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   paracentesis
         n 1: centesis of the belly to remove fluid for diagnosis [syn:
               {abdominocentesis}, {paracentesis}]

English Dictionary: Personalbeurteilung by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
paracentral scotoma
n
  1. a scotoma that is adjacent to the fixation point
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
paragon
n
  1. an ideal instance; a perfect embodiment of a concept [syn: paragon, idol, perfection, beau ideal]
  2. model of excellence or perfection of a kind; one having no equal
    Synonym(s): ideal, paragon, nonpareil, saint, apotheosis, nonesuch, nonsuch
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
paragonite
n
  1. a colorless or pale brown mica with sodium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Paraguayan
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Paraguay or its people
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Paraguay
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Paraguayan monetary unit
n
  1. monetary unit in Paraguay
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parasympathetic
adj
  1. of or relating to the parasympathetic nervous system
n
  1. originates in the brain stem and lower part of the spinal cord; opposes physiological effects of the sympathetic nervous system: stimulates digestive secretions; slows the heart; constricts the pupils; dilates blood vessels
    Synonym(s): parasympathetic nervous system, parasympathetic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parasympathetic nervous system
n
  1. originates in the brain stem and lower part of the spinal cord; opposes physiological effects of the sympathetic nervous system: stimulates digestive secretions; slows the heart; constricts the pupils; dilates blood vessels
    Synonym(s): parasympathetic nervous system, parasympathetic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parasympathomimetic
adj
  1. having an effect similar to that resulting from stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system; "parasympathomimetic drugs slow the heart rate"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parazoan
n
  1. primitive multicellular marine animal whose porous body is supported by a fibrous skeletal framework; usually occurs in sessile colonies
    Synonym(s): sponge, poriferan, parazoan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parchment
n
  1. a superior paper resembling sheepskin
  2. skin of a sheep or goat prepared for writing on
    Synonym(s): parchment, sheepskin, lambskin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
paregmenon
n
  1. juxtaposing words having a common derivation (as in `sense and sensibility')
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Paris University
n
  1. a university in Paris; intellectual center of France [syn: Paris University, University of Paris, Sorbonne]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parishioner
n
  1. a member of a parish
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parisian
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Paris or its inhabitants; "Parisian restaurants can be expensive"
n
  1. a native or resident of Paris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parisienne
n
  1. a female native or resident of Paris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parjanya
n
  1. Hindu god of rain; sometimes identified with Indra
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
park commissioner
n
  1. a commissioner in charge of public parks
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking
n
  1. space in which vehicles can be parked; "there is plenty of parking behind the store"
  2. the act of maneuvering a vehicle into a location where it can be left temporarily
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking area
n
  1. a lot where cars are parked [syn: parking lot, {car park}, park, parking area]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking brake
n
  1. a brake operated by hand; usually operates by mechanical linkage
    Synonym(s): hand brake, emergency, emergency brake, parking brake
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking lot
n
  1. a lot where cars are parked [syn: parking lot, {car park}, park, parking area]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking meter
n
  1. a coin-operated timer located next to a parking space; depositing money into it entitles you to park your car there for a specified length of time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking space
n
  1. a space where an automobile can be parked [syn: {parking space}, parking zone]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking ticket
n
  1. a ticket issued for parking in a restricted place
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parking zone
n
  1. a space where an automobile can be parked [syn: {parking space}, parking zone]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinson
n
  1. English surgeon (1755-1824) [syn: Parkinson, {James Parkinson}]
  2. British historian noted for ridicule of bureaucracies (1909-1993)
    Synonym(s): Parkinson, C. Northcote Parkinson, Cyril Northcote Parkinson
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinson's
n
  1. a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
    Synonym(s): paralysis agitans, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, Parkinson's, shaking palsy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinson's disease
n
  1. a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
    Synonym(s): paralysis agitans, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, Parkinson's, shaking palsy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinson's law
n
  1. C. Northcote Parkinson's cynical observation that work will expand so as to fill the time available for its completion
  2. C. Northcote Parkinson's cynical observation that the number of subordinates in an organization will increase linearly regardless of the amount of work to be done
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinson's syndrome
n
  1. a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
    Synonym(s): paralysis agitans, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, Parkinson's, shaking palsy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinsonia
n
  1. small genus of spiny shrubs or small trees [syn: Parkinsonia, genus Parkinsonia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinsonia aculeata
n
  1. large shrub or shrubby tree having sharp spines and pinnate leaves with small deciduous leaflets and sweet-scented racemose yellow-orange flowers; grown as ornamentals or hedging or emergency food for livestock; tropical America but naturalized in southern United States
    Synonym(s): Jerusalem thorn, horsebean, Parkinsonia aculeata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinsonia florida
n
  1. densely branched spiny tree of southwestern United States having showy yellow flowers and blue-green bark; sometimes placed in genus Cercidium
    Synonym(s): palo verde, Parkinsonia florida, Cercidium floridum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parkinsonism
n
  1. a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
    Synonym(s): paralysis agitans, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, Parkinson's, shaking palsy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parosamia
n
  1. a disorder in the sense of smell [syn: dysosmia, parosamia, olfactory impairment]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pars anterior
n
  1. the anterior part of the anterior pituitary [syn: {pars distilis}, pars anterior]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pars intermedia
n
  1. a thin piece of tissue that has become part of the posterior pituitary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pars nervosa
n
  1. the posterior lobe of the pituitary body; primarily glandular in nature
    Synonym(s): posterior pituitary, posterior pituitary gland, neurohypophysis, pars nervosa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parsimonious
adj
  1. excessively unwilling to spend; "parsimonious thrift relieved by few generous impulses"; "lived in a most penurious manner--denying himself every indulgence"
    Synonym(s): parsimonious, penurious
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parsimoniousness
n
  1. extreme care in spending money; reluctance to spend money unnecessarily
    Synonym(s): parsimony, parsimoniousness, thrift, penny-pinching
  2. extreme stinginess
    Synonym(s): meanness, minginess, niggardliness, niggardness, parsimony, parsimoniousness, tightness, tightfistedness, closeness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parsimony
n
  1. extreme care in spending money; reluctance to spend money unnecessarily
    Synonym(s): parsimony, parsimoniousness, thrift, penny-pinching
  2. extreme stinginess
    Synonym(s): meanness, minginess, niggardliness, niggardness, parsimony, parsimoniousness, tightness, tightfistedness, closeness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parsnip
n
  1. the whitish root of cultivated parsnip
  2. a strong-scented plant cultivated for its edible root
    Synonym(s): parsnip, Pastinaca sativa
  3. whitish edible root; eaten cooked
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parson
n
  1. a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
    Synonym(s): curate, minister of religion, minister, parson, pastor, rector
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parson's nose
n
  1. the tail of a dressed fowl [syn: parson's nose, {pope's nose}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
parsonage
n
  1. an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector
    Synonym(s): parsonage, vicarage, rectory
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parsons
n
  1. United States sociologist (1902-1979) [syn: Parsons, Talcott Parsons]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Parsons table
n
  1. a sturdy rectangular table with block legs at the four corners; the top and the legs are the same width
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient
n
  1. the most commonly used method of computing a correlation coefficient between variables that are linearly related
    Synonym(s): product-moment correlation coefficient, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
per centum
n
  1. a proportion in relation to a whole (which is usually the amount per hundred)
    Synonym(s): percentage, percent, per centum, pct
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percent
n
  1. a proportion in relation to a whole (which is usually the amount per hundred)
    Synonym(s): percentage, percent, per centum, pct
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percent sign
n
  1. a sign (`%') used to indicate that the number preceding it should be understood as a proportion multiplied by 100
    Synonym(s): percent sign, percentage sign
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percentage
n
  1. a proportion in relation to a whole (which is usually the amount per hundred)
    Synonym(s): percentage, percent, per centum, pct
  2. assets belonging to or due to or contributed by an individual person or group; "he wanted his share in cash"
    Synonym(s): share, portion, part, percentage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percentage point
n
  1. the dot at the left of a decimal fraction [syn: {decimal point}, percentage point, point]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percentage sign
n
  1. a sign (`%') used to indicate that the number preceding it should be understood as a proportion multiplied by 100
    Synonym(s): percent sign, percentage sign
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
percentile
n
  1. (statistics) any of the 99 numbered points that divide an ordered set of scores into 100 parts each of which contains one-hundredth of the total
    Synonym(s): percentile, centile
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perchance
adv
  1. through chance, "To sleep, perchance to dream.." [syn: perchance, by chance]
  2. by chance; "perhaps she will call tomorrow"; "we may possibly run into them at the concert"; "it may peradventure be thought that there never was such a time"
    Synonym(s): possibly, perchance, perhaps, maybe, mayhap, peradventure
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perching bird
n
  1. a bird with feet adapted for perching (as on tree branches); this order is now generally abandoned by taxonomists
    Synonym(s): Insessores, order Insessores, perching bird, percher
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Percina
n
  1. a genus of Percidae
    Synonym(s): Percina, genus Percina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Percina tanasi
n
  1. a small snail-eating perch of the Tennessee River [syn: snail darter, Percina tanasi]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Percomorphi
n
  1. one of the largest natural groups of fishes of both marine and fresh water: true perches; basses; tuna
    Synonym(s): Perciformes, order Perciformes, Percomorphi, order Percomorphi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pergamum
n
  1. an ancient Greek city located in the western part of what is now modern Turkey; the technique of preparing sheepskins as parchment was developed here
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pericementoclasia
n
  1. pus pocket formation around a tooth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perigon
n
  1. an angle of 360 degrees
    Synonym(s): perigon, round angle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perigonal
adj
  1. of or relating to a perigone
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perigone
n
  1. collective term for the outer parts of a flower consisting of the calyx and corolla and enclosing the stamens and pistils
    Synonym(s): perianth, chlamys, floral envelope, perigone, perigonium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perigonium
n
  1. collective term for the outer parts of a flower consisting of the calyx and corolla and enclosing the stamens and pistils
    Synonym(s): perianth, chlamys, floral envelope, perigone, perigonium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perkiness
n
  1. cheerfulness that bubbles to the surface [syn: buoyancy, perkiness]
  2. inappropriate playfulness
    Synonym(s): impertinence, perkiness, pertness, sauciness, archness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Perognathus
n
  1. pocket mice
    Synonym(s): Perognathus, genus Perognathus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Perognathus flavescens
n
  1. small rodent of open areas of United States plains states
    Synonym(s): plains pocket mouse, Perognathus flavescens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Perognathus flavus
n
  1. small pale yellowish soft-furred rodent of southwestern United States and Mexico
    Synonym(s): silky pocket mouse, Perognathus flavus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Perognathus hispidus
n
  1. large stiff-haired rodent of shortgrass prairies of United States
    Synonym(s): hispid pocket mouse, Perognathus hispidus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persea Americana
n
  1. tropical American tree bearing large pulpy green fruits
    Synonym(s): avocado, avocado tree, Persea Americana
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pershing
n
  1. United States general who commanded the American forces in Europe during World War I (1860-1948)
    Synonym(s): Pershing, John Joseph Pershing, Black Jack Pershing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian
adj
  1. of or relating to Iran or its people or language or culture; "Iranian mountains"; "Iranian security police"
    Synonym(s): Iranian, Persian
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Iran; "the majority of Irani are Persian Shiite Muslims"
    Synonym(s): Irani, Iranian, Persian
  2. the language of Persia (Iran) in any of its ancient forms
    Synonym(s): Persian, Farsi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian cat
n
  1. a long-haired breed of cat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian deity
n
  1. a deity worshiped by the ancient Persians
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian Empire
n
  1. an empire in southern Asia created by Cyrus the Great in the 6th century BC and destroyed by Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC
    Synonym(s): Persia, Persian Empire
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian Gulf
n
  1. a shallow arm of the Arabian Sea between Iran and the Arabian peninsula; the Persian Gulf oil fields are among the most productive in the world
    Synonym(s): Persian Gulf, Arabian Gulf
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian Gulf illness
n
  1. a medical condition of uncertain origin that affected many veterans of the 1991 Gulf War; characterized by fatigue and headache and dizziness and nausea and rashes and joint pain and respiratory disorders
    Synonym(s): Gulf War syndrome, Persian Gulf illness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian Gulf War
n
  1. a war fought between Iraq and a coalition led by the United States that freed Kuwait from Iraqi invaders; 1990-1991
    Synonym(s): Persian Gulf War, Gulf War
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian iris
n
  1. bulbous iris native to Asia Minor cultivated for its pale lilac-colored flowers
    Synonym(s): Persian iris, Iris persica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian lamb
n
  1. the fur of a karakul lamb
  2. a karakul lamb
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian lilac
n
  1. tree of northern India and China having purple blossoms and small inedible yellow fruits; naturalized in the southern United States as a shade tree
    Synonym(s): chinaberry, chinaberry tree, China tree, Persian lilac, pride- of-India, azederach, azedarach, Melia azederach, Melia azedarach
  2. small densely branching Asiatic shrub having lanceolate leaves and panicles of fragrant lilac flowers
    Synonym(s): Persian lilac, Syringa persica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian melon
n
  1. any of a variety of muskmelon vines having fruit with a smooth white rind and white or greenish flesh that does not have a musky smell
    Synonym(s): winter melon, Persian melon, honeydew melon, winter melon vine, Cucumis melo inodorus
  2. the fruit of a variety of winter melon vine; a large green melon with orange flesh
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian violet
n
  1. perennial cultivated especially as a houseplant for its fragrant bluish to dark lavender flowers
    Synonym(s): Persian violet, Exacum affine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persian walnut
n
  1. Eurasian walnut valued for its large edible nut and its hard richly figured wood; widely cultivated
    Synonym(s): English walnut, English walnut tree, Circassian walnut, Persian walnut, Juglans regia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persimmon
n
  1. any of several tropical trees of the genus Diospyros [syn: persimmon, persimmon tree]
  2. orange fruit resembling a plum; edible when fully ripe
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persimmon tree
n
  1. any of several tropical trees of the genus Diospyros [syn: persimmon, persimmon tree]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persnickety
adj
  1. (used colloquially) overly conceited or arrogant; "a snotty little scion of a degenerate family"-Laurent Le Sage; "they're snobs--stuck-up and uppity and persnickety"
    Synonym(s): bigheaded, persnickety, snooty, snot-nosed, snotty, stuck-up, too big for one's breeches, uppish
  2. characterized by excessive precision and attention to trivial details; "a persnickety job"; "a persnickety school teacher"
    Synonym(s): pernickety, persnickety
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person
n
  1. a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
    Synonym(s): person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, soul
  2. a human body (usually including the clothing); "a weapon was hidden on his person"
  3. a grammatical category used in the classification of pronouns, possessive determiners, and verb forms according to whether they indicate the speaker, the addressee, or a third party; "stop talking about yourself in the third person"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person agreement
n
  1. agreement in person between pronouns and verbs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person hour
n
  1. a time unit used in industry for measuring work [syn: {man hour}, person hour]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person of color
n
  1. (formal) any non-European non-white person [syn: {person of color}, person of colour]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person of colour
n
  1. (formal) any non-European non-white person [syn: {person of color}, person of colour]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
person-to-person
adv
  1. (of two persons) in direct encounter; "preferred to settle the matter one-on-one"; "interviewed her person- to-person"
    Synonym(s): one-on-one, person-to-person
adj
  1. involving direct communication or contact between persons or parties; "a person-to-person interview"; "person-to- person telephone calls"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persona
n
  1. an actor's portrayal of someone in a play; "she played the part of Desdemona"
    Synonym(s): character, role, theatrical role, part, persona
  2. (Jungian psychology) a personal facade that one presents to the world; "a public image is as fragile as Humpty Dumpty"
    Synonym(s): persona, image
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persona grata
n
  1. a diplomat who is acceptable to the government to which he is sent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
persona non grata
n
  1. a diplomat who is unacceptable to the government to which he is sent
  2. a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome
    Synonym(s): unwelcome person, persona non grata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personable
adj
  1. (of persons) pleasant in appearance and personality
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personableness
n
  1. the complex of attributes that make a person socially attractive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personage
n
  1. another word for person; a person not meriting identification; "a strange personage appeared at the door"
  2. a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events
    Synonym(s): important person, influential person, personage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal
adj
  1. concerning or affecting a particular person or his or her private life and personality; "a personal favor"; "for your personal use"; "personal papers"; "I have something personal to tell you"; "a personal God"; "he has his personal bank account and she has hers"
    Antonym(s): impersonal
  2. particular to a given individual
  3. of or arising from personality; "personal magnetism"
  4. intimately concerning a person's body or physical being; "personal hygiene"
  5. indicating grammatical person; "personal verb endings"
n
  1. a short newspaper article about a particular person or group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal appeal
n
  1. a personal attractiveness or interestingness that enables you to influence others
    Synonym(s): charisma, personal appeal, personal magnetism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal business
n
  1. matters of personal concern; "get his affairs in order"
    Synonym(s): personal business, personal matters, affairs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal care
n
  1. care for someone who is disabled or is otherwise unable to care for themselves; can including bathing and cooking and managing bodily functions
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal chattel
n
  1. personal as opposed to real property; any tangible movable property (furniture or domestic animals or a car etc)
    Synonym(s): chattel, personal chattel, movable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal check
n
  1. a check drawn against funds deposited in your personal checking account
    Synonym(s): personal check, personal cheque
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal cheque
n
  1. a check drawn against funds deposited in your personal checking account
    Synonym(s): personal check, personal cheque
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal computer
n
  1. a small digital computer based on a microprocessor and designed to be used by one person at a time
    Synonym(s): personal computer, PC, microcomputer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal credit line
n
  1. the maximum credit that a customer is allowed [syn: {credit line}, line of credit, bank line, line, personal credit line, personal line of credit]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal digital assistant
n
  1. a lightweight consumer electronic device that looks like a hand-held computer but instead performs specific tasks; can serve as a diary or a personal database or a telephone or an alarm clock etc.
    Synonym(s): personal digital assistant, PDA, personal organizer, personal organiser, organizer, organiser
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal effects
n
  1. property of a personal character that is portable but not used in business; "she left some of her personal effects in the house"; "I watched over their effects until they returned"
    Synonym(s): effects, personal effects
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal equation
n
  1. variability attributable to individual differences
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal estate
n
  1. movable property (as distinguished from real estate) [syn: personal property, personal estate, personalty, private property]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal expense
n
  1. the cost of personal or family living; "some personal expenses are tax deductible"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal foul
n
  1. a foul that involves unnecessarily rough contact (as in basketball or football)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal identification number
n
  1. a number you choose and use to gain access to various accounts
    Synonym(s): personal identification number, PIN, PIN number
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal identity
n
  1. the distinct personality of an individual regarded as a persisting entity; "you can lose your identity when you join the army"
    Synonym(s): identity, personal identity, individuality
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal income
n
  1. the income received by a single individual
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal judgement
n
  1. a judgment rendered against an individual (or corporation) for the payment of money damages
    Synonym(s): judgment in personam, judgement in personam, personal judgment, personal judgement
    Antonym(s): judgement in rem, judgment in rem
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal judgment
n
  1. a judgment rendered against an individual (or corporation) for the payment of money damages
    Synonym(s): judgment in personam, judgement in personam, personal judgment, personal judgement
    Antonym(s): judgement in rem, judgment in rem
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal letter
n
  1. a letter dealing with personal affairs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal line of credit
n
  1. the maximum credit that a customer is allowed [syn: {credit line}, line of credit, bank line, line, personal credit line, personal line of credit]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal loan
n
  1. a loan that establishes consumer credit that is granted for personal use; usually unsecured and based on the borrower's integrity and ability to pay
    Synonym(s): personal loan, consumer loan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal magnetism
n
  1. a personal attractiveness or interestingness that enables you to influence others
    Synonym(s): charisma, personal appeal, personal magnetism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal manner
n
  1. a way of acting or behaving [syn: manner, {personal manner}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal matters
n
  1. matters of personal concern; "get his affairs in order"
    Synonym(s): personal business, personal matters, affairs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal memory
n
  1. memory for episodes in your own life [syn: {episodic memory}, personal memory]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal organiser
n
  1. a lightweight consumer electronic device that looks like a hand-held computer but instead performs specific tasks; can serve as a diary or a personal database or a telephone or an alarm clock etc.
