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   talker
         n 1: someone who expresses in language; someone who talks
               (especially someone who delivers a public speech or someone
               especially garrulous); "the speaker at commencement"; "an
               utterer of useful maxims" [syn: {speaker}, {talker},
               {utterer}, {verbalizer}, {verbaliser}]

English Dictionary: Teilkirche by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
talker identification
n
  1. identification of a person from the sound of their voice
    Synonym(s): speaker identification, talker identification
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tall crowfoot
n
  1. perennial European buttercup with yellow spring flowers widely naturalized especially in eastern North America
    Synonym(s): meadow buttercup, tall buttercup, tall crowfoot, tall field buttercup, Ranunculus acris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tall-grass
n
  1. any of various grasses that are tall and that flourish with abundant moisture
    Synonym(s): tallgrass, tall-grass
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tall-growing
adj
  1. (of plants) having tall spindly stems [syn: leggy, tall-growing]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tallgrass
n
  1. any of various grasses that are tall and that flourish with abundant moisture
    Synonym(s): tallgrass, tall-grass
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegram
n
  1. a message transmitted by telegraph [syn: telegram, wire]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph
n
  1. apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
    Synonym(s): telegraph, telegraphy
v
  1. send cables, wires, or telegrams [syn: cable, telegraph, wire]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph form
n
  1. a form to use when sending a telegram
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph key
n
  1. key consisting of a lever that sends a telegraph signal when it is depressed and the circuit is closed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph line
n
  1. the wire that carries telegraph and telephone signals [syn: telephone wire, telephone line, telegraph wire, telegraph line]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph operator
n
  1. someone who transmits messages by telegraph [syn: telegrapher, telegraphist, telegraph operator]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph plant
n
  1. erect tropical Asian shrub whose small lateral leaflets rotate on their axes and jerk up and down under the influence of sunshine
    Synonym(s): telegraph plant, semaphore plant, Codariocalyx motorius, Desmodium motorium, Desmodium gyrans
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph pole
n
  1. tall pole supporting telephone wires [syn: {telephone pole}, telegraph pole, telegraph post]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph post
n
  1. tall pole supporting telephone wires [syn: {telephone pole}, telegraph pole, telegraph post]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraph wire
n
  1. the wire that carries telegraph and telephone signals [syn: telephone wire, telephone line, telegraph wire, telegraph line]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegrapher
n
  1. someone who transmits messages by telegraph [syn: telegrapher, telegraphist, telegraph operator]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphese
n
  1. language characterized by terseness and ellipsis as in telegrams
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphic
adj
  1. of or relating to or transmitted by telegraph; "a telegraphic machine"; "telegraphic news reports"
  2. having the style of a telegram with many short words left out; "telegraphic economy of words"; "the strange telegraphic speech of some aphasics"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphic signal
n
  1. a signal transmitted by telegraphy [syn: {telegraphic signal}, radiotelegraphic signal]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphically
adv
  1. in a short and concise manner; "a particular bird, exactly and tersely described in the book of birds"
    Synonym(s): telegraphically, tersely
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphist
n
  1. someone who transmits messages by telegraph [syn: telegrapher, telegraphist, telegraph operator]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
telegraphy
n
  1. communicating at a distance by electric transmission over wire
  2. apparatus used to communicate at a distance over a wire (usually in Morse code)
    Synonym(s): telegraph, telegraphy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tilia cordata
n
  1. large spreading European linden with small dark green leaves; often cultivated as an ornamental
    Synonym(s): small- leaved linden, small-leaved lime, Tilia cordata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
to a lesser extent
adv
  1. used to form the comparative of some adjectives and adverbs; "less interesting"; "less expensive"; "less quickly"
    Synonym(s): less, to a lesser extent
    Antonym(s): more, to a greater extent
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Talker \Talk"er\, n.
      1. One who talks; especially, one who is noted for his power
            of conversing readily or agreeably; a conversationist.
  
                     There probably were never four talkers more
                     admirable in four different ways than Johnson,
                     Burke, Beauclerk, and Garrick.            --Macaulay.
  
      2. A loquacious person, male or female; a prattler; a
            babbler; also, a boaster; a braggart; -- used in contempt
            or reproach. --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telechirograph \Tel`e*chi"ro*graph\, n. [Gr. th^le far + chei`r,
      cheiro`s, hand + -graph.]
      An instrument for telegraphically transmitting and receiving
      handwritten messages, as photographically by a beam of light
      from a mirror.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegram \Tel"e*gram\, n. [Gr. [?] far + -gram.]
      A message sent by telegraph; a telegraphic dispatch.
  
