            transplanted; also, removal.
  
                     The transplantation of Ulysses to Sparta. --Broome.
  
      2. (Surg.) The removal of tissues from a healthy part, and
            the insertion of them in another place where there is a
            lesion; as, the transplantation of tissues in autoplasty.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplant \Trans*plant"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplanted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transplanting}.] [F. transplanter, L.
      transplantare; trans across, over + plantare to plant. See
      {Plant}.]
      1. To remove, and plant in another place; as, to transplant
            trees. --Dryden.
  
      2. To remove, and settle or establish for residence in
            another place; as, to transplant inhabitants.
  
                     Being transplanted out of his cold, barren diocese
                     of St. David into a warmer climate.   --Clarendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplanter \Trans*plant"er\, n.
      One who transplants; also, a machine for transplanting trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplant \Trans*plant"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transplanted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Transplanting}.] [F. transplanter, L.
      transplantare; trans across, over + plantare to plant. See
      {Plant}.]
      1. To remove, and plant in another place; as, to transplant
            trees. --Dryden.
  
      2. To remove, and settle or establish for residence in
            another place; as, to transplant inhabitants.
  
                     Being transplanted out of his cold, barren diocese
                     of St. David into a warmer climate.   --Clarendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplendency \Tran*splen"den*cy\, n.
      Quality or state of being transplendent. [R.] --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplendent \Tran*splen"dent\, a. [Trans- + splendent.]
      Resplendent in the highest degree. [R.] --
      {Tran*splen"dent*ly}, adv. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transplendent \Tran*splen"dent\, a. [Trans- + splendent.]
      Resplendent in the highest degree. [R.] --
      {Tran*splen"dent*ly}, adv. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans"port\, n. [F. See {Transport}, v.]
      1. Transportation; carriage; conveyance.
  
                     The Romans . . . stipulated with the Carthaginians
                     to furnish them with ships for transport and war.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.
  
      2. A vessel employed for transporting, especially for
            carrying soldiers, warlike stores, or provisions, from one
            place to another, or to convey convicts to their
            destination; -- called also {transport ship}, {transport
            vessel}.
  
      3. Vehement emotion; passion; ecstasy; rapture.
  
                     With transport views the airy rule his own, And
                     swells on an imaginary throne.            --Pope.
  
                     Say not, in transports of despair, That all your
                     hopes are fled.                                 --Doddridge.
  
      4. A convict transported, or sentenced to exile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans*port"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transported}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transporting}.] [F. transporter, L.
      transportare; trans across + portare to carry. See {Port}
      bearing, demeanor.]
      1. To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to
            convey; as, to transport goods; to transport troops.
            --Hakluyt.
  
      2. To carry, or cause to be carried, into banishment, as a
            criminal; to banish.
  
      3. To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow,
            complacency, anger, etc.; to ravish with pleasure or
            ecstasy; as, music transports the soul.
  
                     [They] laugh as if transported with some fit Of
                     passion.                                             --Milton.
  
                     We shall then be transported with a nobler . . .
                     wonder.                                             --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans"port\, n. [F. See {Transport}, v.]
      1. Transportation; carriage; conveyance.
  
                     The Romans . . . stipulated with the Carthaginians
                     to furnish them with ships for transport and war.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.
  
      2. A vessel employed for transporting, especially for
            carrying soldiers, warlike stores, or provisions, from one
            place to another, or to convey convicts to their
            destination; -- called also {transport ship}, {transport
            vessel}.
  
      3. Vehement emotion; passion; ecstasy; rapture.
  
                     With transport views the airy rule his own, And
                     swells on an imaginary throne.            --Pope.
  
                     Say not, in transports of despair, That all your
                     hopes are fled.                                 --Doddridge.
  
      4. A convict transported, or sentenced to exile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans"port\, n. [F. See {Transport}, v.]
      1. Transportation; carriage; conveyance.
  
                     The Romans . . . stipulated with the Carthaginians
                     to furnish them with ships for transport and war.
                                                                              --Arbuthnot.
  
      2. A vessel employed for transporting, especially for
            carrying soldiers, warlike stores, or provisions, from one
            place to another, or to convey convicts to their
            destination; -- called also {transport ship}, {transport
            vessel}.
  
      3. Vehement emotion; passion; ecstasy; rapture.
  
                     With transport views the airy rule his own, And
                     swells on an imaginary throne.            --Pope.
  
                     Say not, in transports of despair, That all your
                     hopes are fled.                                 --Doddridge.
  
      4. A convict transported, or sentenced to exile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportability \Trans*port`a*bil"i*ty\, n.
      The quality or state of being transportable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportable \Trans*port"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. transportable.]
      1. Capable of being transported.
  
      2. Incurring, or subject to, the punishment of
            transportation; as, a transportable offense.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportal \Trans*port"al\, n.
      Transportation; the act of removing from one locality to
      another. [bd]The transportal of seeds in the wool or fur of
      quadrupeds.[b8] --Darwin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportance \Trans*port"ance\, n.
      Transportation. [Obs.] [bd]Give me swift transportance.[b8]
      --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportant \Trans*port"ant\, a.
      Transporting; [?]avishing; as, transportant love. [Obs.]
      --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportation \Trans`por*ta"tion\, n. [L. transportatio: cf. F.
      transportation.]
      1. The act of transporting, or the state of being
            transported; carriage from one place to another; removal;
            conveyance.
  
                     To provide a vessel for their transportation. --Sir
                                                                              H. Wotton.
  
      2. Transport; ecstasy. [R.] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans*port"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transported}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transporting}.] [F. transporter, L.
      transportare; trans across + portare to carry. See {Port}
      bearing, demeanor.]
      1. To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to
            convey; as, to transport goods; to transport troops.
            --Hakluyt.
  