    Synonym(s): personal digital assistant, PDA, personal organizer, personal organiser, organizer, organiser
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal organizer
n
  1. a lightweight consumer electronic device that looks like a hand-held computer but instead performs specific tasks; can serve as a diary or a personal database or a telephone or an alarm clock etc.
    Synonym(s): personal digital assistant, PDA, personal organizer, personal organiser, organizer, organiser
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal pronoun
n
  1. a pronoun expressing a distinction of person
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal property
n
  1. movable property (as distinguished from real estate) [syn: personal property, personal estate, personalty, private property]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal relation
n
  1. a relation between persons [syn: personal relation, personal relationship]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal relationship
n
  1. a relation between persons [syn: personal relation, personal relationship]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personal representative
n
  1. a person who manages the affairs of another
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personalise
v
  1. make personal or more personal; "personalized service"
    Synonym(s): personalize, personalise, individualize, individualise
    Antonym(s): depersonalise, depersonalize, objectify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personalised
adj
  1. made for or directed or adjusted to a particular individual; "personalized luggage"; "personalized advice"
    Synonym(s): individualized, individualised, personalized, personalised
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personality
n
  1. the complex of all the attributes--behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental--that characterize a unique individual; "their different reactions reflected their very different personalities"; "it is his nature to help others"
  2. a person of considerable prominence; "she is a Hollywood personality"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personality assessment
n
  1. a questionnaire that is supposed to yield a description of a person's personality traits; "a personality inventory is a direct test of personality, as contrasted with a projective test"
    Synonym(s): personality inventory, personality assessment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personality disorder
n
  1. inflexible and maladaptive patterns of behavior
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personality inventory
n
  1. a questionnaire that is supposed to yield a description of a person's personality traits; "a personality inventory is a direct test of personality, as contrasted with a projective test"
    Synonym(s): personality inventory, personality assessment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personality test
n
  1. any test that is intended to assess personality
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personalize
v
  1. make personal or more personal; "personalized service"
    Synonym(s): personalize, personalise, individualize, individualise
    Antonym(s): depersonalise, depersonalize, objectify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personalized
adj
  1. made for or directed or adjusted to a particular individual; "personalized luggage"; "personalized advice"
    Synonym(s): individualized, individualised, personalized, personalised
  2. pointedly referring to or concerning a person's individual personality or intimate affairs especially offensively; "unnecessarily personalized remarks"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personally
adv
  1. as yourself; "speaking personally, I would not want to go"
  2. as a person; "he is personally repulsive"
  3. in a personal way; "he took her comments personally"
    Antonym(s): impersonally
  4. in the flesh; without involving anyone else; "I went there personally"; "he appeared in person"
    Synonym(s): personally, in person
  5. concerning the speaker; "personally, I find him stupid"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personalty
n
  1. movable property (as distinguished from real estate) [syn: personal property, personal estate, personalty, private property]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personate
v
  1. pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions; "She posed as the Czar's daughter"
    Synonym(s): pose, impersonate, personate
  2. attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
    Synonym(s): personify, personate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personation
n
  1. imitating the mannerisms of another person [syn: impersonation, personation]
  2. acting the part of a character on stage; dramatically representing the character by speech and action and gesture
    Synonym(s): portrayal, characterization, enactment, personation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personhood
n
  1. being a person; "finding her own personhood as a campus activist"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personification
n
  1. a person who represents an abstract quality; "she is the personification of optimism"
  2. representing an abstract quality or idea as a person or creature
    Synonym(s): personification, prosopopoeia
  3. the act of attributing human characteristics to abstract ideas etc.
    Synonym(s): personification, incarnation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personify
v
  1. invest with or as with a body; give body to [syn: body, personify]
  2. represent, as of a character on stage; "Derek Jacobi was Hamlet"
    Synonym(s): embody, be, personify
  3. attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
    Synonym(s): personify, personate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel
n
  1. group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
    Synonym(s): force, personnel
  2. the department responsible for hiring and training and placing employees and for setting policies for personnel management
    Synonym(s): personnel department, personnel office, personnel, staff office
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel carrier
n
  1. a military vehicle (usually armored) for transporting military personnel and their equipment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel casualty
n
  1. military personnel lost by death or capture [syn: personnel casualty, loss]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel department
n
  1. the department responsible for hiring and training and placing employees and for setting policies for personnel management
    Synonym(s): personnel department, personnel office, personnel, staff office
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel office
n
  1. the department responsible for hiring and training and placing employees and for setting policies for personnel management
    Synonym(s): personnel department, personnel office, personnel, staff office
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
personnel pouch
n
  1. a bag in which the body of a dead soldier is placed [syn: body bag, personnel pouch, human remains pouch]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Persoonia
n
  1. Australian undershrubs to small trees: geebungs [syn: Persoonia, genus Persoonia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
perusing
n
  1. reading carefully with intent to remember [syn: perusal, perusing, poring over, studying]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pharaoh's ant
n
  1. small red ant of warm regions; a common household pest
    Synonym(s): pharaoh ant, pharaoh's ant, Monomorium pharaonis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
phragmacone
n
  1. the thin conical chambered internal shell (either straight or curved) of a belemnite
    Synonym(s): phragmocone, phragmacone
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Phragmipedium
n
  1. genus of tropical American orchid species often included in genus Cypripedium or Paphiopedilum and Selenipedium: lady slippers
    Synonym(s): Phragmipedium, genus Phragmipedium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Phragmites
n
  1. reeds of marshes and riversides in tropical or temperate regions
    Synonym(s): Phragmites, genus Phragmites
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Phragmites communis
n
  1. tall North American reed having relative wide leaves and large plumelike panicles; widely distributed in moist areas; used for mats, screens and arrow shafts
    Synonym(s): ditch reed, common reed, carrizo, Phragmites communis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
phragmocone
n
  1. the thin conical chambered internal shell (either straight or curved) of a belemnite
    Synonym(s): phragmocone, phragmacone
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
phrasing
n
  1. the grouping of musical phrases in a melodic line
  2. the manner in which something is expressed in words; "use concise military verbiage"- G.S.Patton
    Synonym(s): wording, diction, phrasing, phraseology, choice of words, verbiage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Phrygian
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Phrygia
  2. a Thraco-Phrygian language spoken by the ancient inhabitants of Phrygia and now extinct--preserved only in a few inscriptions
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Phrygian deity
n
  1. deity of the ancient Phrygians of west central Asia Minor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
piercing
adj
  1. having or demonstrating ability to recognize or draw fine distinctions; "an acute observer of politics and politicians"; "incisive comments"; "icy knifelike reasoning"; "as sharp and incisive as the stroke of a fang"; "penetrating insight"; "frequent penetrative observations"
    Synonym(s): acute, discriminating, incisive, keen, knifelike, penetrating, penetrative, piercing, sharp
  2. painful as if caused by a sharp instrument; "a cutting wind"; "keen winds"; "knifelike cold"; "piercing knifelike pains"; "piercing cold"; "piercing criticism"; "a stabbing pain"; "lancinating pain"
    Synonym(s): cutting, keen, knifelike, piercing, stabbing, lancinate, lancinating
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
piercingly
adv
  1. extremely and sharply; "it was bitterly cold"; "bitter cold"
    Synonym(s): piercingly, bitterly, bitingly, bitter
  2. in a shrill voice; "she sang rather shrilly"
    Synonym(s): shrilly, piercingly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pierre Simon de Laplace
n
  1. French mathematician and astronomer who formulated the nebular hypothesis concerning the origins of the solar system and who developed the theory of probability (1749-1827)
    Synonym(s): Laplace, Marquis de Laplace, Pierre Simon de Laplace
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
porcine
adj
  1. relating to or suggesting swine; "comparison between human and porcine pleasures"
  2. repellently fat; "a bald porcine old man"
    Synonym(s): gross, porcine
  3. resembling swine; coarsely gluttonous or greedy; "piggish table manners"; "the piggy fat-cheeked little boy and his porcine pot-bellied father"; "swinish slavering over food"
    Synonym(s): hoggish, piggish, piggy, porcine, swinish
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pork and beans
n
  1. dried beans cooked with pork and tomato sauce
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pork-and-veal goulash
n
  1. made with sauerkraut and caraway seeds and served with sour cream
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
porousness
n
  1. the property of being porous; being able to absorb fluids
    Synonym(s): porosity, porousness
    Antonym(s): solidity, solidness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Porzana
n
  1. spotted crakes
    Synonym(s): Porzana, genus Porzana
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Porzana porzana
n
  1. Eurasian rail of swamps and marshes [syn: spotted crake, Porzana porzana]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
power company
n
  1. a public utility that provides electricity [syn: {power company}, power service, electric company, light company]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatic
adj
  1. concerned with practical matters; "a matter-of-fact (or pragmatic) approach to the problem"; "a matter-of-fact account of the trip"
    Synonym(s): matter-of-fact, pragmatic, pragmatical
  2. of or concerning the theory of pragmatism
    Synonym(s): pragmatic, pragmatical
  3. guided by practical experience and observation rather than theory; "a hardheaded appraisal of our position"; "a hard- nosed labor leader"; "completely practical in his approach to business"; "not ideology but pragmatic politics"
    Synonym(s): hardheaded, hard-nosed, practical, pragmatic
n
  1. an imperial decree that becomes part of the fundamental law of the land
    Synonym(s): pragmatic sanction, pragmatic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatic sanction
n
  1. an imperial decree that becomes part of the fundamental law of the land
    Synonym(s): pragmatic sanction, pragmatic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatical
adj
  1. of or concerning the theory of pragmatism [syn: pragmatic, pragmatical]
  2. concerned with practical matters; "a matter-of-fact (or pragmatic) approach to the problem"; "a matter-of-fact account of the trip"
    Synonym(s): matter-of-fact, pragmatic, pragmatical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatically
adv
  1. in a realistic manner; "we want to build a democratic society, but we must act pragmatically"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatics
n
  1. the study of language use
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatism
n
  1. (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
  2. the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
    Synonym(s): realism, pragmatism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pragmatist
n
  1. an adherent of philosophical pragmatism
  2. a person who takes a practical approach to problems and is concerned primarily with the success or failure of her actions
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
praising
adj
  1. full of or giving praise; "a laudatory remark" [syn: laudatory, praiseful, praising]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preaching
n
  1. an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)
    Synonym(s): sermon, discourse, preaching
  2. a moralistic rebuke; "your preaching is wasted on him"
    Synonym(s): sermon, preaching
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preachment
n
  1. a sermon on a moral or religious topic [syn: homily, preachment]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Preakness
n
  1. an annual race for three-year-old horses; held at Pimlico in Baltimore, Maryland
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preassemble
v
  1. to manufacture sections of (a building), especially in a factory, so that they can be easily transported to and rapidly assembled on a building site of buildings
    Synonym(s): prefabricate, preassemble
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Precambrian
n
  1. the eon following the Hadean time and preceding the Phanerozoic eon; from about 3,800 million years ago until 544 million years ago
    Synonym(s): Precambrian, Precambrian eon, Precambrian aeon, Precambrian period
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Precambrian aeon
n
  1. the eon following the Hadean time and preceding the Phanerozoic eon; from about 3,800 million years ago until 544 million years ago
    Synonym(s): Precambrian, Precambrian eon, Precambrian aeon, Precambrian period
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Precambrian eon
n
  1. the eon following the Hadean time and preceding the Phanerozoic eon; from about 3,800 million years ago until 544 million years ago
    Synonym(s): Precambrian, Precambrian eon, Precambrian aeon, Precambrian period
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Precambrian period
n
  1. the eon following the Hadean time and preceding the Phanerozoic eon; from about 3,800 million years ago until 544 million years ago
    Synonym(s): Precambrian, Precambrian eon, Precambrian aeon, Precambrian period
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precancerous
adj
  1. of or relating to a growth that is not malignant but is likely to become so if not treated
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precentor
n
  1. the musical director of a choir [syn: choirmaster, precentor, cantor]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precentorship
n
  1. the position of precentor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precentral gyrus
n
  1. the convolution of the frontal lobe that is bounded in back by the central sulcus and that contains the motor area
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precinct
n
  1. a district of a city or town marked out for administrative purposes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconceive
v
  1. conceive beforehand; "a preconceived notion"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconceived
adj
  1. (of an idea or opinion) formed beforehand; especially without evidence or through prejudice; "certain preconceived notions"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconceived idea
n
  1. an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
    Synonym(s): preconception, prepossession, parti pris, preconceived opinion, preconceived idea, preconceived notion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconceived notion
n
  1. an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
    Synonym(s): preconception, prepossession, parti pris, preconceived opinion, preconceived idea, preconceived notion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconceived opinion
n
  1. an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
    Synonym(s): preconception, prepossession, parti pris, preconceived opinion, preconceived idea, preconceived notion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconception
n
  1. an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
    Synonym(s): preconception, prepossession, parti pris, preconceived opinion, preconceived idea, preconceived notion
  2. a partiality that prevents objective consideration of an issue or situation
    Synonym(s): bias, prejudice, preconception
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconcerted
adj
  1. previously arranged or agreed on; "following preconcerted plans"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
precondition
n
  1. an assumption on which rests the validity or effect of something else
    Synonym(s): condition, precondition, stipulation
  2. an assumption that is taken for granted
    Synonym(s): given, presumption, precondition
  3. a condition that is a prerequisite
v
  1. put into the required condition beforehand
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
preconditioned
adj
  1. having already been put into a suitable condition; "a surface preconditioned to receive paint"; "customers preconditioned to buy a product"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pregnancy
n
  1. the state of being pregnant; the period from conception to birth when a woman carries a developing fetus in her uterus
    Synonym(s): pregnancy, gestation, maternity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pregnancy test
n
  1. a physiological test to determine whether a woman is pregnant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pregnanediol
n
  1. a compound found in women's urine during certain phases of the menstrual cycle and in the urine of pregnant women
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pregnant
adj
  1. carrying developing offspring within the body or being about to produce new life
    Antonym(s): nonpregnant
  2. rich in significance or implication; "a meaning look"
    Synonym(s): meaning(a), pregnant, significant
  3. filled with or attended with; "words fraught with meaning"; "an incident fraught with danger"; "a silence pregnant with suspense"
    Synonym(s): fraught(p), pregnant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pregnant chad
n
  1. a chad that has been punched or dimpled but all four corners are still attached
    Synonym(s): dimpled chad, pregnant chad, dimple
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pres Young
n
  1. United States jazz tenor saxophonist (1909-1959) [syn: Young, Pres Young, Lester Willis Young]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prescience
n
  1. the power to foresee the future [syn: prescience, prevision]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prescient
adj
  1. perceiving the significance of events before they occur; "extraordinarily prescient memoranda on the probable course of postwar relations"-R.H.Rovere
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presciently
adv
  1. with foresight; "more presciently than they superiors, these workers grasped the economic situation"
    Synonym(s): presciently, cannily
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presence
n
  1. the state of being present; current existence; "he tested for the presence of radon"
    Antonym(s): absence
  2. the immediate proximity of someone or something; "she blushed in his presence"; "he sensed the presence of danger"; "he was well behaved in front of company"
    Synonym(s): presence, front
  3. an invisible spiritual being felt to be nearby
  4. the impression that something is present; "he felt the presence of an evil force"
  5. dignified manner or conduct
    Synonym(s): bearing, comportment, presence, mien
  6. the act of being present
    Antonym(s): absence
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presence chamber
n
  1. room in which a monarch or other great person receives guests, assemblies, etc.
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presence of mind
n
  1. self-control in a crisis; ability to say or do the right thing in an emergency
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presenile dementia
n
  1. dementia with onset before the age of 65
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present
adj
  1. temporal sense; intermediate between past and future; now existing or happening or in consideration; "the present leader"; "articles for present use"; "the present topic"; "the present system"; "present observations"
    Antonym(s): future, past
  2. being or existing in a specified place; "the murderer is present in this room"; "present at the wedding"; "present at the creation"
    Antonym(s): absent
n
  1. the period of time that is happening now; any continuous stretch of time including the moment of speech; "that is enough for the present"; "he lives in the present with no thought of tomorrow"
    Synonym(s): present, nowadays
  2. something presented as a gift; "his tie was a present from his wife"
  3. a verb tense that expresses actions or states at the time of speaking
    Synonym(s): present, present tense
v
  1. give an exhibition of to an interested audience; "She shows her dogs frequently"; "We will demo the new software in Washington"
    Synonym(s): show, demo, exhibit, present, demonstrate
  2. bring forward and present to the mind; "We presented the arguments to him"; "We cannot represent this knowledge to our formal reason"
    Synonym(s): present, represent, lay out
  3. perform (a play), especially on a stage; "we are going to stage `Othello'"
    Synonym(s): stage, present, represent
  4. hand over formally
    Synonym(s): present, submit
  5. introduce; "This poses an interesting question"
    Synonym(s): present, pose
  6. give, especially as an honor or reward; "bestow honors and prizes at graduation"
    Synonym(s): award, present
  7. give as a present; make a gift of; "What will you give her for her birthday?"
    Synonym(s): give, gift, present
  8. deliver (a speech, oration, or idea); "The commencement speaker presented a forceful speech that impressed the students"
    Synonym(s): deliver, present
  9. cause to come to know personally; "permit me to acquaint you with my son"; "introduce the new neighbors to the community"
    Synonym(s): introduce, present, acquaint
  10. represent abstractly, for example in a painting, drawing, or sculpture; "The father is portrayed as a good-looking man in this painting"
    Synonym(s): portray, present
  11. present somebody with something, usually to accuse or criticize; "We confronted him with the evidence"; "He was faced with all the evidence and could no longer deny his actions"; "An enormous dilemma faces us"
    Synonym(s): confront, face, present
  12. formally present a debutante, a representative of a country, etc.
  13. recognize with a gesture prescribed by a military regulation; assume a prescribed position; "When the officers show up, the soldiers have to salute"
    Synonym(s): salute, present
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present moment
n
  1. at this time; "the disappointments of the here and now"; "she is studying at the moment"
    Synonym(s): here and now, present moment, moment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present participle
n
  1. a participle expressing present action; in English is formed by adding -ing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present perfect
n
  1. a perfective tense used to express action completed in the present; "`I have finished' is an example of the present perfect"
    Synonym(s): present perfect, present perfect tense
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present perfect tense
n
  1. a perfective tense used to express action completed in the present; "`I have finished' is an example of the present perfect"
    Synonym(s): present perfect, present perfect tense
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present progressive
n
  1. a tense used to express action that is on-going at the time of utterance
    Synonym(s): present progressive, present progressive tense
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present progressive tense
n
  1. a tense used to express action that is on-going at the time of utterance
    Synonym(s): present progressive, present progressive tense
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present tense
n
  1. a verb tense that expresses actions or states at the time of speaking
    Synonym(s): present, present tense
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present times
n
  1. the circumstances and ideas of the present age; "in modern times like these"
    Synonym(s): modern times, present times, modern world, contemporary world
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
present-day
adj
  1. belonging to the present time; "contemporary leaders"
    Synonym(s): contemporary, present-day(a)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentable
adj
  1. fit to be seen; "presentable clothes"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentably
adv
  1. in a presentable manner; "years ago in her white-painted infancy it must have hung presentably on the deck of some luxury liner"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentation
n
  1. the activity of formally presenting something (as a prize or reward); "she gave the trophy but he made the presentation"
  2. a show or display; the act of presenting something to sight or view; "the presentation of new data"; "he gave the customer a demonstration"
    Synonym(s): presentation, presentment, demonstration
  3. the act of making something publicly available; presenting news or other information by broadcasting or printing it; "he prepared his presentation carefully in advance"
  4. the act of presenting a proposal
  5. a visual representation of something
    Synonym(s): display, presentation
  6. formally making a person known to another or to the public
    Synonym(s): presentation, introduction, intro
  7. (obstetrics) position of the fetus in the uterus relative to the birth canal; "Cesarean sections are sometimes the result of abnormal presentations"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentational
adj
  1. of or relating to a presentation (especially in psychology or philosophy); "what Whitehead calls `perception in the presentational immediacy'"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presenter
n
  1. someone who presents a message of some sort (as a petition or an address or a check or a memorial etc.)
  2. an advocate who presents a person (as for an award or a degree or an introduction etc.)
    Synonym(s): presenter, sponsor
  3. person who makes a gift of property
    Synonym(s): donor, giver, presenter, bestower, conferrer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentiment
n
  1. a feeling of evil to come; "a steadily escalating sense of foreboding"; "the lawyer had a presentiment that the judge would dismiss the case"
    Synonym(s): foreboding, premonition, presentiment, boding
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentism
n
  1. the doctrine that the Scripture prophecies of the Apocalypse (as in the Book of Revelations) are presently in the course of being fulfilled
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentist
n
  1. a theologian who believes that the Scripture prophecies of the Apocalypse (the Book of Revelation) are being fulfilled at the present time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presently
adv
  1. in the near future; "the doctor will soon be here"; "the book will appear shortly"; "she will arrive presently"; "we should have news before long"
    Synonym(s): soon, shortly, presently, before long
  2. at this time or period; now; "he is presently our ambassador to the United Nations"; "currently they live in Connecticut"
    Synonym(s): presently, currently
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentment
n
  1. an accusation of crime made by a grand jury on its own initiative
    Synonym(s): presentment, notification
  2. a document that must be accepted and paid by another person
  3. a show or display; the act of presenting something to sight or view; "the presentation of new data"; "he gave the customer a demonstration"
    Synonym(s): presentation, presentment, demonstration
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presentness
n
  1. the quality of being the present; "a study of the pastness of the present and...of the presentness of the past"- R.E.Spiller
    Synonym(s): presentness, nowness
    Antonym(s): futurity, pastness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
press conference
n
  1. a conference at which press and tv reporters ask questions of a politician or other celebrity
    Synonym(s): press conference, news conference
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
press gang
n
  1. a detachment empowered to force civilians to serve in the army or navy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
press home
v
  1. make clear by special emphasis and try to convince somebody of something; "drive home a point or an argument"; "I'm trying to drive home these basic ideas"
    Synonym(s): drive home, ram home, press home
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
press on
v
  1. continue moving forward [syn: press on, push on, plough on]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pressing
adj
  1. compelling immediate action; "too pressing to permit of longer delay"; "the urgent words `Hurry! Hurry!'"; "bridges in urgent need of repair"
    Synonym(s): pressing, urgent
n
  1. the act of pressing; the exertion of pressure; "he gave the button a press"; "he used pressure to stop the bleeding"; "at the pressing of a button"
    Synonym(s): press, pressure, pressing
  2. a metal or plastic part that is made by a mechanical press
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pressingly
adv
  1. in a pressing manner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pressman
n
  1. someone whose occupation is printing [syn: printer, pressman]
  2. a journalist employed to provide news stories for newspapers or broadcast media
    Synonym(s): correspondent, newspaperman, newspaperwoman, newswriter, pressman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pressmark
n
  1. a mark consisting of characters written on a book; used to indicate shelf location
    Synonym(s): call mark, call number, pressmark
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumable
adj
  1. capable of being inferred on slight grounds [syn: presumable, supposable, surmisable]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumably
adv
  1. by reasonable assumption; "presumably, he missed the train"
    Synonym(s): presumably, presumptively
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presume
v
  1. take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof; "I assume his train was late"
    Synonym(s): assume, presume, take for granted
  2. take upon oneself; act presumptuously, without permission; "How dare you call my lawyer?"
    Synonym(s): make bold, dare, presume
  3. constitute reasonable evidence for; "A restaurant bill presumes the consumption of food"
  4. take liberties or act with too much confidence
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumption
n
  1. an assumption that is taken for granted [syn: given, presumption, precondition]
  2. (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed
  3. audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
    Synonym(s): presumption, presumptuousness, effrontery, assumption
  4. a kind of discourtesy in the form of an act of presuming; "his presumption was intolerable"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumptive
adj
  1. having a reasonable basis for belief or acceptance; "the presumptive heir (or heir apparent)"
  2. affording reasonable grounds for belief or acceptance; "presumptive evidence"; "a strong presumptive case is made out"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumptively
adv
  1. by reasonable assumption; "presumably, he missed the train"
    Synonym(s): presumably, presumptively
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumptuous
adj
  1. excessively forward; "an assumptive person"; "on a subject like this it would be too assuming for me to decide"; "the duchess would not put up with presumptuous servants"
    Synonym(s): assumptive, assuming, presumptuous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumptuously
adv
  1. in a presumptuous manner; "he presumptuously overstepped the doctor's orders"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presumptuousness
n
  1. audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
    Synonym(s): presumption, presumptuousness, effrontery, assumption
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
presymptomatic
adj
  1. of or relating to the early phases of a disease when accurate diagnosis is not possible because symptoms of the disease have not yet appeared
    Synonym(s): preclinical, presymptomatic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Preussen
n
  1. a former kingdom in north-central Europe including present- day northern Germany and northern Poland; "in the 19th century Prussia led the economic and political unification of the German states"
    Synonym(s): Prussia, Preussen
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priacanthidae
n
  1. small carnivorous percoid fishes found worldwide in tropical seas
    Synonym(s): Priacanthidae, family Priacanthidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priacanthus
n
  1. type genus of the Priacanthidae [syn: Priacanthus, {genus Priacanthus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priacanthus arenatus
n
  1. brightly colored carnivorous fish of western Atlantic and West Indies waters
    Synonym(s): catalufa, Priacanthus arenatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
price increase
n
  1. increase in price
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
price index
n
  1. an index that traces the relative changes in the price of an individual good (or a market basket of goods) over time
    Synonym(s): price index, price level
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pricing
n
  1. the evaluation of something in terms of its price
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pricing system
n
  1. a system for setting prices on goods or services
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pricking
n
  1. the act of puncturing with a small point; "he gave the balloon a small prick"
    Synonym(s): prick, pricking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priscoan
n
  1. the earliest eon in the history of the Earth from the first accretion of planetary material (around 4,600 million years ago) until the date of the oldest known rocks (about 3,800 million years ago); no evidence of life
    Synonym(s): Hadean, Hadean time, Hadean eon, Hadean aeon, Priscoan, Priscoan eon, Priscoan aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priscoan aeon
n
  1. the earliest eon in the history of the Earth from the first accretion of planetary material (around 4,600 million years ago) until the date of the oldest known rocks (about 3,800 million years ago); no evidence of life
    Synonym(s): Hadean, Hadean time, Hadean eon, Hadean aeon, Priscoan, Priscoan eon, Priscoan aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Priscoan eon
n
  1. the earliest eon in the history of the Earth from the first accretion of planetary material (around 4,600 million years ago) until the date of the oldest known rocks (about 3,800 million years ago); no evidence of life
    Synonym(s): Hadean, Hadean time, Hadean eon, Hadean aeon, Priscoan, Priscoan eon, Priscoan aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prism
n
  1. a polyhedron with two congruent and parallel faces (the bases) and whose lateral faces are parallelograms
  2. optical device having a triangular shape and made of glass or quartz; used to deviate a beam or invert an image
    Synonym(s): prism, optical prism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prism spectroscope
n
  1. an optical instrument for spectrographic analysis [syn: spectroscope, prism spectroscope]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prismatic
adj
  1. of or relating to or resembling or constituting a prism; "prismatic form"
  2. exhibiting spectral colors formed by refraction of light through a prism; "prismatic light"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prismatoid
n
  1. a polyhedron whose vertices all lie in one or the other of two parallel planes; the faces that lie in those planes are the bases of the prismatoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prismoid
n
  1. a prismatoid whose bases are polygons having the same number of sides and whose other faces are trapezoids or parallelograms
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison
n
  1. a correctional institution where persons are confined while on trial or for punishment
    Synonym(s): prison, prison house
  2. a prisonlike situation; a place of seeming confinement
    Synonym(s): prison, prison house
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison camp
n
  1. a camp for prisoners of war [syn: prison camp, internment camp, prisoner of war camp, POW camp]
  2. a camp for trustworthy prisoners employed in government projects
    Synonym(s): work camp, prison camp, prison farm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison cell
n
  1. a room where a prisoner is kept [syn: cell, jail cell, prison cell]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison chaplain
n
  1. a chaplain in a prison
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison farm
n
  1. a camp for trustworthy prisoners employed in government projects
    Synonym(s): work camp, prison camp, prison farm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison guard
n
  1. someone who guards prisoners [syn: prison guard, jailer, jailor, gaoler, screw, turnkey]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison house
n
  1. a prisonlike situation; a place of seeming confinement
    Synonym(s): prison, prison house
  2. a correctional institution where persons are confined while on trial or for punishment
    Synonym(s): prison, prison house
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison term
n
  1. the period of time a prisoner is imprisoned; "he served a prison term of 15 months"; "his sentence was 5 to 10 years"; "he is doing time in the county jail"
    Synonym(s): prison term, sentence, time
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prison-breaking
n
  1. an escape from jail; "the breakout was carefully planned"
    Synonym(s): break, breakout, jailbreak, gaolbreak, prisonbreak, prison-breaking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisonbreak
n
  1. an escape from jail; "the breakout was carefully planned"
    Synonym(s): break, breakout, jailbreak, gaolbreak, prisonbreak, prison-breaking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisoner
n
  1. a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
    Synonym(s): prisoner, captive
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisoner of war
n
  1. a person who surrenders to (or is taken by) the enemy in time of war
    Synonym(s): prisoner of war, POW
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisoner of war camp
n
  1. a camp for prisoners of war [syn: prison camp, internment camp, prisoner of war camp, POW camp]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisoner of war censorship
n
  1. military censorship of communication to and from prisoners of war and civilian internees held by the armed forces
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisoner's base
n
  1. a children's game; two teams capture opposing players by tagging them and taking them to their own base
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prisonlike
adj
  1. resembling a prison
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Prix Goncourt
n
  1. an award given annually for contributions to French literature
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prize money
n
  1. any money given as a prize
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prize winner
n
  1. the winner of a lottery [syn: prize winner, {lottery winner}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prizewinning
adj
  1. holding first place in a contest; "a champion show dog"; "a prizewinning wine"
    Synonym(s): champion, prizewinning
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
procaine
n
  1. a white crystalline powder (trade name Ethocaine) administered near nerves as a local anesthetic in dentistry and medicine
    Synonym(s): procaine, Ethocaine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
procaine hydrochloride
n
  1. procaine administered as a hydrochloride (trade name Novocain)
    Synonym(s): procaine hydrochloride, novocaine, Novocain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Procnias
n
  1. bellbirds
    Synonym(s): Procnias, genus Procnias
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proconsul
n
  1. an official in a modern colony who has considerable administrative power
  2. a provincial governor of consular rank in the Roman Republic and Roman Empire
  3. an anthropoid ape of the genus Proconsul
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proconsular
adj
  1. of or relating to or typical of a proconsul; "proconsular offices"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proconsulate
n
  1. the position of proconsul [syn: proconsulship, proconsulate]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proconsulship
n
  1. the position of proconsul [syn: proconsulship, proconsulate]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proconvertin
n
  1. a coagulation factor formed in the kidney under the influence of vitamin K
    Synonym(s): proconvertin, cothromboplastin, stable factor, factor VII
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
procumbent
adj
  1. having stems that trail along the ground without putting down roots
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Procyon
n
  1. the brightest star in Canis Minor
  2. the type genus of the family Procyonidae: raccoons
    Synonym(s): Procyon, genus Procyon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Procyon cancrivorus
n
  1. a South American raccoon [syn: crab-eating raccoon, Procyon cancrivorus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Procyon lotor
n
  1. North American raccoon [syn: common raccoon, {common racoon}, coon, ringtail, Procyon lotor]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
procyonid
n
  1. plantigrade carnivorous mammals
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Procyonidae
n
  1. raccoons; coatis; cacomistles; kinkajous; and sometimes pandas
    Synonym(s): Procyonidae, family Procyonidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
progenitor
n
  1. an ancestor in the direct line [syn: progenitor, primogenitor]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
progeny
n
  1. the immediate descendants of a person; "she was the mother of many offspring"; "he died without issue"
    Synonym(s): offspring, progeny, issue
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognathic
adj
  1. having a projecting lower jaw [syn: prognathous, prognathic, hypognathous]
    Antonym(s): opisthognathous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognathism
n
  1. the condition of being prognathous; the condition of having a projecting jaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognathous
adj
  1. having a projecting lower jaw [syn: prognathous, prognathic, hypognathous]
    Antonym(s): opisthognathous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Progne
n
  1. a genus of Hirundinidae
    Synonym(s): Progne, genus Progne
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Progne subis
n
  1. large North American martin of which the male is blue-black
    Synonym(s): purple martin, Progne subis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognosis
n
  1. a prediction about how something (as the weather) will develop
    Synonym(s): prognosis, forecast
  2. a prediction of the course of a disease
    Synonym(s): prognosis, prospect, medical prognosis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognostic
adj
  1. of or relating to prediction; having value for making predictions
    Synonym(s): predictive, prognostic, prognosticative
n
  1. a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"
    Synonym(s): omen, portent, presage, prognostic, prognostication, prodigy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognosticate
v
  1. make a prediction about; tell in advance; "Call the outcome of an election"
    Synonym(s): predict, foretell, prognosticate, call, forebode, anticipate, promise
  2. indicate by signs; "These signs bode bad news"
    Synonym(s): bode, portend, auspicate, prognosticate, omen, presage, betoken, foreshadow, augur, foretell, prefigure, forecast, predict
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognostication
n
  1. a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"
    Synonym(s): omen, portent, presage, prognostic, prognostication, prodigy
  2. a statement made about the future
    Synonym(s): prediction, foretelling, forecasting, prognostication
  3. knowledge of the future (usually said to be obtained from a divine source)
    Synonym(s): prophecy, prognostication, vaticination
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognosticative
adj
  1. of or relating to prediction; having value for making predictions
    Synonym(s): predictive, prognostic, prognosticative
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prognosticator
n
  1. someone who makes predictions of the future (usually on the basis of special knowledge)
    Synonym(s): forecaster, predictor, prognosticator, soothsayer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
progymnosperm
n
  1. an ancestral fossil type from which modern gymnosperms are thought to have derived
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proscenium
n
  1. the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)
    Synonym(s): proscenium, apron, forestage
  2. the wall that separates the stage from the auditorium in a modern theater
    Synonym(s): proscenium, proscenium wall
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proscenium arch
n
  1. the arch over the opening in the proscenium wall
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proscenium wall
n
  1. the wall that separates the stage from the auditorium in a modern theater
    Synonym(s): proscenium, proscenium wall
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prosencephalon
n
  1. the anterior portion of the brain; the part of the brain that develops from the anterior part of the neural tube
    Synonym(s): forebrain, prosencephalon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prosimian
n
  1. primitive primates having large ears and eyes and characterized by nocturnal habits
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Prosimii
n
  1. not used in all classifications; in some classifications considered coextensive with the Lemuroidea; in others includes both Lemuroidea and Tarsioidea
    Synonym(s): Prosimii, suborder Prosimii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
prosiness
n
  1. commonplaceness as a consequence of being humdrum and not exciting
    Synonym(s): prosiness, prosaicness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ProSom
n
  1. a frequently prescribed sleeping pill (trade name ProSom)
    Synonym(s): estazolam, ProSom
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proxemics
n
  1. the study of spatial distances between individuals in different cultures and situations
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Proxima
n
  1. the nearest star to the sun; distance: 4.3 light years
    Synonym(s): Proxima, Proxima Centauri
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Proxima Centauri
n
  1. the nearest star to the sun; distance: 4.3 light years
    Synonym(s): Proxima, Proxima Centauri
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proximal
adj
  1. situated nearest to point of attachment or origin; "the proximal end of a bone"
    Antonym(s): distal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proximate
adj
  1. closest in degree or order (space or time) especially in a chain of causes and effects; "news of his proximate arrival"; "interest in proximate rather than ultimate goals"
    Antonym(s): ultimate
  2. very close in space or time; "proximate words"; "proximate houses"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proximity
n
  1. the property of being close together [syn: proximity, propinquity]
  2. the region close around a person or thing
  3. a Gestalt principle of organization holding that (other things being equal) objects or events that are near to one another (in space or time) are perceived as belonging together as a unit
    Synonym(s): proximity, law of proximity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
proximo
adj
  1. in or of the next month after the present; "scheduled for the 6th prox"
    Synonym(s): proximo, prox
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Prussian
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Prussia or its inhabitants; "Prussian officers"; "Prussian aristocracy"
n
  1. a German inhabitant of Prussia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Prussian asparagus
n
  1. Old World star of Bethlehem having edible young shoots
    Synonym(s): bath asparagus, Prussian asparagus, Ornithogalum pyrenaicum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Prussian blue
n
  1. any of various blue pigments [syn: iron blue, {Prussian blue}]
  2. a dark greenish-blue color
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
purging
adj
  1. serving to purge or rid of sin; "purgatorial rites" [syn: purgatorial, purging, purifying]
n
  1. an act of removing by cleansing; ridding of sediment or other undesired elements
    Synonym(s): purge, purging
  2. the act of clearing yourself (or another) from some stigma or charge
    Synonym(s): purge, purging, purgation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
purging cassia
n
  1. deciduous or semi-evergreen tree having scented sepia to yellow flowers in drooping racemes and pods whose pulp is used medicinally; tropical Asia and Central and South America and Australia
    Synonym(s): golden shower tree, drumstick tree, purging cassia, pudding pipe tree, canafistola, canafistula, Cassia fistula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
purism
n
  1. scrupulous or exaggerated insistence on purity or correctness (especially in language); "linguistic purisms"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje
n
  1. Bohemian physiologist remembered for his discovery of Purkinje cells and the Purkinje network (1787-1869)
    Synonym(s): Purkinje, Jan Evangelista Purkinje, Johannes Evangelista Purkinje
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje cell
n
  1. a large densely branching neuron that is the characteristic cell of the cerebellar cortex
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje fiber
n
  1. a specialized cardiac muscle fiber that is part of the Purkinje network
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje network
n
  1. a network of Purkinje fibers that carry the cardiac impulse from the atrioventricular node to the ventricles of the heart and causes them to contract
    Synonym(s): Purkinje network, Purkinje's tissue, Purkinje's system
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje's system
n
  1. a network of Purkinje fibers that carry the cardiac impulse from the atrioventricular node to the ventricles of the heart and causes them to contract
    Synonym(s): Purkinje network, Purkinje's tissue, Purkinje's system
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Purkinje's tissue
n
  1. a network of Purkinje fibers that carry the cardiac impulse from the atrioventricular node to the ventricles of the heart and causes them to contract
    Synonym(s): Purkinje network, Purkinje's tissue, Purkinje's system
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pursuance
n
  1. a search for an alternative that meets cognitive criteria; "the pursuit of love"; "life is more than the pursuance of fame"; "a quest for wealth"
    Synonym(s): pursuit, pursuance, quest
  2. the continuance of something begun with a view to its completion
    Synonym(s): pursuance, prosecution
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pursuant
adj
  1. (followed by `to') in conformance to or agreement with; "pursuant to our agreement"; "pursuant to the dictates of one's conscience"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pursuing
adj
  1. following in order to overtake or capture or as accompaniment to such pursuit; "the fox fled from the pursuing hounds"; "listened for the hounds' pursuing bark"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyracanth
n
  1. any of various thorny shrubs of the genus Pyracantha bearing small white flowers followed by hard red or orange- red berries
    Synonym(s): Pyracantha, pyracanth, fire thorn, firethorn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pyracantha
n
  1. any of various thorny shrubs of the genus Pyracantha bearing small white flowers followed by hard red or orange- red berries
    Synonym(s): Pyracantha, pyracanth, fire thorn, firethorn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrochemical
adj
  1. of or relating to or produced by chemical reactions at high temperatures
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrochemical process
n
  1. processes for chemical reactions at high temperatures [syn: pyrochemical process, pyrochemistry]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrochemistry
n
  1. processes for chemical reactions at high temperatures [syn: pyrochemical process, pyrochemistry]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrogen
n
  1. any substance characterized by its great flammability
  2. any substance that can cause a rise in body temperature
    Synonym(s): pyrogen, pyrectic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrogenetic
adj
  1. produced by or producing fever [syn: pyrogenic, pyrogenous, pyrogenetic]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrogenic
adj
  1. produced by or producing fever [syn: pyrogenic, pyrogenous, pyrogenetic]
  2. produced under conditions involving intense heat; "igneous rock is rock formed by solidification from a molten state; especially from molten magma"; "igneous fusion is fusion by heat alone"; "pyrogenic strata"
    Synonym(s): igneous, pyrogenic, pyrogenous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyrogenous
adj
  1. produced by or producing fever [syn: pyrogenic, pyrogenous, pyrogenetic]
  2. produced under conditions involving intense heat; "igneous rock is rock formed by solidification from a molten state; especially from molten magma"; "igneous fusion is fusion by heat alone"; "pyrogenic strata"
    Synonym(s): igneous, pyrogenic, pyrogenous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pyroxene
n
  1. any of a group of crystalline silicate mineral common in igneous and metamorphic rocks
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Pyrus communis
n
  1. Old World tree having sweet gritty-textured juicy fruit; widely cultivated in many varieties
    Synonym(s): pear, pear tree, Pyrus communis
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yellow \Yel"low\, a. [Compar. {Yellower}; superl. {Yellowest}.]
      [OE. yelow, yelwe, [f4]elow, [f4]eoluw, from AS. geolu; akin
      to D. geel, OS. & OHG. gelo, G. gelb, Icel. gulr, Sw. gul,
      Dan. guul, L. helvus light bay, Gr. [?] young verdure, [?]
      greenish yellow, Skr. hari tawny, yellowish. [?][?][?]. Cf.
      {Chlorine}, {Gall} a bitter liquid, {Gold}, {Yolk}.]
      Being of a bright saffronlike color; of the color of gold or
      brass; having the hue of that part of the rainbow, or of the
      solar spectrum, which is between the orange and the green.
  