      Note: [bd]A friend desires us to give notice that he will ask
               leave, at some convenient time, to introduce a new word
               into the vocabulary. It is telegram, instead of
               telegraphic dispatch, or telegraphic communication.[b8]
               --Albany [N. Y.] Evening Journal (April 6, 1852).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegrammic \Tel`e*gram*mic\, a.
      Pertaining to, or resembling, a telegram; laconic; concise;
      brief. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Telegraphed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Telegraphing}.] [F. t[82]l[82]graphier.]
      To convey or announce by telegraph.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, n. [Gr. [?] far, far off (cf. Lith.
      toli) + -graph: cf. F. t[82]l[82]graphe. See {Graphic}.]
      An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence
      rapidly between distant points, especially by means of
      preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or
      ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by
      electrical action.
  
      Note: The instruments used are classed as indicator,
               type-printing, symbol-printing, or chemical-printing
               telegraphs, according as the intelligence is given by
               the movements of a pointer or indicator, as in Cooke &
               Wheatstone's (the form commonly used in England), or by
               impressing, on a fillet of paper, letters from types,
               as in House's and Hughe's, or dots and marks from a
               sharp point moved by a magnet, as in Morse's, or
               symbols produced by electro-chemical action, as in
               Bain's. In the offices in the United States the
               recording instrument is now little used, the receiving
               operator reading by ear the combinations of long and
               short intervals of sound produced by the armature of an
               electro-magnet as it is put in motion by the opening
               and breaking of the circuit, which motion, in
               registering instruments, traces upon a ribbon of paper
               the lines and dots used to represent the letters of the
               alphabet. See Illustration in Appendix.
  
      {Acoustic telegraph}. See under {Acoustic}.
  
      {Dial telegraph}, a telegraph in which letters of the
            alphabet and numbers or other symbols are placed upon the
            border of a circular dial plate at each station, the
            apparatus being so arranged that the needle or index of
            the dial at the receiving station accurately copies the
            movements of that at the sending station.
  
      {Electric telegraph}, [or] {Electro-magnetic telegraph}, a
            telegraph in which an operator at one station causes words
            or signs to be made at another by means of a current of
            electricity, generated by a battery and transmitted over
            an intervening wire.
  
      {Facsimile telegraph}. See under {Facsimile}.
  
      {Indicator telegraph}. See under {Indicator}.
  
      {Pan-telegraph}, an electric telegraph by means of which a
            drawing or writing, as an autographic message, may be
            exactly reproduced at a distant station.
  
      {Printing telegraph}, an electric telegraph which
            automatically prints the message as it is received at a
            distant station, in letters, not signs.
  
      {Signal telegraph}, a telegraph in which preconcerted
            signals, made by a machine, or otherwise, at one station,
            are seen or heard and interpreted at another; a semaphore.
           
  
      {Submarine telegraph cable}, a telegraph cable laid under
            water to connect stations separated by a body of water.
  
      {Telegraph cable}, a telegraphic cable consisting of several
            conducting wires, inclosed by an insulating and protecting
            material, so as to bring the wires into compact compass
            for use on poles, or to form a strong cable impervious to
            water, to be laid under ground, as in a town or city, or
            under water, as in the ocean.
  
      {Telegraph plant} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Desmodium
            gyrans}) native of the East Indies. The leaflets move up
            and down like the signals of a semaphore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, n. [Gr. [?] far, far off (cf. Lith.
      toli) + -graph: cf. F. t[82]l[82]graphe. See {Graphic}.]
      An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence
      rapidly between distant points, especially by means of
      preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or
      ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by
      electrical action.
  
      Note: The instruments used are classed as indicator,
               type-printing, symbol-printing, or chemical-printing
               telegraphs, according as the intelligence is given by
               the movements of a pointer or indicator, as in Cooke &
               Wheatstone's (the form commonly used in England), or by
               impressing, on a fillet of paper, letters from types,
               as in House's and Hughe's, or dots and marks from a
               sharp point moved by a magnet, as in Morse's, or
               symbols produced by electro-chemical action, as in
               Bain's. In the offices in the United States the
               recording instrument is now little used, the receiving
               operator reading by ear the combinations of long and
               short intervals of sound produced by the armature of an
               electro-magnet as it is put in motion by the opening
               and breaking of the circuit, which motion, in
               registering instruments, traces upon a ribbon of paper
               the lines and dots used to represent the letters of the
               alphabet. See Illustration in Appendix.
  