      2. To carry, or cause to be carried, into banishment, as a
            criminal; to banish.
  
      3. To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow,
            complacency, anger, etc.; to ravish with pleasure or
            ecstasy; as, music transports the soul.
  
                     [They] laugh as if transported with some fit Of
                     passion.                                             --Milton.
  
                     We shall then be transported with a nobler . . .
                     wonder.                                             --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transported \Trans*port"ed\, a.
      Conveyed from one place to another; figuratively, carried
      away with passion or pleasure; entranced. --
      {Trans*port"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Trans*port"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transported \Trans*port"ed\, a.
      Conveyed from one place to another; figuratively, carried
      away with passion or pleasure; entranced. --
      {Trans*port"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Trans*port"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transported \Trans*port"ed\, a.
      Conveyed from one place to another; figuratively, carried
      away with passion or pleasure; entranced. --
      {Trans*port"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Trans*port"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transporter \Trans*port"er\, n.
      One who transports.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transport \Trans*port"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transported}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transporting}.] [F. transporter, L.
      transportare; trans across + portare to carry. See {Port}
      bearing, demeanor.]
      1. To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to
            convey; as, to transport goods; to transport troops.
            --Hakluyt.
  
      2. To carry, or cause to be carried, into banishment, as a
            criminal; to banish.
  
      3. To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow,
            complacency, anger, etc.; to ravish with pleasure or
            ecstasy; as, music transports the soul.
  
                     [They] laugh as if transported with some fit Of
                     passion.                                             --Milton.
  
                     We shall then be transported with a nobler . . .
                     wonder.                                             --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transporting \Trans*port"ing\, a.
      That transports; fig., ravishing.
  
               Your transporting chords ring out.         --Keble.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportingly \Trans*port"ing*ly\, adv.
      So as to transport.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transportment \Trans*port"ment\, n.
      The act of transporting, or the state of being transported;
      transportation. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transposable \Trans*pos"a*ble\, a.
      That may transposed; as, a transposable phrase.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transposal \Trans*pos"al\, n.
      The act of transposing, or the state of being transposed;
      transposition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpose \Trans*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transposing}.] [F. transposer; pref. trans- (L.
      trans across) + poser to put. See {Pose}.]
      1. To change the place or order of; to substitute one for the
            other of; to exchange, in respect of position; as, to
            transpose letters, words, or propositions.
  
      2. To change; to transform; to invert. [R.]
  
                     Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can
                     transpose to form and dignity.            --Shak.
  
      3. (Alg.) To bring, as any term of an equation, from one side
            over to the other, without destroying the equation; thus,
            if a + b = c, and we make a = c - b, then b is said to be
            transposed.
  
      4. (Gram.) To change the natural order of, as words.
  
      5. (Mus.) To change the key of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpose \Trans*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transposing}.] [F. transposer; pref. trans- (L.
      trans across) + poser to put. See {Pose}.]
      1. To change the place or order of; to substitute one for the
            other of; to exchange, in respect of position; as, to
            transpose letters, words, or propositions.
  
      2. To change; to transform; to invert. [R.]
  
                     Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can
                     transpose to form and dignity.            --Shak.
  
      3. (Alg.) To bring, as any term of an equation, from one side
            over to the other, without destroying the equation; thus,
            if a + b = c, and we make a = c - b, then b is said to be
            transposed.
  
      4. (Gram.) To change the natural order of, as words.
  
      5. (Mus.) To change the key of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transposer \Trans*pos"er\, n.
      One who transposes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpose \Trans*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transposed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transposing}.] [F. transposer; pref. trans- (L.
      trans across) + poser to put. See {Pose}.]
      1. To change the place or order of; to substitute one for the
            other of; to exchange, in respect of position; as, to
            transpose letters, words, or propositions.
  
      2. To change; to transform; to invert. [R.]
  
                     Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can
                     transpose to form and dignity.            --Shak.
  
      3. (Alg.) To bring, as any term of an equation, from one side
            over to the other, without destroying the equation; thus,
            if a + b = c, and we make a = c - b, then b is said to be
            transposed.
  
      4. (Gram.) To change the natural order of, as words.
  
      5. (Mus.) To change the key of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transposition \Trans`po*si"tion\, n. [F. transposition, from L.
      transponere, transpositum, to set over, remove, transfer;
      trans across, over + ponere to place. See {Position}.]
      The act of transposing, or the state of being transposed.
      Specifically:
      (a) (Alg.) The bringing of any term of an equation from one
            side over to the other without destroying the equation.
      (b) (Gram.) A change of the natural order of words in a
            sentence; as, the Latin and Greek languages admit
            transposition, without inconvenience, to a much greater
            extent than the English.
      (c) (Mus.) A change of a composition into another key.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpositional \Trans`po*si"tion*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to transposition; involving transposition.
      --Pegge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transpositive \Trans*pos"i*tive\, a.
      Made by transposing; consisting in transposition;
      transposable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transprint \Trans*print"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + print.]
      To transfer to the wrong place in printing; to print out of
      place. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transprose \Trans*prose"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + prose.]
      To change from prose into verse; to versify; also, to change
      from verse into prose. [Obs.] --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transregionate \Trans*re"gion*ate\, a. [Pref. trans- + region.]
      Foreign. [Obs.] --Holinshed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshape \Trans*shape"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transshaped}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transshaping}.] [Pref. trans- + shape.]
      To change into another shape or form; to transform. [Written
      also {transhape}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshape \Trans*shape"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transshaped}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transshaping}.] [Pref. trans- + shape.]
      To change into another shape or form; to transform. [Written
      also {transhape}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshape \Trans*shape"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transshaped}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transshaping}.] [Pref. trans- + shape.]
      To change into another shape or form; to transform. [Written
      also {transhape}.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transship \Trans*ship"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + ship.]
      To transfer from one ship or conveyance to another. [Written
      also {tranship}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transshipment \Trans*ship"ment\, n.
      The act of transshipping, or transferring, as goods, from one
      ship or conveyance to another. [Written also {transhipment}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transom \Tran"som\, n. [Probably fr. L. transtrum a crossbeam,
      transom, from trans across. Cf. {Trestle}.]
      1. (Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or
            between a door and a window above it. Transom is the
            horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an
            opening. See Illust. of {Mullion}.
  