               Her yellow hair was browded [braided] in a tress.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
               A sweaty reaper from his tillage brought First fruits,
               the green ear and the yellow sheaf.         --Milton.
  
               The line of yellow light dies fast away. --Keble.
  
      {Yellow atrophy} (Med.), a fatal affection of the liver, in
            which it undergoes fatty degeneration, and becomes rapidly
            smaller and of a deep yellow tinge. The marked symptoms
            are black vomit, delirium, convulsions, coma, and
            jaundice.
  
      {Yellow bark}, calisaya bark.
  
      {Yellow bass} (Zo[94]l.), a North American fresh-water bass
            ({Morone interrupta}) native of the lower parts of the
            Mississippi and its tributaries. It is yellow, with
            several more or less broken black stripes or bars. Called
            also {barfish}.
  
      {Yellow berry}. (Bot.) Same as {Persian berry}, under
            {Persian}.
  
      {Yellow boy}, a gold coin, as a guinea. [Slang] --Arbuthnot.
  
      {Yellow brier}. (Bot.) See under {Brier}.
  
      {Yellow bugle} (Bot.), a European labiate plant ({Ajuga
            Cham[91]pitys}).
  
      {Yellow bunting} (Zo[94]l.), the European yellow-hammer.
  
      {Yellow cat} (Zo[94]l.), a yellow catfish; especially, the
            bashaw.
  
      {Yellow copperas} (Min.), a hydrous sulphate of iron; --
            called also {copiapite}.
  
      {Yellow copper ore}, a sulphide of copper and iron; copper
            pyrites. See {Chalcopyrite}.
  
      {Yellow cress} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered, cruciferous plant
            ({Barbarea pr[91]cox}), sometimes grown as a salad plant.
           
  
      {Yellow dock}. (Bot.) See the Note under {Dock}.
  
      {Yellow earth}, a yellowish clay, colored by iron, sometimes
            used as a yellow pigment.
  
      {Yellow fever} (Med.), a malignant, contagious, febrile
            disease of warm climates, attended with jaundice,
            producing a yellow color of the skin, and with the black
            vomit. See {Black vomit}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine},
            and 3d {Flag}.
  
      {Yellow jack}.
      (a) The yellow fever. See under 2d {Jack}.
      (b) The quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine}.
  
      {Yellow jacket} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American social wasps of the genus {Vespa}, in which the
            color of the body is partly bright yellow. These wasps are
            noted for their irritability, and for their painful
            stings.
  
      {Yellow lead ore} (Min.), wulfenite.
  
      {Yellow lemur} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow macauco} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow mackerel} (Zo[94]l.), the jurel.
  
      {Yellow metal}. Same as {Muntz metal}, under {Metal}.
  
      {Yellow ocher} (Min.), an impure, earthy variety of brown
            iron ore, which is used as a pigment.
  
      {Yellow oxeye} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered plant
            ({Chrysanthemum segetum}) closely related to the oxeye
            daisy.
  
      {Yellow perch} (Zo[94]l.), the common American perch. See
            {Perch}.
  
      {Yellow pike} (Zo[94]l.), the wall-eye.
  
      {Yellow pine} (Bot.), any of several kinds of pine; also,
            their yellowish and generally durable timber. Among the
            most common are valuable species are {Pinus mitis} and {P.
            palustris} of the Eastern and Southern States, and {P.
            ponderosa} and {P. Arizonica} of the Rocky Mountains and
            Pacific States.
  
      {Yellow plover} (Zo[94]l.), the golden plover.
  
      {Yellow precipitate} (Med. Chem.), an oxide of mercury which
            is thrown down as an amorphous yellow powder on adding
            corrosive sublimate to limewater.
  
      {Yellow puccoon}. (Bot.) Same as {Orangeroot}.
  
      {Yellow rail} (Zo[94]l.), a small American rail ({Porzana
            Noveboracensis}) in which the lower parts are dull yellow,
            darkest on the breast. The back is streaked with brownish
            yellow and with black, and spotted with white. Called also
            {yellow crake}.
  
      {Yellow rattle}, {Yellow rocket}. (Bot.) See under {Rattle},
            and {Rocket}.
  
      {Yellow Sally} (Zo[94]l.), a greenish or yellowish European
            stone fly of the genus {Chloroperla}; -- so called by
            anglers.
  
      {Yellow sculpin} (Zo[94]l.), the dragonet.
  
      {Yellow snake} (Zo[94]l.), a West Indian boa ({Chilobothrus
            inornatus}) common in Jamaica. It becomes from eight to
            ten long. The body is yellowish or yellowish green, mixed
            with black, and anteriorly with black lines.
  
      {Yellow spot}.
      (a) (Anat.) A small yellowish spot with a central pit, the
            fovea centralis, in the center of the retina where vision
            is most accurate. See {Eye}.
      (b) (Zo[94]l.) A small American butterfly ({Polites Peckius})
            of the Skipper family. Its wings are brownish, with a
            large, irregular, bright yellow spot on each of the hind
            wings, most conspicuous beneath. Called also {Peck's
            skipper}. See Illust. under {Skipper}, n., 5.
  
      {Yellow tit} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            crested titmice of the genus {Machlolophus}, native of
            India. The predominating colors of the plumage are yellow
            and green.
  
      {Yellow viper} (Zo[94]l.), the fer-de-lance.
  
      {Yellow warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American warblers of the genus {Dendroica} in which the
            predominant color is yellow, especially {D. [91]stiva},
            which is a very abundant and familiar species; -- called
            also {garden warbler}, {golden warbler}, {summer
            yellowbird}, {summer warbler}, and {yellow-poll warbler}.
           
  
      {Yellow wash} (Pharm.), yellow oxide of mercury suspended in
            water, -- a mixture prepared by adding corrosive sublimate
            to limewater.
  
      {Yellow wren} (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European willow warbler.
      (b) The European wood warbler.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Buttonwood \But"ton*wood`\, n. (Bot.)
      The {Platanus occidentalis}, or American plane tree, a large
      tree, producing rough balls, from which it is named; --
      called also {buttonball tree}, and, in some parts of the
      United States, {sycamore}. The California buttonwood is {P.
      racemosa}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pine \Pine\, n. [AS. p[c6]n, L. pinus.]
      1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus {Pinus}. See
            {Pinus}.
  
      Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United
               States, of which the {white pine} ({P. Strobus}), the
               {Georgia pine} ({P. australis}), the {red pine} ({P.
               resinosa}), and the great West Coast {sugar pine} ({P.
               Lambertiana}) are among the most valuable. The {Scotch
               pine} or {fir}, also called {Norway} or {Riga pine}
               ({Pinus sylvestris}), is the only British species. The
               {nut pine} is any pine tree, or species of pine, which
               bears large edible seeds. See {Pinon}. The spruces,
               firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly
               considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other
               genera.
  
      2. The wood of the pine tree.
  
      3. A pineapple.
  
      {Ground pine}. (Bot.) See under {Ground}.
  
      {Norfolk Island pine} (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree,
            the {Araucaria excelsa}.
  
      {Pine barren}, a tract of infertile land which is covered
            with pines. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Pine borer} (Zo[94]l.), any beetle whose larv[91] bore into
            pine trees.
  
      {Pine finch}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Pinefinch}, in the Vocabulary.
           
  
      {Pine grosbeak} (Zo[94]l.), a large grosbeak ({Pinicola
            enucleator}), which inhabits the northern parts of both
            hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with
            red.
  
      {Pine lizard} (Zo[94]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray
            lizard ({Sceloporus undulatus}), native of the Middle
            States; -- called also {swift}, {brown scorpion}, and
            {alligator}.
  
      {Pine marten}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A European weasel ({Mustela martes}), called also
                  {sweet marten}, and {yellow-breasted marten}.
            (b) The American sable. See {Sable}.
  
      {Pine moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of small
            tortricid moths of the genus {Retinia}, whose larv[91]
            burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often
            doing great damage.
  
      {Pine mouse} (Zo[94]l.), an American wild mouse ({Arvicola
            pinetorum}), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine
            forests.
  
      {Pine needle} (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves
            of a pine tree. See {Pinus}.
  
      {Pine-needle wool}. See {Pine wool} (below).
  
      {Pine oil}, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir
            and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors.
           
  
      {Pine snake} (Zo[94]l.), a large harmless North American
            snake ({Pituophis melanoleucus}). It is whitish, covered
            with brown blotches having black margins. Called also
            {bull snake}. The Western pine snake ({P. Sayi}) is
            chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange.
  
      {Pine tree} (Bot.), a tree of the genus {Pinus}; pine.
  
      {Pine-tree money}, money coined in Massachusetts in the
            seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a
            figure of a pine tree.
  
      {Pine weevil} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            weevils whose larv[91] bore in the wood of pine trees.
            Several species are known in both Europe and America,
            belonging to the genera {Pissodes}, {Hylobius}, etc.
  
      {Pine wool}, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming
            them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the
            Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic
            arts; -- called also {pine-needle wool}, and {pine-wood
            wool}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wombat \Wom"bat\, n. [From the native name, womback, wombach, in
      Australia.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of three species of Australian burrowing marsupials
      of the genus {Phascolomys}, especially the common species
      ({P. ursinus}). They are nocturnal in their habits, and feed
      mostly on roots.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cherry \Cher"ry\, n. [OE. chery, for cherys, fr. F. cerise (cf.
      AS. cyrs cherry), fr. LL. ceresia, fr. L. cerasus Cherry
      tree, Gr. [?], perh. fr. [?] horn, from the hardness of the
      wood.]
      1. (Bot.) A tree or shrub of the genus {Prunus} (Which also
            includes the plum) bearing a fleshy drupe with a bony
            stone;
            (a) The common garden cherry ({Prunus Cerasus}), of which
                  several hundred varieties are cultivated for the
                  fruit, some of which are, the begarreau, blackheart,
                  black Tartarian, oxheart, morelle or morello, May-duke
                  (corrupted from M[82]doc in France).
            (b) The wild cherry; as, {Prunus serotina} (wild black
                  cherry), valued for its timber; {P. Virginiana} (choke
                  cherry), an American shrub which bears astringent
                  fruit; {P. avium} and {P. Padus}, European trees (bird
                  cherry).
  
      2. The fruit of the cherry tree, a drupe of various colors
            and flavors.
  
      3. The timber of the cherry tree, esp. of the black cherry,
            used in cabinetmaking, etc.
  
      4. A peculiar shade of red, like that of a cherry.
  
      {Barbadoes cherry}. See under {Barbadoes}.
  
      {Cherry bird} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird; the cedar bird;
            -- so called from its fondness for cherries.
  
      {Cherry bounce}, cherry brandy and sugar.
  
      {Cherry brandy}, brandy in which cherries have been steeped.
           
  
      {Cherry laurel} (Bot.), an evergreen shrub ({Prunus
            Lauro-cerasus}) common in shrubberies, the poisonous
            leaves of which have a flavor like that of bitter almonds.
           
  
      {Cherry pepper} (Bot.), a species of {Capsicum} ({C.
            cerasiforme}), with small, scarlet, intensely piquant
            cherry-shaped fruit.
  
      {Cherry pit}.
            (a) A child's play, in which cherries are thrown into a
                  hole. --Shak.
            (b) A cherry stone.
  
      {Cherry rum}, rum in which cherries have been steeped.
  
      {Cherry sucker} (Zo[94]l.), the European spotted flycatcher
            ({Musicapa grisola}); -- called also {cherry chopper}
            {cherry snipe}.
  
      {Cherry tree}, a tree that bears cherries.
  
      {Ground cherry}, {Winter cherry}, See {Alkekengi}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracentric \Par`a*cen"tric\, Paracentrical \Par`a*cen"tric*al\,
      a. [Pref. para- + centric, -ical: cf. F. paracentrique.]
      Deviating from circularity; changing the distance from a
      center.
  
      {Paracentric curve} (Math.), a curve having the property
            that, when its plane is placed vertically, a body
            descending along it, by the force of gravity, will
            approach to, or recede from, a fixed point or center, by
            equal distances in equal times; -- called also a
            {paracentric}.
  
      {Paracentric motton} [or] {velocity}, the motion or velocity
            of a revolving body, as a planet, by which it approaches
            to, or recedes from, the center, without reference to its
            motion in space, or to its motion as reckoned in any other
            direction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracentric \Par`a*cen"tric\, Paracentrical \Par`a*cen"tric*al\,
      a. [Pref. para- + centric, -ical: cf. F. paracentrique.]
      Deviating from circularity; changing the distance from a
      center.
  
      {Paracentric curve} (Math.), a curve having the property
            that, when its plane is placed vertically, a body
            descending along it, by the force of gravity, will
            approach to, or recede from, a fixed point or center, by
            equal distances in equal times; -- called also a
            {paracentric}.
  
      {Paracentric motton} [or] {velocity}, the motion or velocity
            of a revolving body, as a planet, by which it approaches
            to, or recedes from, the center, without reference to its
            motion in space, or to its motion as reckoned in any other
            direction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracentric \Par`a*cen"tric\, Paracentrical \Par`a*cen"tric*al\,
      a. [Pref. para- + centric, -ical: cf. F. paracentrique.]
      Deviating from circularity; changing the distance from a
      center.
  
      {Paracentric curve} (Math.), a curve having the property
            that, when its plane is placed vertically, a body
            descending along it, by the force of gravity, will
            approach to, or recede from, a fixed point or center, by
            equal distances in equal times; -- called also a
            {paracentric}.
  
      {Paracentric motton} [or] {velocity}, the motion or velocity
            of a revolving body, as a planet, by which it approaches
            to, or recedes from, the center, without reference to its
            motion in space, or to its motion as reckoned in any other
            direction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracentric \Par`a*cen"tric\, Paracentrical \Par`a*cen"tric*al\,
      a. [Pref. para- + centric, -ical: cf. F. paracentrique.]
      Deviating from circularity; changing the distance from a
      center.
  
      {Paracentric curve} (Math.), a curve having the property
            that, when its plane is placed vertically, a body
            descending along it, by the force of gravity, will
            approach to, or recede from, a fixed point or center, by
            equal distances in equal times; -- called also a
            {paracentric}.
  