      {Acoustic telegraph}. See under {Acoustic}.
  
      {Dial telegraph}, a telegraph in which letters of the
            alphabet and numbers or other symbols are placed upon the
            border of a circular dial plate at each station, the
            apparatus being so arranged that the needle or index of
            the dial at the receiving station accurately copies the
            movements of that at the sending station.
  
      {Electric telegraph}, [or] {Electro-magnetic telegraph}, a
            telegraph in which an operator at one station causes words
            or signs to be made at another by means of a current of
            electricity, generated by a battery and transmitted over
            an intervening wire.
  
      {Facsimile telegraph}. See under {Facsimile}.
  
      {Indicator telegraph}. See under {Indicator}.
  
      {Pan-telegraph}, an electric telegraph by means of which a
            drawing or writing, as an autographic message, may be
            exactly reproduced at a distant station.
  
      {Printing telegraph}, an electric telegraph which
            automatically prints the message as it is received at a
            distant station, in letters, not signs.
  
      {Signal telegraph}, a telegraph in which preconcerted
            signals, made by a machine, or otherwise, at one station,
            are seen or heard and interpreted at another; a semaphore.
           
  
      {Submarine telegraph cable}, a telegraph cable laid under
            water to connect stations separated by a body of water.
  
      {Telegraph cable}, a telegraphic cable consisting of several
            conducting wires, inclosed by an insulating and protecting
            material, so as to bring the wires into compact compass
            for use on poles, or to form a strong cable impervious to
            water, to be laid under ground, as in a town or city, or
            under water, as in the ocean.
  
      {Telegraph plant} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Desmodium
            gyrans}) native of the East Indies. The leaflets move up
            and down like the signals of a semaphore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Creeper \Creep"er\ (kr[emac]p"[etil]r), n.
      1. One who, or that which, creeps; any creeping thing.
  
                     Standing waters are most unwholesome, . . . full of
                     mites, creepers; slimy, muddy, unclean. --Burton.
  
      2. (Bot.) A plant that clings by rootlets, or by tendrils, to
            the ground, or to trees, etc.; as, the Virginia creeper
            (Ampelopsis quinquefolia).
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A small bird of the genus {Certhia}, allied to
            the wrens. The brown or common European creeper is {C.
            familiaris}, a variety of which (var. Americana) inhabits
            America; -- called also {tree creeper} and {creeptree}.
            The American black and white creeper is {Mniotilta varia}.
  
      4. A kind of patten mounted on short pieces of iron instead
            of rings; also, a fixture with iron points worn on a shoe
            to prevent one from slipping.
  
      5. pl. A spurlike device strapped to the boot, which enables
            one to climb a tree or pole; -- called often {telegraph
            creepers}.
  
      6. A small, low iron, or dog, between the andirons.
  
      7. pl. An instrument with iron hooks or claws for dragging at
            the bottom of a well, or any other body of water, and
            bringing up what may lie there.
  
      8. Any device for causing material to move steadily from one
            part of a machine to another, as an apron in a carding
            machine, or an inner spiral in a grain screen.
  
      9. pl. (Arch.) Crockets. See {Crocket}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph plant \Telegraph plant\
      An East Indian tick trefoil (Meibomia gyrans), whose lateral
      leaflets jerk up and down like the arms of a semaphore, and
      also rotate on their axes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, n. [Gr. [?] far, far off (cf. Lith.
      toli) + -graph: cf. F. t[82]l[82]graphe. See {Graphic}.]
      An apparatus, or a process, for communicating intelligence
      rapidly between distant points, especially by means of
      preconcerted visible or audible signals representing words or
      ideas, or by means of words and signs, transmitted by
      electrical action.
  
      Note: The instruments used are classed as indicator,
               type-printing, symbol-printing, or chemical-printing
               telegraphs, according as the intelligence is given by
               the movements of a pointer or indicator, as in Cooke &
               Wheatstone's (the form commonly used in England), or by
               impressing, on a fillet of paper, letters from types,
               as in House's and Hughe's, or dots and marks from a
               sharp point moved by a magnet, as in Morse's, or
               symbols produced by electro-chemical action, as in
               Bain's. In the offices in the United States the
               recording instrument is now little used, the receiving
               operator reading by ear the combinations of long and
               short intervals of sound produced by the armature of an
               electro-magnet as it is put in motion by the opening
               and breaking of the circuit, which motion, in
               registering instruments, traces upon a ribbon of paper
               the lines and dots used to represent the letters of the
               alphabet. See Illustration in Appendix.
  
