DEEn Dictionary De - En
DeEs De - Es
DePt De - Pt
 Vocabulary trainer

Spec. subjects Grammar Abbreviations Random search Preferences
Search in Sprachauswahl
Search for:
Mini search box
 

   T
         n 1: a base found in DNA (but not in RNA) and derived from
               pyrimidine; pairs with adenine [syn: {thymine}, {T}]
         2: one of the four nucleotides used in building DNA; all four
            nucleotides have a common phosphate group and a sugar
            (ribose) [syn: {deoxythymidine monophosphate}, {T}]
         3: a unit of weight equivalent to 1000 kilograms [syn: {metric
            ton}, {MT}, {tonne}, {t}]
         4: the 20th letter of the Roman alphabet [syn: {T}, {t}]
         5: thyroid hormone similar to thyroxine but with one less iodine
            atom per molecule and produced in smaller quantity; exerts
            the same biological effects as thyroxine but is more potent
            and briefer [syn: {triiodothyronine}, {liothyronine}, {T}]
         6: hormone produced by the thyroid glands to regulate metabolism
            by controlling the rate of oxidation in cells; "thyroxine is
            65% iodine" [syn: {thyroxine}, {thyroxin},
            {tetraiodothyronine}, {T}]

English Dictionary: Türkischrotfärbung by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Ta
n
  1. a hard grey lustrous metallic element that is highly resistant to corrosion; occurs in niobite and fergusonite and tantalite
    Synonym(s): tantalum, Ta, atomic number 73
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tai
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Thailand or its people; "Siamese kings"; "different Thai tribes live in the north"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
  2. of or relating to the languages of the Thai people; "Thai tones"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
  3. of or relating to Thailand; "the Thai border with Laos"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Thailand [syn: Thai, Tai, Siamese]
  2. the most widespread and best known of the Kadai family of languages
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tao
n
  1. an adherent of any branch of Taoism
    Synonym(s): Taoist, Tao
  2. the ultimate principle of the universe
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tau
n
  1. the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
taw
n
  1. the 23rd letter of the Hebrew alphabet
  2. a large marble used for shooting in the game of marbles
    Synonym(s): taw, shooter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tay
n
  1. a branch of the Tai languages
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
TDT
n
  1. (astronomy) a measure of time defined by Earth's orbital motion; terrestrial time is mean solar time corrected for the irregularities of the Earth's motions
    Synonym(s): terrestrial time, TT, terrestrial dynamical time, TDT, ephemeris time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Te
n
  1. a brittle silver-white metalloid element that is related to selenium and sulfur; it is used in alloys and as a semiconductor; occurs mainly as tellurides in ores of copper and nickel and silver and gold
    Synonym(s): tellurium, Te, atomic number 52
  2. the syllable naming the seventh (subtonic) note of any musical scale in solmization
    Synonym(s): ti, te, si
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tea
n
  1. a beverage made by steeping tea leaves in water; "iced tea is a cooling drink"
  2. a light midafternoon meal of tea and sandwiches or cakes; "an Englishman would interrupt a war to have his afternoon tea"
    Synonym(s): tea, afternoon tea, teatime
  3. a tropical evergreen shrub or small tree extensively cultivated in e.g. China and Japan and India; source of tea leaves; "tea has fragrant white flowers"
    Synonym(s): tea, Camellia sinensis
  4. a reception or party at which tea is served; "we met at the Dean's tea for newcomers"
  5. dried leaves of the tea shrub; used to make tea; "the store shelves held many different kinds of tea"; "they threw the tea into Boston harbor"
    Synonym(s): tea, tea leaf
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tee
n
  1. the starting place for each hole on a golf course; "they were waiting on the first tee"
    Synonym(s): tee, teeing ground
  2. support holding a football on end and above the ground preparatory to the kickoff
    Synonym(s): tee, football tee
  3. a short peg put into the ground to hold a golf ball off the ground
    Synonym(s): tee, golf tee
v
  1. place on a tee; "tee golf balls"
    Synonym(s): tee, tee up
  2. connect with a tee; "tee two pipes"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Th
n
  1. the fifth day of the week; the fourth working day [syn: Thursday, Th]
  2. a soft silvery-white tetravalent radioactive metallic element; isotope 232 is used as a power source in nuclear reactors; occurs in thorite and in monazite sands
    Synonym(s): thorium, Th, atomic number 90
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thai
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Thailand or its people; "Siamese kings"; "different Thai tribes live in the north"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
  2. of or relating to the languages of the Thai people; "Thai tones"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
  3. of or relating to Thailand; "the Thai border with Laos"
    Synonym(s): Thai, Tai, Siamese
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Thailand [syn: Thai, Tai, Siamese]
  2. a branch of the Tai languages
    Synonym(s): Thai, Siamese, Central Thai
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thaw
n
  1. the process whereby heat changes something from a solid to a liquid; "the power failure caused a refrigerator melt that was a disaster"; "the thawing of a frozen turkey takes several hours"
    Synonym(s): thaw, melt, thawing, melting
  2. warm weather following a freeze; snow and ice melt; "they welcomed the spring thaw"
    Synonym(s): thaw, thawing, warming
  3. a relaxation or slackening of tensions or reserve; becoming less hostile; "the thaw between the United States and Russia has led to increased cooperation in world affairs"
v
  1. become or cause to become soft or liquid; "The sun melted the ice"; "the ice thawed"; "the ice cream melted"; "The heat melted the wax"; "The giant iceberg dissolved over the years during the global warming phase"; "dethaw the meat"
    Synonym(s): dissolve, thaw, unfreeze, unthaw, dethaw, melt
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Thea
n
  1. (Greek mythology) the Titaness who was mother of Helios and Selene and Eos in ancient mythology
    Synonym(s): Thea, Theia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Theia
n
  1. (Greek mythology) the Titaness who was mother of Helios and Selene and Eos in ancient mythology
    Synonym(s): Thea, Theia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tho
n
  1. a branch of the Tai languages
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
thou
n
  1. the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100 [syn: thousand, one thousand, 1000, M, K, chiliad, G, grand, thou, yard]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Ti
n
  1. a light strong grey lustrous corrosion-resistant metallic element used in strong lightweight alloys (as for airplane parts); the main sources are rutile and ilmenite
    Synonym(s): titanium, Ti, atomic number 22
  2. shrub with terminal tufts of elongated leaves used locally for thatching and clothing; thick sweet roots are used as food; tropical southeastern Asia, Australia and Hawaii
    Synonym(s): ti, Cordyline terminalis
  3. the syllable naming the seventh (subtonic) note of any musical scale in solmization
    Synonym(s): ti, te, si
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
TIA
n
  1. brief episode in which the brain gets insufficient blood supply; symptoms depend on the site of the blockage
    Synonym(s): transient ischemic attack, TIA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tie
n
  1. neckwear consisting of a long narrow piece of material worn (mostly by men) under a collar and tied in knot at the front; "he stood in front of the mirror tightening his necktie"; "he wore a vest and tie"
    Synonym(s): necktie, tie
  2. a social or business relationship; "a valuable financial affiliation"; "he was sorry he had to sever his ties with other members of the team"; "many close associations with England"
    Synonym(s): affiliation, association, tie, tie-up
  3. equality of score in a contest
  4. a horizontal beam used to prevent two other structural members from spreading apart or separating; "he nailed the rafters together with a tie beam"
    Synonym(s): tie, tie beam
  5. a fastener that serves to join or connect; "the walls are held together with metal links placed in the wet mortar during construction"
    Synonym(s): link, linkup, tie, tie-in
  6. the finish of a contest in which the score is tied and the winner is undecided; "the game ended in a draw"; "their record was 3 wins, 6 losses and a tie"
    Synonym(s): draw, standoff, tie
  7. (music) a slur over two notes of the same pitch; indicates that the note is to be sustained for their combined time value
  8. one of the cross braces that support the rails on a railway track; "the British call a railroad tie a sleeper"
    Synonym(s): tie, railroad tie, crosstie, sleeper
  9. a cord (or string or ribbon or wire etc.) with which something is tied; "he needed a tie for the packages"
v
  1. fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair"
    Synonym(s): tie, bind
    Antonym(s): unbrace, unlace, untie
  2. finish a game with an equal number of points, goals, etc.; "The teams drew a tie"
    Synonym(s): tie, draw
  3. limit or restrict to; "I am tied to UNIX"; "These big jets are tied to large airports"
  4. connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces; "Can you connect the two loudspeakers?"; "Tie the ropes together"; "Link arms"
    Synonym(s): connect, link, tie, link up
    Antonym(s): disconnect
  5. form a knot or bow in; "tie a necktie"
  6. create social or emotional ties; "The grandparents want to bond with the child"
    Synonym(s): bind, tie, attach, bond
  7. perform a marriage ceremony; "The minister married us on Saturday"; "We were wed the following week"; "The couple got spliced on Hawaii"
    Synonym(s): marry, wed, tie, splice
  8. make by tying pieces together; "The fishermen tied their flies"
  9. unite musical notes by a tie
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Tiu
n
  1. god of war and sky; counterpart of Norse Tyr
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
toe
n
  1. one of the digits of the foot
  2. the part of footwear that provides a covering for the toes
  3. forepart of a hoof
  4. (golf) the part of a clubhead farthest from the shaft
v
  1. walk so that the toes assume an indicated position or direction; "She toes inwards"
  2. drive obliquely; "toe a nail"
    Synonym(s): toe, toenail
  3. hit (a golf ball) with the toe of the club
  4. drive (a golf ball) with the toe of the club
  5. touch with the toe
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
toea
n
  1. 100 toea equal 1 kina in Papua New Guinea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
too
adv
  1. to a degree exceeding normal or proper limits; "too big"
    Synonym(s): excessively, overly, to a fault, too
  2. in addition; "he has a Mercedes, too"
    Synonym(s): besides, too, also, likewise, as well
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
tow
n
  1. the act of hauling something (as a vehicle) by means of a hitch or rope; "the truck gave him a tow to the garage"
    Synonym(s): tow, towage
v
  1. drag behind; "Horses used to tow barges along the canal"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
towhee
n
  1. any of numerous long-tailed American finches
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
toy
n
  1. an artifact designed to be played with [syn: plaything, toy]
  2. a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"
  3. a device regarded as providing amusement; "private airplanes are a rich man's toy"
  4. a copy that reproduces a person or thing in greatly reduced size
    Synonym(s): miniature, toy
  5. any of several breeds of very small dogs kept purely as pets
    Synonym(s): toy dog, toy
v
  1. behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"
    Synonym(s): dally, toy, play, flirt
  2. manipulate manually or in one's mind or imagination; "She played nervously with her wedding ring"; "Don't fiddle with the screws"; "He played with the idea of running for the Senate"
    Synonym(s): toy, fiddle, diddle, play
  3. engage in an activity as if it were a game rather than take it seriously; "They played games on their opponents"; "play the stock market"; "play with her feelings"; "toy with an idea"
    Synonym(s): play, toy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
TT
n
  1. (astronomy) a measure of time defined by Earth's orbital motion; terrestrial time is mean solar time corrected for the irregularities of the Earth's motions
    Synonym(s): terrestrial time, TT, terrestrial dynamical time, TDT, ephemeris time
  2. a republic in the western central Pacific Ocean in association with the United States
    Synonym(s): Palau, Republic of Palau, TT
  3. a country scattered over Micronesia with a constitutional government in free association with the United States; achieved independence in 1986
    Synonym(s): Micronesia, Federated States of Micronesia, TT
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
twee
adj
  1. affectedly dainty or refined [syn: dainty, mincing, niminy-piminy, prim, twee]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
two
adj
  1. being one more than one; "he received two messages" [syn: two, 2, ii]
n
  1. the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number
    Synonym(s): two, 2, II, deuce
  2. one of the four playing cards in a deck that have two spots
    Synonym(s): deuce, two
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
two-way
adj
  1. supported by both sides; "a two-way treaty" [syn: bipartisan, bipartizan, two-party, two-way]
  2. involving two parts or elements; "a bipartite document"; "a two-way treaty"
    Synonym(s): bipartite, two-part, two-way
  3. operating or permitting operation in either of two opposite directions; "a two-way valve"; "two-way traffic"; "two-way streets"
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mute \Mute\, n.
      1. One who does not speak, whether from physical inability,
            unwillingness, or other cause. Specifically:
            (a) One who, from deafness, either congenital or from
                  early life, is unable to use articulate language; a
                  deaf-mute.
            (b) A person employed by undertakers at a funeral.
            (c) A person whose part in a play does not require him to
                  speak.
            (d) Among the Turks, an officer or attendant who is
                  selected for his place because he can not speak.
  
      2. (Phon.) A letter which represents no sound; a silent
            letter; also, a close articulation; an element of speech
            formed by a position of the mouth organs which stops the
            passage of the breath; as, {p}, {b}, {d}, {k}, {t}.
  
      3. (Mus.) A little utensil made of brass, ivory, or other
            material, so formed that it can be fixed in an erect
            position on the bridge of a violin, or similar instrument,
            in order to deaden or soften the tone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   T \T\ (t[emac]),
      the twentieth letter of the English alphabet, is a nonvocal
      consonant. With the letter h it forms the digraph th, which
      has two distinct sounds, as in thin, then. See Guide to
      Pronunciation, [sect][sect]262-264, and also [sect][sect]153,
      156, 169, 172, 176, 178-180. The letter derives its name and
      form from the Latin, the form of the Latin letter being
      further derived through the Greek from the Ph[oe]nician. The
      ultimate origin is probably Egyptian. It is etymologically
      most nearly related to d, s, th; as in tug, duke; two, dual,
      L. duo; resin, L. resina, Gr. "rhti`nh, tent, tense, a.,
      tenuous, thin; nostril, thrill. See {D}, {S}.
  
      {T bandage} (Surg.), a bandage shaped like the letter T, and
            used principally for application to the groin, or
            perineum.
  
      {T cart}, a kind of fashionable two seated wagon for pleasure
            driving.
  
      {T iron}.
      (a) A rod with a short crosspiece at the end, -- used as a
            hook.
      (b) Iron in bars, having a cross section formed like the
            letter T, -- used in structures.
  
      {T rail}, a kind of rail for railroad tracks, having no
            flange at the bottom so that a section resembles the
            letter T.
  
      {T square}, a ruler having a crosspiece or head at one end,
            for the purpose of making parallel lines; -- so called
            from its shape. It is laid on a drawing board and guided
            by the crosspiece, which is pressed against the straight
            edge of the board. Sometimes the head is arranged to be
            set at different angles.
  
      {To a T}, exactly, perfectly; as, to suit to a T. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mute \Mute\, n.
      1. One who does not speak, whether from physical inability,
            unwillingness, or other cause. Specifically:
            (a) One who, from deafness, either congenital or from
                  early life, is unable to use articulate language; a
                  deaf-mute.
            (b) A person employed by undertakers at a funeral.
            (c) A person whose part in a play does not require him to
                  speak.
            (d) Among the Turks, an officer or attendant who is
                  selected for his place because he can not speak.
  
      2. (Phon.) A letter which represents no sound; a silent
            letter; also, a close articulation; an element of speech
            formed by a position of the mouth organs which stops the
            passage of the breath; as, {p}, {b}, {d}, {k}, {t}.
  
      3. (Mus.) A little utensil made of brass, ivory, or other
            material, so formed that it can be fixed in an erect
            position on the bridge of a violin, or similar instrument,
            in order to deaden or soften the tone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   T \T\ (t[emac]),
      the twentieth letter of the English alphabet, is a nonvocal
      consonant. With the letter h it forms the digraph th, which
      has two distinct sounds, as in thin, then. See Guide to
      Pronunciation, [sect][sect]262-264, and also [sect][sect]153,
      156, 169, 172, 176, 178-180. The letter derives its name and
      form from the Latin, the form of the Latin letter being
      further derived through the Greek from the Ph[oe]nician. The
      ultimate origin is probably Egyptian. It is etymologically
      most nearly related to d, s, th; as in tug, duke; two, dual,
      L. duo; resin, L. resina, Gr. "rhti`nh, tent, tense, a.,
      tenuous, thin; nostril, thrill. See {D}, {S}.
  
      {T bandage} (Surg.), a bandage shaped like the letter T, and
            used principally for application to the groin, or
            perineum.
  
      {T cart}, a kind of fashionable two seated wagon for pleasure
            driving.
  
      {T iron}.
      (a) A rod with a short crosspiece at the end, -- used as a
            hook.
      (b) Iron in bars, having a cross section formed like the
            letter T, -- used in structures.
  
      {T rail}, a kind of rail for railroad tracks, having no
            flange at the bottom so that a section resembles the
            letter T.
  
      {T square}, a ruler having a crosspiece or head at one end,
            for the purpose of making parallel lines; -- so called
            from its shape. It is laid on a drawing board and guided
            by the crosspiece, which is pressed against the straight
            edge of the board. Sometimes the head is arranged to be
            set at different angles.
  
      {To a T}, exactly, perfectly; as, to suit to a T. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ta \Ta\, v. t.
      To take. [Obs. or Scot.] --Cursor Mundi.
  
      Note: Used by Chaucer to represent a peculiarity of the
               Northern dialect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taha \Ta"ha\, n.
      The African rufous-necked weaver bird ({Hyphantornis texor}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tai \Tai\, a.
      Designating, or pertaining to, the chief linguistic stock of
      Indo-China, including the peoples of Siamese and Shan speech.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tai \Tai\, n.
      A member of one of the tribes of the Tai stock.
  
               The Tais first appeared in history in Yunnan, and from
               thence they migrated into Upper Burma. The earliest
               swarms appear to have entered that tract about two
               thousand years ago, and were small in number. --Census
                                                                              of India,
                                                                              1901.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tau \Tau\ (tou), n. [Gr. tay^.]
      The nineteenth letter ([TAU], [tau]) of the Greek alphabet,
      equivalent to English t.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tau \Tau\, n. [Gr. tay^ the letter [tau] (English {T}).]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      The common American toadfish; -- so called from a marking
      resembling the Greek letter tau ([tau]).
  
      {Tau cross}. See Illust. 6, of {Cross}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taw \Taw\, n. [Cf. AS. t[be]w instrument.]
      1. A large marble to be played with; also, a game at marbles.
  
      2. A line or mark from which the players begin a game of
            marbles. [Colloq. U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taw \Taw\, n.
      Tow. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taw \Taw\, v. t. [Cf. {Tew} to tow, {Tow}, v. t.]
      To push; to tug; to tow. [Obs.] --Drayton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Taw \Taw\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tawed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tawing}.] [OE. tawen, tewen, AS. t[be]wian to prepare; cf.
      D. touwen, Goth. t[c7]wa order, taujan to do, and E. tool.
      [fb]64. Cf. 1st {Tew}, {Tow} the coarse part of flax.]
      1. To prepare or dress, as hemp, by beating; to tew; hence,
            to beat; to scourge. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      2. To dress and prepare, as the skins of sheep, lambs, goats,
            and kids, for gloves, and the like, by imbuing them with
            alum, salt, and other agents, for softening and bleaching
            them.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tea \Tea\, v. i.
      To take or drink tea. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tea \Tea\, n. [Chin. tsh[be], Prov. Chin. te: cf. F. th[82].]
      1. The prepared leaves of a shrub, or small tree ({Thea, [or]
            Camellia, Chinensis}). The shrub is a native of China, but
            has been introduced to some extent into some other
            countries.
  
      Note: Teas are classed as green or black, according to their
               color or appearance, the kinds being distinguished also
               by various other characteristic differences, as of
               taste, odor, and the like. The color, flavor, and
               quality are dependent upon the treatment which the
               leaves receive after being gathered. The leaves for
               green tea are heated, or roasted slightly, in shallow
               pans over a wood fire, almost immediately after being
               gathered, after which they are rolled with the hands
               upon a table, to free them from a portion of their
               moisture, and to twist them, and are then quickly
               dried. Those intended for black tea are spread out in
               the air for some time after being gathered, and then
               tossed about with the hands until they become soft and
               flaccid, when they are roasted for a few minutes, and
               rolled, and having then been exposed to the air for a
               few hours in a soft and moist state, are finally dried
               slowly over a charcoal fire. The operation of roasting
               and rolling is sometimes repeated several times, until
               the leaves have become of the proper color. The
               principal sorts of green tea are Twankay, the poorest
               kind; Hyson skin, the refuse of Hyson; Hyson, Imperial,
               and Gunpowder, fine varieties; and Young Hyson, a
               choice kind made from young leaves gathered early in
               the spring. Those of black tea are Bohea, the poorest
               kind; Congou; Oolong; Souchong, one of the finest
               varieties; and Pekoe, a fine-flavored kind, made
               chiefly from young spring buds. See {Bohea}, {Congou},
               {Gunpowder tea}, under {Gunpowder}, {Hyson}, {Oolong},
               and {Souchong}. --K. Johnson. Tomlinson.
  
      Note: [bd]No knowledge of . . . [tea] appears to have reached
               Europe till after the establishment of intercourse
               between Portugal and China in 1517. The Portuguese,
               however, did little towards the introduction of the
               herb into Europe, and it was not till the Dutch
               established themselves at Bantam early in 17th century,
               that these adventurers learned from the Chinese the
               habit of tea drinking, and brought it to Europe.[b8]
               --Encyc. Brit.
  
      2. A decoction or infusion of tea leaves in boiling water;
            as, tea is a common beverage.
  
      3. Any infusion or decoction, especially when made of the
            dried leaves of plants; as, sage tea; chamomile tea;
            catnip tea.
  
      4. The evening meal, at which tea is usually served; supper.
  
      {Arabian tea}, the leaves of {Catha edulis}; also (Bot.), the
            plant itself. See {Kat}.
  
      {Assam tea}, tea grown in Assam, in India, originally brought
            there from China about the year 1850.
  
      {Australian}, [or] {Botany Bay}, {tea} (Bot.), a woody
            clambing plant ({Smilax glycyphylla}).
  
      {Brazilian tea}.
            (a) The dried leaves of {Lantana pseodothea}, used in
                  Brazil as a substitute for tea.
            (b) The dried leaves of {Stachytarpheta mutabilis}, used
                  for adulterating tea, and also, in Austria, for
                  preparing a beverage.
  
      {Labrador tea}. (Bot.) See under {Labrador}.
  
      {New Jersey tea} (Bot.), an American shrub, the leaves of
            which were formerly used as a substitute for tea; redroot.
            See {Redroot}.
  
      {New Zealand tea}. (Bot.) See under {New Zealand}.
  
      {Oswego tea}. (Bot.) See {Oswego tea}.
  
      {Paraguay tea}, mate. See 1st {Mate}.
  
      {Tea board}, a board or tray for holding a tea set.
  
      {Tea bug} (Zo[94]l.), an hemipterous insect which injures the
            tea plant by sucking the juice of the tender leaves.
  
      {Tea caddy}, a small box for holding tea.
  
      {Tea chest}, a small, square wooden case, usually lined with
            sheet lead or tin, in which tea is imported from China.
  
      {Tea clam} (Zo[94]l.), a small quahaug. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tea garden}, a public garden where tea and other
            refreshments are served.
  
      {Tea plant} (Bot.), any plant, the leaves of which are used
            in making a beverage by infusion; specifically, {Thea
            Chinensis}, from which the tea of commerce is obtained.
  
      {Tea rose} (Bot.), a delicate and graceful variety of the
            rose ({Rosa Indica}, var. {odorata}), introduced from
            China, and so named from its scent. Many varieties are now
            cultivated.
  
      {Tea service}, the appurtenances or utensils required for a
            tea table, -- when of silver, usually comprising only the
            teapot, milk pitcher, and sugar dish.
  
      {Tea set}, a tea service.
  
      {Tea table}, a table on which tea furniture is set, or at
            which tea is drunk.
  
      {Tea taster}, one who tests or ascertains the quality of tea
            by tasting.
  
      {Tea tree} (Bot.), the tea plant of China. See {Tea plant},
            above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tea \Tea\, v. i.
      To take or drink tea. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tea \Tea\, n. [Chin. tsh[be], Prov. Chin. te: cf. F. th[82].]
      1. The prepared leaves of a shrub, or small tree ({Thea, [or]
            Camellia, Chinensis}). The shrub is a native of China, but
            has been introduced to some extent into some other
            countries.
  
      Note: Teas are classed as green or black, according to their
               color or appearance, the kinds being distinguished also
               by various other characteristic differences, as of
               taste, odor, and the like. The color, flavor, and
               quality are dependent upon the treatment which the
               leaves receive after being gathered. The leaves for
               green tea are heated, or roasted slightly, in shallow
               pans over a wood fire, almost immediately after being
               gathered, after which they are rolled with the hands
               upon a table, to free them from a portion of their
               moisture, and to twist them, and are then quickly
               dried. Those intended for black tea are spread out in
               the air for some time after being gathered, and then
               tossed about with the hands until they become soft and
               flaccid, when they are roasted for a few minutes, and
               rolled, and having then been exposed to the air for a
               few hours in a soft and moist state, are finally dried
               slowly over a charcoal fire. The operation of roasting
               and rolling is sometimes repeated several times, until
               the leaves have become of the proper color. The
               principal sorts of green tea are Twankay, the poorest
               kind; Hyson skin, the refuse of Hyson; Hyson, Imperial,
               and Gunpowder, fine varieties; and Young Hyson, a
               choice kind made from young leaves gathered early in
               the spring. Those of black tea are Bohea, the poorest
               kind; Congou; Oolong; Souchong, one of the finest
               varieties; and Pekoe, a fine-flavored kind, made
               chiefly from young spring buds. See {Bohea}, {Congou},
               {Gunpowder tea}, under {Gunpowder}, {Hyson}, {Oolong},
               and {Souchong}. --K. Johnson. Tomlinson.
  
      Note: [bd]No knowledge of . . . [tea] appears to have reached
               Europe till after the establishment of intercourse
               between Portugal and China in 1517. The Portuguese,
               however, did little towards the introduction of the
               herb into Europe, and it was not till the Dutch
               established themselves at Bantam early in 17th century,
               that these adventurers learned from the Chinese the
               habit of tea drinking, and brought it to Europe.[b8]
               --Encyc. Brit.
  
      2. A decoction or infusion of tea leaves in boiling water;
            as, tea is a common beverage.
  
      3. Any infusion or decoction, especially when made of the
            dried leaves of plants; as, sage tea; chamomile tea;
            catnip tea.
  
      4. The evening meal, at which tea is usually served; supper.
  
      {Arabian tea}, the leaves of {Catha edulis}; also (Bot.), the
            plant itself. See {Kat}.
  
      {Assam tea}, tea grown in Assam, in India, originally brought
            there from China about the year 1850.
  
      {Australian}, [or] {Botany Bay}, {tea} (Bot.), a woody
            clambing plant ({Smilax glycyphylla}).
  
      {Brazilian tea}.
            (a) The dried leaves of {Lantana pseodothea}, used in
                  Brazil as a substitute for tea.
            (b) The dried leaves of {Stachytarpheta mutabilis}, used
                  for adulterating tea, and also, in Austria, for
                  preparing a beverage.
  
      {Labrador tea}. (Bot.) See under {Labrador}.
  
      {New Jersey tea} (Bot.), an American shrub, the leaves of
            which were formerly used as a substitute for tea; redroot.
            See {Redroot}.
  
      {New Zealand tea}. (Bot.) See under {New Zealand}.
  
      {Oswego tea}. (Bot.) See {Oswego tea}.
  
      {Paraguay tea}, mate. See 1st {Mate}.
  
      {Tea board}, a board or tray for holding a tea set.
  
      {Tea bug} (Zo[94]l.), an hemipterous insect which injures the
            tea plant by sucking the juice of the tender leaves.
  
      {Tea caddy}, a small box for holding tea.
  
      {Tea chest}, a small, square wooden case, usually lined with
            sheet lead or tin, in which tea is imported from China.
  
      {Tea clam} (Zo[94]l.), a small quahaug. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Tea garden}, a public garden where tea and other
            refreshments are served.
  
      {Tea plant} (Bot.), any plant, the leaves of which are used
            in making a beverage by infusion; specifically, {Thea
            Chinensis}, from which the tea of commerce is obtained.
  
      {Tea rose} (Bot.), a delicate and graceful variety of the
            rose ({Rosa Indica}, var. {odorata}), introduced from
            China, and so named from its scent. Many varieties are now
            cultivated.
  
      {Tea service}, the appurtenances or utensils required for a
            tea table, -- when of silver, usually comprising only the
            teapot, milk pitcher, and sugar dish.
  
      {Tea set}, a tea service.
  
      {Tea table}, a table on which tea furniture is set, or at
            which tea is drunk.
  
      {Tea taster}, one who tests or ascertains the quality of tea
            by tasting.
  
      {Tea tree} (Bot.), the tea plant of China. See {Tea plant},
            above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tee \Tee\, n.
      The letter T, t; also, something shaped like, or resembling
      in form, the letter T.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tee \Tee\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Teed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Teeing}.] (Golf)
      To place (the ball) on a tee.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tee \Tee\, n. [Cf. Icel. tj[be] to show, mark.]
      (a) The mark aimed at in curling and in quoits.
      (b) The nodule of earth

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tee \Tee\, n.
      A short piece of pipe having a lateral outlet, used to
      connect a line of pipe with a pipe at a right angle with the
      line; -- so called because it resembles the letter {T} in
      shape.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Sand grouse} (Zo[94]l.), any one of many species of Old
            World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and
            resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also {rock
            grouse}, {rock pigeon}, and {ganga}. They mostly belong to
            the genus {Pterocles}, as the common Indian species ({P.
            exustus}). The large sand grouse ({P. arenarius}), the
            painted sand grouse ({P. fasciatus}), and the pintail sand
            grouse ({P. alchata}) are also found in India. See Illust.
            under {Pterocletes}.
  