      {Paracentric motton} [or] {velocity}, the motion or velocity
            of a revolving body, as a planet, by which it approaches
            to, or recedes from, the center, without reference to its
            motion in space, or to its motion as reckoned in any other
            direction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracentric \Par`a*cen"tric\, Paracentrical \Par`a*cen"tric*al\,
      a. [Pref. para- + centric, -ical: cf. F. paracentrique.]
      Deviating from circularity; changing the distance from a
      center.
  
      {Paracentric curve} (Math.), a curve having the property
            that, when its plane is placed vertically, a body
            descending along it, by the force of gravity, will
            approach to, or recede from, a fixed point or center, by
            equal distances in equal times; -- called also a
            {paracentric}.
  
      {Paracentric motton} [or] {velocity}, the motion or velocity
            of a revolving body, as a planet, by which it approaches
            to, or recedes from, the center, without reference to its
            motion in space, or to its motion as reckoned in any other
            direction.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracmastic \Par`ac*mas"tic\, a. [Gr. [?]. See {Para-}, and
      {Acme}.] (Med.)
      Gradually decreasing; past the acme, or crisis, as a
      distemper. --Dunglison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paraconic \Par`a*con"ic\, a. [Pref. para- + aconitic.] (Chem.)
      Pertaining to, or designating, an organic acid obtained as a
      deliquescent white crystalline substance, and isomeric with
      itaconic, citraconic, and mesaconic acids.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paraconine \Par`a*co"nine\, n. [Pref. para- + conine.] (Chem.)
      A base resembling and isomeric with conine, and obtained as a
      colorless liquid from butyric aldehyde and ammonia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracyanogen \Par`a*cy*an"o*gen\, n. [Pref. para- + cyanogen.]
      (Chem.)
      A polymeric modification of cyanogen, obtained as a brown or
      black amorphous residue by heating mercuric cyanide.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracymene \Par`a*cy"mene\, n. [Pref. para- + cymene.] (Chem.)
      Same as {Cymene}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cymene \Cy"mene\ (s?"m?n), n. (Chem.)
      A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon,
      {CH3.C6H4.C3H7}, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of
      cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called
      also {paracymene}, and formerly {camphogen}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paracymene \Par`a*cy"mene\, n. [Pref. para- + cymene.] (Chem.)
      Same as {Cymene}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cymene \Cy"mene\ (s?"m?n), n. (Chem.)
      A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon,
      {CH3.C6H4.C3H7}, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of
      cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called
      also {paracymene}, and formerly {camphogen}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragenesis \Par`a*gen"e*sis\
      (p[acr]r`[adot]*j[ecr]n"[esl]*s[icr]s), n. [Pref. para- +
      genesis.] (Min.)
      The science which treats of minerals with special reference
      to their origin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragenic \Par`a*gen"ic\ (-[icr]k), a. [Pref. para- + the root
      of ge`nos birth.] (Biol.)
      Originating in the character of the germ, or at the first
      commencement of an individual; -- said of peculiarities of
      structure, character, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragnath \Par"ag*nath\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Paragnathus}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Paragnathus \[d8]Pa*rag"na*thus\, n.; pl. {Paragnathi}. [NL.
      See {Para-}, and {Gnathic}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) One of the two lobes which form the lower lip, or
            metastome, of Crustacea.
      (b) One of the small, horny, toothlike jaws of certain
            annelids.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragnathous \Pa*rag"na*thous\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      Having both mandibles of equal length, the tips meeting, as
      in certain birds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragon \Par"a*gon\, v. i.
      To be equal; to hold comparison. [R.]
  
               Few or none could . . . paragon with her. --Shelton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragon \Par"a*gon\, n. [OF. paragon, F. parangon; cf. It.
      paragone, Sp. paragon, parangon; prob. fr. Gr. [?] to rub
      against; [?] beside + [?] whetstone; cf. LGr. [?] a polishing
      stone.]
      1. A companion; a match; an equal. [Obs.] --Spenser.
  
                     Philoclea, who indeed had no paragon but her sister.
                                                                              --Sir P.
                                                                              Sidney.
  
      2. Emulation; rivalry; competition. [Obs.]
  
                     Full many feats adventurous Performed, in paragon of
                     proudest men.                                    --Spenser.
  
      3. A model or pattern; a pattern of excellence or perfection;
            as, a paragon of beauty or eloquence. --Udall.
  
                     Man, . . . the paragon of animals !   --Shak.
  
                     The riches of sweet Mary's son, Boy-rabbi, Israel's
                     paragon.                                             --Emerson.
  
      4. (Print.) A size of type between great primer and double
            pica. See the Note under {Type}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragon \Par"a*gon\, v. t. [Cf. OF. paragonner, F. parangonner.]
      1. To compare; to parallel; to put in rivalry or emulation
            with. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney.
  
      2. To compare with; to equal; to rival. [R.] --Spenser.
  
                     In arms anon to paragon the morn, The morn new
                     rising.                                             --Glover.
  
      3. To serve as a model for; to surpass. [Obs.]
  
                     He hath achieved a maid That paragons description
                     and wild fame.                                    --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paragonite \Pa*rag"o*nite\, n. [From Gr. [?], p. pr. of [?] to
      mislead.] (Min.)
      A kind of mica related to muscovite, but containing soda
      instead of potash. It is characteristic of the paragonite
      schist of the Alps.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paraguayan \Par`a*guay"an\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Paraguay. -- n. A native or inhabitant of
      Paraguay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parasang \Par"a*sang\, n. [L. parasanga, Gr. [?], from Old
      Persian; cf. Per. farsang.]
      A Persian measure of length, which, according to Herodotus
      and Xenophon, was thirty stadia, or somewhat more than three
      and a half miles. The measure varied in different times and
      places, and, as now used, is estimated at from three and a
      half to four English miles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Parascenium \[d8]Par`a*sce"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Parascenia}. [NL.,
      fr. Gr. [?]; [?] beside + [?] stage.] (Greek & Rom. Antiq.)
      One of two apartments adjoining the stage, probably used as
      robing rooms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paraschematic \Par`a*sche*mat"ic\, a. [Gr. [?] to change from
      the true form.]
      Of or pertaining to a change from the right form, as in the
      formation of a word from another by a change of termination,
      gender, etc. --Max M[81]ller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parasynthetic \Par`a*syn*thet"ic\, a. [Gr. [?]. See {Para-}, and
      {Synthetic}.]
      Formed from a compound word. [bd]Parasynthetic
      derivatives.[b8] --Dr. Murray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Paraxanthin \Par`a*xan"thin\, n. [Pref. Para- + xanthin.]
      (Physiol. Chem.)
      A crystalline substance closely related to xanthin, present
      in small quantity in urine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parcenary \Par"ce*na*ry\, n. [See {Parcener}, {partner}.] (Law)
      The holding or occupation of an inheritable estate which
      descends from the ancestor to two or more persons;
      coheirship.
  
      Note: It differs in many respects from joint tenancy, which
               is created by deed or devise. In the United States
               there is no essential distinction between parcenary and
               tenancy in common. --Wharton. Kent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parcener \Par"ce*ner\, n. [Of. par[cced]onnier, parsonnier, fr.
      parzon, par[cced]un, parcion, part, portion, fr. L. partitio
      a division. See {Partition}, and cf. {Partner}.] (Law)
      A coheir, or one of two or more persons to whom an estate of
      inheritance descends jointly, and by whom it is held as one
      estate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parching \Parch"ing\ (p[aum]rch"[icr]ng), a.
      Scorching; burning; drying. [bd]Summer's parching heat.[b8]
      --Shak. -- {Parch"ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parch \Parch\ (p[aum]rch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Parched}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Parching}.] [OE. perchen to pierce, hence used of a
      piercing heat or cold, OF. perchier, another form of percier,
      F. percer. See {Pierce}.]
      1. To burn the surface of; to scorch; to roast over the fire,
            as dry grain; as, to parch the skin; to parch corn.
  
                     Ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn. --Lev.
                                                                              xxiii. 14.
  
      2. To dry to extremity; to shrivel with heat; as, the mouth
            is parched from fever.
  
                     The ground below is parched.               --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parching \Parch"ing\ (p[aum]rch"[icr]ng), a.
      Scorching; burning; drying. [bd]Summer's parching heat.[b8]
      --Shak. -- {Parch"ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parchment \Parch"ment\ (-m[eit]nt), n. [OE. parchemin,
      perchemin, F. parchemin, LL. pergamenum, L. pergamena,
      pergamina, fr. L. Pergamenus of or belonging to Pergamus an
      ancient city of Mysia in Asia Minor, where parchment was
      first used.]
      1. The skin of a lamb, sheep, goat, young calf, or other
            animal, prepared for writing on. See {Vellum}.
  
                     But here's a parchment with the seal of C[91]sar.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. The envelope of the coffee grains, inside the pulp.
  
      {Parchment paper}. See {Papyrine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dry \Dry\, a. [Compar. {Drier}; superl. {Driest}.] [OE. dru[?]e,
      druye, drie, AS. dryge; akin to LG. dr[94]ge, D. droog, OHG.
      trucchan, G. trocken, Icel. draugr a dry log. Cf. {Drought},
      {Drouth}, 3d {Drug}.]
      1. Free from moisture; having little humidity or none; arid;
            not wet or moist; deficient in the natural or normal
            supply of moisture, as rain or fluid of any kind; -- said
            especially:
            (a) Of the weather: Free from rain or mist.
  
                           The weather, we agreed, was too dry for the
                           season.                                       --Addison.
            (b) Of vegetable matter: Free from juices or sap; not
                  succulent; not green; as, dry wood or hay.
            (c) Of animals: Not giving milk; as, the cow is dry.
            (d) Of persons: Thirsty; needing drink.
  
                           Give the dry fool drink.               -- Shak
            (e) Of the eyes: Not shedding tears.
  
                           Not a dry eye was to be seen in the assembly. --
                                                                              Prescott.
            (f) (Med.) Of certain morbid conditions, in which there is
                  entire or comparative absence of moisture; as, dry
                  gangrene; dry catarrh.
  
      2. Destitute of that which interests or amuses; barren;
            unembellished; jejune; plain.
  
                     These epistles will become less dry, more
                     susceptible of ornament.                     --Pope.
  
      3. Characterized by a quality somewhat severe, grave, or
            hard; hence, sharp; keen; shrewd; quaint; as, a dry tone
            or manner; dry wit.
  
                     He was rather a dry, shrewd kind of body. --W.
                                                                              Irving.
  
      4. (Fine Arts) Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of
            execution, or the want of a delicate contour in form, and
            of easy transition in coloring.
  
      {Dry area} (Arch.), a small open space reserved outside the
            foundation of a building to guard it from damp.
  
      {Dry blow}.
            (a) (Med.) A blow which inflicts no wound, and causes no
                  effusion of blood.
            (b) A quick, sharp blow.
  
      {Dry bone} (Min.), Smithsonite, or carbonate of zinc; -- a
            miner's term.
  
      {Dry castor} (Zo[94]l.) a kind of beaver; -- called also
            {parchment beaver}.
  
      {Dry cupping}. (Med.) See under {Cupping}.
  
      {Dry dock}. See under {Dock}.
  
      {Dry fat}. See {Dry vat} (below).
  
      {Dry light}, pure unobstructed light; hence, a clear,
            impartial view. --Bacon.
  
                     The scientific man must keep his feelings under
                     stern control, lest they obtrude into his
                     researches, and color the dry light in which alone
                     science desires to see its objects.   -- J. C.
                                                                              Shairp.
  
      {Dry masonry}. See {Masonry}.
  
      {Dry measure}, a system of measures of volume for dry or
            coarse articles, by the bushel, peck, etc.
  
      {Dry pile} (Physics), a form of the Voltaic pile, constructed
            without the use of a liquid, affording a feeble current,
            and chiefly useful in the construction of electroscopes of
            great delicacy; -- called also {Zamboni's , from the names
            of the two earliest constructors of it.
  
      {Dry pipe} (Steam Engine), a pipe which conducts dry steam
            from a boiler.
  
      {Dry plate} (Photog.), a glass plate having a dry coating
            sensitive to light, upon which photographic negatives or
            pictures can be made, without moistening.
  
      {Dry-plate process}, the process of photographing with dry
            plates.
  
      {Dry point}. (Fine Arts)
            (a) An engraving made with the needle instead of the
                  burin, in which the work is done nearly as in etching,
                  but is finished without the use acid.
            (b) A print from such an engraving, usually upon paper.
            (c) Hence: The needle with which such an engraving is
                  made.
  
      {Dry rent} (Eng. Law), a rent reserved by deed, without a
            clause of distress. --Bouvier.
  
      {Dry rot}, a decay of timber, reducing its fibers to the
            condition of a dry powdery dust, often accompanied by the
            presence of a peculiar fungus ({Merulius lacrymans}),
            which is sometimes considered the cause of the decay; but
            it is more probable that the real cause is the
            decomposition of the wood itself. --D. C. Eaton. Called
            also {sap rot}, and, in the United States, {powder post}.
            --Hebert.
  
      {Dry stove}, a hothouse adapted to preserving the plants of
            arid climates. --Brande & C.
  
      {Dry vat}, a vat, basket, or other receptacle for dry
            articles.
  
      {Dry wine}, that in which the saccharine matter and
            fermentation were so exactly balanced, that they have
            wholly neutralized each other, and no sweetness is
            perceptible; -- opposed to {sweet wine}, in which the
            saccharine matter is in excess.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parchment \Parch"ment\ (-m[eit]nt), n. [OE. parchemin,
      perchemin, F. parchemin, LL. pergamenum, L. pergamena,
      pergamina, fr. L. Pergamenus of or belonging to Pergamus an
      ancient city of Mysia in Asia Minor, where parchment was
      first used.]
      1. The skin of a lamb, sheep, goat, young calf, or other
            animal, prepared for writing on. See {Vellum}.
  
                     But here's a parchment with the seal of C[91]sar.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. The envelope of the coffee grains, inside the pulp.
  
      {Parchment paper}. See {Papyrine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note: Paper is often used adjectively or in combination,
               having commonly an obvious signification; as, paper
               cutter or paper-cutter; paper knife, paper-knife, or
               paperknife; paper maker, paper-maker, or papermaker;
               paper mill or paper-mill; paper weight, paper-weight,
               or paperweight, etc.
  
      {Business paper}, checks, notes, drafts, etc., given in
            payment of actual indebtedness; -- opposed to
            accommodation paper.
  
      {Fly paper}, paper covered with a sticky preparation, -- used
            for catching flies.
  
      {Laid paper}. See under {Laid}.
  
      {Paper birch} (Bot.), the canoe birch tree ({Betula
            papyracea}).
  
      {Paper blockade}, an ineffective blockade, as by a weak naval
            force.
  
      {Paper boat} (Naut.), a boat made of water-proof paper.
  
      {Paper car wheel} (Railroad), a car wheel having a steel
            tire, and a center formed of compressed paper held between
            two plate-iron disks. --Forney.
  
      {Paper credit}, credit founded upon evidences of debt, such
            as promissory notes, duebills, etc.
  
      {Paper hanger}, one who covers walls with paper hangings.
  
      {Paper hangings}, paper printed with colored figures, or
            otherwise made ornamental, prepared to be pasted against
            the walls of apartments, etc.; wall paper.
  
      {Paper house}, an audience composed of people who have come
            in on free passes. [Cant]
  
      {Paper money}, notes or bills, usually issued by government
            or by a banking corporation, promising payment of money,
            and circulated as the representative of coin.
  
      {Paper mulberry}. (Bot.) See under Mulberry.
  
      {Paper muslin}, glazed muslin, used for linings, etc.
  
      {Paper nautilus}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Argonauta}.
  
      {Paper reed} (Bot.), the papyrus.
  
      {Paper sailor}. (Zo[94]l.) See Argonauta.
  
      {Paper stainer}, one who colors or stamps wall paper. --De
            Colange.
  
      {Paper wasp} (Zo[94]l.), any wasp which makes a nest of
            paperlike material, as the yellow jacket.
  
      {Paper weight}, any object used as a weight to prevent loose
            papers from being displaced by wind, or otherwise.
  
      {Parchment paper}. See {Papyrine}.
  
      {Tissue paper}, thin, gauzelike paper, such as is used to
            protect engravings in books.
  
      {Wall paper}. Same as {Paper hangings}, above.
  
      {Waste paper}, paper thrown aside as worthless or useless,
            except for uses of little account.
  
      {Wove paper}, a writing paper with a uniform surface, not
            ribbed or watermarked.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parchmentize \Parch"ment*ize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {-ized}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {-izing}.]
      To convert to a parchmentlike substance, esp. by sulphuric
      acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parigenin \Pa*rig"e*nin\, n. [Parillin + -gen + -in.] (Chem.)
      A curdy white substance, obtained by the decomposition of
      parillin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parishen \Par"ish*en\, n.
      A parishioner. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parishional \Pa*rish"ion*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a parish; parochial. [R.] --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parishioner \Pa*rish"ion*er\, n. [F. paroissien, LL.
      parochianus.]
      One who belongs to, or is connected with, a parish.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parisian \Pa*ri"sian\, n. [Cf. F. parisen.]
      A native or inhabitant of Paris, the capital of France.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parisian \Pa*ri"sian\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Paris.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Park \Park\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Parked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Parking}.]
      1. To inclose in a park, or as in a park.
  
                     How are we parked, and bounded in a pale. --Shak.
  
      2. (Mil.) To bring together in a park, or compact body; as,
            to park the artillery, the wagons, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Jerusalem \Je*ru"sa*lem\, n. [Gr. [?], fr. Heb.
      Y[?]r[?]sh[be]laim.]
      The chief city of Palestine, intimately associated with the
      glory of the Jewish nation, and the life and death of Jesus
      Christ.
  
      {Jerusalem artichoke} [Perh. a corrupt. of It. girasole i.e.,
            sunflower, or turnsole. See {Gyre}, {Solar}.] (Bot.)
      (a) An American plant, a perennial species of sunflower
            ({Helianthus tuberosus}), whose tubers are sometimes used
            as food.
      (b) One of the tubers themselves.
  
      {Jerusalem cherry} (Bot.), the popular name of either of
            either of two species of {Solanum} ({S. Pseudo-capsicum}
            and {S. capsicastrum}), cultivated as ornamental house
            plants. They bear bright red berries of about the size of
            cherries.
  
      {Jerusalem oak} (Bot.), an aromatic goosefoot ({Chenopodium
            Botrys}), common about houses and along roadsides.
  
      {Jerusalem sage} (Bot.), a perennial herb of the Mint family
            ({Phlomis tuberosa}).
  
      {Jerusalem thorn} (Bot.), a spiny, leguminous tree
            ({Parkinsonia aculeata}), widely dispersed in warm
            countries, and used for hedges.
  