      {Acoustic telegraph}. See under {Acoustic}.
  
      {Dial telegraph}, a telegraph in which letters of the
            alphabet and numbers or other symbols are placed upon the
            border of a circular dial plate at each station, the
            apparatus being so arranged that the needle or index of
            the dial at the receiving station accurately copies the
            movements of that at the sending station.
  
      {Electric telegraph}, [or] {Electro-magnetic telegraph}, a
            telegraph in which an operator at one station causes words
            or signs to be made at another by means of a current of
            electricity, generated by a battery and transmitted over
            an intervening wire.
  
      {Facsimile telegraph}. See under {Facsimile}.
  
      {Indicator telegraph}. See under {Indicator}.
  
      {Pan-telegraph}, an electric telegraph by means of which a
            drawing or writing, as an autographic message, may be
            exactly reproduced at a distant station.
  
      {Printing telegraph}, an electric telegraph which
            automatically prints the message as it is received at a
            distant station, in letters, not signs.
  
      {Signal telegraph}, a telegraph in which preconcerted
            signals, made by a machine, or otherwise, at one station,
            are seen or heard and interpreted at another; a semaphore.
           
  
      {Submarine telegraph cable}, a telegraph cable laid under
            water to connect stations separated by a body of water.
  
      {Telegraph cable}, a telegraphic cable consisting of several
            conducting wires, inclosed by an insulating and protecting
            material, so as to bring the wires into compact compass
            for use on poles, or to form a strong cable impervious to
            water, to be laid under ground, as in a town or city, or
            under water, as in the ocean.
  
      {Telegraph plant} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Desmodium
            gyrans}) native of the East Indies. The leaflets move up
            and down like the signals of a semaphore.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Telegraphed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Telegraphing}.] [F. t[82]l[82]graphier.]
      To convey or announce by telegraph.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegrapher \Te*leg"ra*pher\, n.
      One who sends telegraphic messages; a telegraphic operator; a
      telegraphist.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphic \Tel`e*graph"ic\, a. [Cf. F. t[82]l[82]graphique.]
      Of or pertaining to the telegraph; made or communicated by a
      telegraph; as, telegraphic signals; telegraphic art;
      telegraphic intelligence.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphical \Tel`e*graph"ic*al\, a.
      Telegraphic. -- {Tel`e*graph"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphical \Tel`e*graph"ic*al\, a.
      Telegraphic. -- {Tel`e*graph"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraph \Tel"e*graph\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Telegraphed}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Telegraphing}.] [F. t[82]l[82]graphier.]
      To convey or announce by telegraph.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphist \Te*leg"ra*phist\, n.
      One skilled in telegraphy; a telegrapher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphone \Te*leg"ra*phone\, n. [Gr. th^le far + -graph + [?]
      sound.]
      An instrument for recording and reproducing sound by local
      magnetization of a steel wire, disk, or ribbon, moved against
      the pole of a magnet connected electrically with a telephone
      receiver, or the like.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphoscope \Tel`e*graph"o*scope\, n. [Gr. th^le far +
      -graph + -scope.]
      An instrument for telegraphically transmitting a picture and
      reproducing its image as a positive or negative. The
      transmitter includes a camera obscura and a row of minute
      selenium cells. The receiver includes an oscillograph, ralay,
      equilibrator, and an induction coil the sparks from which
      perforate a paper with tiny holes that form the image.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telegraphy \Te*leg"ra*phy\, n. [Cf. F. t[82]l[82]graphie.]
      The science or art of constructing, or of communicating by
      means of, telegraphs; as, submarine telegraphy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wireless \Wire"less\, a.
      Having no wire; specif. (Elec.), designating, or pertaining
      to, a method of telegraphy, telephony, etc., in which the
      messages, etc., are transmitted through space by electric
      waves; as, a wireless message.
  
      {Wireless} {telegraphy [or] telegraph} (Elec.), any system of
            telegraphy employing no connecting wire or wires between
            the transmitting and receiving stations.
  
      Note: Although more or less successful researchers were made
               on the subject by Joseph Henry, Hertz, Oliver Lodge,
               and others, the first commercially successful system
               was that of Guglielmo Marconi, patented in March, 1897.
               Marconi employed electric waves of high frequency set
               up by an induction coil in an oscillator, these waves
               being launched into space through a lofty antenna. The
               receiving apparatus consisted of another antenna in
               circuit with a coherer and small battery for operating
               through a relay the ordinary telegraphic receiver. This
               apparatus contains the essential features of all the
               systems now in use.
  