      2. (Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the
            stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the
            stern structure; -- called also {transsummer}.
  
      3. (Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of
            some gun carriages.
  
      4. (Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff. --Chambers.
  
      5. (Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side
            frames of a truck with each other.
  
      {Transom knees} (Shipbuilding), knees bolted to the transoms
            and after timbers.
  
      {Transom window}. (Arch.)
            (a) A window divided horizontally by a transom or
                  transoms.
            (b) A window over a door, with a transom between.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transsummer \Trans"sum`mer\, n. (Naut.)
      See {Transom}, 2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transom \Tran"som\, n. [Probably fr. L. transtrum a crossbeam,
      transom, from trans across. Cf. {Trestle}.]
      1. (Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or
            between a door and a window above it. Transom is the
            horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an
            opening. See Illust. of {Mullion}.
  
      2. (Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the
            stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the
            stern structure; -- called also {transsummer}.
  
      3. (Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of
            some gun carriages.
  
      4. (Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff. --Chambers.
  
      5. (Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side
            frames of a truck with each other.
  
      {Transom knees} (Shipbuilding), knees bolted to the transoms
            and after timbers.
  
      {Transom window}. (Arch.)
            (a) A window divided horizontally by a transom or
                  transoms.
            (b) A window over a door, with a transom between.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transsummer \Trans"sum`mer\, n. (Naut.)
      See {Transom}, 2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transubstantiate \Tran`sub*stan"ti*ate\, v. t. [LL.
      transubstantiatus, p. p. of transubstantiare to
      transubstantiate; L. trans across, over + substantia
      substance. See {Substance}.]
      1. To change into another substance. [R.]
  
                     The spider love which transubstantiates all, And can
                     convert manna to gall.                        --Donne.
  
      2. (R. C. Theol.) To change, as the sacramental elements,
            bread and wine, into the flesh and blood of Christ.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transubstantiation \Tran`sub*stan`ti*a"tion\, n. [LL.
      transubstantiatio: cf. F. transsubstantiation.]
      1. A change into another substance.
  
      2. (R. C. Theol.) The doctrine held by Roman Catholics, that
            the bread and wine in the Mass is converted into the body
            and blood of Christ; -- distinguished from
            consubstantiation, and impanation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transubstantiator \Tran`sub*stan"ti*a`tor\, n. [Cf. F.
      transsubstantiateur.]
      One who maintains the doctrine of transubstantiation.
      --Barrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transudation \Tran`su*da"tion\, n. [Cf. F. transsudation.]
      1. The act or process of transuding.
  
      2. (Physics) Same as {Exosmose}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transudatory \Tran*su"da*to*ry\, a.
      Of or pertaining to transudation; passing by transudation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transude \Tran*sude"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transuded}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Transuding}.] [Pref. trans- + L. sudare to sweat: cf.
      F. transsuder.]
      To pass, as perspirable matter does, through the pores or
      interstices of textures; as, liquor may transude through
      leather or wood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transude \Tran*sude"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transuded}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Transuding}.] [Pref. trans- + L. sudare to sweat: cf.
      F. transsuder.]
      To pass, as perspirable matter does, through the pores or
      interstices of textures; as, liquor may transude through
      leather or wood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transude \Tran*sude"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Transuded}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Transuding}.] [Pref. trans- + L. sudare to sweat: cf.
      F. transsuder.]
      To pass, as perspirable matter does, through the pores or
      interstices of textures; as, liquor may transude through
      leather or wood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transume \Tran*sume"\, v. t. [L. transumere, transsumere, to
      take from one to another; trans across + sumere to take.]
      To change; to convert. [R.] --Crashaw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transumpt \Tran*sumpt"\, n. [L. transumere, transumptum, to take
      from one to another, in LL., to transcribe. See {Transume}.]
      A copy or exemplification of a record. [Obs.] --Lord Herbert.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transumption \Tran*sump"tion\, n. [L. transumptio.]
      Act of taking from one place to another. [R.] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transumptive \Tran*sump"tive\, a. [L. transumptivus.]
      Taking from one to another; metaphorical. [R.] [bd]A
      transumptive kind of speech.[b8] --Drayton.
  
               Fictive, descriptive, digressive, transumptive, and
               withal definitive.                                 --Lowell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvasate \Trans*va"sate\, v. t. [See {Transvasation}.]
      To pour out of one vessel into another. [Obs.] --Cudworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvasation \Trans`va*sa"tion\, n. [Pref. trans- + L. vas,
      vasis, vessel.]
      The act or process of pouring out of one vessel into another.
      [Obs.] --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvection \Trans*vec"tion\, n. [L. transvectio, from
      transvehere to carry across; trans across + vehere to carry.]
      The act of conveying or carrying over. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverberate \Trans*ver"ber*ate\, v. t. [L. transverberatus,
      p. p. of transverberare to strike or pierce through.]
      To beat or strike through. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transversal \Trans*ver"sal\, a. [Cf. F. transversal. See
      {Transverse}.]
      Running or lying across; transverse; as, a transversal line.
      -- {Trans*ver"sal*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transversal \Trans*ver"sal\, n. [Cf. F. transversale.] (Geom.)
      A straight line which traverses or intersects any system of
      other lines, as a line intersecting the three sides of a
      triangle or the sides produced.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transversal \Trans*ver"sal\, a. [Cf. F. transversal. See
      {Transverse}.]
      Running or lying across; transverse; as, a transversal line.
      -- {Trans*ver"sal*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transversed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transversing}.]
      To overturn; to change. [R.] --C. Leslie.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, v. t. [Pref. trans- + verse, n.
      Cf.{Transpose}.]
      To change from prose into verse, or from verse into prose.
      [Obs.] --Duke of Buckingham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, a. [L. transversus, p. p. of
      transvertere to turn on direct across; trans across + vertere
      to turn: cf. F. transverse. See {Verse}, and cf. {Traverse}.]
      Lying or being across, or in a crosswise direction; athwart;
      -- often opposed to {longitudinal}.
  