      {The New Jerusalem}, Heaven; the Celestial City.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parochian \Pa*ro"chi*an\, a. [See {Parochial}, {Parishioner}.]
      Parochial. [Obs.] [bd]Parochian churches.[b8] --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parochian \Pa*ro"chi*an\, n. [LL. parochianus.]
      A parishioner. [Obs.] --Ld. Burleigh.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsimonious \Par`si*mo"ni*ous\, a. [Cf. F. parcimonieux. See
      {Parsimony}.]
      Exhibiting parsimony; sparing in expenditure of money; frugal
      to excess; penurious; niggardly; stingy. --
      {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ness}, n.
  
               A prodigal king is nearer a tyrant than a parsimonious.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
               Extraordinary funds for one campaign may spare us the
               expense of many years; whereas a long, parsimonious war
               will drain us of more men and money.      --Addison.
  
      Syn: Covetous; niggardly; miserly; penurious; close; saving;
               mean; stingy; frugal. See {Avaricious}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsimonious \Par`si*mo"ni*ous\, a. [Cf. F. parcimonieux. See
      {Parsimony}.]
      Exhibiting parsimony; sparing in expenditure of money; frugal
      to excess; penurious; niggardly; stingy. --
      {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ness}, n.
  
               A prodigal king is nearer a tyrant than a parsimonious.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
               Extraordinary funds for one campaign may spare us the
               expense of many years; whereas a long, parsimonious war
               will drain us of more men and money.      --Addison.
  
      Syn: Covetous; niggardly; miserly; penurious; close; saving;
               mean; stingy; frugal. See {Avaricious}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsimonious \Par`si*mo"ni*ous\, a. [Cf. F. parcimonieux. See
      {Parsimony}.]
      Exhibiting parsimony; sparing in expenditure of money; frugal
      to excess; penurious; niggardly; stingy. --
      {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Par`si*mo"ni*ous*ness}, n.
  
               A prodigal king is nearer a tyrant than a parsimonious.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
               Extraordinary funds for one campaign may spare us the
               expense of many years; whereas a long, parsimonious war
               will drain us of more men and money.      --Addison.
  
      Syn: Covetous; niggardly; miserly; penurious; close; saving;
               mean; stingy; frugal. See {Avaricious}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsimony \Par"si*mo*ny\, n. [L. parsimonia, parcimonia; cf.
      parcere to spare, parsus sparing: cf. F. parcimonie.]
      Closeness or sparingness in the expenditure of money; --
      generally in a bad sense; excessive frugality; niggardliness.
      --Bacon.
  
               Awful parsimony presided generally at the table.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      Syn: Economy; frugality; illiberality; covetousness;
               closeness; stinginess. See {Economy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parse \Parse\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Parsed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Parsing}.] [L. pars a part; pars orationis a part of speech.
      See {Part}, n.] (Gram.)
      To resolve into its elements, as a sentence, pointing out the
      several parts of speech, and their relation to each other by
      government or agreement; to analyze and describe
      grammatically.
  
               Let him construe the letter into English, and parse it
               over perfectly.                                       --Ascham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsnip \Pars"nip\, n. [OE. parsnepe, from a French form, fr. L.
      pastinaca; cf. pastinare to dig up, pastinum a kind of
      dibble; cf. OF. pastenade, pastenaque.] (Bot.)
      The aromatic and edible spindle-shaped root of the cultivated
      form of the Pastinaca sativa, a biennial umbelliferous plant
      which is very poisonous in its wild state; also, the plant
      itself.
  
      {Cow parsnip}. See {Cow parsnip}.
  
      {Meadow parsnip}, the European cow parsnip.
  
      {Poison parsnip}, the wild stock of the parsnip.
  
      {Water parsnip}, any plant of the umbelliferous genus {Sium},
            the species of which are poisonous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parson \Par"son\, n. [OE. persone person, parson, OF. persone,
      F. personne person, LL. persona (sc. ecclesiae), fr. L.
      persona a person. See {Person}.]
      1. (Eng. Eccl. Law) A person who represents a parish in its
            ecclesiastical and corporate capacities; hence, the rector
            or incumbent of a parochial church, who has full
            possession of all the rights thereof, with the cure of
            souls.
  
      2. Any clergyman having ecclesiastical preferment; one who is
            in orders, or is licensed to preach; a preacher.
  
                     He hears the parson pray and preach.   --Longfellow.
  
      {Parson bird} (Zo[94]l.), a New Zealand bird ({Prosthemadera
            Nov[91]seelandi[91]}) remarkable for its powers of mimicry
            and its ability to articulate words. Its color is glossy
            black, with a curious tuft of long, curly, white feathers
            on each side of the throat. It is often kept as a cage
            bird.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parson \Par"son\, n. [OE. persone person, parson, OF. persone,
      F. personne person, LL. persona (sc. ecclesiae), fr. L.
      persona a person. See {Person}.]
      1. (Eng. Eccl. Law) A person who represents a parish in its
            ecclesiastical and corporate capacities; hence, the rector
            or incumbent of a parochial church, who has full
            possession of all the rights thereof, with the cure of
            souls.
  
      2. Any clergyman having ecclesiastical preferment; one who is
            in orders, or is licensed to preach; a preacher.
  
                     He hears the parson pray and preach.   --Longfellow.
  
      {Parson bird} (Zo[94]l.), a New Zealand bird ({Prosthemadera
            Nov[91]seelandi[91]}) remarkable for its powers of mimicry
            and its ability to articulate words. Its color is glossy
            black, with a curious tuft of long, curly, white feathers
            on each side of the throat. It is often kept as a cage
            bird.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsonage \Par"son*age\, n.
      1. (Eng. Eccl. Law) A certain portion of lands, tithes, and
            offerings, for the maintenance of the parson of a parish.
  
      2. The glebe and house, or the house only, owned by a parish
            or ecclesiastical society, and appropriated to the
            maintenance or use of the incumbent or settled pastor.
  
      3. Money paid for the support of a parson. [Scot.]
  
                     What have I been paying stipend and teind, parsonage
                     and vicarage, for?                              --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsoned \Par"soned\, a.
      Furnished with a parson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsonic \Par*son"ic\, Parsonical \Par*son"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a parson; clerical.
  
               Vainglory glowed in his parsonic heart.   --Colman.
      -- {Par*son"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsonic \Par*son"ic\, Parsonical \Par*son"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a parson; clerical.
  
               Vainglory glowed in his parsonic heart.   --Colman.
      -- {Par*son"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsonic \Par*son"ic\, Parsonical \Par*son"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a parson; clerical.
  
               Vainglory glowed in his parsonic heart.   --Colman.
      -- {Par*son"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Parsonish \Par"son*ish\, a.
      Appropriate to, or like, a parson; -- used in disparagement.
      [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Turbine \Tur"bine\, n.
      A form of steam engine analogous in construction and action
      to the water turbine. There are practically only two distinct
      kinds, and they are typified in the de Laval and the Parsons
      and Curtis turbines. The
  
      {de Laval turbine} is an impulse turbine, in which steam
            impinges upon revolving blades from a flared nozzle. The
            flare of the nozzle causes expansion of the steam, and
            hence changes its pressure energy into kinetic energy. An
            enormous velocity (30,000 revolutions per minute in the 5
            H. P. size) is requisite for high efficiency, and the
            machine has therefore to be geared down to be of practical
            use. Some recent development of this type include turbines
            formed of several de Laval elements compounded as in the
            ordinary expansion engine. The
  
      {Parsons turbine} is an impulse-and-reaction turbine, usually
            of the axial type. The steam is constrained to pass
            successively through alternate rows of fixed and moving
            blades, being expanded down to a condenser pressure of
            about 1 lb. per square inch absolute. The
  
      {Curtis turbine} is somewhat simpler than the Parsons, and
            consists of elements each of which has at least two rows
            of moving blades and one row of stationary. The bucket
            velocity is lowered by fractional velocity reduction. Both
            the Parsons and Curtis turbines are suitable for driving
            dynamos and steamships directly. In efficiency, lightness,
            and bulk for a given power, they compare favorably with
            reciprocating engines.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Oxeye \Ox"eye`\, n. [Ox + eye.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) The oxeye daisy. See under {Daisy}.
            (b) The corn camomile ({Anthemis arvensis}).
            (c) A genus of composite plants ({Buphthalmum}) with large
                  yellow flowers.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A titmouse, especially the great titmouse ({Parus
                  major}) and the blue titmouse ({P. c[d2]ruleus}).
                  [Prov. Eng.]
            (b) The dunlin.
            (c) A fish; the bogue, or box.
  
      {Creeping oxeye} (Bot.) a West Indian composite plant
            ({Wedelia carnosa}).
  
      {Seaside oxeye} (Bot.), a West Indian composite shrub
            ({Borrichia arborescens}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Per \Per\, prep. [L. Cf. {Far}, {For-}, {Pardon}, and cf. {Par},
      prep.]
      Through; by means of; through the agency of; by; for; for
      each; as, per annum; per capita, by heads, or according to
      individuals; per curiam, by the court; per se, by itself, of
      itself. Per is also sometimes used with English words.
  
      {Per annum}, by the year; in each successive year; annually.
           
  
      {Per cent}, {Per centum}, by the hundred; in the hundred; --
            used esp. of proportions of ingredients, rate or amount of
            interest, and the like; commonly used in the shortened
            form per cent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Per \Per\, prep. [L. Cf. {Far}, {For-}, {Pardon}, and cf. {Par},
      prep.]
      Through; by means of; through the agency of; by; for; for
      each; as, per annum; per capita, by heads, or according to
      individuals; per curiam, by the court; per se, by itself, of
      itself. Per is also sometimes used with English words.
  
      {Per annum}, by the year; in each successive year; annually.
           
  
      {Per cent}, {Per centum}, by the hundred; in the hundred; --
            used esp. of proportions of ingredients, rate or amount of
            interest, and the like; commonly used in the shortened
            form per cent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Percentage \Per*cent"age\, n. [Per cent + -age, as in average.
      See {Per}, and {Cent}.] (Com.)
      A certain rate per cent; the allowance, duty, rate of
      interest, discount, or commission, on a hundred.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perchance \Per*chance"\, adv. [F. par by (L. per) + chance. See
      {Par}, and {Chance}.]
      By chance; perhaps; peradventure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perchant \Perch"ant\, n. [F.]
      A bird tied by the foot, to serve as decoy to other birds by
      its fluttering.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perch \Perch\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Perched}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Perching}.] [F. percher. See {Perch} a pole.]
      To alight or settle, as a bird; to sit or roost.
  
               Wrens make prey where eagles dare not perch. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Log glass} (Naut.), a small sandglass used to time the
            running out of the log line.
  
      {Log line} (Naut.), a line or cord about a hundred and fifty
            fathoms long, fastened to the log-chip. See Note under 2d
            {Log}, n., 2.
  
      {Log perch} (Zo[94]l.), an ethiostomoid fish, or darter
            ({Percina caprodes}); -- called also {hogfish} and
            {rockfish}.
  
      {Log reel} (Naut.), the reel on which the log line is wound.
           
  
      {Log slate}. (Naut.) See {Log board} (above).
  
      {Rough log} (Naut.), a first draught of a record of the
            cruise or voyage.
  
      {Smooth log} (Naut.), a clean copy of the rough log. In the
            case of naval vessels this copy is forwarded to the proper
            officer of the government.
  
      {To heave the log} (Naut.), to cast the log-chip into the
            water; also, the whole process of ascertaining a vessel's
            speed by the log.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pergamenous \Per`ga*me"no*us\, Pergamentaceous
   \Per`ga*men*ta"ceous\, a. [L. pergamena parchment. See
      {Parchment}.]
      Like parchment.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pergamenous \Per`ga*me"no*us\, Pergamentaceous
   \Per`ga*men*ta"ceous\, a. [L. pergamena parchment. See
      {Parchment}.]
      Like parchment.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perichondrial \Per`i*chon"dri*al\, a. (Anat.)
      Of or pertaining to the perichondrium; situated around
      cartilage.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Periecians \Per`i*e"cians\, n. pl.
      See {Peri[d2]cians}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Periganglionic \Per`i*gan`gli*on"ic\, a. (Anat.)
      Surrounding a ganglion; as, the periganglionic glands of the
      frog.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigean \Per`i*ge"an\, a.
      Pertaining to the perigee.
  
      {Perigean tides}, those spring tides which occur soon after
            the moon passes her perigee.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigean \Per`i*ge"an\, a.
      Pertaining to the perigee.
  
      {Perigean tides}, those spring tides which occur soon after
            the moon passes her perigee.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigenesis \Per`i*gen"e*sis\, n. (Biol.)
      A theory which explains inheritance by the transmission of
      the type of growth force possessed by one generation to
      another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigenetic \Per`i*gen"e*tic\, a. (Biol.)
      Of or pertaining to perigenesis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigee \Per"i*gee\, Perigeum \Per`i*ge"um\, n. [NL. perigeum,
      fr. Gr. [?] about, near + [?] the earth: cf. F.
      p[82]rig[82]e.] (Astron.)
      That point in the orbit of the moon which is nearest to the
      earth; -- opposed to {apogee}. It is sometimes, but rarely,
      used of the nearest points of other orbits, as of a comet, a
      planet, etc. Called also {epigee}, {epigeum}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigone \Per"i*gone\, n. [Pref. peri- + Gr. [?] productive
      organs.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) Any organ inclosing the essential organs of a flower;
                  a perianth.
            (b) In mosses, the involucral bracts of a male flower.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A sac which surrounds the generative bodies in
            the gonophore of a hydroid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Perigonium \[d8]Per`i*go"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Perigonia}. [NL.]
      Same as {Perigone}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Perigynium \[d8]Per`i*gyn"i*um\, n.; pl. {Perigynia}. [NL. See
      {Perigynous}.] (Bot.)
      Some unusual appendage about the pistil, as the bottle-shaped
      body in the sedges, and the bristles or scales in some other
      genera of the Sedge family, or {Cyperace[91]}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perigynous \Pe*rig"y*nous\, a. [Pref. peri- + Gr. [?] woman.]
      (Bot.)
      Having the ovary free, but the petals and stamens borne on
      the calyx; -- said of flower such as that of the cherry or
      peach.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Periscian \Pe*ris"cian\, a. [Gr. [?]; [?] around + [?] shadow:
      cf. F. p[82]riscien.]
      Having the shadow moving all around.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Periscians \Pe*ris"cians\, d8Periscii \[d8]Pe*ris"ci*i\, n. pl.
      [NL. See {Periscian}.]
      Those who live within a polar circle, whose shadows, during
      some summer days, will move entirely round, falling toward
      every point of the compass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perish \Per"ish\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Perished}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Perishing}.] [OE. perissen, perisshen, F. p[82]rir, p.
      pr. p[82]rissant, L. perire to go or run through, come to
      nothing, perish; per through + ire to go. Cf. {Issue}, and
      see {-ish}.]
      To be destroyed; to pass away; to become nothing; to be lost;
      to die; hence, to wither; to waste away.
  
               I perish with hunger!                              --Luke xv. 17.
  
               Grow up and perish, as the summer fly.   --Milton.
  
               The thoughts of a soul that perish in thinking.
                                                                              --Locke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perishment \Per"ish*ment\, n. [Cf. OF. perissement.]
      The act of perishing. [R.] --Udall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Perisoma \[d8]Per`i*so"ma\, n.; pl. {Perisomata}. [NL.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Perisome}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perisome \Per"i*some\, n. [Pref. peri- + -some body.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The entire covering of an invertebrate animal, as echinoderm
      or c[d2]lenterate; the integument.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perjenet \Per"jen*et\, n. [Cf. {Pear}, and {Jenneting}.]
      A kind of pear. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perkin \Per"kin\, n.
      A kind of weak perry.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perk \Perk\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Perked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Perking}.] [Cf. W. percu to trim, to make smart.]
      To make trim or smart; to straighten up; to erect; to make a
      jaunty or saucy display of; as, to perk the ears; to perk up
      one's head. --Cowper. Sherburne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Perkinism \Per"kin*ism\, n. (Med.)
      A remedial treatment, by drawing the pointed extremities of
      two rods, each of a different metal, over the affected part;
      tractoration, -- first employed by Dr. Elisha Perkins of
      Norwich, Conn. See {Metallotherapy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persant \Per"sant\, a. [F. per[87]ant, p. pr. of percer to
      pierce.]
      Piercing. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Indian \In"di*an\ (?; 277), a. [From India, and this fr. Indus,
      the name of a river in Asia, L. Indus, Gr. [?], OPers. Hindu,
      name of the land on the Indus, Skr. sindhu river, the Indus.
      Cf. {Hindoo}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to India proper; also to the East Indies,
            or, sometimes, to the West Indies.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to the aborigines, or Indians, of
            America; as, Indian wars; the Indian tomahawk.
  
      3. Made of maize or Indian corn; as, Indian corn, Indian
            meal, Indian bread, and the like. [U.S.]
  
      {Indian} bay (Bot.), a lauraceous tree ({Persea Indica}).
  
      {Indian bean} (Bot.), a name of the catalpa.
  
      {Indian berry}. (Bot.) Same as {Cocculus indicus}.
  
      {Indian bread}. (Bot.) Same as {Cassava}.
  
      {Indian club}, a wooden club, which is swung by the hand for
            gymnastic exercise.
  
      {Indian cordage}, cordage made of the fibers of cocoanut
            husk.
  
      {Indian corn} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Zea} ({Z. Mays});
            the maize, a native of America. See {Corn}, and {Maize}.
           
  
      {Indian cress} (Bot.), nasturtium. See {Nasturtium}, 2.
  
      {Indian cucumber} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Medeola} ({M.
            Virginica}), a common in woods in the United States. The
            white rootstock has a taste like cucumbers.
  
      {Indian currant} (Bot.), a plant of the genus
            {Symphoricarpus} ({S. vulgaris}), bearing small red
            berries.
  
      {Indian dye}, the puccoon.
  
      {Indian fig}. (Bot.)
            (a) The banyan. See {Banyan}.
            (b) The prickly pear.
  
      {Indian file}, single file; arrangement of persons in a row
            following one after another, the usual way among Indians
            of traversing woods, especially when on the war path.
  
      {Indian fire}, a pyrotechnic composition of sulphur, niter,
            and realgar, burning with a brilliant white light.
  
      {Indian grass} (Bot.), a coarse, high grass ({Chrysopogon
            nutans}), common in the southern portions of the United
            States; wood grass. --Gray.
  
      {Indian hemp}. (Bot.)
            (a) A plant of the genus {Apocynum} ({A. cannabinum}),
                  having a milky juice, and a tough, fibrous bark,
                  whence the name. The root it used in medicine and is
                  both emetic and cathartic in properties.
            (b) The variety of common hemp ({Cannabis Indica}), from
                  which hasheesh is obtained.
  
      {Indian mallow} (Bot.), the velvet leaf ({Abutilon
            Avicenn[91]}). See {Abutilon}.
  
      {Indian meal}, ground corn or maize. [U.S.]
  
      {Indian millet} (Bot.), a tall annual grass ({Sorghum
            vulgare}), having many varieties, among which are broom
            corn, Guinea corn, durra, and the Chinese sugar cane. It
            is called also {Guinea corn}. See {Durra}.
  
      {Indian ox} (Zo[94]l.), the zebu.
  
      {Indian paint}. See {Bloodroot}.
  