      {Wireless telephone}, an apparatus or contrivance for
            wireless telephony.
  
      {Wireless telephony}, telephony without wires, usually
            employing electric waves of high frequency emitted from an
            oscillator or generator, as in wireless telegraphy. A
            telephone transmitter causes fluctuations in these waves,
            it being the fluctuations only which affect the receiver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Teleosaur \Te`le*o*saur"\, n. (Paleon.)
      Any one of several species of fossil suarians belonging to
      Teleosaurus and allied genera. These reptiles are related to
      the crocodiles, but have biconcave vertebr[91].

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thorn \Thorn\, n. [AS. [thorn]orn; akin to OS. & OFries. thorn,
      D. doorn, G. dorn, Dan. torn, Sw. t[94]rne, Icel. [thorn]orn,
      Goth. [thorn]a[a3]rnus; cf. Pol. tarn, Russ. tern' the
      blackthorn, ternie thorns, Skr. t[rsdot][nsdot]a grass, blade
      of grass. [fb]53.]
      1. A hard and sharp-pointed projection from a woody stem;
            usually, a branch so transformed; a spine.
  
      2. (Bot.) Any shrub or small tree which bears thorns;
            especially, any species of the genus Crat[91]gus, as the
            hawthorn, whitethorn, cockspur thorn.
  
      3. Fig.: That which pricks or annoys as a thorn; anything
            troublesome; trouble; care.
  
                     There was given to me a thorn in the flesh, the
                     messenger of Satan to buffet me.         --2 Cor. xii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The guilt of empire, all its thorns and cares, Be
                     only mine.                                          --Southern.
  
      4. The name of the Anglo-Saxon letter [?], capital form [?].
            It was used to represent both of the sounds of English th,
            as in thin, then. So called because it was the initial
            letter of thorn, a spine.
  
      {Thorn apple} (Bot.), Jamestown weed.
  
      {Thorn broom} (Bot.), a shrub that produces thorns.
  
      {Thorn hedge}, a hedge of thorn-bearing trees or bushes.
  
      {Thorn devil}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Moloch}, 2.
  
      {Thorn hopper} (Zo[94]l.), a tree hopper ({Thelia
            crat[91]gi}) which lives on the thorn bush, apple tree,
            and allied trees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Theologer \The*ol"o*ger\, n.
      A theologian. --Cudworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dagger \Dag"ger\ (-g[etil]r), n. [Cf. OE. daggen to pierce, F.
      daguer. See {Dag} a dagger.]
      1. A short weapon used for stabbing. This is the general
            term: cf. {Poniard}, {Stiletto}, {Bowie knife}, {Dirk},
            {Misericorde}, {Anlace}.
  
      2. (Print.) A mark of reference in the form of a dagger
            [[dagger]]. It is the second in order when more than one
            reference occurs on a page; -- called also {obelisk}.
  
      {Dagger moth} (Zo[94]l.), any moth of the genus {Apatalea}.
            The larv[91] are often destructive to the foliage of fruit
            trees, etc.
  
      {Dagger of lath}, the wooden weapon given to the Vice in the
            old Moralities. --Shak.
  
      {Double dagger}, a mark of reference [[Dagger]] which comes
            next in order after the dagger.
  
      {To look, [or] speak}, {daggers}, to look or speak fiercely
            or reproachfully.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lose \Lose\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Losing}.] [OE. losien to
      loose, be lost, lose, AS. losian to become loose; akin to OE.
      leosen to lose, p. p. loren, lorn, AS. le[a2]san, p. p. loren
      (in comp.), D. verliezen, G. verlieren, Dan. forlise, Sw.
      f[94]rlisa, f[94]rlora, Goth. fraliusan, also to E. loose, a
      & v., L. luere to loose, Gr. [?], Skr. l[?] to cut.
      [root]127. Cf. {Analysis}, {Palsy}, {Solve}, {Forlorn},
      {Leasing}, {Loose}, {Loss}.]
      1. To part with unintentionally or unwillingly, as by
            accident, misfortune, negligence, penalty, forfeit, etc.;
            to be deprived of; as, to lose money from one's purse or
            pocket, or in business or gaming; to lose an arm or a leg
            by amputation; to lose men in battle.
  
                     Fair Venus wept the sad disaster Of having lost her
                     favorite dove.                                    --Prior.
  
      2. To cease to have; to possess no longer; to suffer
            diminution of; as, to lose one's relish for anything; to
            lose one's health.
  