      {Sand hill}, a hill of sand; a dune.
  
      {Sand-hill crane} (Zo[94]l.), the American brown crane ({Grus
            Mexicana}).
  
      {Sand hopper} (Zo[94]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian.
  
      {Sand hornet} (Zo[94]l.), a sand wasp.
  
      {Sand lark}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small lark ({Alaudala raytal}), native of India.
            (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the
                  sanderling, and the common European sandpiper.
            (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ({[92]gialophilus
                  ruficapillus}); -- called also {red-necked plover}.
  
      {Sand launce} (Zo[94]l.), a lant, or launce.
  
      {Sand lizard} (Zo[94]l.), a common European lizard ({Lacerta
            agilis}).
  
      {Sand martin} (Zo[94]l.), the bank swallow.
  
      {Sand mole} (Zo[94]l.), the coast rat.
  
      {Sand monitor} (Zo[94]l.), a large Egyptian lizard ({Monitor
            arenarius}) which inhabits dry localities.
  
      {Sand mouse} (Zo[94]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Sand myrtle}. (Bot.) See under {Myrtle}.
  
      {Sand partridge} (Zo[94]l.), either of two small Asiatic
            partridges of the genus {Ammoperdix}. The wings are long
            and the tarsus is spurless. One species ({A. Heeji})
            inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species ({A.
            Bonhami}), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also {seesee
            partridge}, and {teehoo}.
  
      {Sand picture}, a picture made by putting sand of different
            colors on an adhesive surface.
  
      {Sand pike}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The sauger.
            (b) The lizard fish.
  
      {Sand pillar}, a sand storm which takes the form of a
            whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like
            those of the Sahara and Mongolia.
  
      {Sand pipe} (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to
            several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous
            rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called
            also {sand gall}.
  
      {Sand pride} (Zo[94]l.), a small British lamprey now
            considered to be the young of larger species; -- called
            also {sand prey}.
  
      {Sand pump}, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket
            with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well.
           
  
      {Sand rat} (Zo[94]l.), the pocket gopher.
  
      {Sand rock}, a rock made of cemented sand.
  
      {Sand runner} (Zo[94]l.), the turnstone.
  
      {Sand saucer} (Zo[94]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
            o[94]thec[91], of any mollusk of the genus {Natica} and
            allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer,
            and is coated with fine sand; -- called also {sand
            collar}.
  
      {Sand screw} (Zo[94]l.), an amphipod crustacean
            ({Lepidactylis arenarius}), which burrows in the sandy
            seabeaches of Europe and America.
  
      {Sand shark} (Zo[94]l.), an American shark ({Odontaspis
            littoralis}) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern
            United States; -- called also {gray shark}, and {dogfish
            shark}. See Illust. under {Remora}.
  
      {Sand skink} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of Old
            World lizards belonging to the genus {Seps}; as, the
            ocellated sand skink ({Seps ocellatus}) of Southern
            Europe.
  
      {Sand skipper} (Zo[94]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian.
  
      {Sand smelt} (Zo[94]l.), a silverside.
  
      {Sand snake}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing
                  snakes of the genus {Eryx}, native of Southern Europe,
                  Africa, and Asia, especially {E. jaculus} of India and
                  {E. Johnii}, used by snake charmers.
            (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus
                  {Psammophis}, especially {P. sibilans}.
  
      {Sand snipe} (Zo[94]l.), the sandpiper.
  
      {Sand star} (Zo[94]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on
            sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star.
  
      {Sand storm}, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind.
           
  
      {Sand sucker}, the sandnecker.
  
      {Sand swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the bank swallow. See under
            {Bank}.
  
      {Sand tube}, a tube made of sand. Especially:
            (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of
                  lightning; a fulgurite.
            (b) (Zo[94]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand.
            (c) (Zo[94]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous
                  particles in its wall, which connects the oral water
                  tube with the madreporic plate.
  
      {Sand viper}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Hognose snake}.
  
      {Sand wasp} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
            {Pompilid[91]} and {Spherid[91]}, which dig burrows in
            sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or
            spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve
            as food for her young.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Te-hee \Te-hee"\, n. & interj.
      A tittering laugh; a titter. [bd]'Te-hee,' quoth she.[b8]
      --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Te-hee \Te-hee"\, v. i.
      To titter; to laugh derisively.
  
               She cried, [bd]Come, come; you must not look grave upon
               me.[b8] Upon this, I te-heed.                  --Madame
                                                                              D'Arblay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tew \Tew\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tewed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Tewing}.] [OE. tewen, tawen. [fb]64. See {Taw}, v.]
      1. To prepare by beating or working, as leather or hemp; to
            taw.
  
      2. Hence, to beat; to scourge; also, to pull about; to maul;
            to tease; to vex. [Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tew \Tew\, v. i.
      To work hard; to strive; to fuse. [Local]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tew \Tew\, v. t. [Cf. {Taw} to tow, {Tow}, v. t.]
      To tow along, as a vessel. [Obs.] --Drayton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tew \Tew\, n.
      A rope or chain for towing a boat; also, a cord; a string.
      [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Th \Th\
      In Old English, the article the, when the following word
      began with a vowel, was often written with elision as if a
      part of the word. Thus in Chaucer, the forms thabsence,
      tharray, thegle, thend, thingot, etc., are found for the
      absence, the array, the eagle, the end, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thaw \Thaw\, v. t.
      To cause (frozen things, as earth, snow, ice) to melt,
      soften, or dissolve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thaw \Thaw\, n.
      The melting of ice, snow, or other congealed matter; the
      resolution of ice, or the like, into the state of a fluid;
      liquefaction by heat of anything congealed by frost; also, a
      warmth of weather sufficient to melt that which is congealed.
      --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thaw \Thaw\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Thawed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Thawing}.] [AS. [ed][be]wian, [ed][be]wan; akin to D.
      dovijen, G. tauen, thauen (cf. also verdauen 8digest, OHG.
      douwen, firdouwen), Icel. [ed]eyja, Sw. t[94]a, Dan. t[94]e,
      and perhaps to Gr. [?] to melt. [fb]56.]
      1. To melt, dissolve, or become fluid; to soften; -- said of
            that which is frozen; as, the ice thaws.
  
      2. To become so warm as to melt ice and snow; -- said in
            reference to the weather, and used impersonally.
  
      3. Fig.: To grow gentle or genial.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thawy \Thaw"y\, a.
      Liquefying by heat after having been frozen; thawing;
      melting.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   The \The\, adv. [AS. [eb][c7], [eb][df], instrumental case of
      s[c7], se[a2], [eb][91]t, the definite article. See 2d
      {The}.]
      By that; by how much; by so much; on that account; -- used
      before comparatives; as, the longer we continue in sin, the
      more difficult it is to reform. [bd]Yet not the more cease
      I.[b8] --Milton.
  
               So much the rather thou, Celestial Light, Shine inward,
               and the mind through all her powers Irradiate.
                                                                              --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   The \The\, v. i.
      See {Thee}. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   The \The\ ([th][emac], when emphatic or alone; [th][esl],
      obscure before a vowel; [th][eit], obscure before a
      consonant; 37), definite article. [AS. [eb]e, a later form
      for earlier nom. sing. masc. s[c7], formed under the
      influence of the oblique cases. See {That}, pron.]
      A word placed before nouns to limit or individualize their
      meaning.
  
      Note: The was originally a demonstrative pronoun, being a
               weakened form of that. When placed before adjectives
               and participles, it converts them into abstract nouns;
               as, the sublime and the beautiful. --Burke. The is used
               regularly before many proper names, as of rivers,
               oceans, ships, etc.; as, the Nile, the Atlantic, the
               Great Eastern, the West Indies, The Hague. The with an
               epithet or ordinal number often follows a proper name;
               as, Alexander the Great; Napoleon the Third. The may be
               employed to individualize a particular kind or species;
               as, the grasshopper shall be a burden. --Eccl. xii. 5.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   English \Eng"lish\, n.
      1. Collectively, the people of England; English people or
            persons.
  
      2. The language of England or of the English nation, and of
            their descendants in America, India, and other countries.
  
      Note: The English language has been variously divided into
               periods by different writers. In the division most
               commonly recognized, the first period dates from about
               450 to 1150. This is the period of full inflection, and
               is called Anglo-Saxon, or, by many recent writers, Old
               English. The second period dates from about 1150 to
               1550 (or, if four periods be recognized, from about
               1150 to 1350), and is called Early English, Middle
               English, or more commonly (as in the usage of this
               book), Old English. During this period most of the
               inflections were dropped, and there was a great
               addition of French words to the language. The third
               period extends from about 1350 to 1550, and is Middle
               English. During this period orthography became
               comparatively fixed. The last period, from about 1550,
               is called Modern English.
  
      3. A kind of printing type, in size between Pica and Great
            Primer. See {Type}.
  
      Note: The type called English.
  
      4. (Billiards) A twist or spinning motion given to a ball in
            striking it that influences the direction it will take
            after touching a cushion or another ball.
  
      {The} {King's, [or] Queen's}, {English}. See under {King}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thee \Thee\, v. i. [AS. [?]e[a2]n; akin to OS. th[c6]han, D.
      gedijen, G. gedeihen, OHG. gidihan, Goth. [?]eihan, Lith.
      tekti to fall to the lot of. Cf. {Tight}, a.]
      To thrive; to prosper. [Obs.] [bd]He shall never thee.[b8]
      --Chaucer.
  
               Well mote thee, as well can wish your thought.
                                                                              --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thee \Thee\, pron. [AS. [eb][c7], acc. & dat. of [eb][d4] thou.
      See {Thou}.]
      The objective case of thou. See {Thou}.
  
      Note: Thee is poetically used for thyself, as him for
               himself, etc.
  
                        This sword hath ended him; so shall it thee,
                        Unless thou yield thee as my prisoner. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, pron. [Sing.: nom. {Thou}; poss. {Thy}or {Thine};
      obj. {Thee}. Pl.: nom. {You}; poss. {Your}or {Yours}; obj.
      {You}.] [OE. thou, [thorn]u, AS. [edh][umac], [edh]u; akin to
      OS. & OFries. thu, G., Dan. & Sw. du, Icel. [thorn][umac],
      Goth. [thorn]u, Russ. tui, Ir. & Gael. tu, W. ti, L. tu, Gr.
      sy`, Dor. ty`, Skr. tvam. [fb]185. Cf. {Thee}, {Thine}, {Te
      Deum}.]
      The second personal pronoun, in the singular number, denoting
      the person addressed; thyself; the pronoun which is used in
      addressing persons in the solemn or poetical style.
  
               Art thou he that should come?                  --Matt. xi. 3.
  
      Note: [bd]In Old English, generally, thou is the language of
               a lord to a servant, of an equal to an equal, and
               expresses also companionship, love, permission,
               defiance, scorn, threatening: whilst ye is the language
               of a servant to a lord, and of compliment, and further
               expresses honor, submission, or entreaty.[b8] --Skeat.
  
      Note: Thou is now sometimes used by the Friends, or Quakers,
               in familiar discourse, though most of them corruptly
               say thee instead of thou.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thew \Thew\ (th[umac]), n.
  
      Note: [Chiefly used in the plural {Thews} (th[umac]z).] [OE.
               thew, [thorn]eau, manner, habit, strength, AS.
               [thorn]e[a0]w manner, habit (cf. [thorn][ymac]wan to
               drive); akin to OS. thau custom, habit, OHG. dou.
               [fb]56.]
      1. Manner; custom; habit; form of behavior; qualities of
            mind; disposition; specifically, good qualities; virtues.
            [Obs.]
  
                     For her great light Of sapience, and for her thews
                     clear.                                                --Chaucer.
  
                     Evil speeches destroy good thews.      --Wyclif (1
                                                                              Cor. xv. 33).
  
                     To be upbrought in gentle thews and martial might.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. Muscle or strength; nerve; brawn; sinew. --Shak.
  
                     And I myself, who sat apart And watched them, waxed
                     in every limb; I felt the thews of Anakim, The pules
                     of a Titan's heart.                           --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thewy \Thew"y\, a.
      Having strong or large thews or muscles; muscular; sinewy;
      strong.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   She \She\, pron. [sing. nom. {She}; poss. {Her}. or {Hers}; obj.
      {Her}; pl. nom. {They}; poss. {Their}or {Theirs}; obj.
      {Them}.] [OE. she, sche, scheo, scho, AS. se[a2], fem. of the
      definite article, originally a demonstrative pronoun; cf. OS.
      siu, D. zij, G. sie, OHG. siu, s[c6], si, Icel. s[umac],
      sj[be], Goth. si she, s[omac], fem. article, Russ. siia,
      fem., this, Gr. [?], fem. article, Skr. s[be], sy[be]. The
      possessive her or hers, and the objective her, are from a
      different root. See {Her}.]
      1. This or that female; the woman understood or referred to;
            the animal of the female sex, or object personified as
            feminine, which was spoken of.
  
                     She loved her children best in every wise.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     Then Sarah denied, . . . for she was afraid. --Gen.
                                                                              xviii. 15.
  
      2. A woman; a female; -- used substantively. [R.]
  
                     Lady, you are the cruelest she alive. --Shak.
  
      Note: She is used in composition with nouns of common gender,
               for female, to denote an animal of the female sex; as,
               a she-bear; a she-cat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   They \They\ ([th][amac]), pron. pl.; poss. {Theirs}; obj.
      {Them}. [Icel. [thorn]eir they, properly nom. pl. masc. of
      s[be], s[umac], [thorn]at, a demonstrative pronoun, akin to
      the English definite article, AS. s[c7], se[a2], [edh][91]t,
      nom. pl. [edh][be]. See {That}.]
      The plural of he, she, or it. They is never used adjectively,
      but always as a pronoun proper, and sometimes refers to
      persons without an antecedent expressed.
  
               Jolif and glad they went unto here [their] rest And
               casten hem [them] full early for to sail. --Chaucer.
  
               They of Italy salute you.                        --Heb. xiii.
                                                                              24.
  
               Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after
               righteousness.                                       --Matt. v. 6.
  
      Note: They is used indefinitely, as our ancestors used man,
               and as the French use on; as, they say (French on dit),
               that is, it is said by persons not specified.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   He \He\ (h[emac]), pron. [nom. {He}; poss. {His} (h[icr]z); obj.
      {Him} (h[icr]m); pl. nom. {They} ([th][amac]); poss. {Their}
      or {Theirs} ([th][acir]rz or [th][amac]rz); obj. {Them}
      ([th][ecr]m).] [AS. h[?], masc., he[a2], fem., hit, neut.;
      pl. h[c6], or hie, hig; akin to Ofries. hi, D. hij, OS. he,
      hi, G. heute to-day, Goth. himma, dat. masc., this, hina,
      accus. masc., and hita, accus. neut., and prob. to L. his
      this. [root]183. Cf. {It}.]
      1. The man or male being (or object personified to which the
            masculine gender is assigned), previously designated; a
            pronoun of the masculine gender, usually referring to a
            specified subject already indicated.
  
                     Thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall
                     rule over thee.                                 --Gen. iii.
                                                                              16.
  
                     Thou shalt fear the Lord thy God; him shalt thou
                     serve.                                                --Deut. x. 20.
  
      2. Any one; the man or person; -- used indefinitely, and
            usually followed by a relative pronoun.
  
                     He that walketh with wise men shall be wise. --Prov.
                                                                              xiii. 20.
  
      3. Man; a male; any male person; -- in this sense used
            substantively. --Chaucer.
  
                     I stand to answer thee, Or any he, the proudest of
                     thy sort.                                          --Shak.
  
      Note: When a collective noun or a class is referred to, he is
               of common gender. In early English, he referred to a
               feminine or neuter noun, or to one in the plural, as
               well as to noun in the masculine singular. In
               composition, he denotes a male animal; as, a he-goat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thio- \Thi"o-\ [Gr. [?] brimstone, sulphur.] (Chem.)
      A combining form (also used adjectively) denoting the
      presence of sulphur. See {Sulpho-}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tho \Tho\ ([th][omac]), def. art.
      The. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tho \Tho\, pron. pl.
      Those. [Obs.]
  
               This knowen tho that be to wives bound.   --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tho \Tho\, adv. [AS. [thorn][be].]
      Then. [Obs.] --Spenser.
  
               To do obsequies as was tho the guise.      --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tho \Tho\, conj.
      Though. [Reformed spelling.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, v. t.
      To address as thou, esp. to do so in order to treat with
      insolent familiarity or contempt.
  
               If thou thouest him some thrice, it shall not be amiss.
                                                                              --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, v. i.
      To use the words thou and thee in discourse after the manner
      of the Friends. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, pron. [Sing.: nom. {Thou}; poss. {Thy}or {Thine};
      obj. {Thee}. Pl.: nom. {You}; poss. {Your}or {Yours}; obj.
      {You}.] [OE. thou, [thorn]u, AS. [edh][umac], [edh]u; akin to
      OS. & OFries. thu, G., Dan. & Sw. du, Icel. [thorn][umac],
      Goth. [thorn]u, Russ. tui, Ir. & Gael. tu, W. ti, L. tu, Gr.
      sy`, Dor. ty`, Skr. tvam. [fb]185. Cf. {Thee}, {Thine}, {Te
      Deum}.]
      The second personal pronoun, in the singular number, denoting
      the person addressed; thyself; the pronoun which is used in
      addressing persons in the solemn or poetical style.
  
               Art thou he that should come?                  --Matt. xi. 3.
  
      Note: [bd]In Old English, generally, thou is the language of
               a lord to a servant, of an equal to an equal, and
               expresses also companionship, love, permission,
               defiance, scorn, threatening: whilst ye is the language
               of a servant to a lord, and of compliment, and further
               expresses honor, submission, or entreaty.[b8] --Skeat.
  
      Note: Thou is now sometimes used by the Friends, or Quakers,
               in familiar discourse, though most of them corruptly
               say thee instead of thou.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, v. t.
      To address as thou, esp. to do so in order to treat with
      insolent familiarity or contempt.
  
               If thou thouest him some thrice, it shall not be amiss.
                                                                              --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, v. i.
      To use the words thou and thee in discourse after the manner
      of the Friends. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, pron. [Sing.: nom. {Thou}; poss. {Thy}or {Thine};
      obj. {Thee}. Pl.: nom. {You}; poss. {Your}or {Yours}; obj.
      {You}.] [OE. thou, [thorn]u, AS. [edh][umac], [edh]u; akin to
      OS. & OFries. thu, G., Dan. & Sw. du, Icel. [thorn][umac],
      Goth. [thorn]u, Russ. tui, Ir. & Gael. tu, W. ti, L. tu, Gr.
      sy`, Dor. ty`, Skr. tvam. [fb]185. Cf. {Thee}, {Thine}, {Te
      Deum}.]
      The second personal pronoun, in the singular number, denoting
      the person addressed; thyself; the pronoun which is used in
      addressing persons in the solemn or poetical style.
  
               Art thou he that should come?                  --Matt. xi. 3.
  
      Note: [bd]In Old English, generally, thou is the language of
               a lord to a servant, of an equal to an equal, and
               expresses also companionship, love, permission,
               defiance, scorn, threatening: whilst ye is the language
               of a servant to a lord, and of compliment, and further
               expresses honor, submission, or entreaty.[b8] --Skeat.
  
      Note: Thou is now sometimes used by the Friends, or Quakers,
               in familiar discourse, though most of them corruptly
               say thee instead of thou.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Thuja \[d8]Thu"ja\, n. [NL., from Gr. [?] an African tree with
      sweet-smelling wood.] (Bot.)
      A genus of evergreen trees, thickly branched, remarkable for
      the distichous arrangement of their branches, and having
      scalelike, closely imbricated, or compressed leaves. [Written
      also {thuya}.] See {Thyine wood}.
  
      Note: {Thuja occidentalis} is the {Arbor vit[91]} of the
               Eastern and Northern United States. {T. gigantea} of
               North-waetern America is a very large tree, there
               called {red cedar}, and {canoe cedar}, and furnishes a
               useful timber.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thuya \Thu"ya\, n. (Bot.)
      Same as {Thuja}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Thuja \[d8]Thu"ja\, n. [NL., from Gr. [?] an African tree with
      sweet-smelling wood.] (Bot.)
      A genus of evergreen trees, thickly branched, remarkable for
      the distichous arrangement of their branches, and having
      scalelike, closely imbricated, or compressed leaves. [Written
      also {thuya}.] See {Thyine wood}.
  
      Note: {Thuja occidentalis} is the {Arbor vit[91]} of the
               Eastern and Northern United States. {T. gigantea} of
               North-waetern America is a very large tree, there
               called {red cedar}, and {canoe cedar}, and furnishes a
               useful timber.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thuya \Thu"ya\, n. (Bot.)
      Same as {Thuja}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thou \Thou\, pron. [Sing.: nom. {Thou}; poss. {Thy}or {Thine};
      obj. {Thee}. Pl.: nom. {You}; poss. {Your}or {Yours}; obj.
      {You}.] [OE. thou, [thorn]u, AS. [edh][umac], [edh]u; akin to
      OS. & OFries. thu, G., Dan. & Sw. du, Icel. [thorn][umac],
      Goth. [thorn]u, Russ. tui, Ir. & Gael. tu, W. ti, L. tu, Gr.
      sy`, Dor. ty`, Skr. tvam. [fb]185. Cf. {Thee}, {Thine}, {Te
      Deum}.]
      The second personal pronoun, in the singular number, denoting
      the person addressed; thyself; the pronoun which is used in
      addressing persons in the solemn or poetical style.
  
               Art thou he that should come?                  --Matt. xi. 3.
  
      Note: [bd]In Old English, generally, thou is the language of
               a lord to a servant, of an equal to an equal, and
               expresses also companionship, love, permission,
               defiance, scorn, threatening: whilst ye is the language
               of a servant to a lord, and of compliment, and further
               expresses honor, submission, or entreaty.[b8] --Skeat.
  
      Note: Thou is now sometimes used by the Friends, or Quakers,
               in familiar discourse, though most of them corruptly
               say thee instead of thou.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thy \Thy\, pron. [OE. thi, shortened from thin. See {Thine},
      {Thou}.]
      Of thee, or belonging to thee; the more common form of thine,
      possessive case of thou; -- used always attributively, and
      chiefly in the solemn or grave style, and in poetry. Thine is
      used in the predicate; as, the knife is thine. See {Thine}.
  
               Our father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
               Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done.         --Matt. vi.
                                                                              9,10.
  
               These are thy glorious works, Parent of good. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Divertimento \[d8]Di*ver`ti*men"to\, n.; pl. {-ti}. [It.]
      (Mus.)
      A light and pleasing composition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tie \Tie\, n.; pl. {Ties}. [AS. t[c7]ge, t[?]ge, t[c6]ge.
      [fb]64. See {Tie}, v. t.]
      1. A knot; a fastening.
  
      2. A bond; an obligation, moral or legal; as, the sacred ties
            of friendship or of duty; the ties of allegiance.
  
                     No distance breaks the tie of blood.   --Young.
  
      3. A knot of hair, as at the back of a wig. --Young.
  
      4. An equality in numbers, as of votes, scores, etc., which
            prevents either party from being victorious; equality in
            any contest, as a race.
  
      5. (Arch. & Engin.) A beam or rod for holding two parts
            together; in railways, one of the transverse timbers which
            support the track and keep it in place.
  
      6. (Mus.) A line, usually straight, drawn across the stems of
            notes, or a curved line written over or under the notes,
            signifying that they are to be slurred, or closely united
            in the performance, or that two notes of the same pitch
            are to be sounded as one; a bind; a ligature.
  
      7. pl. Low shoes fastened with lacings.
  
      {Bale tie}, a fastening for the ends of a hoop for a bale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tie \Tie\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tied}(Obs. {Tight}); p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Tying}.] [OE. ti[?]en, teyen, AS. t[c6]gan,
      ti[82]gan, fr. te[a0]g, te[a0]h, a rope; akin to Icel. taug,
      and AS. te[a2]n to draw, to pull. See {Tug}, v. t., and cf.
      {Tow} to drag.]
      1. To fasten with a band or cord and knot; to bind. [bd]Tie
            the kine to the cart.[b8] --1 Sam. vi. 7.
  
                     My son, keep thy father's commandment, and forsake
                     not the law of thy mother: bind them continually
                     upon thine heart, and tie them about thy neck.
                                                                              --Prov. vi.
                                                                              20,21.
  
      2. To form, as a knot, by interlacing or complicating a cord;
            also, to interlace, or form a knot in; as, to tie a cord
            to a tree; to knit; to knot. [bd]We do not tie this knot
            with an intention to puzzle the argument.[b8] --Bp.
            Burnet.
  
      3. To unite firmly; to fasten; to hold.
  
                     In bond of virtuous love together tied. --Fairfax.
  
      4. To hold or constrain by authority or moral influence, as
            by knotted cords; to oblige; to constrain; to restrain; to
            confine.
  
                     Not tied to rules of policy, you find Revenge less
                     sweet than a forgiving mind.               --Dryden.
  
      5. (Mus.) To unite, as notes, by a cross line, or by a curved
            line, or slur, drawn over or under them.
  
      6. To make an equal score with, in a contest; to be even
            with.
  
      {To ride and tie}. See under {Ride}.
  
      {To tie down}.
            (a) To fasten so as to prevent from rising.
            (b) To restrain; to confine; to hinder from action.
  
      {To tie up}, to confine; to restrain; to hinder from motion
            or action.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tie \Tie\, v. i.
      To make a tie; to make an equal score.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Titanic \Ti*tan"ic\, a. [Cf. F. titanique.] (Chem.)
      Of or pertaining to titanium; derived from, or containing,
      titanium; specifically, designating those compounds of
      titanium in which it has a higher valence as contrasted with
      the {titanous} compounds.
  
      {Titanic acid} (Chem.), a white amorphous powder, {Ti.(OH)4},
            obtained by decomposing certain titanates; -- called also
            {normal titanic acid}. By extension, any one of a series
            of derived acids, called also {metatitanic acid},
            {polytitanic acid}, etc.
  
      {Titanic iron ore}. (Min.) See {Menaccanite}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Law of Charles} (Physics), the law that the volume of a
            given mass of gas increases or decreases, by a definite
            fraction of its value for a given rise or fall of
            temperature; -- sometimes less correctly styled {Gay
            Lussac's law}, or {Dalton's law}.
  
      {Law of nations}. See {International law}, under
            {International}.
  
      {Law of nature}.
            (a) A broad generalization expressive of the constant
                  action, or effect, of natural conditions; as, death
                  is a law of nature; self-defense is a law of nature.
                  See {Law}, 4.
            (b) A term denoting the standard, or system, of morality
                  deducible from a study of the nature and natural
                  relations of human beings independent of supernatural
                  revelation or of municipal and social usages.
  
      {Law of the land}, due process of law; the general law of the
            land.
  
      {Laws of honor}. See under {Honor}.
  
      {Laws of motion} (Physics), three laws defined by Sir Isaac
            Newton: (1) Every body perseveres in its state of rest or
            of moving uniformly in a straight line, except so far as
            it is made to change that state by external force. (2)
            Change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,
            and takes place in the direction in which the force is
            impressed. (3) Reaction is always equal and opposite to
            action, that is to say, the actions of two bodies upon
            each other are always equal and in opposite directions.
  
      {Marine law}, or {Maritime law}, the law of the sea; a branch
            of the law merchant relating to the affairs of the sea,
            such as seamen, ships, shipping, navigation, and the like.
            --Bouvier.
  
      {Mariotte's law}. See {Boyle's law} (above).
  
      {Martial law}.See under {Martial}.
  
      {Military law}, a branch of the general municipal law,
            consisting of rules ordained for the government of the
            military force of a state in peace and war, and
            administered in courts martial. --Kent. Warren's
            Blackstone.
  
      {Moral law},the law of duty as regards what is right and
            wrong in the sight of God; specifically, the ten
            commandments given by Moses. See {Law}, 2.
  
      {Mosaic}, [or] {Ceremonial}, {law}. (Script.) See {Law}, 3.
           
  
      {Municipal}, [or] {Positive}, {law}, a rule prescribed by the
            supreme power of a state, declaring some right, enforcing
            some duty, or prohibiting some act; -- distinguished from
            international and constitutional law. See {Law}, 1.
  
      {Periodic law}. (Chem.) See under {Periodic}.
  
      {Roman law}, the system of principles and laws found in the
            codes and treatises of the lawmakers and jurists of
            ancient Rome, and incorporated more or less into the laws
            of the several European countries and colonies founded by
            them. See {Civil law} (above).
  
      {Statute law}, the law as stated in statutes or positive
            enactments of the legislative body.
  
      {Sumptuary law}. See under {Sumptuary}.
  
      {To go to law}, to seek a settlement of any matter by
            bringing it before the courts of law; to sue or prosecute
            some one.
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the law of}, to bring the law to
            bear upon; as, to take the law of one's neighbor.
            --Addison.
  
      {Wager of law}. See under {Wager}.
  
      Syn: Justice; equity.
  