      {Transverse axis} (of an ellipse or hyperbola) (Geom.), that
            axis which passes through the foci.
  
      {Transverse partition} (Bot.), a partition, as of a pericarp,
            at right angles with the valves, as in the siliques of
            mustard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans"verse\, n.
      1. Anything that is transverse or athwart.
  
      2. (Geom.) The longer, or transverse, axis of an ellipse.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, a. [L. transversus, p. p. of
      transvertere to turn on direct across; trans across + vertere
      to turn: cf. F. transverse. See {Verse}, and cf. {Traverse}.]
      Lying or being across, or in a crosswise direction; athwart;
      -- often opposed to {longitudinal}.
  
      {Transverse axis} (of an ellipse or hyperbola) (Geom.), that
            axis which passes through the foci.
  
      {Transverse partition} (Bot.), a partition, as of a pericarp,
            at right angles with the valves, as in the siliques of
            mustard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Axis \Ax"is\, n.; pl. {Axes}. [L. axis axis, axle. See {Axle}.]
      A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body,
      on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line
      passing through a body or system around which the parts are
      symmetrically arranged.
  
      2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the
            different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged;
            as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone,
            that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the
            center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight
            line passing through the center.
  
      3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal
            support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the
            central line of any body. --Gray.
  
      4. (Anat.)
            (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or {vertebra
                  dentata}.
            (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is
                  prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first
                  vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process
                  or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head
                  to turn upon.
  
      5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in
            describing the position of the planes by which a crystal
            is bounded.
  
      6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any
            design.
  
      {Anticlinal axis} (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the
            strata slope downward on the two opposite sides.
  
      {Synclinal axis}, a line from which the strata slope upward
            in opposite directions, so as to form a valley.
  
      {Axis cylinder} (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central
            substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also {axis band},
            {axial fiber}, and {cylinder axis}.
  
      {Axis in peritrochio}, the wheel and axle, one of the
            mechanical powers.
  
      {Axis of a curve} (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a
            system of parallel chords of a curve; called a {principal
            axis}, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it
            divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the
            parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has
            two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two
            axes of the ellipse are the {major axis} and the {minor
            axis}, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the
            {transverse axis} and the {conjugate axis}.
  
      {Axis of a lens}, the straight line passing through its
            center and perpendicular to its surfaces.
  
      {Axis of a} {telescope [or] microscope}, the straight line
            with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which
            compose it.
  
      {Axes of co[94]rdinates in a plane}, two straight lines
            intersecting each other, to which points are referred for
            the purpose of determining their relative position: they
            are either rectangular or oblique.
  
      {Axes of co[94]rdinates in space}, the three straight lines
            in which the co[94]rdinate planes intersect each other.
  
      {Axis of a balance}, that line about which it turns.
  
      {Axis of oscillation}, of a pendulum, a right line passing
            through the center about which it vibrates, and
            perpendicular to the plane of vibration.
  
      {Axis of polarization}, the central line around which the
            prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster.
  
      {Axis of revolution} (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line
            about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the
            several points of the line or plane shall describe circles
            with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes
            perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of
            revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution.
  
      {Axis of symmetry} (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which
            divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when
            folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other
            part.
  
      {Axis of the} {equator, ecliptic, horizon} (or other circle
            considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies),
            the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the
            plane of the circle. --Hutton.
  
      {Axis of the Ionic capital} (Arch.), a line passing
            perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the
            volute.
  
      {Neutral axis} (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the
            horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression,
            exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder.
  
      {Optic axis of a crystal}, the direction in which a ray of
            transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All
            crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial
            or biaxial.
  
      {Optic axis}, {Visual axis} (Opt.), the straight line passing
            through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the
            surface of the eye.
  
      {Radical axis of two circles} (Geom.), the straight line
            perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such
            that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles
            shall be equal to each other.
  
      {Spiral axis} (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn
            spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without.
  
      {Axis of abscissas} and {Axis of ordinates}. See {Abscissa}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, a. [L. transversus, p. p. of
      transvertere to turn on direct across; trans across + vertere
      to turn: cf. F. transverse. See {Verse}, and cf. {Traverse}.]
      Lying or being across, or in a crosswise direction; athwart;
      -- often opposed to {longitudinal}.
  
      {Transverse axis} (of an ellipse or hyperbola) (Geom.), that
            axis which passes through the foci.
  
      {Transverse partition} (Bot.), a partition, as of a pericarp,
            at right angles with the valves, as in the siliques of
            mustard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Axis \Ax"is\, n.; pl. {Axes}. [L. axis axis, axle. See {Axle}.]
      A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body,
      on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line
      passing through a body or system around which the parts are
      symmetrically arranged.
  
      2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the
            different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged;
            as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone,
            that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the
            center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight
            line passing through the center.
  
      3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal
            support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the
            central line of any body. --Gray.
  
      4. (Anat.)
            (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or {vertebra
                  dentata}.
            (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is
                  prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first
                  vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process
                  or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head
                  to turn upon.
  