                     If the salt hath lost his savor, wherewith shall it
                     be salted ?                                       --Matt. v. 13.
  
      3. Not to employ; to employ ineffectually; to throw away; to
            waste; to squander; as, to lose a day; to lose the
            benefits of instruction.
  
                     The unhappy have but hours, and these they lose.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      4. To wander from; to miss, so as not to be able to and; to
            go astray from; as, to lose one's way.
  
                     He hath lost his fellows.                  --Shak
  
      5. To ruin; to destroy; as destroy; as, the ship was lost on
            the ledge.
  
                     The woman that deliberates is lost.   --Addison.
  
      6. To be deprived of the view of; to cease to see or know the
            whereabouts of; as, he lost his companion in the crowd.
  
                     Like following life thro' creatures you dissect, You
                     lose it in the moment you detect.      --Pope.
  
      7. To fail to obtain or enjoy; to fail to gain or win; hence,
            to fail to catch with the mind or senses; to miss; as, I
            lost a part of what he said.
  
                     He shall in no wise lose his reward.   --Matt. x. 42.
  
                     I fought the battle bravely which I lost, And lost
                     it but to Macedonians.                        --Dryden.
  
      8. To cause to part with; to deprive of. [R.]
  
                     How should you go about to lose him a wife he loves
                     with so much passion ?                        --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      9. To prevent from gaining or obtaining.
  
                     O false heart ! thou hadst almost betrayed me to
                     eternal flames, and lost me this glory. --Baxter.
  
      {To lose ground}, to fall behind; to suffer gradual loss or
            disadvantage.
  
      {To lose heart}, to lose courage; to become timid. [bd]The
            mutineers lost heart.[b8] --Macaulay.
  
      {To lose one's head}, to be thrown off one's balance; to lose
            the use of one's good sense or judgment.
  
                     In the excitement of such a discovery, many scholars
                     lost their heads.                              --Whitney.
  
      {To lose one's self}.
            (a) To forget or mistake the bearing of surrounding
                  objects; as, to lose one's self in a great city.
            (b) To have the perceptive and rational power temporarily
                  suspended; as, we lose ourselves in sleep.
  
      {To lose sight of}.
            (a) To cease to see; as, to lose sight of the land.
            (b) To overlook; to forget; to fail to perceive; as, he
                  lost sight of the issue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heart \Heart\, n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to
      OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel.
      hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. ha[a1]rt[?], Lith. szirdis, Russ.
      serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. [?], [?] [?][?][?][?]. Cf.
      {Accord}, {Discord}, {Cordial}, 4th {Core}, {Courage}.]
      1. (Anat.) A hollow, muscular organ, which, by contracting
            rhythmically, keeps up the circulation of the blood.
  
                     Why does my blood thus muster to my heart! --Shak.
  
      Note: In adult mammals and birds, the heart is
               four-chambered, the right auricle and ventricle being
               completely separated from the left auricle and
               ventricle; and the blood flows from the systematic
               veins to the right auricle, thence to the right
               ventricle, from which it is forced to the lungs, then
               returned to the left auricle, thence passes to the left
               ventricle, from which it is driven into the systematic
               arteries. See Illust. under {Aorta}. In fishes there
               are but one auricle and one ventricle, the blood being
               pumped from the ventricle through the gills to the
               system, and thence returned to the auricle. In most
               amphibians and reptiles, the separation of the auricles
               is partial or complete, and in reptiles the ventricles
               also are separated more or less completely. The
               so-called lymph hearts, found in many amphibians,
               reptiles, and birds, are contractile sacs, which pump
               the lymph into the veins.
  
      2. The seat of the affections or sensibilities, collectively
            or separately, as love, hate, joy, grief, courage, and the
            like; rarely, the seat of the understanding or will; --
            usually in a good sense, when no epithet is expressed; the
            better or lovelier part of our nature; the spring of all
            our actions and purposes; the seat of moral life and
            character; the moral affections and character itself; the
            individual disposition and character; as, a good, tender,
            loving, bad, hard, or selfish heart.
  
                     Hearts are dust, hearts' loves remain. --Emerson.
  
      3. The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and
            within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or
            system; the source of life and motion in any organization;
            the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of
            energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country,
            of a tree, etc.
  
                     Exploits done in the heart of France. --Shak.
  
                     Peace subsisting at the heart Of endless agitation.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      4. Courage; courageous purpose; spirit.
  
                     Eve, recovering heart, replied.         --Milton.
  