      Usage: {Law}, {Statute}, {Common law}, {Regulation}, {Edict},
                  {Decree}. Law is generic, and, when used with
                  reference to, or in connection with, the other words
                  here considered, denotes whatever is commanded by one
                  who has a right to require obedience. A statute is a
                  particular law drawn out in form, and distinctly
                  enacted and proclaimed. Common law is a rule of action
                  founded on long usage and the decisions of courts of
                  justice. A regulation is a limited and often,
                  temporary law, intended to secure some particular end
                  or object. An edict is a command or law issued by a
                  sovereign, and is peculiar to a despotic government. A
                  decree is a permanent order either of a court or of
                  the executive government. See {Justice}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lead \Lead\ (l[ecr]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le[a0]d;
      akin to D. lood, MHG. l[omac]t, G. loth plummet, sounding
      lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
      1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
            metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
            tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
            little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
            etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
            forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
            solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
            Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
            lead sulphide.
  
      2. An article made of lead or an alloy of lead; as:
            (a) A plummet or mass of lead, used in sounding at sea.
            (b) (Print.) A thin strip of type metal, used to separate
                  lines of type in printing.
            (c) Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs;
                  hence, pl., a roof covered with lead sheets or terne
                  plates.
  
                           I would have the tower two stories, and goodly
                           leads upon the top.                     --Bacon
  
      3. A small cylinder of black lead or plumbago, used in
            pencils.
  
      {Black lead}, graphite or plumbago; -- so called from its
            leadlike appearance and streak. [Colloq.]
  
      {Coasting lead}, a sounding lead intermediate in weight
            between a hand lead and deep-sea lead.
  
      {Deep-sea lead}, the heaviest of sounding leads, used in
            water exceeding a hundred fathoms in depth. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {Hand lead}, a small lead use for sounding in shallow water.
           
  
      {Krems lead}, {Kremnitz lead} [so called from Krems or
            Kremnitz, in Austria], a pure variety of white lead,
            formed into tablets, and called also {Krems, [or]
            Kremnitz, white}, and {Vienna white}.
  
      {Lead arming}, tallow put in the hollow of a sounding lead.
            See {To arm the lead} (below).
  
      {Lead colic}. See under {Colic}.
  
      {Lead color}, a deep bluish gray color, like tarnished lead.
           
  
      {Lead glance}. (Min.) Same as {Galena}.
  
      {Lead line}
            (a) (Med.) A dark line along the gums produced by a
                  deposit of metallic lead, due to lead poisoning.
            (b) (Naut.) A sounding line.
  
      {Lead mill}, a leaden polishing wheel, used by lapidaries.
  
      {Lead ocher} (Min.), a massive sulphur-yellow oxide of lead.
            Same as {Massicot}.
  
      {Lead pencil}, a pencil of which the marking material is
            graphite (black lead).
  
      {Lead plant} (Bot.), a low leguminous plant, genus {Amorpha}
            ({A. canescens}), found in the Northwestern United States,
            where its presence is supposed to indicate lead ore.
            --Gray.
  
      {Lead tree}.
            (a) (Bot.) A West Indian name for the tropical, leguminous
                  tree, {Leuc[91]na glauca}; -- probably so called from
                  the glaucous color of the foliage.
            (b) (Chem.) Lead crystallized in arborescent forms from a
                  solution of some lead salt, as by suspending a strip
                  of zinc in lead acetate.
  
      {Mock lead}, a miner's term for blende.
  
      {Red lead}, a scarlet, crystalline, granular powder,
            consisting of minium when pure, but commonly containing
            several of the oxides of lead. It is used as a paint or
            cement and also as an ingredient of flint glass.
  
      {Red lead ore} (Min.), crocoite.
  
      {Sugar of lead}, acetate of lead.
  
      {To arm the lead}, to fill the hollow in the bottom of a
            sounding lead with tallow in order to discover the nature
            of the bottom by the substances adhering. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {To} {cast, [or] heave}, {the lead}, to cast the sounding
            lead for ascertaining the depth of water.
  
      {White lead}, hydrated carbonate of lead, obtained as a
            white, amorphous powder, and much used as an ingredient of
            white paint.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To be in the wind}, to be suggested or expected; to be a
            matter of suspicion or surmise. [Colloq.]
  
      {To carry the wind} (Man.), to toss the nose as high as the
            ears, as a horse.
  
      {To raise the wind}, to procure money. [Colloq.]
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the wind}, to gain or have the
            advantage. --Bacon.
  
      {To take the wind out of one's sails}, to cause one to stop,
            or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of
            another. [Colloq.]
  
      {To take wind}, or {To get wind}, to be divulged; to become
            public; as, the story got wind, or took wind.
  
      {Wind band} (Mus.), a band of wind instruments; a military
            band; the wind instruments of an orchestra.
  
      {Wind chest} (Mus.), a chest or reservoir of wind in an
            organ.
  
      {Wind dropsy}. (Med.)
            (a) Tympanites.
            (b) Emphysema of the subcutaneous areolar tissue.
  
      {Wind egg}, an imperfect, unimpregnated, or addled egg.
  
      {Wind furnace}. See the Note under {Furnace}.
  
      {Wind gauge}. See under {Gauge}.
  
      {Wind gun}. Same as {Air gun}.
  
      {Wind hatch} (Mining), the opening or place where the ore is
            taken out of the earth.
  
      {Wind instrument} (Mus.), an instrument of music sounded by
            means of wind, especially by means of the breath, as a
            flute, a clarinet, etc.
  
      {Wind pump}, a pump moved by a windmill.
  
      {Wind rose}, a table of the points of the compass, giving the
            states of the barometer, etc., connected with winds from
            the different directions.
  
      {Wind sail}.
            (a) (Naut.) A wide tube or funnel of canvas, used to
                  convey a stream of air for ventilation into the lower
                  compartments of a vessel.
            (b) The sail or vane of a windmill.
  
      {Wind shake}, a crack or incoherence in timber produced by
            violent winds while the timber was growing.
  
      {Wind shock}, a wind shake.
  
      {Wind side}, the side next the wind; the windward side. [R.]
            --Mrs. Browning.
  
      {Wind rush} (Zo[94]l.), the redwing. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Wind wheel}, a motor consisting of a wheel moved by wind.
  
      {Wood wind} (Mus.), the flutes and reed instruments of an
            orchestra, collectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nativity \Na*tiv"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Nativies}. [F. nativit[82], L.
      nativitas. See {Native}, and cf. {Na[8b]vet[90]}.]
      1. The coming into life or into the world; birth; also, the
            circumstances attending birth, as time, place, manner,
            etc. --Chaucer.
  
                     I have served him from the hour of my nativity.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     Thou hast left . . . the land of thy nativity.
                                                                              --Ruth ii. 11.
  
                     These in their dark nativity the deep Shall yield
                     us, pregnant with infernal flame.      --Milton.
  
      2. (Fine Arts) A picture representing or symbolizing the
            early infancy of Christ. The simplest form is the babe in
            a rude cradle, and the heads of an ox and an ass to
            express the stable in which he was born.
  
      3. (Astrol.) A representation of the positions of the
            heavenly bodies as the moment of one's birth, supposed to
            indicate his future destinies; a horoscope.
  
      {The Nativity}, the birth or birthday of Christ; Christmas
            day.
  
      {To}
  
      {cast, [or] calculate},
  
      {one's nativity} (Astrol.), to find out and represent the
            position of the heavenly bodies at the time of one's
            birth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scale \Scale\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scaled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Scaling}.]
      To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also,
      to grade or vary according to a scale or system.
  
               Scaling his present bearing with his past. --Shak.
  
      {To} {scale, [or] scale down}, {a debt, wages, etc.}, to
            reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale.
            [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nutshell \Nut"shell`\, n.
      1. The shell or hard external covering in which the kernel of
            a nut is inclosed.
  
      2. Hence, a thing of little compass, or of little value.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A shell of the genus Nucula.
  
      {To} {be, [or] lie}, {in a nutshell}, to be within a small
            compass; to admit of very brief or simple determination or
            statement. [bd]The remedy lay in a nutshell.[b8]
            --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gapeseed \Gape"seed`\, n.
      A person who looks or stares gapingly.
  
      {To} {buy, [or] sow}, {gapeseed}, to stare idly or in idle
            wonderment, instead of attending to business.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pace \Pace\, n. [OE. pas, F. pas, from L. passus a step, pace,
      orig., a stretching out of the feet in walking; cf. pandere,
      passum, to spread, stretch; perh. akin to E. patent. Cf.
      {Pas}, {Pass}.]
      1. A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a
            step.
  
      2. The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from
            the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; -- used as
            a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty
            paces. [bd]The heigh of sixty pace .[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Ordinarily the pace is estimated at two and one half
               linear feet; but in measuring distances be stepping,
               the pace is extended to three feet (one yard) or to
               three and three tenths feet (one fifth of a rod). The
               regulation marching pace in the English and United
               States armies is thirty inches for quick time, and
               thirty-six inches for double time. The Roman pace
               (passus) was from the heel of one foot to the heel of
               the same foot when it next touched the ground, five
               Roman feet.
  
      3. Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk,
            trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a
            swaggering pace; a quick pace. --Chaucer.
  
                     To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in
                     this petty pace from day to day.         --Shak.
  
                     In the military schools of riding a variety of paces
                     are taught.                                       --Walsh.
  
      4. A slow gait; a footpace. [Obs.] --Chucer.
  
      5. Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.
  
      6. Any single movement, step, or procedure. [R.]
  
                     The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is
                     to fall into confidence with Spain.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      7. (Arch.) A broad step or platform; any part of a floor
            slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at
            the upper end of a hall.
  
      8. (Weaving) A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the
            warp in pacing the web.
  
      {Geometrical pace}, the space from heel to heel between the
            spot where one foot is set down and that where the same
            foot is again set down, loosely estimated at five feet, or
            by some at four feet and two fifths. See {Roman pace} in
            the Note under def. 2. [Obs.]
  
      {To} {keep, [or] hold}, {pace with}, to keep up with; to go
            as fast as. [bd]In intellect and attainments he kept pace
            with his age.[b8] --Southey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To \To\ ([?], emphatic or alone, [?], obscure or unemphatic),
      prep. [AS. t[d3]; akin to OS. & OFries. t[d3], D. toe, G. zu,
      OHG. zuo, zua, z[d3], Russ. do, Ir. & Gael. do, OL. -do, -du,
      as in endo, indu, in, Gr. [?], as in [?] homeward. [fb]200.
      Cf. {Too}, {Tatoo} a beat of drums.]
      1. The preposition to primarily indicates approach and
            arrival, motion made in the direction of a place or thing
            and attaining it, access; and also, motion or tendency
            without arrival; movement toward; -- opposed to {from}.
            [bd]To Canterbury they wend.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                     Stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.   --Shak.
  
                     So to the sylvan lodge They came, that like Pomona's
                     arbor smiled.                                    --Milton.
  
                     I'll to him again, . . . He'll tell me all his
                     purpose. She stretched her arms to heaven. --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, it indicates motion, course, or tendency toward a
            time, a state or condition, an aim, or anything capable of
            being regarded as a limit to a tendency, movement, or
            action; as, he is going to a trade; he is rising to wealth
            and honor.
  
      Note: Formerly, by omission of the verb denoting motion, to
               sometimes followed a form of be, with the sense of at,
               or in. [bd]When the sun was [gone or declined] to
               rest.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      3. In a very general way, and with innumerable varieties of
            application, to connects transitive verbs with their
            remoter or indirect object, and adjectives, nouns, and
            neuter or passive verbs with a following noun which limits
            their action. Its sphere verges upon that of for, but it
            contains less the idea of design or appropriation; as,
            these remarks were addressed to a large audience; let us
            keep this seat to ourselves; a substance sweet to the
            taste; an event painful to the mind; duty to God and to
            our parents; a dislike to spirituous liquor.
  
                     Marks and points out each man of us to slaughter.
                                                                              --B. Jonson.
  
                     Whilst they, distilled Almost to jelly with the act
                     of fear, Stand dumb and speak not to him. --Shak.
  
                     Add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge;
                     and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance
                     patience; and to patience godliness; and to
                     godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly
                     kindness charity.                              --2 Pet. i.
                                                                              5,6,7.
  
                     I have a king's oath to the contrary. --Shak.
  
                     Numbers were crowded to death.            --Clarendon.
  
                     Fate and the dooming gods are deaf to tears.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     Go, buckle to the law.                        --Dryden.
  
      4. As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of
            last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun,
            and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb
            or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going;
            good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead
            my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost
            constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations
            where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the
            infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to
            learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is
            noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the
            infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage
            formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what
            went ye out for see? (--Matt. xi. 8).
  
                     Then longen folk to go on pilgrimages, And palmers
                     for to seeken strange stranders.         --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Such usage is now obsolete or illiterate. In colloquial
               usage, to often stands for, and supplies, an infinitive
               already mentioned; thus, he commands me to go with him,
               but I do not wish to.
  
      5. In many phrases, and in connection with many other words,
            to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically. Thus,
            it denotes or implies:
            (a) Extent; limit; degree of comprehension; inclusion as
                  far as; as, they met us to the number of three
                  hundred.
  
                           We ready are to try our fortunes To the last
                           man.                                             --Shak.
  
                           Few of the Esquimaux can count to ten. --Quant.
                                                                              Rev.
            (b) Effect; end; consequence; as, the prince was flattered
                  to his ruin; he engaged in a war to his cost; violent
                  factions exist to the prejudice of the state.
            (c) Apposition; connection; antithesis; opposition; as,
                  they engaged hand to hand.
  
                           Now we see through a glass, darkly; but then
                           face to face.                              --1 Cor. xiii.
                                                                              12.
            (d) Accord; adaptation; as, an occupation to his taste;
                  she has a husband to her mind.
  
                           He to God's image, she to his was made.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) Comparison; as, three is to nine as nine is to
                  twenty-seven; it is ten to one that you will offend
                  him.
  
                           All that they did was piety to this. --B.
                                                                              Jonson.
            (f) Addition; union; accumulation.
  
                           Wisdom he has, and to his wisdom, courage.
                                                                              --Denham.
            (g) Accompaniment; as, she sang to his guitar; they danced
                  to the music of a piano.
  
                           Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian
                           mood Of flutes and soft recorders. --Milton.
            (h) Character; condition of being; purpose subserved or
                  office filled. [In this sense archaic] [bd]I have a
                  king here to my flatterer.[b8] --Shak.
  
                           Made his masters and others . . . to consider
                           him to a little wonder.               --Walton.
  
      Note: To in to-day, to-night, and to-morrow has the sense or
               force of for or on; for, or on, (this) day, for, or on,
               (this) night, for, or on, (the) morrow. To-day,
               to-night, to-morrow may be considered as compounds, and
               usually as adverbs; but they are sometimes used as
               nouns; as, to-day is ours.
  
                        To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow; Creeps
                        in this petty pace from day to day. --Shak.
  
      {To and again}, to and fro. [R.]
  
      {To and fro}, forward and back. In this phrase, to is
            adverbial.
  
                     There was great showing both to and fro. --Chaucer.
  
      {To-and-fro}, a pacing backward and forward; as, to commence
            a to-and-fro. --Tennyson.
  
      {To the face}, in front of; in behind; hence, in the presence
            of.
  
      {To wit}, to know; namely. See {Wit}, v. i.
  
      Note: To, without an object expressed, is used adverbially;
               as, put to the door, i. e., put the door to its frame,
               close it; and in the nautical expressions, to heave to,
               to come to, meaning to a certain position. To, like on,
               is sometimes used as a command, forward, set to.
               [bd]To, Achilles! to, Ajax! to![b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To- \To-\ (?, see {To}, prep.), [AS. to- asunder; akin to G.
      zer-, and perhaps to L. dis-, or Gr. [?].]
      An obsolete intensive prefix used in the formation of
      compound verbs; as in to-beat, to-break, to-hew, to-rend,
      to-tear. See these words in the Vocabulary. See the Note on
      {All to}, or {All-to}, under {All}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Alone \A*lone"\, a. [All + one. OE. al one all allone, AS. [be]n
      one, alone. See {All}, {One}, {Lone}.]
      1. Quite by one's self; apart from, or exclusive of, others;
            single; solitary; -- applied to a person or thing.
  
                     Alone on a wide, wide sea.                  --Coleridge.
  
                     It is not good that the man should be alone. --Gen.
                                                                              ii. 18.
  
      2. Of or by itself; by themselves; without any thing more or
            any one else; without a sharer; only.
  
                     Man shall not live by bread alone.      --Luke iv. 4.
  
                     The citizens alone should be at the expense.
                                                                              --Franklin.
  
      3. Sole; only; exclusive. [R.]
  
                     God, by whose alone power and conversation we all
                     live, and move, and have our being.   --Bentley.
  
      4. Hence; Unique; rare; matchless. --Shak.
  
      Note: The adjective alone commonly follows its noun.
  
      {To} {let [or] leave} {alone}, to abstain from interfering
            with or molesting; to suffer to remain in its present
            state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dust \Dust\, n. [AS. dust; cf. LG. dust, D. duist meal dust, OD.
      doest, donst, and G. dunst vapor, OHG. tunist, dunist, a
      blowing, wind, Icel. dust dust, Dan. dyst mill dust; perh.
      akin to L. fumus smoke, E. fume. [?].]
      1. Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so
            comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind;
            that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder;
            as, clouds of dust; bone dust.
  
                     Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.
                                                                              --Gen. iii.
                                                                              19.
  
                     Stop! -- for thy tread is on an empire's dust.
                                                                              --Byron.
  
      2. A single particle of earth or other matter. [R.] [bd]To
            touch a dust of England's ground.[b8] --Shak.
  
      3. The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
  
                     For now shall sleep in the dust.         --Job vii. 21.
  
      4. The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of
            the human body.
  
                     And you may carve a shrine about my dust.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      5. Figuratively, a worthless thing.
  
                     And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust. --Shak.
  
      6. Figuratively, a low or mean condition.
  
                     [God] raiseth up the poor out of the dust. --1 Sam.
                                                                              ii. 8.
  
      7. Gold dust; hence: (Slang) Coined money; cash.
  
      {Down with the dust}, deposit the cash; pay down the money.
            [Slang] [bd]My lord, quoth the king, presently deposit
            your hundred pounds in gold, or else no going hence all
            the days of your life. . . . The Abbot down with his dust,
            and glad he escaped so, returned to Reading.[b8] --Fuller.
  
      {Dust brand} (Bot.), a fungous plant ({Ustilago Carbo}); --
            called also {smut}.
  
      {Gold dust}, fine particles of gold, such as are obtained in
            placer mining; -- often used as money, being transferred
            by weight.
  
      {In dust and ashes}. See under {Ashes}.
  
      {To bite the dust}. See under {Bite}, v. t.
  
      {To}
  
      {raise, [or] kick up, dust}, to make a commotion. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {To throw dust in one's eyes}, to mislead; to deceive.
            [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Flag \Flag\, n. [Cf. LG. & G. flagge, Sw. flagg, Dan. flag, D.
      vlag. See {Flag} to hang loose.]
      1. That which flags or hangs down loosely.
  
      2. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to
            indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask
            information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved
            by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors;
            as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of
                  certain hawks, owls, etc.
            (b) A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
            (c) The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter.
  
      {Black flag}. See under {Black}.
  
      {Flag captain}, {Flag leutenant}, etc., special officers
            attached to the flagship, as aids to the flag officer.
  
      {Flag officer}, the commander of a fleet or squadron; an
            admiral, or commodore.
  
      {Flag of truse}, a white flag carried or displayed to an
            enemy, as an invitation to conference, or for the purpose
            of making some communication not hostile.
  
      {Flag share}, the flag officer's share of prize money.
  
      {Flag station} (Railroad), a station at which trains do not
            stop unless signaled to do so, by a flag hung out or
            waved.
  
      {National flag}, a flag of a particular country, on which
            some national emblem or device, is emblazoned.
  
      {Red flag}, a flag of a red color, displayed as a signal of
            danger or token of defiance; the emblem of anarchists.
  
      {To dip, the flag}, to mlower it and quickly restore it to
            its place; -- done as a mark of respect.
  
      {To hang out the white flag}, to ask truce or quarter, or, in
            some cases, to manifest a friendly design by exhibiting a
            white flag.
  
      {To hang the flag} {half-mast high [or] half-staff}, to raise
            it only half way to the mast or staff, as a token or sign
            of mourning.
  
      {To} {strike, [or] lower}, {the flag}, to haul it down, in
            token of respect, submission, or, in an engagement, of
            surrender.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag of all nations; also
            carried at a vessel's fore, to denote that an infectious
            disease is on board.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Field \Field\, n. [OE. feld, fild, AS. feld; akin to D. veld, G.
      feld, Sw. f[84]lt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS.
      folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda.]
      1. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture;
            cultivated ground; the open country.
  
      2. A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece
            inclosed for tillage or pasture.
  
                     Fields which promise corn and wine.   --Byron.
  
      3. A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself.
  
                     In this glorious and well-foughten field. --Shak.
  
                     What though the field be lost?            --Milton.
  
      4. An open space; an extent; an expanse. Esp.:
            (a) Any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn
                  or projected.
            (b) The space covered by an optical instrument at one
                  view.
  
                           Without covering, save yon field of stars.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                           Ask of yonder argent fields above. --Pope.
  
      5. (Her.) The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much
            of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon
            it. See Illust. of {Fess}, where the field is represented
            as gules (red), while the fess is argent (silver).
  
      6. An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action,
            operation, or achievement; province; room.
  
                     Afforded a clear field for moral experiments.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      7. A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor
            contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the
            betting.
  
      8. (Baseball) That part of the grounds reserved for the
            players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also
            {outfield}.
  
      Note: Field is often used adjectively in the sense of
               belonging to, or used in, the fields; especially with
               reference to the operations and equipments of an army
               during a campaign away from permanent camps and
               fortifications. In most cases such use of the word is
               sufficiently clear; as, field battery; field
               fortification; field gun; field hospital, etc. A field
               geologist, naturalist, etc., is one who makes
               investigations or collections out of doors. A survey
               uses a field book for recording field notes, i.e.,
               measurment, observations, etc., made in field work
               (outdoor operations). A farmer or planter employs field
               hands, and may use a field roller or a field derrick.
               Field sports are hunting, fishing, athletic games, etc.
  
      {Coal field} (Geol.) See under {Coal}.
  
      {Field artillery}, light ordnance mounted on wheels, for the
            use of a marching army.
  
      {Field basil} (Bot.), a plant of the Mint family ({Calamintha
            Acinos}); -- called also {basil thyme}.
  
      {Field colors} (Mil.), small flags for marking out the
            positions for squadrons and battalions; camp colors.
  
      {Field cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a large European cricket
            ({Gryllus campestric}), remarkable for its loud notes.
  
      {Field day}.
            (a) A day in the fields.
            (b) (Mil.) A day when troops are taken into the field for
                  instruction in evolutions. --Farrow.
            (c) A day of unusual exertion or display; a gala day.
  
      {Field driver}, in New England, an officer charged with the
            driving of stray cattle to the pound.
  
      {Field duck} (Zo[94]l.), the little bustard ({Otis tetrax}),
            found in Southern Europe.
  
      {Field glass}. (Optics)
            (a) A binocular telescope of compact form; a lorgnette; a
                  race glass.
            (b) A small achromatic telescope, from 20 to 24 inches
                  long, and having 3 to 6 draws.
            (c) See {Field lens}.
  
      {Field lark}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The skylark.
            (b) The tree pipit.
  
      {Field lens} (Optics), that one of the two lenses forming the
            eyepiece of an astronomical telescope or compound
            microscope which is nearer the object glass; -- called
            also {field glass}.
  
      {Field madder} (Bot.), a plant ({Sherardia arvensis}) used in
            dyeing.
  
      {Field marshal} (Mil.), the highest military rank conferred
            in the British and other European armies.
  
      {Field mouse} (Zo[94]l.), a mouse inhabiting fields, as the
            campagnol and the deer mouse. See {Campagnol}, and {Deer
            mouse}.
  
      {Field officer} (Mil.), an officer above the rank of captain
            and below that of general.
  
      {Field officer's court} (U.S.Army), a court-martial
            consisting of one field officer empowered to try all
            cases, in time of war, subject to jurisdiction of garrison
            and regimental courts. --Farrow.
  
      {Field plover} (Zo[94]l.), the black-bellied plover
            ({Charadrius squatarola}); also sometimes applied to the
            Bartramian sandpiper ({Bartramia longicauda}).
  
      {Field spaniel} (Zo[94]l.), a small spaniel used in hunting
            small game.
  
      {Field sparrow}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small American sparrow ({Spizella pusilla}).
            (b) The hedge sparrow. [Eng.]
  
      {Field staff}> (Mil.), a staff formerly used by gunners to
            hold a lighted match for discharging a gun.
  
      {Field vole} (Zo[94]l.), the European meadow mouse.
  
      {Field of ice}, a large body of floating ice; a pack.
  
      {Field}, [or] {Field of view}, in a telescope or microscope,
            the entire space within which objects are seen.
  
      {Field magnet}. see under {Magnet}.
  
      {Magnetic field}. See {Magnetic}.
  
      {To back the field}, [or] {To bet on the field}. See under
            {Back}, v. t. -- {To keep the field}.
            (a) (Mil.) To continue a campaign.
            (b) To maintain one's ground against all comers.
  
      {To} {lay, [or] back}, {against the field}, to bet on (a
            horse, etc.) against all comers.
  
      {To take the field} (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Foot \Foot\ (f[oocr]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[emac]t). [OE. fot,
      foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[omac]t, pl. f[emac]t; akin to D.
      voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[omac]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod,
      Goth. f[omac]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy`s, Skr. p[be]d, Icel. fet
      step, pace measure of a foot, feta to step, find one's way.
      [fb]77, 250. Cf. {Antipodes}, {Cap-a-pie}, {Expedient}, {Fet}
      to fetch, {Fetlock}, {Fetter}, {Pawn} a piece in chess,
      {Pedal}.]
      1. (Anat.) The terminal part of the leg of man or an animal;
            esp., the part below the ankle or wrist; that part of an
            animal upon which it rests when standing, or moves. See
            {Manus}, and {Pes}.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The muscular locomotive organ of a mollusk. It
            is a median organ arising from the ventral region of body,
            often in the form of a flat disk, as in snails. See
            Illust. of {Buccinum}.
  
      3. That which corresponds to the foot of a man or animal; as,
            the foot of a table; the foot of a stocking.
  
      4. The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as
            of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or
            series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with
            inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the
            procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.
  
                     And now at foot Of heaven's ascent they lift their
                     feet.                                                --Milton.
  
      5. Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the
            singular.
  
                     Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
                                                                              --Berkeley.
  
      6. Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the
            singular. [R.]
  
                     As to his being on the foot of a servant. --Walpole.
  
      7. A measure of length equivalent to twelve inches; one third
            of a yard. See {Yard}.
  
      Note: This measure is supposed to be taken from the length of
               a man's foot. It differs in length in different
               countries. In the United States and in England it is
               304.8 millimeters.
  
      8. (Mil.) Soldiers who march and fight on foot; the infantry,
            usually designated as the foot, in distinction from the
            cavalry. [bd]Both horse and foot.[b8] --Milton.
  
      9. (Pros.) A combination of syllables consisting a metrical
            element of a verse, the syllables being formerly
            distinguished by their quantity or length, but in modern
            poetry by the accent.
  
      10. (Naut.) The lower edge of a sail.
  
      Note: Foot is often used adjectively, signifying of or
               pertaining to a foot or the feet, or to the base or
               lower part. It is also much used as the first of
               compounds.
  
      {Foot artillery}. (Mil.)
            (a) Artillery soldiers serving in foot.
            (b) Heavy artillery. --Farrow.
  
      {Foot bank} (Fort.), a raised way within a parapet.
  
      {Foot barracks} (Mil.), barracks for infantery.
  
      {Foot bellows}, a bellows worked by a treadle. --Knight.
  
      {Foot company} (Mil.), a company of infantry. --Milton.
  
      {Foot gear}, covering for the feet, as stocking, shoes, or
            boots.
  
      {Foot hammer} (Mach.), a small tilt hammer moved by a
            treadle.
  
      {Foot iron}.
            (a) The step of a carriage.
            (b) A fetter.
  
      {Foot jaw}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Maxilliped}.
  
      {Foot key} (Mus.), an organ pedal.
  
      {Foot level} (Gunnery), a form of level used in giving any
            proposed angle of elevation to a piece of ordnance.
            --Farrow.
  
      {Foot mantle}, a long garment to protect the dress in riding;
            a riding skirt. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot page}, an errand boy; an attendant. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot passenger}, one who passes on foot, as over a road or
            bridge.
  
      {Foot pavement}, a paved way for foot passengers; a footway;
            a trottoir.
  
      {Foot poet}, an inferior poet; a poetaster. [R.] --Dryden.
  
      {Foot post}.
            (a) A letter carrier who travels on foot.
            (b) A mail delivery by means of such carriers.
  
      {Fot pound}, [and] {Foot poundal}. (Mech.) See {Foot pound}
            and {Foot poundal}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Foot press} (Mach.), a cutting, embossing, or printing
            press, moved by a treadle.
  
      {Foot race}, a race run by persons on foot. --Cowper.
  
      {Foot rail}, a railroad rail, with a wide flat flange on the
            lower side.
  
      {Foot rot}, an ulcer in the feet of sheep; claw sickness.
  
      {Foot rule}, a rule or measure twelve inches long.
  