      5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in
            describing the position of the planes by which a crystal
            is bounded.
  
      6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any
            design.
  
      {Anticlinal axis} (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the
            strata slope downward on the two opposite sides.
  
      {Synclinal axis}, a line from which the strata slope upward
            in opposite directions, so as to form a valley.
  
      {Axis cylinder} (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central
            substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also {axis band},
            {axial fiber}, and {cylinder axis}.
  
      {Axis in peritrochio}, the wheel and axle, one of the
            mechanical powers.
  
      {Axis of a curve} (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a
            system of parallel chords of a curve; called a {principal
            axis}, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it
            divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the
            parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has
            two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two
            axes of the ellipse are the {major axis} and the {minor
            axis}, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the
            {transverse axis} and the {conjugate axis}.
  
      {Axis of a lens}, the straight line passing through its
            center and perpendicular to its surfaces.
  
      {Axis of a} {telescope [or] microscope}, the straight line
            with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which
            compose it.
  
      {Axes of co[94]rdinates in a plane}, two straight lines
            intersecting each other, to which points are referred for
            the purpose of determining their relative position: they
            are either rectangular or oblique.
  
      {Axes of co[94]rdinates in space}, the three straight lines
            in which the co[94]rdinate planes intersect each other.
  
      {Axis of a balance}, that line about which it turns.
  
      {Axis of oscillation}, of a pendulum, a right line passing
            through the center about which it vibrates, and
            perpendicular to the plane of vibration.
  
      {Axis of polarization}, the central line around which the
            prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster.
  
      {Axis of revolution} (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line
            about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the
            several points of the line or plane shall describe circles
            with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes
            perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of
            revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution.
  
      {Axis of symmetry} (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which
            divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when
            folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other
            part.
  
      {Axis of the} {equator, ecliptic, horizon} (or other circle
            considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies),
            the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the
            plane of the circle. --Hutton.
  
      {Axis of the Ionic capital} (Arch.), a line passing
            perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the
            volute.
  
      {Neutral axis} (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the
            horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression,
            exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder.
  
      {Optic axis of a crystal}, the direction in which a ray of
            transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All
            crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial
            or biaxial.
  
      {Optic axis}, {Visual axis} (Opt.), the straight line passing
            through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the
            surface of the eye.
  
      {Radical axis of two circles} (Geom.), the straight line
            perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such
            that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles
            shall be equal to each other.
  
      {Spiral axis} (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn
            spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without.
  
      {Axis of abscissas} and {Axis of ordinates}. See {Abscissa}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, a. [L. transversus, p. p. of
      transvertere to turn on direct across; trans across + vertere
      to turn: cf. F. transverse. See {Verse}, and cf. {Traverse}.]
      Lying or being across, or in a crosswise direction; athwart;
      -- often opposed to {longitudinal}.
  
      {Transverse axis} (of an ellipse or hyperbola) (Geom.), that
            axis which passes through the foci.
  
      {Transverse partition} (Bot.), a partition, as of a pericarp,
            at right angles with the valves, as in the siliques of
            mustard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transversed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transversing}.]
      To overturn; to change. [R.] --C. Leslie.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transversely \Trans*verse"ly\, adv.
      In a transverse manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transverse \Trans*verse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Transversed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Transversing}.]
      To overturn; to change. [R.] --C. Leslie.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transversion \Trans*ver"sion\, n.
      The act of changing from prose into verse, or from verse into
      prose.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvert \Trans*vert"\, v. t. [L. transvertere. See
      {Transverse}, a.]
      To cause to turn across; to transverse. [Obs.] --Craft of
      Lovers (1448).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvertible \Trans*vert"i*ble\, a.
      Capable of being transverted. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Transvolation \Trans`vo*la"tion\, n. [L. transvolare to fly over
      or across; trans across + volare to fly.]
      The act of flying beyond or across. --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Traunce \Traunce\, n. & v.
      See {Trance}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lichen \Li"chen\ (l[imac]"k[ecr]n; 277), n. [L., fr. Gr.
      leichh`n.]
      1. (Bot.) One of a class of cellular, flowerless plants,
            (technically called {Lichenes}), having no distinction of
            leaf and stem, usually of scaly, expanded, frond-like
            forms, but sometimes erect or pendulous and variously
            branched. They derive their nourishment from the air, and
            generate by means of spores. The species are very widely
            distributed, and form irregular spots or patches, usually
            of a greenish or yellowish color, upon rocks, trees, and
            various bodies, to which they adhere with great tenacity.
            They are often improperly called {rock moss} or {tree
            moss}.
  
      Note: A favorite modern theory of lichens (called after its
               inventor the Schwendener hypothesis), is that they are
               not autonomous plants, but that they consist of
               ascigerous fungi, parasitic on alg[91]. Each lichen is
               composed of white filaments and green, or greenish,
               rounded cells, and it is argued that the two are of
               different nature, the one living at the expense of the
               other. See {Hyph[91]}, and {Gonidia}.
  
      2. (Med.) A name given to several varieties of skin disease,
            esp. to one characterized by the eruption of small,
            conical or flat, reddish pimples, which, if unchecked,
            tend to spread and produce great and even fatal
            exhaustion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tree \Tree\ (tr[emac]), n. [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre[a2],
      tre[a2]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[emac], OS. treo,
      trio, Icel. tr[emac], Dan. tr[91], Sw. tr[84], tr[84]d, Goth.
      triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr.
      dry^s a tree, oak, do`ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru
      tree, wood, d[be]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad},
      {Germander}, {Tar}, n., {Trough}.]
      1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size
            (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single
            trunk.
  
      Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case,
               is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree,
               fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
  
      2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as
            resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and
            branches; as, a genealogical tree.
  