                     The expelled nations take heart, and when they fly
                     from one country invade another.         --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      5. Vigorous and efficient activity; power of fertile
            production; condition of the soil, whether good or bad.
  
                     That the spent earth may gather heart again.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      6. That which resembles a heart in shape; especially, a
            roundish or oval figure or object having an obtuse point
            at one end, and at the other a corresponding indentation,
            -- used as a symbol or representative of the heart.
  
      7. One of a series of playing cards, distinguished by the
            figure or figures of a heart; as, hearts are trumps.
  
      8. Vital part; secret meaning; real intention.
  
                     And then show you the heart of my message. --Shak.
  
      9. A term of affectionate or kindly and familiar address.
            [bd]I speak to thee, my heart.[b8] --Shak.
  
      Note: Heart is used in many compounds, the most of which need
               no special explanation; as, heart-appalling,
               heart-breaking, heart-cheering, heart-chilled,
               heart-expanding, heart-free, heart-hardened,
               heart-heavy, heart-purifying, heart-searching,
               heart-sickening, heart-sinking, heart-stirring,
               heart-touching, heart-wearing, heart-whole,
               heart-wounding, heart-wringing, etc.
  
      {After one's own heart}, conforming with one's inmost
            approval and desire; as, a friend after my own heart.
  
                     The Lord hath sought him a man after his own heart.
                                                                              --1 Sam. xiii.
                                                                              14.
  
      {At heart}, in the inmost character or disposition; at
            bottom; really; as, he is at heart a good man.
  
      {By heart}, in the closest or most thorough manner; as, to
            know or learn by heart. [bd]Composing songs, for fools to
            get by heart[b8] (that is, to commit to memory, or to
            learn thoroughly). --Pope.
  
      {For my heart}, for my life; if my life were at stake. [Obs.]
            [bd]I could not get him for my heart to do it.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {Heart bond} (Masonry), a bond in which no header stone
            stretches across the wall, but two headers meet in the
            middle, and their joint is covered by another stone laid
            header fashion. --Knight.
  
      {Heart and hand}, with enthusiastic co[94]peration.
  
      {Heart hardness}, hardness of heart; callousness of feeling;
            moral insensibility. --Shak.
  
      {Heart heaviness}, depression of spirits. --Shak.
  
      {Heart point} (Her.), the fess point. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      {Heart rising}, a rising of the heart, as in opposition.
  
      {Heart shell} (Zo[94]l.), any marine, bivalve shell of the
            genus {Cardium} and allied genera, having a heart-shaped
            shell; esp., the European {Isocardia cor}; -- called also
            {heart cockle}.
  
      {Heart sickness}, extreme depression of spirits.
  
      {Heart and soul}, with the utmost earnestness.
  
      {Heart urchin} (Zo[94]l.), any heartshaped, spatangoid sea
            urchin. See {Spatangoid}.
  
      {Heart wheel}, a form of cam, shaped like a heart. See {Cam}.
           
  
      {In good heart}, in good courage; in good hope.
  
      {Out of heart}, discouraged.
  
      {Poor heart}, an exclamation of pity.
  
      {To break the heart of}.
            (a) To bring to despair or hopeless grief; to cause to be
                  utterly cast down by sorrow.
            (b) To bring almost to completion; to finish very nearly;
                  -- said of anything undertaken; as, he has broken the
                  heart of the task.
  
      {To find in the heart}, to be willing or disposed. [bd]I
            could find in my heart to ask your pardon.[b8] --Sir P.
            Sidney.
  
      {To have at heart}, to desire (anything) earnestly.
  
      {To have in the heart}, to purpose; to design or intend to
            do.
  
      {To have the heart in the mouth}, to be much frightened.
  
      {To lose heart}, to become discouraged.
  
      {To lose one's heart}, to fall in love.
  
      {To set the heart at rest}, to put one's self at ease.
  
      {To set the heart upon}, to fix the desires on; to long for
            earnestly; to be very fond of.
  
      {To take heart of grace}, to take courage.
  
      {To take to heart}, to grieve over.
  
      {To wear one's heart upon one's sleeve}, to expose one's
            feelings or intentions; to be frank or impulsive.
  
      {With all one's whole heart}, very earnestly; fully;
            completely; devotedly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toll \Toll\, n. [OE. tol, AS. toll; akin to OS. & D. tol, G.
      zoll, OHG. zol, Icel. tollr, Sw. tull, Dan. told, and also to
      E. tale; -- originally, that which is counted out in payment.
      See {Tale} number.]
      1. A tax paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for
            the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or
            for that of vending goods in a fair, market, or the like.
  