      {Foot screw}, an adjusting screw which forms a foot, and
            serves to give a machine or table a level standing on an
            uneven place.
  
      {Foot secretion}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Sclerobase}.
  
      {Foot soldier}, a soldier who serves on foot.
  
      {Foot stick} (Printing), a beveled piece of furniture placed
            against the foot of the page, to hold the type in place.
           
  
      {Foot stove}, a small box, with an iron pan, to hold hot
            coals for warming the feet.
  
      {Foot tubercle}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Parapodium}.
  
      {Foot valve} (Steam Engine), the valve that opens to the air
            pump from the condenser.
  
      {Foot vise}, a kind of vise the jaws of which are operated by
            a treadle.
  
      {Foot waling} (Naut.), the inside planks or lining of a
            vessel over the floor timbers. --Totten.
  
      {Foot wall} (Mining), the under wall of an inclosed vein.
  
      {By foot}, [or] {On foot}, by walking; as, to pass a stream
            on foot.
  
      {Cubic foot}. See under {Cubic}.
  
      {Foot and mouth disease}, a contagious disease (Eczema
            epizo[94]tica) of cattle, sheep, swine, etc.,
            characterized by the formation of vesicles and ulcers in
            the mouth and about the hoofs.
  
      {Foot of the fine} (Law), the concluding portion of an
            acknowledgment in court by which, formerly, the title of
            land was conveyed. See {Fine of land}, under {Fine}, n.;
            also {Chirograph}. (b).
  
      {Square foot}. See under {Square}.
  
      {To be on foot}, to be in motion, action, or process of
            execution.
  
      {To keep the foot} (Script.), to preserve decorum. [bd]Keep
            thy foot when thou goest to the house of God.[b8] --Eccl.
            v. 1.
  
      {To put one's foot down}, to take a resolute stand; to be
            determined. [Colloq.]
  
      {To put the best foot foremost}, to make a good appearance;
            to do one's best. [Colloq.]
  
      {To set on foot}, to put in motion; to originate; as, to set
            on foot a subscription.
  
      {To} {put, [or] set}, {one on his feet}, to put one in a
            position to go on; to assist to start.
  
      {Under foot}.
            (a) Under the feet; (Fig.) at one's mercy; as, to trample
                  under foot. --Gibbon.
            (b) Below par. [Obs.] [bd]They would be forced to sell .
                  . . far under foot.[b8] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Foul anchor}. (Naut.) See under {Anchor}.
  
      {Foul ball} (Baseball), a ball that first strikes the ground
            outside of the foul ball lines, or rolls outside of
            certain limits.
  
      {Foul ball lines} (Baseball), lines from the home base,
            through the first and third bases, to the boundary of the
            field.
  
      {Foul berth} (Naut.), a berth in which a ship is in danger of
            fouling another vesel.
  
      {Foul bill}, [or] {Foul bill of health}, a certificate, duly
            authenticated, that a ship has come from a place where a
            contagious disorder prevails, or that some of the crew are
            infected.
  
      {Foul copy}, a rough draught, with erasures and corrections;
            -- opposed to fair or clean copy. [bd]Some writers boast
            of negligence, and others would be ashamed to show their
            foul copies.[b8] --Cowper.
  
      {Foul proof}, an uncorrected proof; a proof containing an
            excessive quantity of errors.
  
      {Foul strike} (Baseball), a strike by the batsman when any
            part of his person is outside of the lines of his
            position.
  
      {To fall foul}, to fall out; to quarrel. [Obs.] [bd]If they
            be any ways offended, they fall foul.[b8] --Burton.
  
      {To} {fall, [or] run}, {foul of}. See under {Fall}.
  
      {To make foul water}, to sail in such shallow water that the
            ship's keel stirs the mud at the bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cart \Cart\, n. [AS. cr[91]t; cf. W. cart, Ir. & Gael. cairt, or
      Icel. kartr. Cf. {Car}.]
      1. A common name for various kinds of vehicles, as a Scythian
            dwelling on wheels, or a chariot. [bd]Ph[d2]bus' cart.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      2. A two-wheeled vehicle for the ordinary purposes of
            husbandry, or for transporting bulky and heavy articles.
  
                     Packing all his goods in one poor cart. --Dryden.
  
      3. A light business wagon used by bakers, grocerymen,
            butchers, etc.
  
      4. An open two-wheeled pleasure carriage.
  
      {Cart horse}, a horse which draws a cart; a horse bred or
            used for drawing heavy loads.
  
      {Cart load}, or {Cartload}, as much as will fill or load a
            cart. In excavating and carting sand, gravel, earth, etc.,
            one third of a cubic yard of the material before it is
            loosened is estimated to be a cart load.
  
      {Cart rope}, a stout rope for fastening a load on a cart; any
            strong rope.
  
      {To} {put ([or] get [or] set)} {the cart before the horse},
            to invert the order of related facts or ideas, as by
            putting an effect for a cause.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghost \Ghost\, n. [OE. gast, gost, soul, spirit, AS. g[be]st
      breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. g[?]st spirit, soul, D.
      geest, G. geist, and prob. to E. gaze, ghastly.]
      1. The spirit; the soul of man. [Obs.]
  
                     Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased
            person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a
            specter.
  
                     The mighty ghosts of our great Harrys rose. --Shak.
  
                     I thought that I had died in sleep, And was a
                     blessed ghost.                                    --Coleridge.
  
      3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a
            phantom; a glimmering; as, not a ghost of a chance; the
            ghost of an idea.
  
                     Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the
                     floor.                                                --Poe.
  
      4. A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the
            surfaces of one or more lenses.
  
      {Ghost moth} (Zo[94]l.), a large European moth {(Hepialus
            humuli)}; so called from the white color of the male, and
            the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also {great
            swift}.
  
      {Holy Ghost}, the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter;
            (Theol.) the third person in the Trinity.
  
      {To} {give up [or] yield up} {the ghost}, to die; to expire.
  
                     And he gave up the ghost full softly. --Chaucer.
  
                     Jacob . . . yielded up the ghost, and was gathered
                     unto his people.                                 --Gen. xlix.
                                                                              33.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Chide \Chide\ (ch[imac]d), v. t. [imp. {Chid} (ch[icr]d), or
      {Chode} (ch[imac]d Obs.); p. p. {Chidden}, {Chid}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Chiding}.] [AS. c[c6]dan; of unknown origin.]
      1. To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.
  
                     Upbraided, chid, and rated at.            --Shak.
  
      2. Fig.: To be noisy about; to chafe against.
  
                     The sea that chides the banks of England. --Shak.
  
      {To} {chide hither, chide from, [or] chide away}, to cause to
            come, or to drive away, by scolding or reproof.
  
      Syn: To blame; rebuke; reprove; scold; censure; reproach;
               reprehend; reprimand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grindstone \Grind"stone`\, n.
      A flat, circular stone, revolving on an axle, for grinding or
      sharpening tools, or shaping or smoothing objects.
  
      {To} {hold, pat, [or] bring} {one's nose to the grindstone},
            to oppress one; to keep one in a condition of servitude.
  
                     They might be ashamed, for lack of courage, to
                     suffer the Laced[91]monians to hold their noses to
                     the grindstone.                                 --Sir T.
                                                                              North.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hand \Hand\, n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand,
      OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[94]nd, Goth. handus, and perh.
      to Goth. hinpan to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.]
      1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in
            man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other
            animals; manus; paw. See {Manus}.
  
      2. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the
            office of, a human hand; as:
            (a) A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or
                  any one of the four extremities of a monkey.
            (b) An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute
                  hand of a clock.
  
      3. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, -- four inches; a
            palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses.
  
      4. Side; part; direction, either right or left.
  
                     On this hand and that hand, were hangings. --Ex.
                                                                              xxxviii. 15.
  
                     The Protestants were then on the winning hand.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      5. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill;
            dexterity.
  
                     He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      6. Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence,
            manner of performance.
  
                     To change the hand in carrying on the war.
                                                                              --Clarendon.
  
                     Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my
                     hand.                                                --Judges vi.
                                                                              36.
  
      7. An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or
            competent for special service or duty; a performer more or
            less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand
            at speaking.
  
                     A dictionary containing a natural history requires
                     too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be
                     hoped for.                                          --Locke.
  
                     I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile.
                                                                              --Hazlitt.
  
      8. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad or
            running hand. Hence, a signature.
  
                     I say she never did invent this letter; This is a
                     man's invention and his hand.            --Shak.
  
                     Some writs require a judge's hand.      --Burril.
  
      9. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction;
            management; -- usually in the plural. [bd]Receiving in
            hand one year's tribute.[b8] --Knolles.
  
                     Albinus . . . found means to keep in his hands the
                     goverment of Britain.                        --Milton.
  
      10. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to
            buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when
            new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the
            producer's hand, or when not new.
  
      11. Rate; price. [Obs.] [bd]Business is bought at a dear
            hand, where there is small dispatch.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      12. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as:
            (a) (Card Playing) The quota of cards received from the
                  dealer.
            (b) (Tobacco Manuf.) A bundle of tobacco leaves tied
                  together.
  
      13. (Firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock,
            which is grasped by the hand in taking aim.
  
      Note: Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts
               or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the
               hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a
               symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as:
            (a) Activity; operation; work; -- in distinction from the
                  head, which implies thought, and the heart, which
                  implies affection. [bd]His hand will be against every
                  man.[b8] --Gen. xvi. 12.
            (b) Power; might; supremacy; -- often in the Scriptures.
                  [bd]With a mighty hand . . . will I rule over
                  you.[b8] --Ezek. xx. 33.
            (c) Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to
                  give the right hand.
            (d) Contract; -- commonly of marriage; as, to ask the
                  hand; to pledge the hand.
  
      Note: Hand is often used adjectively or in compounds (with or
               without the hyphen), signifying performed by the hand;
               as, hand blow or hand-blow, hand gripe or hand-gripe:
               used by, or designed for, the hand; as, hand ball or
               handball, hand bow, hand fetter, hand grenade or
               hand-grenade, handgun or hand gun, handloom or hand
               loom, handmill or hand organ or handorgan, handsaw or
               hand saw, hand-weapon: measured or regulated by the
               hand; as, handbreadth or hand's breadth, hand gallop or
               hand-gallop. Most of the words in the following
               paragraph are written either as two words or in
               combination.
  
      {Hand bag}, a satchel; a small bag for carrying books,
            papers, parcels, etc.
  
      {Hand basket}, a small or portable basket.
  
      {Hand bell}, a small bell rung by the hand; a table bell.
            --Bacon.
  
      {Hand bill}, a small pruning hook. See 4th {Bill}.
  
      {Hand car}. See under {Car}.
  
      {Hand director} (Mus.), an instrument to aid in forming a
            good position of the hands and arms when playing on the
            piano; a hand guide.
  
      {Hand drop}. See {Wrist drop}.
  
      {Hand gallop}. See under {Gallop}.
  
      {Hand gear} (Mach.), apparatus by means of which a machine,
            or parts of a machine, usually operated by other power,
            may be operated by hand.
  
      {Hand glass}.
            (a) A glass or small glazed frame, for the protection of
                  plants.
            (b) A small mirror with a handle.
  
      {Hand guide}. Same as {Hand director} (above).
  
      {Hand language}, the art of conversing by the hands, esp. as
            practiced by the deaf and dumb; dactylology.
  
      {Hand lathe}. See under {Lathe}.
  
      {Hand money}, money paid in hand to bind a contract; earnest
            money.
  
      {Hand organ} (Mus.), a barrel organ, operated by a crank
            turned by hand.
  
      {Hand plant}. (Bot.) Same as {Hand tree} (below). -- {Hand
            rail}, a rail, as in staircases, to hold by. --Gwilt.
  
      {Hand sail}, a sail managed by the hand. --Sir W. Temple.
  
      {Hand screen}, a small screen to be held in the hand.
  
      {Hand screw}, a small jack for raising heavy timbers or
            weights; (Carp.) a screw clamp.
  
      {Hand staff} (pl. {Hand staves}), a javelin. --Ezek. xxxix.
            9.
  
      {Hand stamp}, a small stamp for dating, addressing, or
            canceling papers, envelopes, etc.
  
      {Hand tree} (Bot.), a lofty tree found in Mexico
            ({Cheirostemon platanoides}), having red flowers whose
            stamens unite in the form of a hand.
  
      {Hand vise}, a small vise held in the hand in doing small
            work. --Moxon.
  
      {Hand work}, [or] {Handwork}, work done with the hands, as
            distinguished from work done by a machine; handiwork.
  
      {All hands}, everybody; all parties.
  
      {At all hands}, {On all hands}, on all sides; from every
            direction; generally.
  
      {At any hand}, {At no hand}, in any (or no) way or direction;
            on any account; on no account. [bd]And therefore at no
            hand consisting with the safety and interests of
            humility.[b8] --Jer. Taylor.
  
      {At first hand}, {At second hand}. See def. 10 (above).
  
      {At hand}.
            (a) Near in time or place; either present and within
                  reach, or not far distant. [bd]Your husband is at
                  hand; I hear his trumpet.[b8] --Shak.
            (b) Under the hand or bridle. [Obs.] [bd]Horses hot at
                  hand.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {At the hand of}, by the act of; as a gift from. [bd]Shall we
            receive good at the hand of God and shall we not receive
            evil?[b8] --Job ii. 10.
  
      {Bridle hand}. See under {Bridle}.
  
      {By hand}, with the hands, in distinction from
            instrumentality of tools, engines, or animals; as, to weed
            a garden by hand; to lift, draw, or carry by hand.
  
      {Clean hands}, freedom from guilt, esp. from the guilt of
            dishonesty in money matters, or of bribe taking. [bd]He
            that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger.[b8]
            --Job xvii. 9.
  
      {From hand to hand}, from one person to another.
  
      {Hand in hand}.
            (a) In union; conjointly; unitedly. --Swift.
            (b) Just; fair; equitable.
  
                           As fair and as good, a kind of hand in hand
                           comparison.                                 --Shak.
                 
  
      {Hand over hand}, {Hand over fist}, by passing the hands
            alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand
            over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand
            over hand.
  
      {Hand over head}, negligently; rashly; without seeing what
            one does. [Obs.] --Bacon.
  
      {Hand running}, consecutively; as, he won ten times hand
            running.
  
      {Hand off!} keep off! forbear! no interference or meddling!
           
  
      {Hand to hand}, in close union; in close fight; as, a hand to
            hand contest. --Dryden.
  
      {Heavy hand}, severity or oppression.
  
      {In hand}.
            (a) Paid down. [bd]A considerable reward in hand, and . .
                  . a far greater reward hereafter.[b8] --Tillotson.
            (b) In preparation; taking place. --Chaucer. [bd]Revels .
                  . . in hand.[b8] --Shak.
            (c) Under consideration, or in the course of transaction;
                  as, he has the business in hand.
  
      {In one's hand} [or] {hands}.
            (a) In one's possession or keeping.
            (b) At one's risk, or peril; as, I took my life in my
                  hand.
  
      {Laying on of hands}, a form used in consecrating to office,
            in the rite of confirmation, and in blessing persons.
  
      {Light hand}, gentleness; moderation.
  
      {Note of hand}, a promissory note.
  
      {Off hand}, {Out of hand}, forthwith; without delay,
            hesitation, or difficulty; promptly. [bd]She causeth them
            to be hanged up out of hand.[b8] --Spenser.
  
      {Off one's hands}, out of one's possession or care.
  
      {On hand}, in present possession; as, he has a supply of
            goods on hand.
  
      {On one's hands}, in one's possession care, or management.
  
      {Putting the hand under the thigh}, an ancient Jewish
            ceremony used in swearing.
  
      {Right hand}, the place of honor, power, and strength.
  
      {Slack hand}, idleness; carelessness; inefficiency; sloth.
  
      {Strict hand}, severe discipline; rigorous government.
  
      {To bear a hand}
            (Naut), to give help quickly; to hasten.
  
      {To bear in hand}, to keep in expectation with false
            pretenses. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To be} {hand and glove, [or] in glove} {with}. See under
            {Glove}.
  
      {To be on the mending hand}, to be convalescent or improving.
           
  
      {To bring up by hand}, to feed (an infant) without suckling
            it.
  
      {To change hand}. See {Change}.
  
      {To change hands}, to change sides, or change owners.
            --Hudibras.
  
      {To clap the hands}, to express joy or applause, as by
            striking the palms of the hands together.
  
      {To come to hand}, to be received; to be taken into
            possession; as, the letter came to hand yesterday.
  
      {To get hand}, to gain influence. [Obs.]
  
                     Appetites have . . . got such a hand over them.
                                                                              --Baxter.
  
      {To got one's hand in}, to make a beginning in a certain
            work; to become accustomed to a particular business.
  
      {To have a hand in}, to be concerned in; to have a part or
            concern in doing; to have an agency or be employed in.
  
      {To have in hand}.
            (a) To have in one's power or control. --Chaucer.
            (b) To be engaged upon or occupied with.
  
      {To have one's hands full}, to have in hand al that one can
            do, or more than can be done conveniently; to be pressed
            with labor or engagements; to be surrounded with
            difficulties.
  
      {To} {have, [or] get}, {the (higher) upper hand}, to have, or
            get, the better of another person or thing.
  
      {To his hand}, {To my hand}, etc., in readiness; already
            prepared. [bd]The work is made to his hands.[b8] --Locke.
  
      {To hold hand}, to compete successfully or on even
            conditions. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To lay hands on}, to seize; to assault.
  
      {To lend a hand}, to give assistance.
  
      {To} {lift, [or] put forth}, {the hand against}, to attack;
            to oppose; to kill.
  
      {To live from hand to mouth}, to obtain food and other
            necessaries as want compels, without previous provision.
           
  
      {To make one's hand}, to gain advantage or profit.
  
      {To put the hand unto}, to steal. --Ex. xxii. 8.
  
      {To put the}
  
      {last, [or] finishing},
  
      {hand to}, to make the last corrections in; to complete; to
            perfect.
  
      {To set the hand to}, to engage in; to undertake.
  
                     That the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that
                     thou settest thine hand to.               --Deut. xxiii.
                                                                              20.
  
      {To stand one in hand}, to concern or affect one.
  
      {To strike hands}, to make a contract, or to become surety
            for another's debt or good behavior.
  
      {To take in hand}.
            (a) To attempt or undertake.
            (b) To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand.
  
      {To wash the hands of}, to disclaim or renounce interest in,
            or responsibility for, a person or action; as, to wash
            one's hands of a business. --Matt. xxvii. 24.
  
      {Under the hand of}, authenticated by the handwriting or
            signature of; as, the deed is executed under the hand and
            seal of the owner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: The constable of France was the first officer of the
               crown, and had the chief command of the army. It was
               also his duty to regulate all matters of chivalry. The
               office was suppressed in 1627. The constable, or lord
               high constable, of England, was one of the highest
               officers of the crown, commander in chief of the
               forces, and keeper of the peace of the nation. He also
               had judicial cognizance of many important matters. The
               office was as early as the Conquest, but has been
               disused (except on great and solemn occasions), since
               the attainder of Stafford, duke of Buckingham, in the
               reign of Henry VIII.
  
      2. (Law) An officer of the peace having power as a
            conservator of the public peace, and bound to execute the
            warrants of judicial officers. --Bouvier.
  
      Note: In England, at the present time, the constable is a
               conservator of the peace within his district, and is
               also charged by various statutes with other duties,
               such as serving summons, precepts, warrants, etc. In
               the United States, constables are town or city officers
               of the peace, with powers similar to those of the
               constables of England. In addition to their duties as
               conservators of the peace, they are invested with
               others by statute, such as to execute civil as well as
               criminal process in certain cases, to attend courts,
               keep juries, etc. In some cities, there are officers
               called {high constables}, who act as chiefs of the
               constabulary or police force. In other cities the title
               of constable, as well as the office, is merged in that
               of the police officer.
  
      {High constable}, a constable having certain duties and
            powers within a hundred. [Eng.]
  
      {Petty constable}, a conservator of the peace within a parish
            or tithing; a tithingman. [Eng.]
  
      {Special constable}, a person appointed to act as constable
            of special occasions.
  
      {To} {overrun, [or] outrun}, {the constable}, to spend more
            than one's income; to get into debt. [Colloq.] --Smollett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To} {raise, [or] lift}, {the horn} (Script.), to exalt one's
            self; to act arrogantly. [bd]'Gainst them that raised thee
            dost thou lift thy horn?[b8] --Milton.
  
      {To take a horn}, to take a drink of intoxicating liquor.
            [Low]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Law of Charles} (Physics), the law that the volume of a
            given mass of gas increases or decreases, by a definite
            fraction of its value for a given rise or fall of
            temperature; -- sometimes less correctly styled {Gay
            Lussac's law}, or {Dalton's law}.
  
      {Law of nations}. See {International law}, under
            {International}.
  
      {Law of nature}.
            (a) A broad generalization expressive of the constant
                  action, or effect, of natural conditions; as, death
                  is a law of nature; self-defense is a law of nature.
                  See {Law}, 4.
            (b) A term denoting the standard, or system, of morality
                  deducible from a study of the nature and natural
                  relations of human beings independent of supernatural
                  revelation or of municipal and social usages.
  
      {Law of the land}, due process of law; the general law of the
            land.
  
      {Laws of honor}. See under {Honor}.
  
      {Laws of motion} (Physics), three laws defined by Sir Isaac
            Newton: (1) Every body perseveres in its state of rest or
            of moving uniformly in a straight line, except so far as
            it is made to change that state by external force. (2)
            Change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,
            and takes place in the direction in which the force is
            impressed. (3) Reaction is always equal and opposite to
            action, that is to say, the actions of two bodies upon
            each other are always equal and in opposite directions.
  
      {Marine law}, or {Maritime law}, the law of the sea; a branch
            of the law merchant relating to the affairs of the sea,
            such as seamen, ships, shipping, navigation, and the like.
            --Bouvier.
  
      {Mariotte's law}. See {Boyle's law} (above).
  
      {Martial law}.See under {Martial}.
  
      {Military law}, a branch of the general municipal law,
            consisting of rules ordained for the government of the
            military force of a state in peace and war, and
            administered in courts martial. --Kent. Warren's
            Blackstone.
  
      {Moral law},the law of duty as regards what is right and
            wrong in the sight of God; specifically, the ten
            commandments given by Moses. See {Law}, 2.
  
      {Mosaic}, [or] {Ceremonial}, {law}. (Script.) See {Law}, 3.
           
  
      {Municipal}, [or] {Positive}, {law}, a rule prescribed by the
            supreme power of a state, declaring some right, enforcing
            some duty, or prohibiting some act; -- distinguished from
            international and constitutional law. See {Law}, 1.
  
      {Periodic law}. (Chem.) See under {Periodic}.
  
      {Roman law}, the system of principles and laws found in the
            codes and treatises of the lawmakers and jurists of
            ancient Rome, and incorporated more or less into the laws
            of the several European countries and colonies founded by
            them. See {Civil law} (above).
  
      {Statute law}, the law as stated in statutes or positive
            enactments of the legislative body.
  
      {Sumptuary law}. See under {Sumptuary}.
  
      {To go to law}, to seek a settlement of any matter by
            bringing it before the courts of law; to sue or prosecute
            some one.
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the law of}, to bring the law to
            bear upon; as, to take the law of one's neighbor.
            --Addison.
  
      {Wager of law}. See under {Wager}.
  
      Syn: Justice; equity.
  
      Usage: {Law}, {Statute}, {Common law}, {Regulation}, {Edict},
                  {Decree}. Law is generic, and, when used with
                  reference to, or in connection with, the other words
                  here considered, denotes whatever is commanded by one
                  who has a right to require obedience. A statute is a
                  particular law drawn out in form, and distinctly
                  enacted and proclaimed. Common law is a rule of action
                  founded on long usage and the decisions of courts of
                  justice. A regulation is a limited and often,
                  temporary law, intended to secure some particular end
                  or object. An edict is a command or law issued by a
                  sovereign, and is peculiar to a despotic government. A
                  decree is a permanent order either of a court or of
                  the executive government. See {Justice}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lead \Lead\ (l[ecr]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le[a0]d;
      akin to D. lood, MHG. l[omac]t, G. loth plummet, sounding
      lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
      1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
            metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
            tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
            little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
            etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
            forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
            solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
            Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
            lead sulphide.
  
      2. An article made of lead or an alloy of lead; as:
            (a) A plummet or mass of lead, used in sounding at sea.
            (b) (Print.) A thin strip of type metal, used to separate
                  lines of type in printing.
            (c) Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs;
                  hence, pl., a roof covered with lead sheets or terne
                  plates.
  
                           I would have the tower two stories, and goodly
                           leads upon the top.                     --Bacon
  
      3. A small cylinder of black lead or plumbago, used in
            pencils.
  
      {Black lead}, graphite or plumbago; -- so called from its
            leadlike appearance and streak. [Colloq.]
  
      {Coasting lead}, a sounding lead intermediate in weight
            between a hand lead and deep-sea lead.
  
      {Deep-sea lead}, the heaviest of sounding leads, used in
            water exceeding a hundred fathoms in depth. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {Hand lead}, a small lead use for sounding in shallow water.
           
  
      {Krems lead}, {Kremnitz lead} [so called from Krems or
            Kremnitz, in Austria], a pure variety of white lead,
            formed into tablets, and called also {Krems, [or]
            Kremnitz, white}, and {Vienna white}.
  
      {Lead arming}, tallow put in the hollow of a sounding lead.
            See {To arm the lead} (below).
  
      {Lead colic}. See under {Colic}.
  
      {Lead color}, a deep bluish gray color, like tarnished lead.
           
  
      {Lead glance}. (Min.) Same as {Galena}.
  
      {Lead line}
            (a) (Med.) A dark line along the gums produced by a
                  deposit of metallic lead, due to lead poisoning.
            (b) (Naut.) A sounding line.
  
      {Lead mill}, a leaden polishing wheel, used by lapidaries.
  
      {Lead ocher} (Min.), a massive sulphur-yellow oxide of lead.
            Same as {Massicot}.
  
      {Lead pencil}, a pencil of which the marking material is
            graphite (black lead).
  
      {Lead plant} (Bot.), a low leguminous plant, genus {Amorpha}
            ({A. canescens}), found in the Northwestern United States,
            where its presence is supposed to indicate lead ore.
            --Gray.
  
      {Lead tree}.
            (a) (Bot.) A West Indian name for the tropical, leguminous
                  tree, {Leuc[91]na glauca}; -- probably so called from
                  the glaucous color of the foliage.
            (b) (Chem.) Lead crystallized in arborescent forms from a
                  solution of some lead salt, as by suspending a strip
                  of zinc in lead acetate.
  
      {Mock lead}, a miner's term for blende.
  
      {Red lead}, a scarlet, crystalline, granular powder,
            consisting of minium when pure, but commonly containing
            several of the oxides of lead. It is used as a paint or
            cement and also as an ingredient of flint glass.
  
      {Red lead ore} (Min.), crocoite.
  
      {Sugar of lead}, acetate of lead.
  
      {To arm the lead}, to fill the hollow in the bottom of a
            sounding lead with tallow in order to discover the nature
            of the bottom by the substances adhering. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {To} {cast, [or] heave}, {the lead}, to cast the sounding
            lead for ascertaining the depth of water.
  
      {White lead}, hydrated carbonate of lead, obtained as a
            white, amorphous powder, and much used as an ingredient of
            white paint.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To be in the wind}, to be suggested or expected; to be a
            matter of suspicion or surmise. [Colloq.]
  
      {To carry the wind} (Man.), to toss the nose as high as the
            ears, as a horse.
  
      {To raise the wind}, to procure money. [Colloq.]
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the wind}, to gain or have the
            advantage. --Bacon.
  
      {To take the wind out of one's sails}, to cause one to stop,
            or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of
            another. [Colloq.]
  
      {To take wind}, or {To get wind}, to be divulged; to become
            public; as, the story got wind, or took wind.
  
      {Wind band} (Mus.), a band of wind instruments; a military
            band; the wind instruments of an orchestra.
  
      {Wind chest} (Mus.), a chest or reservoir of wind in an
            organ.
  
      {Wind dropsy}. (Med.)
            (a) Tympanites.
            (b) Emphysema of the subcutaneous areolar tissue.
  
      {Wind egg}, an imperfect, unimpregnated, or addled egg.
  
      {Wind furnace}. See the Note under {Furnace}.
  
      {Wind gauge}. See under {Gauge}.
  
      {Wind gun}. Same as {Air gun}.
  
      {Wind hatch} (Mining), the opening or place where the ore is
            taken out of the earth.
  
      {Wind instrument} (Mus.), an instrument of music sounded by
            means of wind, especially by means of the breath, as a
            flute, a clarinet, etc.
  
      {Wind pump}, a pump moved by a windmill.
  
      {Wind rose}, a table of the points of the compass, giving the
            states of the barometer, etc., connected with winds from
            the different directions.
  
      {Wind sail}.
            (a) (Naut.) A wide tube or funnel of canvas, used to
                  convey a stream of air for ventilation into the lower
                  compartments of a vessel.
            (b) The sail or vane of a windmill.
  
      {Wind shake}, a crack or incoherence in timber produced by
            violent winds while the timber was growing.
  
      {Wind shock}, a wind shake.
  
      {Wind side}, the side next the wind; the windward side. [R.]
            --Mrs. Browning.
  
      {Wind rush} (Zo[94]l.), the redwing. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Wind wheel}, a motor consisting of a wheel moved by wind.
  