      3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber;
            -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree,
            chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  
      4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  
                     [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts
                                                                              x. 39.
  
      5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
                     In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of
                     silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2
                                                                              Tim. ii. 20).
  
      6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent
            forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
            See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.
  
      {Tree bear} (Zo[94]l.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tree beetle} (Zo[94]l.) any one of numerous species of
            beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as
            the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the
            goldsmith beetle.
  
      {Tree bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of,
            trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma},
            {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.
  
      {Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus
            musang}).
  
      {Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus
            alba}). See {Melilot}.
  
      {Tree crab} (Zo[94]l.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.
  
      {Tree creeper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris},
            and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.
  
      {Tree cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a nearly white arboreal American
            cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud
            stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.
  
      {Tree crow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera,
            intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail
            is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
  
      {Tree dove} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of East
            Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and
            allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly
            arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
  
      {Tree duck} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of ducks
            belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks
            have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are
            arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical
            parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
  
      {Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight
            trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even
            higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most
            of the existing species are tropical.
  
      {Tree fish} (Zo[94]l.), a California market fish
            ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).
  
      {Tree frog}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Same as {Tree toad}.
            (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs
                  belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied
                  genera of the family {Ranid[91]}. Their toes are
                  furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog
                  (see under {Flying}) is an example.
  
      {Tree goose} (Zo[94]l.), the bernicle goose.
  
      {Tree hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on
            the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by
            sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the
            prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the
            form of a spine or crest.
  
      {Tree jobber} (Zo[94]l.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]
  
      {Tree kangaroo}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Kangaroo}.
  
      {Tree lark} (Zo[94]l.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Tree lizard} (Zo[94]l.), any one of a group of Old World
            arboreal lizards ({Dendrosauria}) comprising the
            chameleons.
  
      {Tree lobster}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.
  
      {Tree louse} (Zo[94]l.), any aphid; a plant louse.
  
      {Tree moss}. (Bot.)
            (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
            (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
                 
  
      {Tree mouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyin[91]}. They have
            long claws and habitually live in trees.
  
      {Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.
  
      {Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.
  
      {Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus
            glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and
            greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
  
      {Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor
            vit[91].
  
      {Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium
            proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or
            among its flowers.
  
      {Tree oyster} (Zo[94]l.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea
            folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree;
            -- called also {raccoon oyster}.
  
      {Tree pie} (Zo[94]l.), any species of Asiatic birds of the
            genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the
            magpie.
  
      {Tree pigeon} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and
            Australia, and belonging to {Megaloprepia}, {Carpophaga},
            and allied genera.
  
      {Tree pipit}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Pipit}.
  
      {Tree porcupine} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging
            to the genera {Ch[91]tomys} and {Sphingurus}. They have an
            elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on
            the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed
            with bristles. One South American species ({S. villosus})
            is called also {couiy}; another ({S. prehensilis}) is
            called also {c[oe]ndou}.
  
      {Tree rat} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of large
            ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera
            {Capromys} and {Plagiodon}. They are allied to the
            porcupines.
  
      {Tree serpent} (Zo[94]l.), a tree snake.
  
      {Tree shrike} (Zo[94]l.), a bush shrike.
  
      {Tree snake} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            snakes of the genus {Dendrophis}. They live chiefly among
            the branches of trees, and are not venomous.
  
      {Tree sorrel} (Bot.), a kind of sorrel ({Rumex Lunaria})
            which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears
            greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and
            Teneriffe.
  
      {Tree sparrow} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of small
            arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow
            ({Spizella monticola}), and the common European species
            ({Passer montanus}).
  
      {Tree swallow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            swallows of the genus {Hylochelidon} which lay their eggs
            in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and
            adjacent regions. Called also {martin} in Australia.
  
      {Tree swift} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of swifts
            of the genus {Dendrochelidon} which inhabit the East
            Indies and Southern Asia.
  
      {Tree tiger} (Zo[94]l.), a leopard.
  
      {Tree toad} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            amphibians belonging to {Hyla} and allied genera of the
            family {Hylid[91]}. They are related to the common frogs
            and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into
            suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and
            leaves of trees. Only one species ({Hyla arborea}) is
            found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and
            Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United
            States ({H. versicolor}) is noted for the facility with
            which it changes its colors. Called also {tree frog}. See
            also {Piping frog}, under {Piping}, and {Cricket frog},
            under {Cricket}.
  
      {Tree warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            arboreal warblers belonging to {Phylloscopus} and allied
            genera.
  
      {Tree wool} (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of
            pine trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lichen \Li"chen\ (l[imac]"k[ecr]n; 277), n. [L., fr. Gr.
      leichh`n.]
      1. (Bot.) One of a class of cellular, flowerless plants,
            (technically called {Lichenes}), having no distinction of
            leaf and stem, usually of scaly, expanded, frond-like
            forms, but sometimes erect or pendulous and variously
            branched. They derive their nourishment from the air, and
            generate by means of spores. The species are very widely
            distributed, and form irregular spots or patches, usually
            of a greenish or yellowish color, upon rocks, trees, and
            various bodies, to which they adhere with great tenacity.
            They are often improperly called {rock moss} or {tree
            moss}.
  
      Note: A favorite modern theory of lichens (called after its
               inventor the Schwendener hypothesis), is that they are
               not autonomous plants, but that they consist of
               ascigerous fungi, parasitic on alg[91]. Each lichen is
               composed of white filaments and green, or greenish,
               rounded cells, and it is argued that the two are of
               different nature, the one living at the expense of the
               other. See {Hyph[91]}, and {Gonidia}.
  