      2. (Sax. & O. Eng. Law) A liberty to buy and sell within the
            bounds of a manor.
  
      3. A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for
            grinding.
  
      {Toll and team} (O. Eng. Law), the privilege of having a
            market, and jurisdiction of villeins. --Burrill.
  
      {Toll bar}, a bar or beam used on a canal for stopping boats
            at the tollhouse, or on a road for stopping passengers.
  
      {Toll bridge}, a bridge where toll is paid for passing over
            it.
  
      {Toll corn}, corn taken as pay for grinding at a mill.
  
      {Toll dish}, a dish for measuring toll in mills.
  
      {Toll gatherer}, a man who takes, or gathers, toll.
  
      {Toll hop}, a toll dish. [Obs.] --Crabb.
  
      {Toll thorough} (Eng. Law), toll taken by a town for beasts
            driven through it, or over a bridge or ferry maintained at
            its cost. --Brande & C.
  
      {Toll traverse} (Eng. Law), toll taken by an individual for
            beasts driven across his ground; toll paid by a person for
            passing over the private ground, bridge, ferry, or the
            like, of another.
  
      {Toll turn} (Eng. Law), a toll paid at the return of beasts
            from market, though they were not sold. --Burrill.
  
      Syn: Tax; custom; duty; impost.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Towel \Tow"el\, n. [OE. towaille, towail, F. touaille, LL.
      toacula, of Teutonic origin; cf. OHG. dwahila, swahilla, G.
      zwehle, fr. OHG. dwahan to wash; akin to D. dwaal a towel,
      AS. [thorn]we[a0]n to wash, OS. thwahan, Icel.
      [thorn]v[amac], Sw. tv[86], Dan. toe, Goth. [thorn]wahan. Cf.
      {Doily}.]
      A cloth used for wiping, especially one used for drying
      anything wet, as the person after a bath.
  
      {Towel gourd} (Bot.), the fruit of the cucurbitaceous plant
            {Luffa [92]gyptiaca}; also, the plant itself. The fruit is
            very fibrous, and, when separated from its rind and seeds,
            is used as a sponge or towel. Called also {Egyptian bath
            sponge}, and {dishcloth}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Billfish \Bill"fish`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A name applied to several distinct fishes:
      (a) The garfish ({Tylosurus, [or] Belone, longirostris}) and
            allied species.
      (b) The saury, a slender fish of the Atlantic coast
            ({Scomberesox saurus}).
      (c) The {Tetrapturus albidus}, a large oceanic species
            related to the swordfish; the spearfish.
      (d) The American fresh-water garpike ({Lepidosteus osseus}).

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Telegraph, TX
      Zip code(s): 76883

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   talker system n.   British hackerism for software that enables
   real-time chat or {talk mode}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   tall card n.   A PC/AT-size expansion card (these can be larger
   than IBM PC or XT cards because the AT case is bigger).   See also
   {short card}.   When IBM introduced the PS/2 model 30 (its last gasp
   at supporting the ISA) they made the case lower and many
   industry-standard tall cards wouldn't fit; this was felt to be a
   reincarnation of the {connector conspiracy}, done with less style.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tail circuit
  
      A circuit which connects the {serial lines}
      of two {modems} together.
  
      [Why do that?]
  
      (1996-10-16)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   talker system
  
      {talk}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tall card
  
      An expansion card for the {IBM PC AT}.   These can
      be larger than {IBM PC} or {IBM PC XT} cards because the AT
      case is bigger.
  
      When IBM introduced the PS/2 model 30 (its last gasp at
      supporting the {ISA}) they made the case lower and many
      industry-standard tall cards wouldn't fit.   This was felt to
      be a reincarnation of the {connector conspiracy}, done with
      less style.
  
      See also {short card}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-03-01)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Telescript
  
      A communications-oriented programming language using "active
      software agents", released by {General Magic} in 1994.   What
      {PostScript} did for cross-{platform}, device-independent
      documents, Telescript aims to do for cross-{platform},
      network-independent messaging.   Telescript protects
      programmers from many of the complexities of network
      {protocol}s.
  
      (1995-01-16)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Telassar
      or Thelasar, (Isa. 37:12; 2 Kings 19:12), a province in the
      south-east of Assyria, probably in Babylonia. Some have
      identified it with Tel Afer, a place in Mesopotamia, some 30
      miles from Sinjar.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Telassar, taking away; heaping up
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Thelasar, same as Telassar
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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