      {Wood wind} (Mus.), the flutes and reed instruments of an
            orchestra, collectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nativity \Na*tiv"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Nativies}. [F. nativit[82], L.
      nativitas. See {Native}, and cf. {Na[8b]vet[90]}.]
      1. The coming into life or into the world; birth; also, the
            circumstances attending birth, as time, place, manner,
            etc. --Chaucer.
  
                     I have served him from the hour of my nativity.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     Thou hast left . . . the land of thy nativity.
                                                                              --Ruth ii. 11.
  
                     These in their dark nativity the deep Shall yield
                     us, pregnant with infernal flame.      --Milton.
  
      2. (Fine Arts) A picture representing or symbolizing the
            early infancy of Christ. The simplest form is the babe in
            a rude cradle, and the heads of an ox and an ass to
            express the stable in which he was born.
  
      3. (Astrol.) A representation of the positions of the
            heavenly bodies as the moment of one's birth, supposed to
            indicate his future destinies; a horoscope.
  
      {The Nativity}, the birth or birthday of Christ; Christmas
            day.
  
      {To}
  
      {cast, [or] calculate},
  
      {one's nativity} (Astrol.), to find out and represent the
            position of the heavenly bodies at the time of one's
            birth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scale \Scale\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scaled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Scaling}.]
      To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also,
      to grade or vary according to a scale or system.
  
               Scaling his present bearing with his past. --Shak.
  
      {To} {scale, [or] scale down}, {a debt, wages, etc.}, to
            reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale.
            [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nutshell \Nut"shell`\, n.
      1. The shell or hard external covering in which the kernel of
            a nut is inclosed.
  
      2. Hence, a thing of little compass, or of little value.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A shell of the genus Nucula.
  
      {To} {be, [or] lie}, {in a nutshell}, to be within a small
            compass; to admit of very brief or simple determination or
            statement. [bd]The remedy lay in a nutshell.[b8]
            --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gapeseed \Gape"seed`\, n.
      A person who looks or stares gapingly.
  
      {To} {buy, [or] sow}, {gapeseed}, to stare idly or in idle
            wonderment, instead of attending to business.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pace \Pace\, n. [OE. pas, F. pas, from L. passus a step, pace,
      orig., a stretching out of the feet in walking; cf. pandere,
      passum, to spread, stretch; perh. akin to E. patent. Cf.
      {Pas}, {Pass}.]
      1. A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a
            step.
  
      2. The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from
            the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; -- used as
            a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty
            paces. [bd]The heigh of sixty pace .[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Ordinarily the pace is estimated at two and one half
               linear feet; but in measuring distances be stepping,
               the pace is extended to three feet (one yard) or to
               three and three tenths feet (one fifth of a rod). The
               regulation marching pace in the English and United
               States armies is thirty inches for quick time, and
               thirty-six inches for double time. The Roman pace
               (passus) was from the heel of one foot to the heel of
               the same foot when it next touched the ground, five
               Roman feet.
  
      3. Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk,
            trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a
            swaggering pace; a quick pace. --Chaucer.
  
                     To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in
                     this petty pace from day to day.         --Shak.
  
                     In the military schools of riding a variety of paces
                     are taught.                                       --Walsh.
  
      4. A slow gait; a footpace. [Obs.] --Chucer.
  
      5. Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.
  
      6. Any single movement, step, or procedure. [R.]
  
                     The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is
                     to fall into confidence with Spain.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      7. (Arch.) A broad step or platform; any part of a floor
            slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at
            the upper end of a hall.
  
      8. (Weaving) A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the
            warp in pacing the web.
  
      {Geometrical pace}, the space from heel to heel between the
            spot where one foot is set down and that where the same
            foot is again set down, loosely estimated at five feet, or
            by some at four feet and two fifths. See {Roman pace} in
            the Note under def. 2. [Obs.]
  
      {To} {keep, [or] hold}, {pace with}, to keep up with; to go
            as fast as. [bd]In intellect and attainments he kept pace
            with his age.[b8] --Southey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To \To\ ([?], emphatic or alone, [?], obscure or unemphatic),
      prep. [AS. t[d3]; akin to OS. & OFries. t[d3], D. toe, G. zu,
      OHG. zuo, zua, z[d3], Russ. do, Ir. & Gael. do, OL. -do, -du,
      as in endo, indu, in, Gr. [?], as in [?] homeward. [fb]200.
      Cf. {Too}, {Tatoo} a beat of drums.]
      1. The preposition to primarily indicates approach and
            arrival, motion made in the direction of a place or thing
            and attaining it, access; and also, motion or tendency
            without arrival; movement toward; -- opposed to {from}.
            [bd]To Canterbury they wend.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                     Stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.   --Shak.
  
                     So to the sylvan lodge They came, that like Pomona's
                     arbor smiled.                                    --Milton.
  
                     I'll to him again, . . . He'll tell me all his
                     purpose. She stretched her arms to heaven. --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, it indicates motion, course, or tendency toward a
            time, a state or condition, an aim, or anything capable of
            being regarded as a limit to a tendency, movement, or
            action; as, he is going to a trade; he is rising to wealth
            and honor.
  
      Note: Formerly, by omission of the verb denoting motion, to
               sometimes followed a form of be, with the sense of at,
               or in. [bd]When the sun was [gone or declined] to
               rest.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      3. In a very general way, and with innumerable varieties of
            application, to connects transitive verbs with their
            remoter or indirect object, and adjectives, nouns, and
            neuter or passive verbs with a following noun which limits
            their action. Its sphere verges upon that of for, but it
            contains less the idea of design or appropriation; as,
            these remarks were addressed to a large audience; let us
            keep this seat to ourselves; a substance sweet to the
            taste; an event painful to the mind; duty to God and to
            our parents; a dislike to spirituous liquor.
  
                     Marks and points out each man of us to slaughter.
                                                                              --B. Jonson.
  
                     Whilst they, distilled Almost to jelly with the act
                     of fear, Stand dumb and speak not to him. --Shak.
  
                     Add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge;
                     and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance
                     patience; and to patience godliness; and to
                     godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly
                     kindness charity.                              --2 Pet. i.
                                                                              5,6,7.
  
                     I have a king's oath to the contrary. --Shak.
  
                     Numbers were crowded to death.            --Clarendon.
  
                     Fate and the dooming gods are deaf to tears.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     Go, buckle to the law.                        --Dryden.
  
      4. As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of
            last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun,
            and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb
            or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going;
            good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead
            my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost
            constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations
            where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the
            infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to
            learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is
            noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the
            infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage
            formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what
            went ye out for see? (--Matt. xi. 8).
  
                     Then longen folk to go on pilgrimages, And palmers
                     for to seeken strange stranders.         --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Such usage is now obsolete or illiterate. In colloquial
               usage, to often stands for, and supplies, an infinitive
               already mentioned; thus, he commands me to go with him,
               but I do not wish to.
  
      5. In many phrases, and in connection with many other words,
            to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically. Thus,
            it denotes or implies:
            (a) Extent; limit; degree of comprehension; inclusion as
                  far as; as, they met us to the number of three
                  hundred.
  
                           We ready are to try our fortunes To the last
                           man.                                             --Shak.
  
                           Few of the Esquimaux can count to ten. --Quant.
                                                                              Rev.
            (b) Effect; end; consequence; as, the prince was flattered
                  to his ruin; he engaged in a war to his cost; violent
                  factions exist to the prejudice of the state.
            (c) Apposition; connection; antithesis; opposition; as,
                  they engaged hand to hand.
  
                           Now we see through a glass, darkly; but then
                           face to face.                              --1 Cor. xiii.
                                                                              12.
            (d) Accord; adaptation; as, an occupation to his taste;
                  she has a husband to her mind.
  
                           He to God's image, she to his was made.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) Comparison; as, three is to nine as nine is to
                  twenty-seven; it is ten to one that you will offend
                  him.
  
                           All that they did was piety to this. --B.
                                                                              Jonson.
            (f) Addition; union; accumulation.
  
                           Wisdom he has, and to his wisdom, courage.
                                                                              --Denham.
            (g) Accompaniment; as, she sang to his guitar; they danced
                  to the music of a piano.
  
                           Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian
                           mood Of flutes and soft recorders. --Milton.
            (h) Character; condition of being; purpose subserved or
                  office filled. [In this sense archaic] [bd]I have a
                  king here to my flatterer.[b8] --Shak.
  
                           Made his masters and others . . . to consider
                           him to a little wonder.               --Walton.
  
      Note: To in to-day, to-night, and to-morrow has the sense or
               force of for or on; for, or on, (this) day, for, or on,
               (this) night, for, or on, (the) morrow. To-day,
               to-night, to-morrow may be considered as compounds, and
               usually as adverbs; but they are sometimes used as
               nouns; as, to-day is ours.
  
                        To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow; Creeps
                        in this petty pace from day to day. --Shak.
  
      {To and again}, to and fro. [R.]
  
      {To and fro}, forward and back. In this phrase, to is
            adverbial.
  
                     There was great showing both to and fro. --Chaucer.
  
      {To-and-fro}, a pacing backward and forward; as, to commence
            a to-and-fro. --Tennyson.
  
      {To the face}, in front of; in behind; hence, in the presence
            of.
  
      {To wit}, to know; namely. See {Wit}, v. i.
  
      Note: To, without an object expressed, is used adverbially;
               as, put to the door, i. e., put the door to its frame,
               close it; and in the nautical expressions, to heave to,
               to come to, meaning to a certain position. To, like on,
               is sometimes used as a command, forward, set to.
               [bd]To, Achilles! to, Ajax! to![b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To- \To-\ (?, see {To}, prep.), [AS. to- asunder; akin to G.
      zer-, and perhaps to L. dis-, or Gr. [?].]
      An obsolete intensive prefix used in the formation of
      compound verbs; as in to-beat, to-break, to-hew, to-rend,
      to-tear. See these words in the Vocabulary. See the Note on
      {All to}, or {All-to}, under {All}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Alone \A*lone"\, a. [All + one. OE. al one all allone, AS. [be]n
      one, alone. See {All}, {One}, {Lone}.]
      1. Quite by one's self; apart from, or exclusive of, others;
            single; solitary; -- applied to a person or thing.
  
                     Alone on a wide, wide sea.                  --Coleridge.
  
                     It is not good that the man should be alone. --Gen.
                                                                              ii. 18.
  
      2. Of or by itself; by themselves; without any thing more or
            any one else; without a sharer; only.
  
                     Man shall not live by bread alone.      --Luke iv. 4.
  
                     The citizens alone should be at the expense.
                                                                              --Franklin.
  
      3. Sole; only; exclusive. [R.]
  
                     God, by whose alone power and conversation we all
                     live, and move, and have our being.   --Bentley.
  
      4. Hence; Unique; rare; matchless. --Shak.
  
      Note: The adjective alone commonly follows its noun.
  
      {To} {let [or] leave} {alone}, to abstain from interfering
            with or molesting; to suffer to remain in its present
            state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dust \Dust\, n. [AS. dust; cf. LG. dust, D. duist meal dust, OD.
      doest, donst, and G. dunst vapor, OHG. tunist, dunist, a
      blowing, wind, Icel. dust dust, Dan. dyst mill dust; perh.
      akin to L. fumus smoke, E. fume. [?].]
      1. Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so
            comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind;
            that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder;
            as, clouds of dust; bone dust.
  
                     Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.
                                                                              --Gen. iii.
                                                                              19.
  
                     Stop! -- for thy tread is on an empire's dust.
                                                                              --Byron.
  
      2. A single particle of earth or other matter. [R.] [bd]To
            touch a dust of England's ground.[b8] --Shak.
  
      3. The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
  
                     For now shall sleep in the dust.         --Job vii. 21.
  
      4. The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of
            the human body.
  
                     And you may carve a shrine about my dust.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      5. Figuratively, a worthless thing.
  
                     And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust. --Shak.
  
      6. Figuratively, a low or mean condition.
  
                     [God] raiseth up the poor out of the dust. --1 Sam.
                                                                              ii. 8.
  
      7. Gold dust; hence: (Slang) Coined money; cash.
  
      {Down with the dust}, deposit the cash; pay down the money.
            [Slang] [bd]My lord, quoth the king, presently deposit
            your hundred pounds in gold, or else no going hence all
            the days of your life. . . . The Abbot down with his dust,
            and glad he escaped so, returned to Reading.[b8] --Fuller.
  
      {Dust brand} (Bot.), a fungous plant ({Ustilago Carbo}); --
            called also {smut}.
  
      {Gold dust}, fine particles of gold, such as are obtained in
            placer mining; -- often used as money, being transferred
            by weight.
  
      {In dust and ashes}. See under {Ashes}.
  
      {To bite the dust}. See under {Bite}, v. t.
  
      {To}
  
      {raise, [or] kick up, dust}, to make a commotion. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {To throw dust in one's eyes}, to mislead; to deceive.
            [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Flag \Flag\, n. [Cf. LG. & G. flagge, Sw. flagg, Dan. flag, D.
      vlag. See {Flag} to hang loose.]
      1. That which flags or hangs down loosely.
  
      2. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to
            indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask
            information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved
            by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors;
            as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of
                  certain hawks, owls, etc.
            (b) A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
            (c) The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter.
  
      {Black flag}. See under {Black}.
  
      {Flag captain}, {Flag leutenant}, etc., special officers
            attached to the flagship, as aids to the flag officer.
  
      {Flag officer}, the commander of a fleet or squadron; an
            admiral, or commodore.
  
      {Flag of truse}, a white flag carried or displayed to an
            enemy, as an invitation to conference, or for the purpose
            of making some communication not hostile.
  
      {Flag share}, the flag officer's share of prize money.
  
      {Flag station} (Railroad), a station at which trains do not
            stop unless signaled to do so, by a flag hung out or
            waved.
  
      {National flag}, a flag of a particular country, on which
            some national emblem or device, is emblazoned.
  
      {Red flag}, a flag of a red color, displayed as a signal of
            danger or token of defiance; the emblem of anarchists.
  
      {To dip, the flag}, to mlower it and quickly restore it to
            its place; -- done as a mark of respect.
  
      {To hang out the white flag}, to ask truce or quarter, or, in
            some cases, to manifest a friendly design by exhibiting a
            white flag.
  
      {To hang the flag} {half-mast high [or] half-staff}, to raise
            it only half way to the mast or staff, as a token or sign
            of mourning.
  
      {To} {strike, [or] lower}, {the flag}, to haul it down, in
            token of respect, submission, or, in an engagement, of
            surrender.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag of all nations; also
            carried at a vessel's fore, to denote that an infectious
            disease is on board.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Field \Field\, n. [OE. feld, fild, AS. feld; akin to D. veld, G.
      feld, Sw. f[84]lt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS.
      folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda.]
      1. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture;
            cultivated ground; the open country.
  
      2. A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece
            inclosed for tillage or pasture.
  
                     Fields which promise corn and wine.   --Byron.
  
      3. A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself.
  
                     In this glorious and well-foughten field. --Shak.
  
                     What though the field be lost?            --Milton.
  
      4. An open space; an extent; an expanse. Esp.:
            (a) Any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn
                  or projected.
            (b) The space covered by an optical instrument at one
                  view.
  
                           Without covering, save yon field of stars.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                           Ask of yonder argent fields above. --Pope.
  
      5. (Her.) The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much
            of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon
            it. See Illust. of {Fess}, where the field is represented
            as gules (red), while the fess is argent (silver).
  
      6. An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action,
            operation, or achievement; province; room.
  
                     Afforded a clear field for moral experiments.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      7. A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor
            contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the
            betting.
  
      8. (Baseball) That part of the grounds reserved for the
            players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also
            {outfield}.
  
      Note: Field is often used adjectively in the sense of
               belonging to, or used in, the fields; especially with
               reference to the operations and equipments of an army
               during a campaign away from permanent camps and
               fortifications. In most cases such use of the word is
               sufficiently clear; as, field battery; field
               fortification; field gun; field hospital, etc. A field
               geologist, naturalist, etc., is one who makes
               investigations or collections out of doors. A survey
               uses a field book for recording field notes, i.e.,
               measurment, observations, etc., made in field work
               (outdoor operations). A farmer or planter employs field
               hands, and may use a field roller or a field derrick.
               Field sports are hunting, fishing, athletic games, etc.
  
      {Coal field} (Geol.) See under {Coal}.
  
      {Field artillery}, light ordnance mounted on wheels, for the
            use of a marching army.
  
      {Field basil} (Bot.), a plant of the Mint family ({Calamintha
            Acinos}); -- called also {basil thyme}.
  
      {Field colors} (Mil.), small flags for marking out the
            positions for squadrons and battalions; camp colors.
  
      {Field cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a large European cricket
            ({Gryllus campestric}), remarkable for its loud notes.
  
      {Field day}.
            (a) A day in the fields.
            (b) (Mil.) A day when troops are taken into the field for
                  instruction in evolutions. --Farrow.
            (c) A day of unusual exertion or display; a gala day.
  
      {Field driver}, in New England, an officer charged with the
            driving of stray cattle to the pound.
  
      {Field duck} (Zo[94]l.), the little bustard ({Otis tetrax}),
            found in Southern Europe.
  
      {Field glass}. (Optics)
            (a) A binocular telescope of compact form; a lorgnette; a
                  race glass.
            (b) A small achromatic telescope, from 20 to 24 inches
                  long, and having 3 to 6 draws.
            (c) See {Field lens}.
  
      {Field lark}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The skylark.
            (b) The tree pipit.
  
      {Field lens} (Optics), that one of the two lenses forming the
            eyepiece of an astronomical telescope or compound
            microscope which is nearer the object glass; -- called
            also {field glass}.
  
      {Field madder} (Bot.), a plant ({Sherardia arvensis}) used in
            dyeing.
  
      {Field marshal} (Mil.), the highest military rank conferred
            in the British and other European armies.
  
      {Field mouse} (Zo[94]l.), a mouse inhabiting fields, as the
            campagnol and the deer mouse. See {Campagnol}, and {Deer
            mouse}.
  
      {Field officer} (Mil.), an officer above the rank of captain
            and below that of general.
  
      {Field officer's court} (U.S.Army), a court-martial
            consisting of one field officer empowered to try all
            cases, in time of war, subject to jurisdiction of garrison
            and regimental courts. --Farrow.
  
      {Field plover} (Zo[94]l.), the black-bellied plover
            ({Charadrius squatarola}); also sometimes applied to the
            Bartramian sandpiper ({Bartramia longicauda}).
  
      {Field spaniel} (Zo[94]l.), a small spaniel used in hunting
            small game.
  
      {Field sparrow}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small American sparrow ({Spizella pusilla}).
            (b) The hedge sparrow. [Eng.]
  
      {Field staff}> (Mil.), a staff formerly used by gunners to
            hold a lighted match for discharging a gun.
  
      {Field vole} (Zo[94]l.), the European meadow mouse.
  
      {Field of ice}, a large body of floating ice; a pack.
  
      {Field}, [or] {Field of view}, in a telescope or microscope,
            the entire space within which objects are seen.
  
      {Field magnet}. see under {Magnet}.
  
      {Magnetic field}. See {Magnetic}.
  
      {To back the field}, [or] {To bet on the field}. See under
            {Back}, v. t. -- {To keep the field}.
            (a) (Mil.) To continue a campaign.
            (b) To maintain one's ground against all comers.
  
      {To} {lay, [or] back}, {against the field}, to bet on (a
            horse, etc.) against all comers.
  
      {To take the field} (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Foot \Foot\ (f[oocr]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[emac]t). [OE. fot,
      foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[omac]t, pl. f[emac]t; akin to D.
      voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[omac]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod,
      Goth. f[omac]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy`s, Skr. p[be]d, Icel. fet
      step, pace measure of a foot, feta to step, find one's way.
      [fb]77, 250. Cf. {Antipodes}, {Cap-a-pie}, {Expedient}, {Fet}
      to fetch, {Fetlock}, {Fetter}, {Pawn} a piece in chess,
      {Pedal}.]
      1. (Anat.) The terminal part of the leg of man or an animal;
            esp., the part below the ankle or wrist; that part of an
            animal upon which it rests when standing, or moves. See
            {Manus}, and {Pes}.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The muscular locomotive organ of a mollusk. It
            is a median organ arising from the ventral region of body,
            often in the form of a flat disk, as in snails. See
            Illust. of {Buccinum}.
  
      3. That which corresponds to the foot of a man or animal; as,
            the foot of a table; the foot of a stocking.
  
      4. The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as
            of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or
            series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with
            inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the
            procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.
  
                     And now at foot Of heaven's ascent they lift their
                     feet.                                                --Milton.
  
      5. Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the
            singular.
  
                     Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
                                                                              --Berkeley.
  
      6. Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the
            singular. [R.]
  
                     As to his being on the foot of a servant. --Walpole.
  
      7. A measure of length equivalent to twelve inches; one third
            of a yard. See {Yard}.
  
      Note: This measure is supposed to be taken from the length of
               a man's foot. It differs in length in different
               countries. In the United States and in England it is
               304.8 millimeters.
  
      8. (Mil.) Soldiers who march and fight on foot; the infantry,
            usually designated as the foot, in distinction from the
            cavalry. [bd]Both horse and foot.[b8] --Milton.
  
      9. (Pros.) A combination of syllables consisting a metrical
            element of a verse, the syllables being formerly
            distinguished by their quantity or length, but in modern
            poetry by the accent.
  
      10. (Naut.) The lower edge of a sail.
  
      Note: Foot is often used adjectively, signifying of or
               pertaining to a foot or the feet, or to the base or
               lower part. It is also much used as the first of
               compounds.
  
      {Foot artillery}. (Mil.)
            (a) Artillery soldiers serving in foot.
            (b) Heavy artillery. --Farrow.
  
      {Foot bank} (Fort.), a raised way within a parapet.
  
      {Foot barracks} (Mil.), barracks for infantery.
  
      {Foot bellows}, a bellows worked by a treadle. --Knight.
  
      {Foot company} (Mil.), a company of infantry. --Milton.
  
      {Foot gear}, covering for the feet, as stocking, shoes, or
            boots.
  
      {Foot hammer} (Mach.), a small tilt hammer moved by a
            treadle.
  
      {Foot iron}.
            (a) The step of a carriage.
            (b) A fetter.
  
      {Foot jaw}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Maxilliped}.
  
      {Foot key} (Mus.), an organ pedal.
  
      {Foot level} (Gunnery), a form of level used in giving any
            proposed angle of elevation to a piece of ordnance.
            --Farrow.
  
      {Foot mantle}, a long garment to protect the dress in riding;
            a riding skirt. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot page}, an errand boy; an attendant. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot passenger}, one who passes on foot, as over a road or
            bridge.
  
      {Foot pavement}, a paved way for foot passengers; a footway;
            a trottoir.
  
      {Foot poet}, an inferior poet; a poetaster. [R.] --Dryden.
  
      {Foot post}.
            (a) A letter carrier who travels on foot.
            (b) A mail delivery by means of such carriers.
  
      {Fot pound}, [and] {Foot poundal}. (Mech.) See {Foot pound}
            and {Foot poundal}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Foot press} (Mach.), a cutting, embossing, or printing
            press, moved by a treadle.
  
      {Foot race}, a race run by persons on foot. --Cowper.
  
      {Foot rail}, a railroad rail, with a wide flat flange on the
            lower side.
  
      {Foot rot}, an ulcer in the feet of sheep; claw sickness.
  
      {Foot rule}, a rule or measure twelve inches long.
  
      {Foot screw}, an adjusting screw which forms a foot, and
            serves to give a machine or table a level standing on an
            uneven place.
  
      {Foot secretion}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Sclerobase}.
  
      {Foot soldier}, a soldier who serves on foot.
  
      {Foot stick} (Printing), a beveled piece of furniture placed
            against the foot of the page, to hold the type in place.
           
  
      {Foot stove}, a small box, with an iron pan, to hold hot
            coals for warming the feet.
  
      {Foot tubercle}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Parapodium}.
  
      {Foot valve} (Steam Engine), the valve that opens to the air
            pump from the condenser.
  
      {Foot vise}, a kind of vise the jaws of which are operated by
            a treadle.
  
      {Foot waling} (Naut.), the inside planks or lining of a
            vessel over the floor timbers. --Totten.
  
      {Foot wall} (Mining), the under wall of an inclosed vein.
  
      {By foot}, [or] {On foot}, by walking; as, to pass a stream
            on foot.
  
      {Cubic foot}. See under {Cubic}.
  
      {Foot and mouth disease}, a contagious disease (Eczema
            epizo[94]tica) of cattle, sheep, swine, etc.,
            characterized by the formation of vesicles and ulcers in
            the mouth and about the hoofs.
  
      {Foot of the fine} (Law), the concluding portion of an
            acknowledgment in court by which, formerly, the title of
            land was conveyed. See {Fine of land}, under {Fine}, n.;
            also {Chirograph}. (b).
  
      {Square foot}. See under {Square}.
  
      {To be on foot}, to be in motion, action, or process of
            execution.
  
      {To keep the foot} (Script.), to preserve decorum. [bd]Keep
            thy foot when thou goest to the house of God.[b8] --Eccl.
            v. 1.
  
      {To put one's foot down}, to take a resolute stand; to be
            determined. [Colloq.]
  
      {To put the best foot foremost}, to make a good appearance;
            to do one's best. [Colloq.]
  
      {To set on foot}, to put in motion; to originate; as, to set
            on foot a subscription.
  
      {To} {put, [or] set}, {one on his feet}, to put one in a
            position to go on; to assist to start.
  
      {Under foot}.
            (a) Under the feet; (Fig.) at one's mercy; as, to trample
                  under foot. --Gibbon.
            (b) Below par. [Obs.] [bd]They would be forced to sell .
                  . . far under foot.[b8] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Foul anchor}. (Naut.) See under {Anchor}.
  
      {Foul ball} (Baseball), a ball that first strikes the ground
            outside of the foul ball lines, or rolls outside of
            certain limits.
  
      {Foul ball lines} (Baseball), lines from the home base,
            through the first and third bases, to the boundary of the
            field.
  
      {Foul berth} (Naut.), a berth in which a ship is in danger of
            fouling another vesel.
  
      {Foul bill}, [or] {Foul bill of health}, a certificate, duly
            authenticated, that a ship has come from a place where a
            contagious disorder prevails, or that some of the crew are
            infected.
  
      {Foul copy}, a rough draught, with erasures and corrections;
            -- opposed to fair or clean copy. [bd]Some writers boast
            of negligence, and others would be ashamed to show their
            foul copies.[b8] --Cowper.
  
      {Foul proof}, an uncorrected proof; a proof containing an
            excessive quantity of errors.
  
      {Foul strike} (Baseball), a strike by the batsman when any
            part of his person is outside of the lines of his
            position.
  
      {To fall foul}, to fall out; to quarrel. [Obs.] [bd]If they
            be any ways offended, they fall foul.[b8] --Burton.
  
      {To} {fall, [or] run}, {foul of}. See under {Fall}.
  
      {To make foul water}, to sail in such shallow water that the
            ship's keel stirs the mud at the bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cart \Cart\, n. [AS. cr[91]t; cf. W. cart, Ir. & Gael. cairt, or
      Icel. kartr. Cf. {Car}.]
      1. A common name for various kinds of vehicles, as a Scythian
            dwelling on wheels, or a chariot. [bd]Ph[d2]bus' cart.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      2. A two-wheeled vehicle for the ordinary purposes of
            husbandry, or for transporting bulky and heavy articles.
  
                     Packing all his goods in one poor cart. --Dryden.
  
      3. A light business wagon used by bakers, grocerymen,
            butchers, etc.
  
      4. An open two-wheeled pleasure carriage.
  
      {Cart horse}, a horse which draws a cart; a horse bred or
            used for drawing heavy loads.
  
      {Cart load}, or {Cartload}, as much as will fill or load a
            cart. In excavating and carting sand, gravel, earth, etc.,
            one third of a cubic yard of the material before it is
            loosened is estimated to be a cart load.
  
      {Cart rope}, a stout rope for fastening a load on a cart; any
            strong rope.
  
      {To} {put ([or] get [or] set)} {the cart before the horse},
            to invert the order of related facts or ideas, as by
            putting an effect for a cause.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghost \Ghost\, n. [OE. gast, gost, soul, spirit, AS. g[be]st
      breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. g[?]st spirit, soul, D.
      geest, G. geist, and prob. to E. gaze, ghastly.]
      1. The spirit; the soul of man. [Obs.]
  
                     Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased
            person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a
            specter.
  
                     The mighty ghosts of our great Harrys rose. --Shak.
  
                     I thought that I had died in sleep, And was a
                     blessed ghost.                                    --Coleridge.
  
      3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a
            phantom; a glimmering; as, not a ghost of a chance; the
            ghost of an idea.
  
                     Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the
                     floor.                                                --Poe.
  
      4. A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the
            surfaces of one or more lenses.
  
      {Ghost moth} (Zo[94]l.), a large European moth {(Hepialus
            humuli)}; so called from the white color of the male, and
            the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also {great
            swift}.
  
      {Holy Ghost}, the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter;
            (Theol.) the third person in the Trinity.
  
      {To} {give up [or] yield up} {the ghost}, to die; to expire.
  
                     And he gave up the ghost full softly. --Chaucer.
  