      {Indian paper}. See {India paper}, under {India}.
  
      {Indian physic} (Bot.), a plant of two species of the genus
            {Gillenia} ({G. trifoliata}, and {G. stipulacea}), common
            in the United States, the roots of which are used in
            medicine as a mild emetic; -- called also {American
            ipecac}, and {bowman's root}. --Gray.
  
      {Indian pink}. (Bot.)
            (a) The Cypress vine ({Ipom[d2]a Quamoclit}); -- so called
                  in the West Indies.
            (b) See {China pink}, under {China}.
  
      {Indian pipe} (Bot.), a low, fleshy herb ({Monotropa
            uniflora}), growing in clusters in dark woods, and having
            scalelike leaves, and a solitary nodding flower. The whole
            plant is waxy white, but turns black in drying.
  
      {Indian plantain} (Bot.), a name given to several species of
            the genus {Cacalia}, tall herbs with composite white
            flowers, common through the United States in rich woods.
            --Gray.
  
      {Indian poke} (Bot.), a plant usually known as the {white
            hellebore} ({Veratrum viride}).
  
      {Indian pudding}, a pudding of which the chief ingredients
            are Indian meal, milk, and molasses.
  
      {Indian purple}.
            (a) A dull purple color.
            (b) The pigment of the same name, intensely blue and
                  black.
  
      {Indian red}.
            (a) A purplish red earth or pigment composed of a silicate
                  of iron and alumina, with magnesia. It comes from the
                  Persian Gulf. Called also {Persian red}.
            (b) See {Almagra}.
  
      {Indian rice} (Bot.), a reedlike water grass. See {Rice}.
  
      {Indian shot} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Canna} ({C.
            Indica}). The hard black seeds are as large as swan shot.
            See {Canna}.
  
      {Indian summer}, in the United States, a period of warm and
            pleasant weather occurring late in autumn. See under
            {Summer}.
  
      {Indian tobacco} (Bot.), a species of {Lobelia}. See
            {Lobelia}.
  
      {Indian turnip} (Bot.), an American plant of the genus
            {Aris[91]ma}. {A. triphyllum} has a wrinkled farinaceous
            root resembling a small turnip, but with a very acrid
            juice. See {Jack in the Pulpit}, and {Wake-robin}.
  
      {Indian wheat}, maize or Indian corn.
  
      {Indian yellow}.
            (a) An intense rich yellow color, deeper than gamboge but
                  less pure than cadmium.
            (b) See {Euxanthin}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mahogany \Ma*hog"a*ny\, n. [From the South American name.]
      1. (Bot.) A large tree of the genus {Swietenia} ({S.
            Mahogoni}), found in tropical America.
  
      Note: Several other trees, with wood more or less like
               mahogany, are called by this name; as, African mahogany
               ({Khaya Senegalensis}), Australian mahogany
               ({Eucalyptus marginatus}), Bastard mahogany ({Batonia
               apetala} of the West Indies), Indian mahogany ({Cedrela
               Toona} of Bengal, and trees of the genera {Soymida} and
               {Chukrassia}), Madeira mahogany ({Persea Indica}),
               Mountain mahogany, the black or cherry birch ({Betula
               lenta}), also the several species of {Cercocarpus} of
               California and the Rocky Mountains.
  
      2. The wood of the {Swietenia Mahogoni}. It is of a reddish
            brown color, beautifully veined, very hard, and
            susceptible of a fine polish. It is used in the
            manufacture of furniture.
  
      3. A table made of mahogany wood. [Colloq.]
  
      {To be under the mahogany}, to be so drunk as to have fallen
            under the table. [Eng.]
  
      {To put one's legs under some one's mahogany}, to dine with
            him. [Slang]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Canary \Ca*na"ry\, a. [F. Canarie, L. Canaria insula one of the
      Canary islands, said to be so called from its large dogs, fr.
      canis dog.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the Canary Islands; as, canary wine;
            canary birds.
  
      2. Of a pale yellowish color; as, Canary stone.
  
      {Canary grass}, a grass of the genus {Phalaris} ({P.
            Canariensis}), producing the seed used as food for canary
            birds.
  
      {Canary stone} (Min.), a yellow species of carnelian, named
            from its resemblance in color to the plumage of the canary
            bird.
  
      {Canary wood}, the beautiful wood of the trees {Persea
            Indica} and {P. Canariensis}, natives of Madeira and the
            Canary Islands.
  
      {Canary vine}. See {Canary bird flower}, under {Canary bird}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, n.
      1. A native or inhabitant of Persia.
  
      2. The language spoken in Persia.
  
      3. A thin silk fabric, used formerly for linings. --Beck.
  
      4. pl. (Arch.) See {Persian columns}, under {Persian}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manna \Man"na\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?], Heb. m[be]n; cf. Ar. mann,
      properly, gift (of heaven).]
      1. (Script.) The food supplied to the Israelites in their
            journey through the wilderness of Arabia; hence, divinely
            supplied food. --Ex. xvi. 15.
  
      2. (Bot.) A name given to lichens of the genus {Lecanora},
            sometimes blown into heaps in the deserts of Arabia and
            Africa, and gathered and used as food.
  
      3. (Bot. & Med.) A sweetish exudation in the form of pale
            yellow friable flakes, coming from several trees and
            shrubs and used in medicine as a gentle laxative, as the
            secretion of {Fraxinus Ornus}, and {F. rotundifolia}, the
            manna ashes of Southern Europe.
  
      Note: {Persian manna} is the secretion of the camel's thorn
               (see {Camel's thorn}, under {Camel}); {Tamarisk manna},
               that of the {Tamarisk mannifera}, a shrub of Western
               Asia; {Australian, manna}, that of certain species of
               eucalyptus; {Brian[87]on manna}, that of the European
               larch.
  
      {Manna grass} (Bot.), a name of several tall slender grasses
            of the genus {Glyceria}. they have long loose panicles,
            and grow in moist places. {Nerved manna grass} is
            {Glyceria nervata}, and {Floating manna grass} is {G.
            flu}.
  
      {Manna insect} (Zo[94]l), a scale insect ({Gossyparia
            mannipara}), which causes the exudation of manna from the
            Tamarisk tree in Arabia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Insect powder},a powder used for the extermination of
            insects; esp., the powdered flowers of certain species of
            {Pyrethrum}, a genus now merged in {Chrysanthemum}. Called
            also {Persian powder}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Indian \In"di*an\ (?; 277), a. [From India, and this fr. Indus,
      the name of a river in Asia, L. Indus, Gr. [?], OPers. Hindu,
      name of the land on the Indus, Skr. sindhu river, the Indus.
      Cf. {Hindoo}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to India proper; also to the East Indies,
            or, sometimes, to the West Indies.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to the aborigines, or Indians, of
            America; as, Indian wars; the Indian tomahawk.
  
      3. Made of maize or Indian corn; as, Indian corn, Indian
            meal, Indian bread, and the like. [U.S.]
  
      {Indian} bay (Bot.), a lauraceous tree ({Persea Indica}).
  
      {Indian bean} (Bot.), a name of the catalpa.
  
      {Indian berry}. (Bot.) Same as {Cocculus indicus}.
  
      {Indian bread}. (Bot.) Same as {Cassava}.
  
      {Indian club}, a wooden club, which is swung by the hand for
            gymnastic exercise.
  
      {Indian cordage}, cordage made of the fibers of cocoanut
            husk.
  
      {Indian corn} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Zea} ({Z. Mays});
            the maize, a native of America. See {Corn}, and {Maize}.
           
  
      {Indian cress} (Bot.), nasturtium. See {Nasturtium}, 2.
  
      {Indian cucumber} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Medeola} ({M.
            Virginica}), a common in woods in the United States. The
            white rootstock has a taste like cucumbers.
  
      {Indian currant} (Bot.), a plant of the genus
            {Symphoricarpus} ({S. vulgaris}), bearing small red
            berries.
  
      {Indian dye}, the puccoon.
  
      {Indian fig}. (Bot.)
            (a) The banyan. See {Banyan}.
            (b) The prickly pear.
  
      {Indian file}, single file; arrangement of persons in a row
            following one after another, the usual way among Indians
            of traversing woods, especially when on the war path.
  
      {Indian fire}, a pyrotechnic composition of sulphur, niter,
            and realgar, burning with a brilliant white light.
  
      {Indian grass} (Bot.), a coarse, high grass ({Chrysopogon
            nutans}), common in the southern portions of the United
            States; wood grass. --Gray.
  
      {Indian hemp}. (Bot.)
            (a) A plant of the genus {Apocynum} ({A. cannabinum}),
                  having a milky juice, and a tough, fibrous bark,
                  whence the name. The root it used in medicine and is
                  both emetic and cathartic in properties.
            (b) The variety of common hemp ({Cannabis Indica}), from
                  which hasheesh is obtained.
  
      {Indian mallow} (Bot.), the velvet leaf ({Abutilon
            Avicenn[91]}). See {Abutilon}.
  
      {Indian meal}, ground corn or maize. [U.S.]
  
      {Indian millet} (Bot.), a tall annual grass ({Sorghum
            vulgare}), having many varieties, among which are broom
            corn, Guinea corn, durra, and the Chinese sugar cane. It
            is called also {Guinea corn}. See {Durra}.
  
      {Indian ox} (Zo[94]l.), the zebu.
  
      {Indian paint}. See {Bloodroot}.
  
      {Indian paper}. See {India paper}, under {India}.
  
      {Indian physic} (Bot.), a plant of two species of the genus
            {Gillenia} ({G. trifoliata}, and {G. stipulacea}), common
            in the United States, the roots of which are used in
            medicine as a mild emetic; -- called also {American
            ipecac}, and {bowman's root}. --Gray.
  
      {Indian pink}. (Bot.)
            (a) The Cypress vine ({Ipom[d2]a Quamoclit}); -- so called
                  in the West Indies.
            (b) See {China pink}, under {China}.
  
      {Indian pipe} (Bot.), a low, fleshy herb ({Monotropa
            uniflora}), growing in clusters in dark woods, and having
            scalelike leaves, and a solitary nodding flower. The whole
            plant is waxy white, but turns black in drying.
  
      {Indian plantain} (Bot.), a name given to several species of
            the genus {Cacalia}, tall herbs with composite white
            flowers, common through the United States in rich woods.
            --Gray.
  
      {Indian poke} (Bot.), a plant usually known as the {white
            hellebore} ({Veratrum viride}).
  
      {Indian pudding}, a pudding of which the chief ingredients
            are Indian meal, milk, and molasses.
  
      {Indian purple}.
            (a) A dull purple color.
            (b) The pigment of the same name, intensely blue and
                  black.
  
      {Indian red}.
            (a) A purplish red earth or pigment composed of a silicate
                  of iron and alumina, with magnesia. It comes from the
                  Persian Gulf. Called also {Persian red}.
            (b) See {Almagra}.
  
      {Indian rice} (Bot.), a reedlike water grass. See {Rice}.
  
      {Indian shot} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Canna} ({C.
            Indica}). The hard black seeds are as large as swan shot.
            See {Canna}.
  
      {Indian summer}, in the United States, a period of warm and
            pleasant weather occurring late in autumn. See under
            {Summer}.
  
      {Indian tobacco} (Bot.), a species of {Lobelia}. See
            {Lobelia}.
  
      {Indian turnip} (Bot.), an American plant of the genus
            {Aris[91]ma}. {A. triphyllum} has a wrinkled farinaceous
            root resembling a small turnip, but with a very acrid
            juice. See {Jack in the Pulpit}, and {Wake-robin}.
  
      {Indian wheat}, maize or Indian corn.
  
      {Indian yellow}.
            (a) An intense rich yellow color, deeper than gamboge but
                  less pure than cadmium.
            (b) See {Euxanthin}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aden ulcer \A"den ul"cer\ [So named after Aden, a seaport in
      Southern Arabia, where it occurs.] (Med.)
      A disease endemic in various parts of tropical Asia, due to a
      specific micro[94]rganism which produces chronic ulcers on
      the limbs. It is often fatal. Called also {Cochin China
      ulcer}, {Persian ulcer}, {tropical ulcer}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persian \Per"sian\, a. [From Persia: cf. It. Persiano. Cf.
      {Parsee}, {Peach}, {Persic}.]
      Of or pertaining to Persia, to the Persians, or to their
      language.
  
      {Persian berry}, the fruit of {Rhamnus infectorius}, a kind
            of buckthorn, used for dyeing yellow, and imported chiefly
            from Trebizond.
  
      {Persian cat}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Angora cat}, under
            {Angora}.
  
      {Persian columns} (Arch.), columns of which the shaft
            represents a Persian slave; -- called also {Persians}. See
            {Atlantes}.
  
      {Persian drill} (Mech.), a drill which is turned by pushing a
            nut back and forth along a spirally grooved drill holder.
           
  
      {Persian fire} (Med.), malignant pustule.
  
      {Persian powder}. See {Insect powder}, under {Insect}.
  
      {Persian red}. See {Indian red}
      (a), under {Indian}.
  
      {Persian wheel}, a noria; a tympanum. See {Noria}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persienne \Per`si*enne"\ (p[etil]r`s[icr]*[ecr]n";
      -sh[icr]*[ecr]n"; F. p[etil]r`sy[ecr]n"), n. [F., fem. of
      presien Persian.]
      Properly, printed calico, whether Oriental or of fanciful
      design with flowers, etc., in Western work. Hence, as
      extended in English, material of a similar character.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persiennes \Per`si*ennes"\ (-[ecr]nz"; F. p[etil]r`sy[ecr]n"),
      n. pl. [F.]
      Window blinds having movable slats, similar to Venetian
      blinds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Persimmon \Per*sim"mon\, n. [Virginia Indian.] (Bot.)
      An American tree ({Diospyros Virginiana}) and its fruit,
      found from New York southward. The fruit is like a plum in
      appearance, but is very harsh and astringent until it has
      been exposed to frost, when it becomes palatable and
      nutritious.
  
      {Japanese persimmon}, {Diospyros Kaki} and its red or yellow
            edible fruit, which outwardly resembles a tomato, but
            contains a few large seeds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, n. [OE. persone, persoun, person, parson, OF.
      persone, F. personne, L. persona a mask (used by actors), a
      personage, part, a person, fr. personare to sound through;
      per + sonare to sound. See {Per-}, and cf. {Parson}.]
      1. A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or
            manifestation of individual character, whether in real
            life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an
            assumed character. [Archaic]
  
                     His first appearance upon the stage in his new
                     person of a sycophant or juggler.      --Bacon.
  
                     No man can long put on a person and act a part.
                                                                              --Jer. Taylor.
  
                     To bear rule, which was thy part And person, hadst
                     thou known thyself aright.                  --Milton.
  
                     How different is the same man from himself, as he
                     sustains the person of a magistrate and that of a
                     friend!                                             --South.
  
      2. The bodily form of a human being; body; outward
            appearance; as, of comely person.
  
                     A fair persone, and strong, and young of age.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     If it assume my noble father's person. --Shak.
  
                     Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal
            or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or
            child.
  
                     Consider what person stands for; which, I think, is
                     a thinking, intelligent being, that has reason and
                     reflection.                                       --Locke.
  
      4. A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any
            person present.
  
      5. A parson; the parish priest. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      6. (Theol.) Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions
            of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost);
            an hypostasis. [bd]Three persons and one God.[b8] --Bk. of
            Com. Prayer.
  
      7. (Gram.) One of three relations or conditions (that of
            speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being
            spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence
            also to the verb of which it may be the subject.
  
      Note: A noun or pronoun, when representing the speaker, is
               said to be in the first person; when representing what
               is spoken to, in the second person; when representing
               what is spoken of, in the third person.
  
      8. (Biol.) A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the
            compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in
            the narrowest sense, among the higher animals. --Haeckel.
  
                     True corms, composed of united person[91] . . .
                     usually arise by gemmation, . . . yet in sponges and
                     corals occasionally by fusion of several originally
                     distinct persons.                              --Encyc. Brit.
  
      {Artificial}, [or] {Fictitious}, {person} (Law), a
            corporation or body politic. --blackstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, v. t.
      To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.
      [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, n. [OE. persone, persoun, person, parson, OF.
      persone, F. personne, L. persona a mask (used by actors), a
      personage, part, a person, fr. personare to sound through;
      per + sonare to sound. See {Per-}, and cf. {Parson}.]
      1. A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or
            manifestation of individual character, whether in real
            life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an
            assumed character. [Archaic]
  
                     His first appearance upon the stage in his new
                     person of a sycophant or juggler.      --Bacon.
  
                     No man can long put on a person and act a part.
                                                                              --Jer. Taylor.
  
                     To bear rule, which was thy part And person, hadst
                     thou known thyself aright.                  --Milton.
  
                     How different is the same man from himself, as he
                     sustains the person of a magistrate and that of a
                     friend!                                             --South.
  
      2. The bodily form of a human being; body; outward
            appearance; as, of comely person.
  
                     A fair persone, and strong, and young of age.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     If it assume my noble father's person. --Shak.
  
                     Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal
            or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or
            child.
  
                     Consider what person stands for; which, I think, is
                     a thinking, intelligent being, that has reason and
                     reflection.                                       --Locke.
  
      4. A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any
            person present.
  
      5. A parson; the parish priest. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      6. (Theol.) Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions
            of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost);
            an hypostasis. [bd]Three persons and one God.[b8] --Bk. of
            Com. Prayer.
  
      7. (Gram.) One of three relations or conditions (that of
            speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being
            spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence
            also to the verb of which it may be the subject.
  
      Note: A noun or pronoun, when representing the speaker, is
               said to be in the first person; when representing what
               is spoken to, in the second person; when representing
               what is spoken of, in the third person.
  
      8. (Biol.) A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the
            compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in
            the narrowest sense, among the higher animals. --Haeckel.
  
                     True corms, composed of united person[91] . . .
                     usually arise by gemmation, . . . yet in sponges and
                     corals occasionally by fusion of several originally
                     distinct persons.                              --Encyc. Brit.
  
      {Artificial}, [or] {Fictitious}, {person} (Law), a
            corporation or body politic. --blackstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, v. t.
      To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.
      [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, n. [OE. persone, persoun, person, parson, OF.
      persone, F. personne, L. persona a mask (used by actors), a
      personage, part, a person, fr. personare to sound through;
      per + sonare to sound. See {Per-}, and cf. {Parson}.]
      1. A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or
            manifestation of individual character, whether in real
            life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an
            assumed character. [Archaic]
  
                     His first appearance upon the stage in his new
                     person of a sycophant or juggler.      --Bacon.
  
                     No man can long put on a person and act a part.
                                                                              --Jer. Taylor.
  
                     To bear rule, which was thy part And person, hadst
                     thou known thyself aright.                  --Milton.
  
                     How different is the same man from himself, as he
                     sustains the person of a magistrate and that of a
                     friend!                                             --South.
  
      2. The bodily form of a human being; body; outward
            appearance; as, of comely person.
  
                     A fair persone, and strong, and young of age.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     If it assume my noble father's person. --Shak.
  
                     Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal
            or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or
            child.
  