      2. (Med.) A name given to several varieties of skin disease,
            esp. to one characterized by the eruption of small,
            conical or flat, reddish pimples, which, if unchecked,
            tend to spread and produce great and even fatal
            exhaustion.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tree \Tree\ (tr[emac]), n. [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre[a2],
      tre[a2]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[emac], OS. treo,
      trio, Icel. tr[emac], Dan. tr[91], Sw. tr[84], tr[84]d, Goth.
      triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr.
      dry^s a tree, oak, do`ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru
      tree, wood, d[be]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad},
      {Germander}, {Tar}, n., {Trough}.]
      1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size
            (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single
            trunk.
  
      Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case,
               is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree,
               fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
  
      2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as
            resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and
            branches; as, a genealogical tree.
  
      3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber;
            -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree,
            chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  
      4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  
                     [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts
                                                                              x. 39.
  
      5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
                     In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of
                     silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2
                                                                              Tim. ii. 20).
  
      6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent
            forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
            See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.
  
      {Tree bear} (Zo[94]l.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tree beetle} (Zo[94]l.) any one of numerous species of
            beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as
            the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the
            goldsmith beetle.
  
      {Tree bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of,
            trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma},
            {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.
  
      {Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus
            musang}).
  
      {Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus
            alba}). See {Melilot}.
  
      {Tree crab} (Zo[94]l.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.
  
      {Tree creeper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris},
            and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.
  
      {Tree cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a nearly white arboreal American
            cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud
            stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.
  
      {Tree crow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera,
            intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail
            is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
  
      {Tree dove} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of East
            Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and
            allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly
            arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
  
      {Tree duck} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of ducks
            belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks
            have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are
            arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical
            parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
  
      {Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight
            trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even
            higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most
            of the existing species are tropical.
  
      {Tree fish} (Zo[94]l.), a California market fish
            ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).
  
      {Tree frog}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Same as {Tree toad}.
            (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs
                  belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied
                  genera of the family {Ranid[91]}. Their toes are
                  furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog
                  (see under {Flying}) is an example.
  
      {Tree goose} (Zo[94]l.), the bernicle goose.
  
      {Tree hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on
            the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by
            sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the
            prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the
            form of a spine or crest.
  
      {Tree jobber} (Zo[94]l.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]
  
      {Tree kangaroo}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Kangaroo}.
  
      {Tree lark} (Zo[94]l.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Tree lizard} (Zo[94]l.), any one of a group of Old World
            arboreal lizards ({Dendrosauria}) comprising the
            chameleons.
  
      {Tree lobster}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.
  
      {Tree louse} (Zo[94]l.), any aphid; a plant louse.
  
      {Tree moss}. (Bot.)
            (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
            (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
                 
  
      {Tree mouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyin[91]}. They have
            long claws and habitually live in trees.
  
      {Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.
  
      {Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.
  
      {Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus
            glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and
            greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
  
      {Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor
            vit[91].
  
      {Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium
            proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or
            among its flowers.
  
      {Tree oyster} (Zo[94]l.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea
            folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree;
            -- called also {raccoon oyster}.
  
      {Tree pie} (Zo[94]l.), any species of Asiatic birds of the
            genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the
            magpie.
  
      {Tree pigeon} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            longwinged arboreal pigeons native of Asia, Africa, and
            Australia, and belonging to {Megaloprepia}, {Carpophaga},
            and allied genera.
  
      {Tree pipit}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Pipit}.
  
      {Tree porcupine} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Central and South American arboreal porcupines belonging
            to the genera {Ch[91]tomys} and {Sphingurus}. They have an
            elongated and somewhat prehensile tail, only four toes on
            the hind feet, and a body covered with short spines mixed
            with bristles. One South American species ({S. villosus})
            is called also {couiy}; another ({S. prehensilis}) is
            called also {c[oe]ndou}.
  
      {Tree rat} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of large
            ratlike West Indian rodents belonging to the genera
            {Capromys} and {Plagiodon}. They are allied to the
            porcupines.
  
      {Tree serpent} (Zo[94]l.), a tree snake.
  
      {Tree shrike} (Zo[94]l.), a bush shrike.
  
      {Tree snake} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            snakes of the genus {Dendrophis}. They live chiefly among
            the branches of trees, and are not venomous.
  
      {Tree sorrel} (Bot.), a kind of sorrel ({Rumex Lunaria})
            which attains the stature of a small tree, and bears
            greenish flowers. It is found in the Canary Islands and
            Teneriffe.
  
      {Tree sparrow} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of small
            arboreal sparrows, especially the American tree sparrow
            ({Spizella monticola}), and the common European species
            ({Passer montanus}).
  
      {Tree swallow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            swallows of the genus {Hylochelidon} which lay their eggs
            in holes in dead trees. They inhabit Australia and
            adjacent regions. Called also {martin} in Australia.
  
      {Tree swift} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of swifts
            of the genus {Dendrochelidon} which inhabit the East
            Indies and Southern Asia.
  
      {Tree tiger} (Zo[94]l.), a leopard.
  
      {Tree toad} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            amphibians belonging to {Hyla} and allied genera of the
            family {Hylid[91]}. They are related to the common frogs
            and toads, but have the tips of the toes expanded into
            suckers by means of which they cling to the bark and
            leaves of trees. Only one species ({Hyla arborea}) is
            found in Europe, but numerous species occur in America and
            Australia. The common tree toad of the Northern United
            States ({H. versicolor}) is noted for the facility with
            which it changes its colors. Called also {tree frog}. See
            also {Piping frog}, under {Piping}, and {Cricket frog},
            under {Cricket}.
  
      {Tree warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            arboreal warblers belonging to {Phylloscopus} and allied
            genera.
  