                     Jacob . . . yielded up the ghost, and was gathered
                     unto his people.                                 --Gen. xlix.
                                                                              33.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Chide \Chide\ (ch[imac]d), v. t. [imp. {Chid} (ch[icr]d), or
      {Chode} (ch[imac]d Obs.); p. p. {Chidden}, {Chid}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Chiding}.] [AS. c[c6]dan; of unknown origin.]
      1. To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.
  
                     Upbraided, chid, and rated at.            --Shak.
  
      2. Fig.: To be noisy about; to chafe against.
  
                     The sea that chides the banks of England. --Shak.
  
      {To} {chide hither, chide from, [or] chide away}, to cause to
            come, or to drive away, by scolding or reproof.
  
      Syn: To blame; rebuke; reprove; scold; censure; reproach;
               reprehend; reprimand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grindstone \Grind"stone`\, n.
      A flat, circular stone, revolving on an axle, for grinding or
      sharpening tools, or shaping or smoothing objects.
  
      {To} {hold, pat, [or] bring} {one's nose to the grindstone},
            to oppress one; to keep one in a condition of servitude.
  
                     They might be ashamed, for lack of courage, to
                     suffer the Laced[91]monians to hold their noses to
                     the grindstone.                                 --Sir T.
                                                                              North.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hand \Hand\, n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand,
      OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[94]nd, Goth. handus, and perh.
      to Goth. hinpan to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.]
      1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in
            man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other
            animals; manus; paw. See {Manus}.
  
      2. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the
            office of, a human hand; as:
            (a) A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or
                  any one of the four extremities of a monkey.
            (b) An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute
                  hand of a clock.
  
      3. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, -- four inches; a
            palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses.
  
      4. Side; part; direction, either right or left.
  
                     On this hand and that hand, were hangings. --Ex.
                                                                              xxxviii. 15.
  
                     The Protestants were then on the winning hand.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      5. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill;
            dexterity.
  
                     He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      6. Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence,
            manner of performance.
  
                     To change the hand in carrying on the war.
                                                                              --Clarendon.
  
                     Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my
                     hand.                                                --Judges vi.
                                                                              36.
  
      7. An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or
            competent for special service or duty; a performer more or
            less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand
            at speaking.
  
                     A dictionary containing a natural history requires
                     too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be
                     hoped for.                                          --Locke.
  
                     I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile.
                                                                              --Hazlitt.
  
      8. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad or
            running hand. Hence, a signature.
  
                     I say she never did invent this letter; This is a
                     man's invention and his hand.            --Shak.
  
                     Some writs require a judge's hand.      --Burril.
  
      9. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction;
            management; -- usually in the plural. [bd]Receiving in
            hand one year's tribute.[b8] --Knolles.
  
                     Albinus . . . found means to keep in his hands the
                     goverment of Britain.                        --Milton.
  
      10. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to
            buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when
            new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the
            producer's hand, or when not new.
  
      11. Rate; price. [Obs.] [bd]Business is bought at a dear
            hand, where there is small dispatch.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      12. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as:
            (a) (Card Playing) The quota of cards received from the
                  dealer.
            (b) (Tobacco Manuf.) A bundle of tobacco leaves tied
                  together.
  
      13. (Firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock,
            which is grasped by the hand in taking aim.
  
      Note: Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts
               or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the
               hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a
               symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as:
            (a) Activity; operation; work; -- in distinction from the
                  head, which implies thought, and the heart, which
                  implies affection. [bd]His hand will be against every
                  man.[b8] --Gen. xvi. 12.
            (b) Power; might; supremacy; -- often in the Scriptures.
                  [bd]With a mighty hand . . . will I rule over
                  you.[b8] --Ezek. xx. 33.
            (c) Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to
                  give the right hand.
            (d) Contract; -- commonly of marriage; as, to ask the
                  hand; to pledge the hand.
  
      Note: Hand is often used adjectively or in compounds (with or
               without the hyphen), signifying performed by the hand;
               as, hand blow or hand-blow, hand gripe or hand-gripe:
               used by, or designed for, the hand; as, hand ball or
               handball, hand bow, hand fetter, hand grenade or
               hand-grenade, handgun or hand gun, handloom or hand
               loom, handmill or hand organ or handorgan, handsaw or
               hand saw, hand-weapon: measured or regulated by the
               hand; as, handbreadth or hand's breadth, hand gallop or
               hand-gallop. Most of the words in the following
               paragraph are written either as two words or in
               combination.
  
      {Hand bag}, a satchel; a small bag for carrying books,
            papers, parcels, etc.
  
      {Hand basket}, a small or portable basket.
  
      {Hand bell}, a small bell rung by the hand; a table bell.
            --Bacon.
  
      {Hand bill}, a small pruning hook. See 4th {Bill}.
  
      {Hand car}. See under {Car}.
  
      {Hand director} (Mus.), an instrument to aid in forming a
            good position of the hands and arms when playing on the
            piano; a hand guide.
  
      {Hand drop}. See {Wrist drop}.
  
      {Hand gallop}. See under {Gallop}.
  
      {Hand gear} (Mach.), apparatus by means of which a machine,
            or parts of a machine, usually operated by other power,
            may be operated by hand.
  
      {Hand glass}.
            (a) A glass or small glazed frame, for the protection of
                  plants.
            (b) A small mirror with a handle.
  
      {Hand guide}. Same as {Hand director} (above).
  
      {Hand language}, the art of conversing by the hands, esp. as
            practiced by the deaf and dumb; dactylology.
  
      {Hand lathe}. See under {Lathe}.
  
      {Hand money}, money paid in hand to bind a contract; earnest
            money.
  
      {Hand organ} (Mus.), a barrel organ, operated by a crank
            turned by hand.
  
      {Hand plant}. (Bot.) Same as {Hand tree} (below). -- {Hand
            rail}, a rail, as in staircases, to hold by. --Gwilt.
  
      {Hand sail}, a sail managed by the hand. --Sir W. Temple.
  
      {Hand screen}, a small screen to be held in the hand.
  
      {Hand screw}, a small jack for raising heavy timbers or
            weights; (Carp.) a screw clamp.
  
      {Hand staff} (pl. {Hand staves}), a javelin. --Ezek. xxxix.
            9.
  
      {Hand stamp}, a small stamp for dating, addressing, or
            canceling papers, envelopes, etc.
  
      {Hand tree} (Bot.), a lofty tree found in Mexico
            ({Cheirostemon platanoides}), having red flowers whose
            stamens unite in the form of a hand.
  
      {Hand vise}, a small vise held in the hand in doing small
            work. --Moxon.
  
      {Hand work}, [or] {Handwork}, work done with the hands, as
            distinguished from work done by a machine; handiwork.
  
      {All hands}, everybody; all parties.
  
      {At all hands}, {On all hands}, on all sides; from every
            direction; generally.
  
      {At any hand}, {At no hand}, in any (or no) way or direction;
            on any account; on no account. [bd]And therefore at no
            hand consisting with the safety and interests of
            humility.[b8] --Jer. Taylor.
  
      {At first hand}, {At second hand}. See def. 10 (above).
  
      {At hand}.
            (a) Near in time or place; either present and within
                  reach, or not far distant. [bd]Your husband is at
                  hand; I hear his trumpet.[b8] --Shak.
            (b) Under the hand or bridle. [Obs.] [bd]Horses hot at
                  hand.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {At the hand of}, by the act of; as a gift from. [bd]Shall we
            receive good at the hand of God and shall we not receive
            evil?[b8] --Job ii. 10.
  
      {Bridle hand}. See under {Bridle}.
  
      {By hand}, with the hands, in distinction from
            instrumentality of tools, engines, or animals; as, to weed
            a garden by hand; to lift, draw, or carry by hand.
  
      {Clean hands}, freedom from guilt, esp. from the guilt of
            dishonesty in money matters, or of bribe taking. [bd]He
            that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger.[b8]
            --Job xvii. 9.
  
      {From hand to hand}, from one person to another.
  
      {Hand in hand}.
            (a) In union; conjointly; unitedly. --Swift.
            (b) Just; fair; equitable.
  
                           As fair and as good, a kind of hand in hand
                           comparison.                                 --Shak.
                 
  
      {Hand over hand}, {Hand over fist}, by passing the hands
            alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand
            over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand
            over hand.
  
      {Hand over head}, negligently; rashly; without seeing what
            one does. [Obs.] --Bacon.
  
      {Hand running}, consecutively; as, he won ten times hand
            running.
  
      {Hand off!} keep off! forbear! no interference or meddling!
           
  
      {Hand to hand}, in close union; in close fight; as, a hand to
            hand contest. --Dryden.
  
      {Heavy hand}, severity or oppression.
  
      {In hand}.
            (a) Paid down. [bd]A considerable reward in hand, and . .
                  . a far greater reward hereafter.[b8] --Tillotson.
            (b) In preparation; taking place. --Chaucer. [bd]Revels .
                  . . in hand.[b8] --Shak.
            (c) Under consideration, or in the course of transaction;
                  as, he has the business in hand.
  
      {In one's hand} [or] {hands}.
            (a) In one's possession or keeping.
            (b) At one's risk, or peril; as, I took my life in my
                  hand.
  
      {Laying on of hands}, a form used in consecrating to office,
            in the rite of confirmation, and in blessing persons.
  
      {Light hand}, gentleness; moderation.
  
      {Note of hand}, a promissory note.
  
      {Off hand}, {Out of hand}, forthwith; without delay,
            hesitation, or difficulty; promptly. [bd]She causeth them
            to be hanged up out of hand.[b8] --Spenser.
  
      {Off one's hands}, out of one's possession or care.
  
      {On hand}, in present possession; as, he has a supply of
            goods on hand.
  
      {On one's hands}, in one's possession care, or management.
  
      {Putting the hand under the thigh}, an ancient Jewish
            ceremony used in swearing.
  
      {Right hand}, the place of honor, power, and strength.
  
      {Slack hand}, idleness; carelessness; inefficiency; sloth.
  
      {Strict hand}, severe discipline; rigorous government.
  
      {To bear a hand}
            (Naut), to give help quickly; to hasten.
  
      {To bear in hand}, to keep in expectation with false
            pretenses. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To be} {hand and glove, [or] in glove} {with}. See under
            {Glove}.
  
      {To be on the mending hand}, to be convalescent or improving.
           
  
      {To bring up by hand}, to feed (an infant) without suckling
            it.
  
      {To change hand}. See {Change}.
  
      {To change hands}, to change sides, or change owners.
            --Hudibras.
  
      {To clap the hands}, to express joy or applause, as by
            striking the palms of the hands together.
  
      {To come to hand}, to be received; to be taken into
            possession; as, the letter came to hand yesterday.
  
      {To get hand}, to gain influence. [Obs.]
  
                     Appetites have . . . got such a hand over them.
                                                                              --Baxter.
  
      {To got one's hand in}, to make a beginning in a certain
            work; to become accustomed to a particular business.
  
      {To have a hand in}, to be concerned in; to have a part or
            concern in doing; to have an agency or be employed in.
  
      {To have in hand}.
            (a) To have in one's power or control. --Chaucer.
            (b) To be engaged upon or occupied with.
  
      {To have one's hands full}, to have in hand al that one can
            do, or more than can be done conveniently; to be pressed
            with labor or engagements; to be surrounded with
            difficulties.
  
      {To} {have, [or] get}, {the (higher) upper hand}, to have, or
            get, the better of another person or thing.
  
      {To his hand}, {To my hand}, etc., in readiness; already
            prepared. [bd]The work is made to his hands.[b8] --Locke.
  
      {To hold hand}, to compete successfully or on even
            conditions. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To lay hands on}, to seize; to assault.
  
      {To lend a hand}, to give assistance.
  
      {To} {lift, [or] put forth}, {the hand against}, to attack;
            to oppose; to kill.
  
      {To live from hand to mouth}, to obtain food and other
            necessaries as want compels, without previous provision.
           
  
      {To make one's hand}, to gain advantage or profit.
  
      {To put the hand unto}, to steal. --Ex. xxii. 8.
  
      {To put the}
  
      {last, [or] finishing},
  
      {hand to}, to make the last corrections in; to complete; to
            perfect.
  
      {To set the hand to}, to engage in; to undertake.
  
                     That the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that
                     thou settest thine hand to.               --Deut. xxiii.
                                                                              20.
  
      {To stand one in hand}, to concern or affect one.
  
      {To strike hands}, to make a contract, or to become surety
            for another's debt or good behavior.
  
      {To take in hand}.
            (a) To attempt or undertake.
            (b) To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand.
  
      {To wash the hands of}, to disclaim or renounce interest in,
            or responsibility for, a person or action; as, to wash
            one's hands of a business. --Matt. xxvii. 24.
  
      {Under the hand of}, authenticated by the handwriting or
            signature of; as, the deed is executed under the hand and
            seal of the owner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: The constable of France was the first officer of the
               crown, and had the chief command of the army. It was
               also his duty to regulate all matters of chivalry. The
               office was suppressed in 1627. The constable, or lord
               high constable, of England, was one of the highest
               officers of the crown, commander in chief of the
               forces, and keeper of the peace of the nation. He also
               had judicial cognizance of many important matters. The
               office was as early as the Conquest, but has been
               disused (except on great and solemn occasions), since
               the attainder of Stafford, duke of Buckingham, in the
               reign of Henry VIII.
  
      2. (Law) An officer of the peace having power as a
            conservator of the public peace, and bound to execute the
            warrants of judicial officers. --Bouvier.
  
      Note: In England, at the present time, the constable is a
               conservator of the peace within his district, and is
               also charged by various statutes with other duties,
               such as serving summons, precepts, warrants, etc. In
               the United States, constables are town or city officers
               of the peace, with powers similar to those of the
               constables of England. In addition to their duties as
               conservators of the peace, they are invested with
               others by statute, such as to execute civil as well as
               criminal process in certain cases, to attend courts,
               keep juries, etc. In some cities, there are officers
               called {high constables}, who act as chiefs of the
               constabulary or police force. In other cities the title
               of constable, as well as the office, is merged in that
               of the police officer.
  
      {High constable}, a constable having certain duties and
            powers within a hundred. [Eng.]
  
      {Petty constable}, a conservator of the peace within a parish
            or tithing; a tithingman. [Eng.]
  
      {Special constable}, a person appointed to act as constable
            of special occasions.
  
      {To} {overrun, [or] outrun}, {the constable}, to spend more
            than one's income; to get into debt. [Colloq.] --Smollett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To} {raise, [or] lift}, {the horn} (Script.), to exalt one's
            self; to act arrogantly. [bd]'Gainst them that raised thee
            dost thou lift thy horn?[b8] --Milton.
  
      {To take a horn}, to take a drink of intoxicating liquor.
            [Low]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Law of Charles} (Physics), the law that the volume of a
            given mass of gas increases or decreases, by a definite
            fraction of its value for a given rise or fall of
            temperature; -- sometimes less correctly styled {Gay
            Lussac's law}, or {Dalton's law}.
  
      {Law of nations}. See {International law}, under
            {International}.
  
      {Law of nature}.
            (a) A broad generalization expressive of the constant
                  action, or effect, of natural conditions; as, death
                  is a law of nature; self-defense is a law of nature.
                  See {Law}, 4.
            (b) A term denoting the standard, or system, of morality
                  deducible from a study of the nature and natural
                  relations of human beings independent of supernatural
                  revelation or of municipal and social usages.
  
      {Law of the land}, due process of law; the general law of the
            land.
  
      {Laws of honor}. See under {Honor}.
  
      {Laws of motion} (Physics), three laws defined by Sir Isaac
            Newton: (1) Every body perseveres in its state of rest or
            of moving uniformly in a straight line, except so far as
            it is made to change that state by external force. (2)
            Change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,
            and takes place in the direction in which the force is
            impressed. (3) Reaction is always equal and opposite to
            action, that is to say, the actions of two bodies upon
            each other are always equal and in opposite directions.
  
      {Marine law}, or {Maritime law}, the law of the sea; a branch
            of the law merchant relating to the affairs of the sea,
            such as seamen, ships, shipping, navigation, and the like.
            --Bouvier.
  
      {Mariotte's law}. See {Boyle's law} (above).
  
      {Martial law}.See under {Martial}.
  
      {Military law}, a branch of the general municipal law,
            consisting of rules ordained for the government of the
            military force of a state in peace and war, and
            administered in courts martial. --Kent. Warren's
            Blackstone.
  
      {Moral law},the law of duty as regards what is right and
            wrong in the sight of God; specifically, the ten
            commandments given by Moses. See {Law}, 2.
  
      {Mosaic}, [or] {Ceremonial}, {law}. (Script.) See {Law}, 3.
           
  
      {Municipal}, [or] {Positive}, {law}, a rule prescribed by the
            supreme power of a state, declaring some right, enforcing
            some duty, or prohibiting some act; -- distinguished from
            international and constitutional law. See {Law}, 1.
  
      {Periodic law}. (Chem.) See under {Periodic}.
  
      {Roman law}, the system of principles and laws found in the
            codes and treatises of the lawmakers and jurists of
            ancient Rome, and incorporated more or less into the laws
            of the several European countries and colonies founded by
            them. See {Civil law} (above).
  
      {Statute law}, the law as stated in statutes or positive
            enactments of the legislative body.
  
      {Sumptuary law}. See under {Sumptuary}.
  
      {To go to law}, to seek a settlement of any matter by
            bringing it before the courts of law; to sue or prosecute
            some one.
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the law of}, to bring the law to
            bear upon; as, to take the law of one's neighbor.
            --Addison.
  
      {Wager of law}. See under {Wager}.
  
      Syn: Justice; equity.
  
      Usage: {Law}, {Statute}, {Common law}, {Regulation}, {Edict},
                  {Decree}. Law is generic, and, when used with
                  reference to, or in connection with, the other words
                  here considered, denotes whatever is commanded by one
                  who has a right to require obedience. A statute is a
                  particular law drawn out in form, and distinctly
                  enacted and proclaimed. Common law is a rule of action
                  founded on long usage and the decisions of courts of
                  justice. A regulation is a limited and often,
                  temporary law, intended to secure some particular end
                  or object. An edict is a command or law issued by a
                  sovereign, and is peculiar to a despotic government. A
                  decree is a permanent order either of a court or of
                  the executive government. See {Justice}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lead \Lead\ (l[ecr]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le[a0]d;
      akin to D. lood, MHG. l[omac]t, G. loth plummet, sounding
      lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123]
      1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic
            metal, having a bright, bluish color, but easily
            tarnished. It is both malleable and ductile, though with
            little tenacity, and is used for tubes, sheets, bullets,
            etc. Its specific gravity is 11.37. It is easily fusible,
            forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of
            solder and type metal. Atomic weight, 206.4. Symbol Pb (L.
            Plumbum). It is chiefly obtained from the mineral galena,
            lead sulphide.
  
      2. An article made of lead or an alloy of lead; as:
            (a) A plummet or mass of lead, used in sounding at sea.
            (b) (Print.) A thin strip of type metal, used to separate
                  lines of type in printing.
            (c) Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs;
                  hence, pl., a roof covered with lead sheets or terne
                  plates.
  
                           I would have the tower two stories, and goodly
                           leads upon the top.                     --Bacon
  
      3. A small cylinder of black lead or plumbago, used in
            pencils.
  
      {Black lead}, graphite or plumbago; -- so called from its
            leadlike appearance and streak. [Colloq.]
  
      {Coasting lead}, a sounding lead intermediate in weight
            between a hand lead and deep-sea lead.
  
      {Deep-sea lead}, the heaviest of sounding leads, used in
            water exceeding a hundred fathoms in depth. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {Hand lead}, a small lead use for sounding in shallow water.
           
  
      {Krems lead}, {Kremnitz lead} [so called from Krems or
            Kremnitz, in Austria], a pure variety of white lead,
            formed into tablets, and called also {Krems, [or]
            Kremnitz, white}, and {Vienna white}.
  
      {Lead arming}, tallow put in the hollow of a sounding lead.
            See {To arm the lead} (below).
  
      {Lead colic}. See under {Colic}.
  
      {Lead color}, a deep bluish gray color, like tarnished lead.
           
  
      {Lead glance}. (Min.) Same as {Galena}.
  
      {Lead line}
            (a) (Med.) A dark line along the gums produced by a
                  deposit of metallic lead, due to lead poisoning.
            (b) (Naut.) A sounding line.
  
      {Lead mill}, a leaden polishing wheel, used by lapidaries.
  
      {Lead ocher} (Min.), a massive sulphur-yellow oxide of lead.
            Same as {Massicot}.
  
      {Lead pencil}, a pencil of which the marking material is
            graphite (black lead).
  
      {Lead plant} (Bot.), a low leguminous plant, genus {Amorpha}
            ({A. canescens}), found in the Northwestern United States,
            where its presence is supposed to indicate lead ore.
            --Gray.
  
      {Lead tree}.
            (a) (Bot.) A West Indian name for the tropical, leguminous
                  tree, {Leuc[91]na glauca}; -- probably so called from
                  the glaucous color of the foliage.
            (b) (Chem.) Lead crystallized in arborescent forms from a
                  solution of some lead salt, as by suspending a strip
                  of zinc in lead acetate.
  
      {Mock lead}, a miner's term for blende.
  
      {Red lead}, a scarlet, crystalline, granular powder,
            consisting of minium when pure, but commonly containing
            several of the oxides of lead. It is used as a paint or
            cement and also as an ingredient of flint glass.
  
      {Red lead ore} (Min.), crocoite.
  
      {Sugar of lead}, acetate of lead.
  
      {To arm the lead}, to fill the hollow in the bottom of a
            sounding lead with tallow in order to discover the nature
            of the bottom by the substances adhering. --Ham. Nav.
            Encyc.
  
      {To} {cast, [or] heave}, {the lead}, to cast the sounding
            lead for ascertaining the depth of water.
  
      {White lead}, hydrated carbonate of lead, obtained as a
            white, amorphous powder, and much used as an ingredient of
            white paint.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To be in the wind}, to be suggested or expected; to be a
            matter of suspicion or surmise. [Colloq.]
  
      {To carry the wind} (Man.), to toss the nose as high as the
            ears, as a horse.
  
      {To raise the wind}, to procure money. [Colloq.]
  
      {To} {take, [or] have}, {the wind}, to gain or have the
            advantage. --Bacon.
  
      {To take the wind out of one's sails}, to cause one to stop,
            or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of
            another. [Colloq.]
  
      {To take wind}, or {To get wind}, to be divulged; to become
            public; as, the story got wind, or took wind.
  
      {Wind band} (Mus.), a band of wind instruments; a military
            band; the wind instruments of an orchestra.
  
      {Wind chest} (Mus.), a chest or reservoir of wind in an
            organ.
  
      {Wind dropsy}. (Med.)
            (a) Tympanites.
            (b) Emphysema of the subcutaneous areolar tissue.
  
      {Wind egg}, an imperfect, unimpregnated, or addled egg.
  
      {Wind furnace}. See the Note under {Furnace}.
  
      {Wind gauge}. See under {Gauge}.
  
      {Wind gun}. Same as {Air gun}.
  
      {Wind hatch} (Mining), the opening or place where the ore is
            taken out of the earth.
  
      {Wind instrument} (Mus.), an instrument of music sounded by
            means of wind, especially by means of the breath, as a
            flute, a clarinet, etc.
  
      {Wind pump}, a pump moved by a windmill.
  
      {Wind rose}, a table of the points of the compass, giving the
            states of the barometer, etc., connected with winds from
            the different directions.
  
      {Wind sail}.
            (a) (Naut.) A wide tube or funnel of canvas, used to
                  convey a stream of air for ventilation into the lower
                  compartments of a vessel.
            (b) The sail or vane of a windmill.
  
      {Wind shake}, a crack or incoherence in timber produced by
            violent winds while the timber was growing.
  
      {Wind shock}, a wind shake.
  
      {Wind side}, the side next the wind; the windward side. [R.]
            --Mrs. Browning.
  
      {Wind rush} (Zo[94]l.), the redwing. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Wind wheel}, a motor consisting of a wheel moved by wind.
  
      {Wood wind} (Mus.), the flutes and reed instruments of an
            orchestra, collectively.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nativity \Na*tiv"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Nativies}. [F. nativit[82], L.
      nativitas. See {Native}, and cf. {Na[8b]vet[90]}.]
      1. The coming into life or into the world; birth; also, the
            circumstances attending birth, as time, place, manner,
            etc. --Chaucer.
  
                     I have served him from the hour of my nativity.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     Thou hast left . . . the land of thy nativity.
                                                                              --Ruth ii. 11.
  
                     These in their dark nativity the deep Shall yield
                     us, pregnant with infernal flame.      --Milton.
  
      2. (Fine Arts) A picture representing or symbolizing the
            early infancy of Christ. The simplest form is the babe in
            a rude cradle, and the heads of an ox and an ass to
            express the stable in which he was born.
  
      3. (Astrol.) A representation of the positions of the
            heavenly bodies as the moment of one's birth, supposed to
            indicate his future destinies; a horoscope.
  
      {The Nativity}, the birth or birthday of Christ; Christmas
            day.
  
      {To}
  
      {cast, [or] calculate},
  
      {one's nativity} (Astrol.), to find out and represent the
            position of the heavenly bodies at the time of one's
            birth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scale \Scale\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scaled}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Scaling}.]
      To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also,
      to grade or vary according to a scale or system.
  
               Scaling his present bearing with his past. --Shak.
  
      {To} {scale, [or] scale down}, {a debt, wages, etc.}, to
            reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale.
            [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nutshell \Nut"shell`\, n.
      1. The shell or hard external covering in which the kernel of
            a nut is inclosed.
  
      2. Hence, a thing of little compass, or of little value.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A shell of the genus Nucula.
  
      {To} {be, [or] lie}, {in a nutshell}, to be within a small
            compass; to admit of very brief or simple determination or
            statement. [bd]The remedy lay in a nutshell.[b8]
            --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gapeseed \Gape"seed`\, n.
      A person who looks or stares gapingly.
  
      {To} {buy, [or] sow}, {gapeseed}, to stare idly or in idle
            wonderment, instead of attending to business.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pace \Pace\, n. [OE. pas, F. pas, from L. passus a step, pace,
      orig., a stretching out of the feet in walking; cf. pandere,
      passum, to spread, stretch; perh. akin to E. patent. Cf.
      {Pas}, {Pass}.]
      1. A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a
            step.
  
      2. The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from
            the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; -- used as
            a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty
            paces. [bd]The heigh of sixty pace .[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Ordinarily the pace is estimated at two and one half
               linear feet; but in measuring distances be stepping,
               the pace is extended to three feet (one yard) or to
               three and three tenths feet (one fifth of a rod). The
               regulation marching pace in the English and United
               States armies is thirty inches for quick time, and
               thirty-six inches for double time. The Roman pace
               (passus) was from the heel of one foot to the heel of
               the same foot when it next touched the ground, five
               Roman feet.
  
      3. Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk,
            trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a
            swaggering pace; a quick pace. --Chaucer.
  
                     To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in
                     this petty pace from day to day.         --Shak.
  
                     In the military schools of riding a variety of paces
                     are taught.                                       --Walsh.
  
      4. A slow gait; a footpace. [Obs.] --Chucer.
  
      5. Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.
  
      6. Any single movement, step, or procedure. [R.]
  
                     The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is
                     to fall into confidence with Spain.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      7. (Arch.) A broad step or platform; any part of a floor
            slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at
            the upper end of a hall.
  
      8. (Weaving) A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the
            warp in pacing the web.
  
      {Geometrical pace}, the space from heel to heel between the
            spot where one foot is set down and that where the same
            foot is again set down, loosely estimated at five feet, or
            by some at four feet and two fifths. See {Roman pace} in
            the Note under def. 2. [Obs.]
  
      {To} {keep, [or] hold}, {pace with}, to keep up with; to go
            as fast as. [bd]In intellect and attainments he kept pace
            with his age.[b8] --Southey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To \To\ ([?], emphatic or alone, [?], obscure or unemphatic),
      prep. [AS. t[d3]; akin to OS. & OFries. t[d3], D. toe, G. zu,
      OHG. zuo, zua, z[d3], Russ. do, Ir. & Gael. do, OL. -do, -du,
      as in endo, indu, in, Gr. [?], as in [?] homeward. [fb]200.
      Cf. {Too}, {Tatoo} a beat of drums.]
      1. The preposition to primarily indicates approach and
            arrival, motion made in the direction of a place or thing
            and attaining it, access; and also, motion or tendency
            without arrival; movement toward; -- opposed to {from}.
            [bd]To Canterbury they wend.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                     Stay with us, go not to Wittenberg.   --Shak.
  
                     So to the sylvan lodge They came, that like Pomona's
                     arbor smiled.                                    --Milton.
  
                     I'll to him again, . . . He'll tell me all his
                     purpose. She stretched her arms to heaven. --Dryden.
  
      2. Hence, it indicates motion, course, or tendency toward a
            time, a state or condition, an aim, or anything capable of
            being regarded as a limit to a tendency, movement, or
            action; as, he is going to a trade; he is rising to wealth
            and honor.
  
      Note: Formerly, by omission of the verb denoting motion, to
               sometimes followed a form of be, with the sense of at,
               or in. [bd]When the sun was [gone or declined] to
               rest.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
      3. In a very general way, and with innumerable varieties of
            application, to connects transitive verbs with their
            remoter or indirect object, and adjectives, nouns, and
            neuter or passive verbs with a following noun which limits
            their action. Its sphere verges upon that of for, but it
            contains less the idea of design or appropriation; as,
            these remarks were addressed to a large audience; let us
            keep this seat to ourselves; a substance sweet to the
            taste; an event painful to the mind; duty to God and to
            our parents; a dislike to spirituous liquor.
  