      {Tree wool} (Bot.), a fine fiber obtained from the leaves of
            pine trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tree \Tree\ (tr[emac]), n. [OE. tree, tre, treo, AS. tre[a2],
      tre[a2]w, tree, wood; akin to OFries. tr[emac], OS. treo,
      trio, Icel. tr[emac], Dan. tr[91], Sw. tr[84], tr[84]d, Goth.
      triu, Russ. drevo, W. derw an oak, Ir. darag, darog, Gr.
      dry^s a tree, oak, do`ry a beam, spear shaft, spear, Skr. dru
      tree, wood, d[be]ru wood. [root]63, 241. Cf. {Dryad},
      {Germander}, {Tar}, n., {Trough}.]
      1. (Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size
            (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single
            trunk.
  
      Note: The kind of tree referred to, in any particular case,
               is often indicated by a modifying word; as forest tree,
               fruit tree, palm tree, apple tree, pear tree, etc.
  
      2. Something constructed in the form of, or considered as
            resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and
            branches; as, a genealogical tree.
  
      3. A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber;
            -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree,
            chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
  
      4. A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
  
                     [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree. --Acts
                                                                              x. 39.
  
      5. Wood; timber. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
                     In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of
                     silver but also of tree and of earth. --Wyclif (2
                                                                              Tim. ii. 20).
  
      6. (Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent
            forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
            See {Lead tree}, under {Lead}.
  
      {Tree bear} (Zo[94]l.), the raccoon. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tree beetle} (Zo[94]l.) any one of numerous species of
            beetles which feed on the leaves of trees and shrubs, as
            the May beetles, the rose beetle, the rose chafer, and the
            goldsmith beetle.
  
      {Tree bug} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hemipterous insects which live upon, and suck the sap of,
            trees and shrubs. They belong to {Arma}, {Pentatoma},
            {Rhaphigaster}, and allied genera.
  
      {Tree cat} (Zool.), the common paradoxure ({Paradoxurus
            musang}).
  
      {Tree clover} (Bot.), a tall kind of melilot ({Melilotus
            alba}). See {Melilot}.
  
      {Tree crab} (Zo[94]l.), the purse crab. See under {Purse}.
  
      {Tree creeper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            arboreal creepers belonging to {Certhia}, {Climacteris},
            and allied genera. See {Creeper}, 3.
  
      {Tree cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a nearly white arboreal American
            cricket ({Ecanthus niv[oe]us}) which is noted for its loud
            stridulation; -- called also {white cricket}.
  
      {Tree crow} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World crows belonging to {Crypsirhina} and allied genera,
            intermediate between the true crows and the jays. The tail
            is long, and the bill is curved and without a tooth.
  
      {Tree dove} (Zo[94]l.) any one of several species of East
            Indian and Asiatic doves belonging to {Macropygia} and
            allied genera. They have long and broad tails, are chiefly
            arboreal in their habits, and feed mainly on fruit.
  
      {Tree duck} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of ducks
            belonging to {Dendrocygna} and allied genera. These ducks
            have a long and slender neck and a long hind toe. They are
            arboreal in their habits, and are found in the tropical
            parts of America, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
  
      {Tree fern} (Bot.), an arborescent fern having a straight
            trunk, sometimes twenty or twenty-five feet high, or even
            higher, and bearing a cluster of fronds at the top. Most
            of the existing species are tropical.
  
      {Tree fish} (Zo[94]l.), a California market fish
            ({Sebastichthys serriceps}).
  
      {Tree frog}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Same as {Tree toad}.
            (b) Any one of numerous species of Old World frogs
                  belonging to {Chiromantis}, {Rhacophorus}, and allied
                  genera of the family {Ranid[91]}. Their toes are
                  furnished with suckers for adhesion. The flying frog
                  (see under {Flying}) is an example.
  
      {Tree goose} (Zo[94]l.), the bernicle goose.
  
      {Tree hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small leaping hemipterous insects which live chiefly on
            the branches and twigs of trees, and injure them by
            sucking the sap. Many of them are very odd in shape, the
            prothorax being often prolonged upward or forward in the
            form of a spine or crest.
  
      {Tree jobber} (Zo[94]l.), a woodpecker. [Obs.]
  
      {Tree kangaroo}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Kangaroo}.
  
      {Tree lark} (Zo[94]l.), the tree pipit. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Tree lizard} (Zo[94]l.), any one of a group of Old World
            arboreal lizards ({Dendrosauria}) comprising the
            chameleons.
  
      {Tree lobster}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tree crab}, above.
  
      {Tree louse} (Zo[94]l.), any aphid; a plant louse.
  
      {Tree moss}. (Bot.)
            (a) Any moss or lichen growing on trees.
            (b) Any species of moss in the form of a miniature tree.
                 
  
      {Tree mouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            African mice of the subfamily {Dendromyin[91]}. They have
            long claws and habitually live in trees.
  
      {Tree nymph}, a wood nymph. See {Dryad}.
  
      {Tree of a saddle}, a saddle frame.
  
      {Tree of heaven} (Bot.), an ornamental tree ({Ailantus
            glandulosus}) having long, handsome pinnate leaves, and
            greenish flowers of a disagreeable odor.
  
      {Tree of life} (Bot.), a tree of the genus Thuja; arbor
            vit[91].
  
      {Tree onion} (Bot.), a species of garlic ({Allium
            proliferum}) which produces bulbs in place of flowers, or
            among its flowers.
  
      {Tree oyster} (Zo[94]l.), a small American oyster ({Ostrea
            folium}) which adheres to the roots of the mangrove tree;
            -- called also {raccoon oyster}.
  
      {Tree pie} (Zo[94]l.), any species of Asiatic birds of the
            genus {Dendrocitta}. The tree pies are allied to the
            magpie.
  
      {Tree pigeon} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
 &