                     Marks and points out each man of us to slaughter.
                                                                              --B. Jonson.
  
                     Whilst they, distilled Almost to jelly with the act
                     of fear, Stand dumb and speak not to him. --Shak.
  
                     Add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge;
                     and to knowledge temperance; and to temperance
                     patience; and to patience godliness; and to
                     godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly
                     kindness charity.                              --2 Pet. i.
                                                                              5,6,7.
  
                     I have a king's oath to the contrary. --Shak.
  
                     Numbers were crowded to death.            --Clarendon.
  
                     Fate and the dooming gods are deaf to tears.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     Go, buckle to the law.                        --Dryden.
  
      4. As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of
            last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun,
            and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb
            or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going;
            good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead
            my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost
            constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations
            where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the
            infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to
            learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is
            noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the
            infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage
            formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what
            went ye out for see? (--Matt. xi. 8).
  
                     Then longen folk to go on pilgrimages, And palmers
                     for to seeken strange stranders.         --Chaucer.
  
      Note: Such usage is now obsolete or illiterate. In colloquial
               usage, to often stands for, and supplies, an infinitive
               already mentioned; thus, he commands me to go with him,
               but I do not wish to.
  
      5. In many phrases, and in connection with many other words,
            to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically. Thus,
            it denotes or implies:
            (a) Extent; limit; degree of comprehension; inclusion as
                  far as; as, they met us to the number of three
                  hundred.
  
                           We ready are to try our fortunes To the last
                           man.                                             --Shak.
  
                           Few of the Esquimaux can count to ten. --Quant.
                                                                              Rev.
            (b) Effect; end; consequence; as, the prince was flattered
                  to his ruin; he engaged in a war to his cost; violent
                  factions exist to the prejudice of the state.
            (c) Apposition; connection; antithesis; opposition; as,
                  they engaged hand to hand.
  
                           Now we see through a glass, darkly; but then
                           face to face.                              --1 Cor. xiii.
                                                                              12.
            (d) Accord; adaptation; as, an occupation to his taste;
                  she has a husband to her mind.
  
                           He to God's image, she to his was made.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) Comparison; as, three is to nine as nine is to
                  twenty-seven; it is ten to one that you will offend
                  him.
  
                           All that they did was piety to this. --B.
                                                                              Jonson.
            (f) Addition; union; accumulation.
  
                           Wisdom he has, and to his wisdom, courage.
                                                                              --Denham.
            (g) Accompaniment; as, she sang to his guitar; they danced
                  to the music of a piano.
  
                           Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian
                           mood Of flutes and soft recorders. --Milton.
            (h) Character; condition of being; purpose subserved or
                  office filled. [In this sense archaic] [bd]I have a
                  king here to my flatterer.[b8] --Shak.
  
                           Made his masters and others . . . to consider
                           him to a little wonder.               --Walton.
  
      Note: To in to-day, to-night, and to-morrow has the sense or
               force of for or on; for, or on, (this) day, for, or on,
               (this) night, for, or on, (the) morrow. To-day,
               to-night, to-morrow may be considered as compounds, and
               usually as adverbs; but they are sometimes used as
               nouns; as, to-day is ours.
  
                        To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow; Creeps
                        in this petty pace from day to day. --Shak.
  
      {To and again}, to and fro. [R.]
  
      {To and fro}, forward and back. In this phrase, to is
            adverbial.
  
                     There was great showing both to and fro. --Chaucer.
  
      {To-and-fro}, a pacing backward and forward; as, to commence
            a to-and-fro. --Tennyson.
  
      {To the face}, in front of; in behind; hence, in the presence
            of.
  
      {To wit}, to know; namely. See {Wit}, v. i.
  
      Note: To, without an object expressed, is used adverbially;
               as, put to the door, i. e., put the door to its frame,
               close it; and in the nautical expressions, to heave to,
               to come to, meaning to a certain position. To, like on,
               is sometimes used as a command, forward, set to.
               [bd]To, Achilles! to, Ajax! to![b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   To- \To-\ (?, see {To}, prep.), [AS. to- asunder; akin to G.
      zer-, and perhaps to L. dis-, or Gr. [?].]
      An obsolete intensive prefix used in the formation of
      compound verbs; as in to-beat, to-break, to-hew, to-rend,
      to-tear. See these words in the Vocabulary. See the Note on
      {All to}, or {All-to}, under {All}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Alone \A*lone"\, a. [All + one. OE. al one all allone, AS. [be]n
      one, alone. See {All}, {One}, {Lone}.]
      1. Quite by one's self; apart from, or exclusive of, others;
            single; solitary; -- applied to a person or thing.
  
                     Alone on a wide, wide sea.                  --Coleridge.
  
                     It is not good that the man should be alone. --Gen.
                                                                              ii. 18.
  
      2. Of or by itself; by themselves; without any thing more or
            any one else; without a sharer; only.
  
                     Man shall not live by bread alone.      --Luke iv. 4.
  
                     The citizens alone should be at the expense.
                                                                              --Franklin.
  
      3. Sole; only; exclusive. [R.]
  
                     God, by whose alone power and conversation we all
                     live, and move, and have our being.   --Bentley.
  
      4. Hence; Unique; rare; matchless. --Shak.
  
      Note: The adjective alone commonly follows its noun.
  
      {To} {let [or] leave} {alone}, to abstain from interfering
            with or molesting; to suffer to remain in its present
            state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dust \Dust\, n. [AS. dust; cf. LG. dust, D. duist meal dust, OD.
      doest, donst, and G. dunst vapor, OHG. tunist, dunist, a
      blowing, wind, Icel. dust dust, Dan. dyst mill dust; perh.
      akin to L. fumus smoke, E. fume. [?].]
      1. Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so
            comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind;
            that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder;
            as, clouds of dust; bone dust.
  
                     Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.
                                                                              --Gen. iii.
                                                                              19.
  
                     Stop! -- for thy tread is on an empire's dust.
                                                                              --Byron.
  
      2. A single particle of earth or other matter. [R.] [bd]To
            touch a dust of England's ground.[b8] --Shak.
  
      3. The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
  
                     For now shall sleep in the dust.         --Job vii. 21.
  
      4. The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of
            the human body.
  
                     And you may carve a shrine about my dust.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      5. Figuratively, a worthless thing.
  
                     And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust. --Shak.
  
      6. Figuratively, a low or mean condition.
  
                     [God] raiseth up the poor out of the dust. --1 Sam.
                                                                              ii. 8.
  
      7. Gold dust; hence: (Slang) Coined money; cash.
  
      {Down with the dust}, deposit the cash; pay down the money.
            [Slang] [bd]My lord, quoth the king, presently deposit
            your hundred pounds in gold, or else no going hence all
            the days of your life. . . . The Abbot down with his dust,
            and glad he escaped so, returned to Reading.[b8] --Fuller.
  
      {Dust brand} (Bot.), a fungous plant ({Ustilago Carbo}); --
            called also {smut}.
  
      {Gold dust}, fine particles of gold, such as are obtained in
            placer mining; -- often used as money, being transferred
            by weight.
  
      {In dust and ashes}. See under {Ashes}.
  
      {To bite the dust}. See under {Bite}, v. t.
  
      {To}
  
      {raise, [or] kick up, dust}, to make a commotion. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {To throw dust in one's eyes}, to mislead; to deceive.
            [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Flag \Flag\, n. [Cf. LG. & G. flagge, Sw. flagg, Dan. flag, D.
      vlag. See {Flag} to hang loose.]
      1. That which flags or hangs down loosely.
  
      2. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to
            indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask
            information; -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved
            by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors;
            as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of
                  certain hawks, owls, etc.
            (b) A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
            (c) The bushy tail of a dog, as of a setter.
  
      {Black flag}. See under {Black}.
  
      {Flag captain}, {Flag leutenant}, etc., special officers
            attached to the flagship, as aids to the flag officer.
  
      {Flag officer}, the commander of a fleet or squadron; an
            admiral, or commodore.
  
      {Flag of truse}, a white flag carried or displayed to an
            enemy, as an invitation to conference, or for the purpose
            of making some communication not hostile.
  
      {Flag share}, the flag officer's share of prize money.
  
      {Flag station} (Railroad), a station at which trains do not
            stop unless signaled to do so, by a flag hung out or
            waved.
  
      {National flag}, a flag of a particular country, on which
            some national emblem or device, is emblazoned.
  
      {Red flag}, a flag of a red color, displayed as a signal of
            danger or token of defiance; the emblem of anarchists.
  
      {To dip, the flag}, to mlower it and quickly restore it to
            its place; -- done as a mark of respect.
  
      {To hang out the white flag}, to ask truce or quarter, or, in
            some cases, to manifest a friendly design by exhibiting a
            white flag.
  
      {To hang the flag} {half-mast high [or] half-staff}, to raise
            it only half way to the mast or staff, as a token or sign
            of mourning.
  
      {To} {strike, [or] lower}, {the flag}, to haul it down, in
            token of respect, submission, or, in an engagement, of
            surrender.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag of all nations; also
            carried at a vessel's fore, to denote that an infectious
            disease is on board.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Field \Field\, n. [OE. feld, fild, AS. feld; akin to D. veld, G.
      feld, Sw. f[84]lt, Dan. felt, Icel. fold field of grass, AS.
      folde earth, land, ground, OS. folda.]
      1. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture;
            cultivated ground; the open country.
  
      2. A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece
            inclosed for tillage or pasture.
  
                     Fields which promise corn and wine.   --Byron.
  
      3. A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself.
  
                     In this glorious and well-foughten field. --Shak.
  
                     What though the field be lost?            --Milton.
  
      4. An open space; an extent; an expanse. Esp.:
            (a) Any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn
                  or projected.
            (b) The space covered by an optical instrument at one
                  view.
  
                           Without covering, save yon field of stars.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                           Ask of yonder argent fields above. --Pope.
  
      5. (Her.) The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much
            of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon
            it. See Illust. of {Fess}, where the field is represented
            as gules (red), while the fess is argent (silver).
  
      6. An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action,
            operation, or achievement; province; room.
  
                     Afforded a clear field for moral experiments.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      7. A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor
            contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the
            betting.
  
      8. (Baseball) That part of the grounds reserved for the
            players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also
            {outfield}.
  
      Note: Field is often used adjectively in the sense of
               belonging to, or used in, the fields; especially with
               reference to the operations and equipments of an army
               during a campaign away from permanent camps and
               fortifications. In most cases such use of the word is
               sufficiently clear; as, field battery; field
               fortification; field gun; field hospital, etc. A field
               geologist, naturalist, etc., is one who makes
               investigations or collections out of doors. A survey
               uses a field book for recording field notes, i.e.,
               measurment, observations, etc., made in field work
               (outdoor operations). A farmer or planter employs field
               hands, and may use a field roller or a field derrick.
               Field sports are hunting, fishing, athletic games, etc.
  
      {Coal field} (Geol.) See under {Coal}.
  
      {Field artillery}, light ordnance mounted on wheels, for the
            use of a marching army.
  
      {Field basil} (Bot.), a plant of the Mint family ({Calamintha
            Acinos}); -- called also {basil thyme}.
  
      {Field colors} (Mil.), small flags for marking out the
            positions for squadrons and battalions; camp colors.
  
      {Field cricket} (Zo[94]l.), a large European cricket
            ({Gryllus campestric}), remarkable for its loud notes.
  
      {Field day}.
            (a) A day in the fields.
            (b) (Mil.) A day when troops are taken into the field for
                  instruction in evolutions. --Farrow.
            (c) A day of unusual exertion or display; a gala day.
  
      {Field driver}, in New England, an officer charged with the
            driving of stray cattle to the pound.
  
      {Field duck} (Zo[94]l.), the little bustard ({Otis tetrax}),
            found in Southern Europe.
  
      {Field glass}. (Optics)
            (a) A binocular telescope of compact form; a lorgnette; a
                  race glass.
            (b) A small achromatic telescope, from 20 to 24 inches
                  long, and having 3 to 6 draws.
            (c) See {Field lens}.
  
      {Field lark}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The skylark.
            (b) The tree pipit.
  
      {Field lens} (Optics), that one of the two lenses forming the
            eyepiece of an astronomical telescope or compound
            microscope which is nearer the object glass; -- called
            also {field glass}.
  
      {Field madder} (Bot.), a plant ({Sherardia arvensis}) used in
            dyeing.
  
      {Field marshal} (Mil.), the highest military rank conferred
            in the British and other European armies.
  
      {Field mouse} (Zo[94]l.), a mouse inhabiting fields, as the
            campagnol and the deer mouse. See {Campagnol}, and {Deer
            mouse}.
  
      {Field officer} (Mil.), an officer above the rank of captain
            and below that of general.
  
      {Field officer's court} (U.S.Army), a court-martial
            consisting of one field officer empowered to try all
            cases, in time of war, subject to jurisdiction of garrison
            and regimental courts. --Farrow.
  
      {Field plover} (Zo[94]l.), the black-bellied plover
            ({Charadrius squatarola}); also sometimes applied to the
            Bartramian sandpiper ({Bartramia longicauda}).
  
      {Field spaniel} (Zo[94]l.), a small spaniel used in hunting
            small game.
  
      {Field sparrow}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small American sparrow ({Spizella pusilla}).
            (b) The hedge sparrow. [Eng.]
  
      {Field staff}> (Mil.), a staff formerly used by gunners to
            hold a lighted match for discharging a gun.
  
      {Field vole} (Zo[94]l.), the European meadow mouse.
  
      {Field of ice}, a large body of floating ice; a pack.
  
      {Field}, [or] {Field of view}, in a telescope or microscope,
            the entire space within which objects are seen.
  
      {Field magnet}. see under {Magnet}.
  
      {Magnetic field}. See {Magnetic}.
  
      {To back the field}, [or] {To bet on the field}. See under
            {Back}, v. t. -- {To keep the field}.
            (a) (Mil.) To continue a campaign.
            (b) To maintain one's ground against all comers.
  
      {To} {lay, [or] back}, {against the field}, to bet on (a
            horse, etc.) against all comers.
  
      {To take the field} (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Foot \Foot\ (f[oocr]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[emac]t). [OE. fot,
      foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[omac]t, pl. f[emac]t; akin to D.
      voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[omac]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod,
      Goth. f[omac]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy`s, Skr. p[be]d, Icel. fet
      step, pace measure of a foot, feta to step, find one's way.
      [fb]77, 250. Cf. {Antipodes}, {Cap-a-pie}, {Expedient}, {Fet}
      to fetch, {Fetlock}, {Fetter}, {Pawn} a piece in chess,
      {Pedal}.]
      1. (Anat.) The terminal part of the leg of man or an animal;
            esp., the part below the ankle or wrist; that part of an
            animal upon which it rests when standing, or moves. See
            {Manus}, and {Pes}.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The muscular locomotive organ of a mollusk. It
            is a median organ arising from the ventral region of body,
            often in the form of a flat disk, as in snails. See
            Illust. of {Buccinum}.
  
      3. That which corresponds to the foot of a man or animal; as,
            the foot of a table; the foot of a stocking.
  
      4. The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as
            of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or
            series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with
            inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the
            procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.
  
                     And now at foot Of heaven's ascent they lift their
                     feet.                                                --Milton.
  
      5. Fundamental principle; basis; plan; -- used only in the
            singular.
  
                     Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
                                                                              --Berkeley.
  
      6. Recognized condition; rank; footing; -- used only in the
            singular. [R.]
  
                     As to his being on the foot of a servant. --Walpole.
  
      7. A measure of length equivalent to twelve inches; one third
            of a yard. See {Yard}.
  
      Note: This measure is supposed to be taken from the length of
               a man's foot. It differs in length in different
               countries. In the United States and in England it is
               304.8 millimeters.
  
      8. (Mil.) Soldiers who march and fight on foot; the infantry,
            usually designated as the foot, in distinction from the
            cavalry. [bd]Both horse and foot.[b8] --Milton.
  
      9. (Pros.) A combination of syllables consisting a metrical
            element of a verse, the syllables being formerly
            distinguished by their quantity or length, but in modern
            poetry by the accent.
  
      10. (Naut.) The lower edge of a sail.
  
      Note: Foot is often used adjectively, signifying of or
               pertaining to a foot or the feet, or to the base or
               lower part. It is also much used as the first of
               compounds.
  
      {Foot artillery}. (Mil.)
            (a) Artillery soldiers serving in foot.
            (b) Heavy artillery. --Farrow.
  
      {Foot bank} (Fort.), a raised way within a parapet.
  
      {Foot barracks} (Mil.), barracks for infantery.
  
      {Foot bellows}, a bellows worked by a treadle. --Knight.
  
      {Foot company} (Mil.), a company of infantry. --Milton.
  
      {Foot gear}, covering for the feet, as stocking, shoes, or
            boots.
  
      {Foot hammer} (Mach.), a small tilt hammer moved by a
            treadle.
  
      {Foot iron}.
            (a) The step of a carriage.
            (b) A fetter.
  
      {Foot jaw}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Maxilliped}.
  
      {Foot key} (Mus.), an organ pedal.
  
      {Foot level} (Gunnery), a form of level used in giving any
            proposed angle of elevation to a piece of ordnance.
            --Farrow.
  
      {Foot mantle}, a long garment to protect the dress in riding;
            a riding skirt. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot page}, an errand boy; an attendant. [Obs.]
  
      {Foot passenger}, one who passes on foot, as over a road or
            bridge.
  
      {Foot pavement}, a paved way for foot passengers; a footway;
            a trottoir.
  
      {Foot poet}, an inferior poet; a poetaster. [R.] --Dryden.
  
      {Foot post}.
            (a) A letter carrier who travels on foot.
            (b) A mail delivery by means of such carriers.
  
      {Fot pound}, [and] {Foot poundal}. (Mech.) See {Foot pound}
            and {Foot poundal}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Foot press} (Mach.), a cutting, embossing, or printing
            press, moved by a treadle.
  
      {Foot race}, a race run by persons on foot. --Cowper.
  
      {Foot rail}, a railroad rail, with a wide flat flange on the
            lower side.
  
      {Foot rot}, an ulcer in the feet of sheep; claw sickness.
  
      {Foot rule}, a rule or measure twelve inches long.
  
      {Foot screw}, an adjusting screw which forms a foot, and
            serves to give a machine or table a level standing on an
            uneven place.
  
      {Foot secretion}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Sclerobase}.
  
      {Foot soldier}, a soldier who serves on foot.
  
      {Foot stick} (Printing), a beveled piece of furniture placed
            against the foot of the page, to hold the type in place.
           
  
      {Foot stove}, a small box, with an iron pan, to hold hot
            coals for warming the feet.
  
      {Foot tubercle}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Parapodium}.
  
      {Foot valve} (Steam Engine), the valve that opens to the air
            pump from the condenser.
  
      {Foot vise}, a kind of vise the jaws of which are operated by
            a treadle.
  
      {Foot waling} (Naut.), the inside planks or lining of a
            vessel over the floor timbers. --Totten.
  
      {Foot wall} (Mining), the under wall of an inclosed vein.
  
      {By foot}, [or] {On foot}, by walking; as, to pass a stream
            on foot.
  
      {Cubic foot}. See under {Cubic}.
  
      {Foot and mouth disease}, a contagious disease (Eczema
            epizo[94]tica) of cattle, sheep, swine, etc.,
            characterized by the formation of vesicles and ulcers in
            the mouth and about the hoofs.
  
      {Foot of the fine} (Law), the concluding portion of an
            acknowledgment in court by which, formerly, the title of
            land was conveyed. See {Fine of land}, under {Fine}, n.;
            also {Chirograph}. (b).
  
      {Square foot}. See under {Square}.
  
      {To be on foot}, to be in motion, action, or process of
            execution.
  
      {To keep the foot} (Script.), to preserve decorum. [bd]Keep
            thy foot when thou goest to the house of God.[b8] --Eccl.
            v. 1.
  
      {To put one's foot down}, to take a resolute stand; to be
            determined. [Colloq.]
  
      {To put the best foot foremost}, to make a good appearance;
            to do one's best. [Colloq.]
  
      {To set on foot}, to put in motion; to originate; as, to set
            on foot a subscription.
  
      {To} {put, [or] set}, {one on his feet}, to put one in a
            position to go on; to assist to start.
  
      {Under foot}.
            (a) Under the feet; (Fig.) at one's mercy; as, to trample
                  under foot. --Gibbon.
            (b) Below par. [Obs.] [bd]They would be forced to sell .
                  . . far under foot.[b8] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Foul anchor}. (Naut.) See under {Anchor}.
  
      {Foul ball} (Baseball), a ball that first strikes the ground
            outside of the foul ball lines, or rolls outside of
            certain limits.
  
      {Foul ball lines} (Baseball), lines from the home base,
            through the first and third bases, to the boundary of the
            field.
  
      {Foul berth} (Naut.), a berth in which a ship is in danger of
            fouling another vesel.
  
      {Foul bill}, [or] {Foul bill of health}, a certificate, duly
            authenticated, that a ship has come from a place where a
            contagious disorder prevails, or that some of the crew are
            infected.
  
      {Foul copy}, a rough draught, with erasures and corrections;
            -- opposed to fair or clean copy. [bd]Some writers boast
            of negligence, and others would be ashamed to show their
            foul copies.[b8] --Cowper.
  
      {Foul proof}, an uncorrected proof; a proof containing an
            excessive quantity of errors.
  
      {Foul strike} (Baseball), a strike by the batsman when any
            part of his person is outside of the lines of his
            position.
  
      {To fall foul}, to fall out; to quarrel. [Obs.] [bd]If they
            be any ways offended, they fall foul.[b8] --Burton.
  
      {To} {fall, [or] run}, {foul of}. See under {Fall}.
  
      {To make foul water}, to sail in such shallow water that the
            ship's keel stirs the mud at the bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cart \Cart\, n. [AS. cr[91]t; cf. W. cart, Ir. & Gael. cairt, or
      Icel. kartr. Cf. {Car}.]
      1. A common name for various kinds of vehicles, as a Scythian
            dwelling on wheels, or a chariot. [bd]Ph[d2]bus' cart.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      2. A two-wheeled vehicle for the ordinary purposes of
            husbandry, or for transporting bulky and heavy articles.
  
                     Packing all his goods in one poor cart. --Dryden.
  
      3. A light business wagon used by bakers, grocerymen,
            butchers, etc.
  
      4. An open two-wheeled pleasure carriage.
  
      {Cart horse}, a horse which draws a cart; a horse bred or
            used for drawing heavy loads.
  
      {Cart load}, or {Cartload}, as much as will fill or load a
            cart. In excavating and carting sand, gravel, earth, etc.,
            one third of a cubic yard of the material before it is
            loosened is estimated to be a cart load.
  
      {Cart rope}, a stout rope for fastening a load on a cart; any
            strong rope.
  
      {To} {put ([or] get [or] set)} {the cart before the horse},
            to invert the order of related facts or ideas, as by
            putting an effect for a cause.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ghost \Ghost\, n. [OE. gast, gost, soul, spirit, AS. g[be]st
      breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. g[?]st spirit, soul, D.
      geest, G. geist, and prob. to E. gaze, ghastly.]
      1. The spirit; the soul of man. [Obs.]
  
                     Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased
            person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a
            specter.
  
                     The mighty ghosts of our great Harrys rose. --Shak.
  
                     I thought that I had died in sleep, And was a
                     blessed ghost.                                    --Coleridge.
  
      3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a
            phantom; a glimmering; as, not a ghost of a chance; the
            ghost of an idea.
  
                     Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the
                     floor.                                                --Poe.
  
      4. A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the
            surfaces of one or more lenses.
  
      {Ghost moth} (Zo[94]l.), a large European moth {(Hepialus
            humuli)}; so called from the white color of the male, and
            the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also {great
            swift}.
  
      {Holy Ghost}, the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter;
            (Theol.) the third person in the Trinity.
  
      {To} {give up [or] yield up} {the ghost}, to die; to expire.
  
                     And he gave up the ghost full softly. --Chaucer.
  
                     Jacob . . . yielded up the ghost, and was gathered
                     unto his people.                                 --Gen. xlix.
                                                                              33.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Chide \Chide\ (ch[imac]d), v. t. [imp. {Chid} (ch[icr]d), or
      {Chode} (ch[imac]d Obs.); p. p. {Chidden}, {Chid}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Chiding}.] [AS. c[c6]dan; of unknown origin.]
      1. To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.
  
                     Upbraided, chid, and rated at.            --Shak.
  
      2. Fig.: To be noisy about; to chafe against.
  
                     The sea that chides the banks of England. --Shak.
  
      {To} {chide hither, chide from, [or] chide away}, to cause to
            come, or to drive away, by scolding or reproof.
  
      Syn: To blame; rebuke; reprove; scold; censure; reproach;
               reprehend; reprimand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grindstone \Grind"stone`\, n.
      A flat, circular stone, revolving on an axle, for grinding or
      sharpening tools, or shaping or smoothing objects.
  
      {To} {hold, pat, [or] bring} {one's nose to the grindstone},
            to oppress one; to keep one in a condition of servitude.
  
                     They might be ashamed, for lack of courage, to
                     suffer the Laced[91]monians to hold their noses to
                     the grindstone.                                 --Sir T.
                                                                              North.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hand \Hand\, n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand,
      OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[94]nd, Goth. handus, and perh.
      to Goth. hinpan to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.]
      1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in
            man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other
            animals; manus; paw. See {Manus}.
  
      2. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the
            office of, a human hand; as:
            (a) A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or
                  any one of the four extremities of a monkey.
            (b) An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute
                  hand of a clock.
  
      3. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, -- four inches; a
            palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses.
  
      4. Side; part; direction, either right or left.
  
                     On this hand and that hand, were hangings. --Ex.
                                                                              xxxviii. 15.
  
                     The Protestants were then on the winning hand.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      5. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill;
            dexterity.
  
                     He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      6. Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence,
            manner of performance.
  
                     To change the hand in carrying on the war.
                                                                              --Clarendon.
  
                     Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my
                     hand.                                                --Judges vi.
                                                                              36.
  
      7. An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or
            competent for special service or duty; a performer more or
            less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand
            at speaking.
  
                     A dictionary containing a natural history requires
                     too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be
                     hoped for.                                          --Locke.
  
                     I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile.
                                                                              --Hazlitt.
  
      8. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad or
            running hand. Hence, a signature.
  
                     I say she never did invent this letter; This is a
                     man's invention and his hand.            --Shak.
  
                     Some writs require a judge's hand.      --Burril.
  
      9. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction;
            management; -- usually in the plural. [bd]Receiving in
            hand one year's tribute.[b8] --Knolles.
  
                     Albinus . . . found means to keep in his hands the
                     goverment of Britain.                        --Milton.
  
      10. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to
            buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when
            new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the
            producer's hand, or when not new.
  
      11. Rate; price. [Obs.] [bd]Business is bought at a dear
            hand, where there is small dispatch.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      12. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as:
            (a) (Card Playing) The quota of cards received from the
                  dealer.
            (b) (Tobacco Manuf.) A bundle of tobacco leaves tied
                  together.
  
      13. (Firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock,
            which is grasped by the hand in taking aim.
  
      Note: Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts
               or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the
               hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a
               symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as:
            (a) Activity; operation; work; -- in distinction from the
                  head, which implies thought, and the heart, which
                  implies affection. [bd]His hand will be against every
                  man.[b8] --Gen. xvi. 12.
            (b) Power; might; supremacy; -- often in the Scriptures.
                  [bd]With a mighty hand . . . will I rule over
                  you.[b8] --Ezek. xx. 33.
            (c) Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to
                  give the right hand.
            (d) Contract; -- commonly of marriage; as, to ask the
                  hand; to pledge the hand.
  
      Note: Hand is often used adjectively or in compounds (with or
               without the hyphen), signifying performed by the hand;
               as, hand blow or hand-blow, hand gripe or hand-gripe:
               used by, or designed for, the hand; as, hand ball or
               handball, hand bow, hand fetter, hand grenade or
               hand-grenade, handgun or hand gun, handloom or hand
               loom, handmill or hand organ or handorgan, handsaw or
               hand saw, hand-weapon: measured or regulated by the
               hand; as, handbreadth or hand's breadth, hand gallop or
               hand-gallop. Most of the words in the following
               paragraph are written either as two words or in
               combination.
  
      {Hand bag}, a satchel; a small bag for carrying books,
            papers, parcels, etc.
  
      {Hand basket}, a small or portable basket.
  
      {Hand bell}, a small bell rung by the hand; a table bell.
            --Bacon.
  
      {Hand bill}, a small pruning hook. See 4th {Bill}.
  
      {Hand car}. See under {Car}.
  
      {Hand director} (Mus.), an instrument to aid in forming a
            good position of the hands and arms when playing on the
            piano; a hand guide.
  
      {Hand drop}. See {Wrist drop}.
  
      {Hand gallop}. See under {Gallop}.
  
      {Hand gear} (Mach.), apparatus by means of which a machine,
            or parts of a machine, usually operated by other power,
            may be operated by hand.
  
      {Hand glass}.
            (a) A glass or small glazed frame, for the protection of
                  plants.
            (b) A small mirror with a handle.
  
      {Hand guide}. Same as {Hand director} (above).
  
      {Hand language}, the art of conversing by the hands, esp. as
            practiced by the deaf and dumb; dactylology.
  
      {Hand lathe}. See under {Lathe}.
  
      {Hand money}, money paid in hand to bind a contract; earnest
            money.
  
      {Hand organ} (Mus.), a barrel organ, operated by a crank
            turned by hand.
  
      {Hand plant}. (Bot.) Same as {Hand tree} (below). -- {Hand
            rail}, a rail, as in staircases, to hold by. --Gwilt.
  
      {Hand sail}, a sail managed by the hand. --Sir W. Temple.
  
      {Hand screen}, a small screen to be held in the hand.
  
      {Hand screw}, a small jack for raising heavy timbers or
            weights; (Carp.) a screw clamp.
  
      {Hand staff} (pl. {Hand staves}), a javelin. --Ezek. xxxix.
            9.
  
      {Hand stamp}, a small stamp for dating, addressing, or
            canceling papers, envelopes, etc.
  
      {Hand tree} (Bot.), a lofty tree found in Mexico
            ({Cheirostemon platanoides}), having red flowers whose
            stamens unite in the form of a hand.
  
      {Hand vise}, a small vise held in the hand in doing small
            work. --Moxon.
  
      {Hand work}, [or] {Handwork}, work done with the hands, as
            distinguished from work done by a machine; handiwork.
  
      {All hands}, everybody; all parties.
  
      {At all hands}, {On all hands}, on all sides; from every
            direction; generally.
  
      {At any hand}, {At no hand}, in any (or no) way or direction;
            on any account; on no account. [bd]And therefore at no
            hand consisting with the safety and interests of
            humility.[b8] --Jer. Taylor.
  
      {At first hand}, {At second hand}. See def. 10 (above).
  
      {At hand}.
            (a) Near in time or place; either present and within
                  reach, or not far distant. [bd]Your husband is at
                  hand; I hear his trumpet.[b8] --Shak.
            (b) Under the hand or bridle. [Obs.] [bd]Horses hot at
                  hand.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {At the hand of}, by the act of; as a gift from. [bd]Shall we
            receive good at the hand of God and shall we not receive
            evil?[b8] --Job ii. 10.
  
      {Bridle hand}. See under {Bridle}.
  
      {By hand}, with the hands, in distinction from
            instrumentality of tools, engines, or animals; as, to weed
            a garden by hand; to lift, draw, or carry by hand.
  
      {Clean hands}, freedom from guilt, esp. from the guilt of
            dishonesty in money matters, or of bribe taking. [bd]He
            that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger.[b8]
            --Job xvii. 9.
  
      {From hand to hand}, from one person to another.
  
      {Hand in hand}.
            (a) In union; conjointly; unitedly. --Swift.
            (b) Just; fair; equitable.
  
                           As fair and as good, a kind of hand in hand
                           comparison.                                 --Shak.
                 
  
      {Hand over hand}, {Hand over fist}, by passing the hands
            alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand
            over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand
            over hand.
  
      {Hand over head}, negligently; rashly; without seeing what
            one does. [Obs.] --Bacon.
  
      {Hand running}, consecutively; as, he won ten times hand
            running.
  
      {Hand off!} keep off! forbear! no interference or meddling!
           
  
      {Hand to hand}, in close union; in close fight; as, a hand to
            hand contest. --Dryden.
  
      {Heavy hand}, severity or oppression.
  
      {In hand}.
            (a) Paid down. [bd]A considerable reward in hand, and . .
                  . a far greater reward hereafter.[b8] --Tillotson.
            (b) In preparation; taking place. --Chaucer. [bd]Revels .
                  . . in hand.[b8] --Shak.
            (c) Under consideration, or in the course of transaction;
                  as, he has the business in hand.
  
      {In one's hand} [or] {hands}.
            (a) In one's possession or keeping.
            (b) At one's risk, or peril; as, I took my life in my
                  hand.
  
      {Laying on of hands}, a form used in consecrating to office,
            in the rite of confirmation, and in blessing persons.
  
      {Light hand}, gentleness; moderation.
  
      {Note of hand}, a promissory note.
  
      {Off hand}, {Out of hand}, forthwith; without delay,
            hesitation, or difficulty; promptly. [bd]She causeth them
            to be hanged up out of hand.[b8] --Spenser.
  
      {Off one's hands}, out of one's possession or care.
  
      {On hand}, in present possession; as, he has a supply of
            goods on hand.
  
      {On one's hands}, in one's possession care, or management.
  
      {Putting the hand under the thigh}, an ancient Jewish
            ceremony used in swearing.
  
      {Right hand}, the place of honor, power, and strength.
  
      {Slack hand}, idleness; carelessness; inefficiency; sloth.
  
      {Strict hand}, severe discipline; rigorous government.
  
      {To bear a hand}
            (Naut), to give help quickly; to hasten.
  
      {To bear in hand}, to keep in expectation with false
            pretenses. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To be} {hand and glove, [or] in glove} {with}. See under
            {Glove}.
  
      {To be on the mending hand}, to be convalescent or improving.
           
  
      {To bring up by hand}, to feed (an infant) without suckling
            it.
  
      {To change hand}. See {Change}.
  
      {To change hands}, to change sides, or change owners.
            --Hudibras.
  
      {To clap the hands}, to express joy or applause, as by
            striking the palms of the hands together.
  
      {To come to hand}, to be received; to be taken into
            possession; as, the letter came to hand yesterday.
  
      {To get hand}, to gain influence. [Obs.]
  
                     Appetites have . . . got such a hand over them.
                                                                              --Baxter.
  
      {To got one's hand in}, to make a beginning in a certain
            work; to become accustomed to a particular business.
  
      {To have a hand in}, to be concerned in; to have a part or
            concern in doing; to have an agency or be employed in.
  
      {To have in hand}.
            (a) To have in one's power or control. --Chaucer.
            (b) To be engaged upon or occupied with.
  
      {To have one's hands full}, to have in hand al that one can
            do, or more than can be done conveniently; to be pressed
            with labor or engagements; to be surrounded with
            difficulties.
  
      {To} {have, [or] get}, {the (higher) upper hand}, to have, or
            get, the better of another person or thing.
  
      {To his hand}, {To my hand}, etc., in readiness; already
            prepared. [bd]The work is made to his hands.[b8] --Locke.
  
      {To hold hand}, to compete successfully or on even
            conditions. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      {To lay hands on}, to seize; to assault.
  
      {To lend a hand}, to give assistance.
  
      {To} {lift, [or] put forth}, {the hand against}, to attack;
            to oppose; to kill.
  
      {To live from hand to mouth}, to obtain food and other
            necessaries as want compels, without previous provision.
           
  
      {To make one's hand}, to gain advantage or profit.
  
      {To put the hand unto}, to steal. --Ex. xxii. 8.
  
      {To put the}
  
      {last, [or] finishing},
  
      {hand to}, to make the last corrections in; to complete; to
            perfect.
  
      {To set the hand to}, to engage in; to undertake.
  
                     That the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that
                     thou settest thine hand to.               --Deut. xxiii.
                                                                              20.
  
      {To stand one in hand}, to concern or affect one.
  
      {To strike hands}, to make a contract, or to become surety
            for another's debt or good behavior.
  
      {To take in hand}.
            (a) To attempt or undertake.
            (b) To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand.
  
      {To wash the hands of}, to disclaim or renounce interest in,
            or responsibility for, a person or action; as, to wash
            one's hands of a business. --Matt. xxvii. 24.
  
      {Under the hand of}, authenticated by the handwriting or
            signature of; as, the deed is executed under the hand and
            seal of the owner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: The constable of France was the first officer of the
               crown, and had the chief command of the army. It was
               also his duty to regulate all matters of chivalry. The
               office was suppressed in 1627. The constable, or lord
               high constable, of England, was one of the highest
               officers of the crown, commander in chief of the
               forces, and keeper of the peace of the nation. He also
               had judicial cognizance of many important matters. The
               office was as early as the Conquest, but has been
               disused (except on great and solemn occasions), since
               the attainder of Stafford, duke of Buckingham, in the
               reign of Henry VIII.
  
      2. (Law) An officer of the peace having power as a
            conservator of the public peace, and bound to execute the
            warrants of judicial officers. --Bouvier.
  
      Note: In England, at the present time, the constable is a
               conservator of the peace within his district, and is
               also charged by various statutes with other duties,
               such as serving summons, precepts, warrants, etc. In
               the United States, constables are town or city officers
               of the peace, with powers similar to those of the
               constables of England. In addition to their duties as
               conservators of the peace, they are invested with
               others by statute, such as to execute civil as well as
               criminal process in certain cases, to attend courts,
               keep juries, etc. In some cities, there are officers
               called {high constables}, who act as chiefs of the
               constabulary or police force. In other cities the title
               of constable, as well as the office, is merged in that
               of the police officer.
  
      {High constable}, a constable having certain duties and
            powers within a hundred. [Eng.]
  
      {Petty constable}, a conservator of the peace within a parish
            or tithing; a tithingman. [Eng.]
  
      {Special constable}, a person appointed to act as constable
            of special occasions.
  
      {To} {overrun, [or] outrun}, {the constable}, to spend more
            than one's income; to get into debt. [Colloq.] --Smollett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {To} {raise, [or] lift}, {the horn} (Script.), to exalt one's
            self; to act arrogantly. [bd]'Gainst them that raised thee
            dost thou lift thy horn?[b8] --Milton.
  
      {To take a horn}, to take a drink of intoxicating liquor.
            [Low]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toe \Toe\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Toed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Toeing}.]
      To touch or reach with the toes; to come fully up to; as, to
      toe the mark.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toe \Toe\, v. i.
      To hold or carry the toes (in a certain way).
  
      {To toe in}, to stand or carry the feet in such a way that
            the toes of either foot incline toward the other.
  
      {To toe out}, to have the toes of each foot, in standing or
            walking, incline from the other foot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toe \Toe\, n. [OE. too, taa, AS. t[be]; akin to D. teen, G.
      zehe, OHG. z[c7]ha, Icel. t[be], Sw. t[86], Dan. taa; of
      uncertain origin. [fb]60.]
      1. (Anat.) One of the terminal members, or digits, of the
            foot of a man or an animal. [bd]Each one, tripping on his
            toe.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The fore part of the hoof or foot of an animal.
  
      3. Anything, or any part, corresponding to the toe of the
            foot; as, the toe of a boot; the toe of a skate.
  
      4. (Mach.)
            (a) The journal, or pivot, at the lower end of a revolving
                  shaft or spindle, which rests in a step.
            (b) A lateral projection at one end, or between the ends,
                  of a piece, as a rod or bolt, by means of which it is
                  moved.
            (c) A projection from the periphery of a revolving piece,
                  acting as a cam to lift another piece.
  
      {Toe biter} (Zo[94]l.), a tadpole; a polliwig.
  
      {Toe drop} (Med.), a morbid condition of the foot in which
            the toe is depressed and the heel elevated, as in talipes
            equinus. See {Talipes}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tohew \To*hew"\, v. t. [Pref. to- + hew.]
      To hew in pieces. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Too \Too\, adv. [The same word as to, prep. See {To}.]
      1. Over; more than enough; -- noting excess; as, a thing is
            too long, too short, or too wide; too high; too many; too
            much.
  
                     His will, too strong to bend, too proud to learn.
                                                                              --Cowley.
  
      2. Likewise; also; in addition.
  
                     An honest courtier, yet a patriot too. --Pope.
  
                     Let those eyes that view The daring crime, behold
                     the vengeance too.                              --Pope.
  
      {Too too}, a duplication used to signify great excess.
  
                     O that this too too solid flesh would melt. --Shak.
  
                     Such is not Charles his too too active age.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      Syn: Also; likewise. See {Also}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tow \Tow\, n. [OE. tow, AS. tow, akin to OD. touw, Icel. [?] a
      tuft of wool for spinning; cf. E. taw, v.t.]
      The coarse and broken part of flax or hemp, separated from
      the finer part by the hatchel or swingle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tow \Tow\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Towed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Towing}.] [OE. towen, to[?]en; akin to OFries. toga to pull
      about, OHG. zog[d3]n, Icel. toga, AS. tohline a towline, and
      AS.te[a2]n to draw, p. p. getogen. See {Tug}]
      To draw or pull through the water, as a vessel of any kind,
      by means of a rope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tow \Tow\, n. [Cf. Icel. taug a rope, from the same root as E.
      tow, v. t.]
      1. A rope by which anything is towed; a towline, or towrope.
  
      2. The act of towing, or the state of being towed; --chiefly
            used in the phrase, to take in tow, that is to tow.
  
      3. That which is towed, or drawn by a towline, as a barge,
            raft, collection of boats, ect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Towhee \To*whee"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The chewink.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Towy \Tow"y\ (t[omac]"[ycr]), a.
      Composed of, or like, tow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toy \Toy\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {toyed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {toying}.]
      To dally amorously; to trifle; to play.
  
               To toy, to wanton, dally, smile and jest. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toy \Toy\, v. t.
      To treat foolishly. [Obs.] --E. Dering (1576).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Toy \Toy\ (toi), n. [D. tuid tools, implements, stuff, trash,
      speeltuig playthings, toys; akin to G. zeug stuff, materials,
      MNG. ziuc, Icel. tygi gear; all ultimately from the root of
      E. tug, v. t.; cf. G. zeugen to beget, MHG. ziugen to beget,
      make ready, procure. See {Tug}, v. t.]
      1. A plaything for children; a bawble. --Cowper.
  
      2. A thing for amusement, but of no real value; an article of
            trade of little value; a trifle.
  
                     They exchange for knives, glasses, and such toys,
                     great abundance of gold and pearl.      --Abr. Abbot.
  
      3. A wild fancy; an odd conceit; idle sport; folly; trifling
            opinion.
  
                     To fly about playing their wanton toys. --Spenser.
  
                     What if a toy take'em in the heels now, and they all
                     run away.                                          --Beau. &Fl.
  
                     Nor light and idle toys my lines may vainly swell.
                                                                              --Drayton.
  
      4. Amorous dalliance; play; sport; pastime. --Milton.
  
                     To dally thus with death is no fit toy. --Spenser.
  
      5. An old story; a silly tale. --Shak.
  
      6. [Probably the same word.] A headdress of linen or woolen,
            that hangs down over the shoulders, worn by old women of
            the lower classes; -- called also {toy mutch}. [Scot.]
            [bd]Having, moreover, put on her clean toy, rokelay, and
            scarlet plaid.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tue \Tu"e\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The parson bird.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tu-whit \Tu-whit"\, Tu-whoo \Tu-whoo"\, n. & interj.
      Words imitative of the notes of the owl.
  
               Thy tu-whits are lulled, I wot, Thy tu-whoos of
               yesternight.                                          --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tway \Tway\, a. & n. [OE. twei. See {Twain}.]
      Two; twain. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Twey \Twey\, a. [See {Two}.]
      Two. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Two \Two\, n.
      1. The sum of one and one; the number next greater than one,
            and next less than three; two units or objects.
  
      2. A symbol representing two units, as 2, II., or ii.
  
      {In two}, asunder; into parts; in halves; in twain; as, cut
            in two.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Two \Two\ (t[oomac]), a. [OE. two, twa, properly fem. & neut.,
      twei, twein, tweien, properly masc. (whence E. twain), AS.
      tw[be], fem. & neut., tw[emac]gen, masc., t[umac], neut.;
      akin to OFries. tw[emac]ne, masc., tw[be], fem. & neut., OS.
      tw[emac]ne, masc., tw[be], fem., tw[emac], neut., D. twee,
      OHG. zw[emac]ne, zw[omac], zwei, G. zwei, Icel. tveir,
      tv[91]r, tvau, Sw. tv[86], Dan. to, Goth. twai, tw[omac]s,
      twa; Lith. du, Russ. dva, Ir. & Gael. da, W. dau, dwy, L.
      duo, Gr. dy`o, Skr. dva. [root]300. Cf. {Balance},
      {Barouche}, {Between}, {Bi-}, {Combine}, {Deuce} two in
      cards, {Double}, {Doubt}, {Dozen}, {Dual}, {Duet}, {Dyad},
      {Twain}, {Twelve}, {Twenty}, {Twice}, {Twilight}, {Twig},
      {Twine}, n., {Twist}.]
      One and one; twice one. [bd]Two great lights.[b8] --Gen. i.
      16. [bd]Two black clouds.[b8] --Milton.
  
      Note: Two is often joined with other words, forming compounds
               signifying divided into, consisting of, or having, two
               parts, divisions, organs, or the like; as two-bladed,
               two-celled, two-eared, two-flowered, twohand,
               two-headed, two-horse, two-leafed or two-leaved,
               two-legged, two-lobed, two-masted, two-named, two-part,
               two-petaled, two-pronged, two-seeded, two-sided,
               two-story, two-stringed, two-foothed, two-valved,
               two-winged, and the like.
  
      {One or two}, a phrase often used indefinitely for a small
            number.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Two-way \Two"-way`\, a. (Pipe Fitting)
      Serving to connect at will one pipe or channel with either of
      two others; as, a two-way cock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tye \Tye\, n.
      1. A knot; a tie. [R.] See {Tie}.
  
      2. (Naut.) A chain or rope, one end of which passes through
            the mast, and is made fast to the center of a yard; the
            other end is attached to a tackle, by means of which the
            yard is hoisted or lowered.
  
      3. (Mining) A trough for washing ores. --Knight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Tye \Tye\, v. t.
      See {Tie}, the proper orthography.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tahuya, WA
      Zip code(s): 98588

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tea, SD (city, FIPS 63100)
      Location: 43.44808 N, 96.83726 W
      Population (1990): 786 (261 housing units)
      Area: 0.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 57064

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tow, TX
      Zip code(s): 78672

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Toyah, TX (town, FIPS 73496)
      Location: 31.31251 N, 103.79347 W
      Population (1990): 115 (66 housing units)
      Area: 4.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Tye, TX (town, FIPS 74132)
      Location: 32.45320 N, 99.86935 W
      Population (1990): 1088 (492 housing units)
      Area: 13.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 79563

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   T /T/   1. [from LISP terminology for `true'] Yes.   Used in
   reply to a question (particularly one asked using {The -P
   convention}).   In LISP, the constant T means `true', among other
   things.   Some Lisp hackers use `T' and `NIL' instead of `Yes' and
   `No' almost reflexively.   This sometimes causes misunderstandings.
   When a waiter or flight attendant asks whether a hacker wants
   coffee, he may absently respond `T', meaning that he wants coffee;
   but of course he will be brought a cup of tea instead.   Fortunately,
   most hackers (particularly those who frequent Chinese restaurants)
   like tea at least as well as coffee -- so it is not that big a
   problem.   2. See {time T} (also {since time T equals minus
   infinity}).   3. [techspeak] In transaction-processing circles, an
   abbreviation for the noun `transaction'.   4. [Purdue] Alternate
   spelling of {tee}.   5. A dialect of {LISP} developed at Yale. (There
   is an intended allusion to NIL, "New Implementation of Lisp",
   another dialect of Lisp developed for the {VAX})
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   tee n.,vt.   [Purdue] A carbon copy of an electronic
   transmission.   "Oh, you're sending him the {bits} to that?   Slap on
   a tee for me."   From the Unix command `tee(1)', itself named after a
   pipe fitting (see {plumbing}).   Can also mean `save one for me', as
   in "Tee a slice for me!"   Also spelled `T'.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   toy n.   A computer system; always used with qualifiers.   1.
   `nice toy': One that supports the speaker's hacking style
   adequately.   2. `just a toy': A machine that yields insufficient
   {computron}s for the speaker's preferred uses.   This is not
   condemnatory, as is {bitty box}; toys can at least be fun.   It is
   also strongly conditioned by one's expectations; Cray XMP users
   sometimes consider the Cray-1 a `toy', and certainly all RISC boxes
   and mainframes are toys by their standards.   See also {Get a real
   computer!}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   tty /T-T-Y/, /tit'ee/ n.   The latter pronunciation was
   primarily ITS, but some Unix people say it this way as well; this
   pronunciation is _not_ considered to have sexual undertones. 1. A
   terminal of the teletype variety, characterized by a noisy
   mechanical printer, a very limited character set, and poor print
   quality.   Usage: antiquated (like the TTYs themselves).   See also
   {bit-paired keyboard}.   2. [especially Unix] Any terminal at all;
   sometimes used to refer to the particular terminal controlling a
   given job.   3. [Unix] Any serial port, whether or not the device
   connected to it is a terminal; so called because under Unix such
   devices have names of the form tty*.   Ambiguity between senses 2 and
   3 is common but seldom bothersome.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   T
  
      1. True.   A {Lisp} compiler by Johnathan A. Rees in 1982 at
      {Yale University}.   T has {static scope} and is a
      near-superset of {Scheme}.   {Unix} source is available.   T is
      written in itself and compiles to efficient native code.   Used
      as the basis for the Yale {Haskell} system.   Maintained by
      David Kranz .
  
      Current version: 3.1.
  
      {(ftp://ftp.ai.mit.edu/pub/systems/t3.1)}.
  
      A {multiprocessing} version of T is available
      {(ftp://masala.lcs.mit.edu/pub/mult)}.
  
      Runs on {Decstation}, {SPARC}, {Sun-3}, {Vax} under {Unix},
      {Encore}, {HP}, {Apollo}, {Macintosh} under {A/UX}.
  
      E-mail: (bugs).
      E-mail: .
  
      (1991-11-26)
  
      ["The T Manual", Johnathan A. Rees et
      al, Yale U, 1984].
  
      2. A {functional language}.
  
      ["T: A Simple Reduction Language Based on Combinatory Term
      Rewriting", Ida et al, Proc of Prog Future Generation
      Computers, 1988].
  
      3. (lower case) The {Lisp} {atom} used to represent "true",
      among other things.   "false" is represented using the same
      atom as an empty list, {nil}.   This {overloading} of the basic
      constants of the language helps to make Lisp {write-only
      code}.
  
      4. In transaction-processing circles, an abbreviation for
      "transaction".
  
      5. (Purdue) An alternative spelling of "{tee}".
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   \t
  
      {horizontal tabulation}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   T
  
      1. True.   A {Lisp} compiler by Johnathan A. Rees in 1982 at
      {Yale University}.   T has {static scope} and is a
      near-superset of {Scheme}.   {Unix} source is available.   T is
      written in itself and compiles to efficient native code.   Used
      as the basis for the Yale {Haskell} system.   Maintained by
      David Kranz .
  
      Current version: 3.1.
  
      {(ftp://ftp.ai.mit.edu/pub/systems/t3.1)}.
  
      A {multiprocessing} version of T is available
      {(ftp://masala.lcs.mit.edu/pub/mult)}.
  
      Runs on {Decstation}, {SPARC}, {Sun-3}, {Vax} under {Unix},
      {Encore}, {HP}, {Apollo}, {Macintosh} under {A/UX}.
  
      E-mail: (bugs).
      E-mail: .
  
      (1991-11-26)
  
      ["The T Manual", Johnathan A. Rees et
      al, Yale U, 1984].
  
      2. A {functional language}.
  
      ["T: A Simple Reduction Language Based on Combinatory Term
      Rewriting", Ida et al, Proc of Prog Future Generation
      Computers, 1988].
  
      3. (lower case) The {Lisp} {atom} used to represent "true",
      among other things.   "false" is represented using the same
      atom as an empty list, {nil}.   This {overloading} of the basic
      constants of the language helps to make Lisp {write-only
      code}.
  
      4. In transaction-processing circles, an abbreviation for
      "transaction".
  
      5. (Purdue) An alternative spelling of "{tee}".
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   \t
  
      {horizontal tabulation}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   T1
  
      An {AT&T} term for a {digital carrier}
      facility used to transmit a {DS1} formatted digital signal at
      1.544 megabits per second.
  
      T1 transmission uses a bipolar {Return To Zero} {alternate
      mark inversion} line coding scheme to keep the DC carrier
      component from saturating the line.
  
      Although some consider T1 signaling obsolete, much equipment
      operates at the "T1 rate" and such signals are either
      combined for transmission via faster circuits, or
      demultiplexed into 64 kilobit per second circuits for
      distribution to individual subscribers.
  
      T1 signals can be transported on {unshielded twisted pair}
      telephone lines.   The transmitted signal consists of pips of a
      few hundred nanoseconds width, each inverted with respect to
      the one preceding.   At the sending end the signal is 1 volt,
      and as received, greater than 0.01 volts.   This requires
      repeaters about every 6000 feet.
  
      The information is contained in the timing of the signals, not
      the polarity.   When a long sequence of bits in the transmitted
      information would cause no pip to be sent, "{bit stuffing}" is
      used so the receiving apparatus will not lose track of the
      sending clock.
  
      A T1 circuit requires two twisted pair lines, one for each
      direction.   Some newer equipment uses the two lines at half
      the T1 rate and in {full-duplex} mode; the sent and received
      signals are separated at each end by components collectively
      called a "hybrid".   Although this technique requires more
      sophisticated equipment and lowers the line length, an
      advantage is that half the sent and half the received
      information is mixed on any one line, making low-tech wiretaps
      less a threat.
  
      See also {Integrated Services Digital Network}.
  
      (1994-11-23)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   T3
  
      A {digital carrier} facility used to transmit
      a {DS3} formatted digital signal at 44.736 megabits per
      second.
  
      See also {Integrated Services Digital Network}.
  
      (1994-11-23)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TA
  
      {Terminal Adaptor}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TAA
  
      {Track Average Amplitude}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TAO
  
      Lisp dialect with concurrency, object-orientation and logic.
      "Concurrent Programming in TAO - Practice and Experience",
      I. Takeuchi in Parallel Lisp: Languages and Systems, T. Ito et
      al eds, LNCS 441, Springer 1989, pp.271-299.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   td
  
      The {country code} for Chad.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TDD
  
      {Telecommunications Device for the Deaf}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TDI
  
      {Transport Driver Interface}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tee
  
      A {Unix} command which copies its
      {standard input} to its {standard output} (like {cat}) but
      also to a file given as its argument.   tee is thus useful in
      {pipeline}s of {Unix} commands (see {plumbing}) where it
      allows you to create a duplicate copy of the data stream.
      E.g.
  
      egrep Unix Dictionary | tee /dev/tty | wc -l
  
      searches for lines containing the string "Unix" in the file
      "Dictionary", prints them to the terminal (/dev/tty) and
      counts them.
  
      {Unix manual page}: tee(1).
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1996-01-22)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TEI
  
      1. {Terminal Endpoint Identifier}.
  
      2. {Text Encoding Initiative}.
  
      (1997-03-11)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   th
  
      The {country code} for Thailand.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   T.H.E
  
      The {operating system} in which
      {semaphores} were first used.
  
      [Details?]
  
      (1999-10-12)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   THEO
  
      A {frame language}.
  
      ["Theo: A Framework for Self-Improving Systems", Mitchell et
      al, in Architectures for Intelligence, K. VanLehn ed, Erlbaum,
      1989].
  
      (1994-12-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TIA
  
      1. Thanks in advance.
  
      2. {Telecommunications Industry Association}.
  
      3. The {Internet Adapter}.
  
      4. {Television Interface Adaptor}.
  
      (1999-12-06)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   to
  
      The {country code} for Tonga.
  
      Heavily used for {vanity domains} because it looks like the
      English word "to".
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   toy
  
      A computer system; always used with qualifiers.
  
      1. "nice toy": One that supports the speaker's hacking style
      adequately.
  
      2. "just a toy": A machine that yields insufficient
      {computron}s for the speaker's preferred uses.   This is not
      condemnatory, as is {bitty box}; toys can at least be fun.   It
      is also strongly conditioned by one's expectations; Cray XMP
      users sometimes consider the Cray-1 a "toy", and certainly all
      RISC boxes and mainframes are toys by their standards.   See
      also {Get a real computer!}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tt
  
      The {country code} for Trinidad and Tobago.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TTD
  
      {Telecommunications Device for the Deaf}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tty
  
      /tit'ee/ ({ITS} pronunciation, but some {Unix}
      people say it this way as well; this pronunciation is not
      considered to have sexual undertones), /T T Y/
  
      1. {teletypewriter}.
  
      2. (Especially {Unix}) Any terminal at all; sometimes used to
      refer to the particular terminal controlling a given job (it
      is also the name of a Unix command which outputs the name of
      the current controlling terminal).
  
      3. ({Unix}) Any {serial port}, whether or not the device
      connected to it is a terminal; so called because under Unix
      such devices have names of the form tty*.   Ambiguity between
      senses 2 and 3 is common but seldom bothersome.
  
      4. A {TDD}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-11-23)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   TUI
  
     
  
      1. {Textual User Interface}.
  
      2. Terminal User Interface.   Alternative name for {Textual
      User Interface}.
  
      3. {Telephony User Interface}.
  
      4. {Tangible User Interface}.
  
      5. {Tactile User Interface}.
  
      6. {Telescope User Interface}.
  
      (2003-10-17)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   tw
  
      The {country code} for Taiwan.
  
      (1999-01-27)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Tohu
      one of Samuel's ancestors (1 Sam. 1:1).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Toi
      a king of Hamath, who sent "Joram his son unto King David to
      salute him," when he "heard that David had smitten all the host
      of Hadadezer" (2 Sam. 8:9, 10). Called Tou (1 Chr. 18:9, 10).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Tow
      (Judg. 16:9). See {FLAX}.
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Toah, weapon; dart
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Tohu, that lives; that declares
  

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Toi, who wanders
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2020
Your feedback:
Ad partners


Sprachreisen.org