                     Consider what person stands for; which, I think, is
                     a thinking, intelligent being, that has reason and
                     reflection.                                       --Locke.
  
      4. A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any
            person present.
  
      5. A parson; the parish priest. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      6. (Theol.) Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions
            of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost);
            an hypostasis. [bd]Three persons and one God.[b8] --Bk. of
            Com. Prayer.
  
      7. (Gram.) One of three relations or conditions (that of
            speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being
            spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence
            also to the verb of which it may be the subject.
  
      Note: A noun or pronoun, when representing the speaker, is
               said to be in the first person; when representing what
               is spoken to, in the second person; when representing
               what is spoken of, in the third person.
  
      8. (Biol.) A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the
            compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in
            the narrowest sense, among the higher animals. --Haeckel.
  
                     True corms, composed of united person[91] . . .
                     usually arise by gemmation, . . . yet in sponges and
                     corals occasionally by fusion of several originally
                     distinct persons.                              --Encyc. Brit.
  
      {Artificial}, [or] {Fictitious}, {person} (Law), a
            corporation or body politic. --blackstone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Person \Per"son\, v. t.
      To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.
      [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Persona \[d8]Per*so"na\, n.; pl. {Person[91]}. [L.] (Biol.)
      Same as {Person}, n., 8.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personable \Per"son*a*ble\, a.
      1. Having a well-formed body, or person; graceful; comely; of
            good appearance; presentable; as, a personable man or
            woman.
  
                     Wise, warlike, personable, courteous, and kind.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
                     The king, . . . so visited with sickness, was not
                     personable.                                       --E. Hall.
  
      2. (Law)
            (a) Enabled to maintain pleas in court. --Cowell.
            (b) Having capacity to take anything granted.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personage \Per"son*age\, n. [F. personnage.]
      1. Form, appearance, or belongings of a person; the external
            appearance, stature, figure, air, and the like, of a
            person. [bd]In personage stately.[b8] --Hayward.
  
                     The damsel well did view his personage. --Spenser.
  
      2. Character assumed or represented. [bd]The actors and
            personages of this fable.[b8] --Broome. [bd]Disguised in a
            false personage.[b8] --Addison.
  
      3. A notable or distinguished person; a conspicious or
            peculiar character; as, an illustrious personage; a comely
            personage of stature tall. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, n. (Law)
      A movable; a chattel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Equation \E*qua"tion\, n. [L. aequatio an equalizing: cf. F.
      [82]quation equation. See {Equate}.]
      1. A making equal; equal division; equality; equilibrium.
  
                     Again the golden day resumed its right, And ruled in
                     just equation with the night.            --Rowe.
  
      2. (Math.) An expression of the condition of equality between
            two algebraic quantities or sets of quantities, the sign =
            being placed between them; as, a binomial equation; a
            quadratic equation; an algebraic equation; a
            transcendental equation; an exponential equation; a
            logarithmic equation; a differential equation, etc.
  
      3. (Astron.) A quantity to be applied in computing the mean
            place or other element of a celestial body; that is, any
            one of the several quantities to be added to, or taken
            from, its position as calculated on the hypothesis of a
            mean uniform motion, in order to find its true position as
            resulting from its actual and unequal motion.
  
      {Absolute equation}. See under {Absolute}.
  
      {Equation box}, [or] {Equational box}, a system of
            differential gearing used in spinning machines for
            regulating the twist of the yarn. It resembles gearing
            used in equation clocks for showing apparent time.
  
      {Equation of the center} (Astron.), the difference between
            the place of a planet as supposed to move uniformly in a
            circle, and its place as moving in an ellipse.
  
      {Equations of condition} (Math.), equations formed for
            deducing the true values of certain quantities from others
            on which they depend, when different sets of the latter,
            as given by observation, would yield different values of
            the quantities sought, and the number of equations that
            may be found is greater than the number of unknown
            quantities.
  
      {Equation of a curve} (Math.), an equation which expresses
            the relation between the co[94]rdinates of every point in
            the curve.
  
      {Equation of equinoxes} (Astron.), the difference between the
            mean and apparent places of the equinox.
  
      {Equation of payments} (Arith.), the process of finding the
            mean time of payment of several sums due at different
            times.
  
      {Equation of time} (Astron.), the difference between mean and
            apparent time, or between the time of day indicated by the
            sun, and that by a perfect clock going uniformly all the
            year round.
  
      {Equation} {clock [or] watch}, a timepiece made to exhibit
            the differences between mean solar and apparent solar
            time. --Knight.
  
      {Normal equation}. See under {Normal}.
  
      {Personal equation} (Astron.), the difference between an
            observed result and the true qualities or peculiarities in
            the observer; particularly the difference, in an average
            of a large number of observation, between the instant when
            an observer notes a phenomenon, as the transit of a star,
            and the assumed instant of its actual occurrence; or,
            relatively, the difference between these instants as noted
            by two observers. It is usually only a fraction of a
            second; -- sometimes applied loosely to differences of
            judgment or method occasioned by temperamental qualities
            of individuals.
  
      {Theory of equations} (Math.), the branch of algebra that
            treats of the properties of a single algebraic equation of
            any degree containing one unknown quantity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Servitude \Serv"i*tude\, n. [L. servitudo: cf. F. servitude.]
      1. The state of voluntary or compulsory subjection to a
            master; the condition of being bound to service; the
            condition of a slave; slavery; bondage; hence, a state of
            slavish dependence.
  
                     You would have sold your king to slaughter, His
                     princes and his peers to servitude.   --Shak.
  
                     A splendid servitude; . . . for he that rises up
                     early, and goe[?] to bed late, only to receive
                     addresses, is really as much abridged in his freedom
                     as he that waits to present one.         --South.
  
      2. Servants, collectively. [Obs.]
  
                     After him a cumbrous train Of herds and flocks, and
                     numerous servitude.                           --Milton.
  
      3. (Law) A right whereby one thing is subject to another
            thing or person for use or convenience, contrary to the
            common right.
  
      Note: The object of a servitude is either to suffer something
               to be done by another, or to omit to do something, with
               respect to a thing. The easements of the English
               correspond in some respects with the servitudes of the
               Roman law. Both terms are used by common law writers,
               and often indiscriminately. The former, however, rather
               indicates the right enjoyed, and the latter the burden
               imposed. --Ayliffe. Erskine. E. Washburn.
  
      {Penal servitude}. See under {Penal}.
  
      {Personal servitude} (Law), that which arises when the use of
            a thing is granted as a real right to a particular
            individual other than the proprietor.
  
      {Predial servitude} (Law), that which one estate owes to
            another estate. When it related to lands, vineyards,
            gardens, or the like, it is called rural; when it related
            to houses and buildings, it is called urban.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personal \Per"son*al\, a. [L. personalis: cf. F. personnel.]
      1. Pertaining to human beings as distinct from things.
  
                     Every man so termed by way of personal difference.
                                                                              --Hooker.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to a particular person; relating to, or
            affecting, an individual, or each of many individuals;
            peculiar or proper to private concerns; not public or
            general; as, personal comfort; personal desire.
  
                     The words are conditional, -- If thou doest well, --
                     and so personal to Cain.                     --Locke.
  
      3. Pertaining to the external or bodily appearance;
            corporeal; as, personal charms. --Addison.
  
      4. Done in person; without the intervention of another.
            [bd]Personal communication.[b8] --Fabyan.
  
                     The immediate and personal speaking of God. --White.
  
      5. Relating to an individual, his character, conduct,
            motives, or private affairs, in an invidious and offensive
            manner; as, personal reflections or remarks.
  
      6. (Gram.) Denoting person; as, a personal pronoun.
  
      {Personal action} (Law), a suit or action by which a man
            claims a debt or personal duty, or damages in lieu of it;
            or wherein he claims satisfaction in damages for an injury
            to his person or property, or the specific recovery of
            goods or chattels; -- opposed to real action.
  
      {Personal equation}. (Astron.) See under {Equation}.
  
      {Personal estate} [or] {property} (Law), movables; chattels;
            -- opposed to real estate or property. It usually consists
            of things temporary and movable, including all subjects of
            property not of a freehold nature.
  
      {Personal identity} (Metaph.), the persistent and continuous
            unity of the individual person, which is attested by
            consciousness.
  
      {Personal pronoun} (Gram.), one of the pronouns {I}, {thou},
            {he}, {she}, {it}, and their plurals.
  
      {Personal representatives} (Law), the executors or
            administrators of a person deceased.
  
      {Personal rights}, rights appertaining to the person; as, the
            rights of a personal security, personal liberty, and
            private property.
  
      {Personal tithes}. See under {Tithe}.
  
      {Personal verb} (Gram.), a verb which is modified or
            inflected to correspond with the three persons.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wealth \Wealth\, n. (Econ.)
            (a) In the private sense, all pooperty which has a money
                  value.
            (b) In the public sense, all objects, esp. material
                  objects, which have economic utility.
            (c) Specif. called {personal wealth}. Those energies,
                  faculties, and habits directly contributing to make
                  people industrially efficient.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personalism \Per"son*al*ism\, n.
      The quality or state of being personal; personality. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personality \Per`son*al"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Personalities}. [Cf. F.
      personnalit[82]. Cf. {Personality}.]
      1. That which constitutes distinction of person;
            individuality.
  
                     Personality is individuality existing in itself, but
                     with a nature as a ground.                  --Coleridge.
  
      2. Something said or written which refers to the person,
            conduct, etc., of some individual, especially something of
            a disparaging or offensive nature; personal remarks; as,
            indulgence in personalities.
  
                     Sharp personalities were exchanged.   --Macaulay.
  
      3. (Law) That quality of a law which concerns the condition,
            state, and capacity of persons. --Burrill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personality \Per`son*al"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Personalities}. [Cf. F.
      personnalit[82]. Cf. {Personality}.]
      1. That which constitutes distinction of person;
            individuality.
  
                     Personality is individuality existing in itself, but
                     with a nature as a ground.                  --Coleridge.
  
      2. Something said or written which refers to the person,
            conduct, etc., of some individual, especially something of
            a disparaging or offensive nature; personal remarks; as,
            indulgence in personalities.
  
                     Sharp personalities were exchanged.   --Macaulay.
  
      3. (Law) That quality of a law which concerns the condition,
            state, and capacity of persons. --Burrill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personalize \Per"son*al*ize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Personalized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Personalizing}.]
      To make personal. [bd]They personalize death.[b8] --H.
      Spencer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personalize \Per"son*al*ize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Personalized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Personalizing}.]
      To make personal. [bd]They personalize death.[b8] --H.
      Spencer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personalize \Per"son*al*ize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Personalized}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Personalizing}.]
      To make personal. [bd]They personalize death.[b8] --H.
      Spencer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personally \Per"son*al*ly\, adv.
      1. In a personal manner; by bodily presence; in person; not
            by representative or substitute; as, to deliver a letter
            personally.
  
                     He, being cited, personally came not. --Grafton.
  
      2. With respect to an individual; as regards the person;
            individually; particularly.
  
                     She bore a mortal hatred to the house of Lancaster,
                     and personally to the king.               --Bacon.
  
      3. With respect to one's individuality; as regards one's
            self; as, personally I have no feeling in the matter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personalty \Per"son*al*ty\, n.
      1. The state of being a person; personality. [R.]
  
      2. (Law) Personal property, as distinguished from realty or
            real property.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, v. t. [L. personatus masked, assumed,
      fictitious, fr. persona a mask. See {Person}.]
      1. To assume the character of; to represent by a fictitious
            appearance; to act the part of; hence, to counterfeit; to
            feign; as, he tried to personate his brother; a personated
            devotion. --Hammond.
  
      2. To set forth in an unreal character; to disguise; to mask.
            [R.] [bd]A personated mate.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. To personify; to typify; to describe. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, v. i.
      To play or assume a character.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, a. [L. personatus masked.] (Bot.)
      Having the throat of a bilabiate corolla nearly closed by a
      projection of the base of the lower lip; masked, as in the
      flower of the snapdragon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personating}.] [L. personare to cry out, LL.,
      to extol. See {Person}.]
      To celebrate loudly; to extol; to praise. [Obs.]
  
               In fable, hymn, or song so personating Their gods
               ridiculous.                                             --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personating}.] [L. personare to cry out, LL.,
      to extol. See {Person}.]
      To celebrate loudly; to extol; to praise. [Obs.]
  
               In fable, hymn, or song so personating Their gods
               ridiculous.                                             --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personate \Per"son*ate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personating}.] [L. personare to cry out, LL.,
      to extol. See {Person}.]
      To celebrate loudly; to extol; to praise. [Obs.]
  
               In fable, hymn, or song so personating Their gods
               ridiculous.                                             --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personation \Per`son*a"tion\, n.
      The act of personating, or conterfeiting the person or
      character of another.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personator \Per"son*a`tor\, n.
      One who personates. [bd]The personators of these actions.[b8]
      --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personeity \Per`son*e"i*ty\, n.
      Personality. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personification \Per*son`i*fi*ca"tion\, n. [Cf. F.
      personnification.]
      1. The act of personifying; impersonation; embodiment. --C.
            Knight.
  
      2. (Rhet.) A figure of speech in which an inanimate object or
            abstract idea is represented as animated, or endowed with
            personality; prosopop[?]ia; as, the floods clap their
            hands. [bd]Confusion heards his voice.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personify \Per*son"i*fy\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personified}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personifying}.] [Person + -fy: cf. F.
      personnifier.]
      1. To regard, treat, or represent as a person; to represent
            as a rational being.
  
                     The poets take the liberty of personifying inanimate
                     things.                                             --Chesterfield.
  
      2. To be the embodiment or personification of; to
            impersonate; as, he personifies the law.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personifier \Per*son"i*fi`er\, n.
      One who personifies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personify \Per*son"i*fy\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personified}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personifying}.] [Person + -fy: cf. F.
      personnifier.]
      1. To regard, treat, or represent as a person; to represent
            as a rational being.
  
                     The poets take the liberty of personifying inanimate
                     things.                                             --Chesterfield.
  
      2. To be the embodiment or personification of; to
            impersonate; as, he personifies the law.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personify \Per*son"i*fy\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Personified}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Personifying}.] [Person + -fy: cf. F.
      personnifier.]
      1. To regard, treat, or represent as a person; to represent
            as a rational being.
  
                     The poets take the liberty of personifying inanimate
                     things.                                             --Chesterfield.
  
      2. To be the embodiment or personification of; to
            impersonate; as, he personifies the law.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Personize \Per"son*ize\, v. t.
      To personify. [R.]
  
               Milton has personized them.                     --J.
                                                                              Richardson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Respect \Re*spect"\ (r?*sp?kt"), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Respected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Respecting}.] [L. respectare,
      v. intens. from respicere, respectum, to look back, respect;
      pref. re- re- + specere, spicere, to look, to view: cf. F.
      respecter. See {Spy}, and cf. {Respite}.]
      1. To take notice of; to regard with special attention; to
            regard as worthy of special consideration; hence, to care
            for; to heed.
  
                     Thou respectest not spilling Edward's blood. --Shak.
  
                     In orchards and gardens, we do not so much respect
                     beauty as variety of ground for fruits, trees, and
                     herbs.                                                --Bacon.
  
      2. To consider worthy of esteem; to regard with honor. [bd]I
            do respect thee as my soul.[b8] --Shak.
  
      3. To look toward; to front upon or toward. [Obs.]
  
                     Palladius adviseth the front of his house should so
                     respect the [?][?]uth.                        --Sir T.
                                                                              Browne.
  
      4. To regard; to consider; to deem. [Obs.]
  
                     To whom my father gave this name of Gaspar, And as
                     his own respected him to death.         --B. Jonson.
  
      5. To have regard to; to have reference to; to relate to; as,
            the treaty particularly respects our commerce.
  
      {As respects}, as regards; with regard to; as to. --Macaulay.
           
  
      {To respect the person} [or] {persons}, to favor a person, or
            persons on corrupt grounds; to show partiality. [bd]Ye
            shall not respect persons in judgment.[b8] --Deut. i. 17.
  
      Syn: To regard; esteem; honor; revere; venerate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Peruse \Pe*ruse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Perused}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Perusing}.] [Pref. per- + use.]
      1. To observe; to examine with care. [R.]
  
                     Myself I then perused, and limb by limb Surveyed.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. To read through; to read carefully. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Periwig \Per"i*wig\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Perwigged}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Perwigging}.]
      To dress with a periwig, or with false hair. --Swift.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pharisean \Phar`i*se"an\, a. [L. Pharisaeus, Gr. Farisai^os.]
      Following the practice of Pharisees; Pharisaic. [Obs.]
      [bd]Pharisean disciples.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phragmocone \Phrag"mo*cone\, n. [Gr. [?], [?], a fence, an
      inclosure + [?] a cone.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The thin chambered shell attached to the anterior end of a
      belemnite. [Written also {phragmacone}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Reed \Reed\, n. [AS. hre[oacute]d; akin to D. riet, G. riet,
      ried, OHG. kriot, riot.]
      1. (Bot.) A name given to many tall and coarse grasses or
            grasslike plants, and their slender, often jointed, stems,
            such as the various kinds of bamboo, and especially the
            common reed of Europe and North America ({Phragmites
            communis}).
  
      2. A musical instrument made of the hollow joint of some
            plant; a rustic or pastoral pipe.
  
                     Arcadian pipe, the pastoral reed Of Hermes.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. An arrow, as made of a reed. --Prior.
  
      4. Straw prepared for thatching a roof. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      5. (Mus.)
            (a) A small piece of cane or wood attached to the
                  mouthpiece of certain instruments, and set in
                  vibration by the breath. In the clarinet it is a
                  single fiat reed; in the oboe and bassoon it is
                  double, forming a compressed tube.
            (b) One of the thin pieces of metal, the vibration of
                  which produce the tones of a melodeon, accordeon,
                  harmonium, or seraphine; also attached to certain sets
                  or registers of pipes in an organ.
  
      6. (Weaving) A frame having parallel flat stripe of metal or
            reed, between which the warp threads pass, set in the
            swinging lathe or batten of a loom for beating up the
            weft; a sley. See {Batten}.
  
      7. (Mining) A tube containing the train of powder for
            igniting the charge in blasting.
  
      8. (Arch.) Same as {Reeding}.
  
      {Egyptian reed} (Bot.), the papyrus.
  
      {Free reed} (Mus.), a reed whose edges do not overlap the
            wind passage, -- used in the harmonium, concertina, etc.
            It is distinguished from the beating or striking reed of
            the organ and clarinet.
  
      {Meadow reed grass} (Bot.), the {Glyceria aquatica}, a tall
            grass found in wet places.
  
      {Reed babbler}. See {Reedbird}.
  
      {Reed bunting} (Zo[94]l.) A European sparrow ({Emberiza
            sch[oe]niclus}) which frequents marshy places; -- called
            also {reed sparrow}, {ring bunting}.
            (b) Reedling.
  
      {Reed canary grass} (Bot.), a tall wild grass ({Phalaris
            arundinacea}).
  
      {Reed grass}. (Bot.)
            (a) The common reed. See {Reed}, 1.
            (b) A plant of the genus {Sparganium}; bur reed. See under
                  {Bur}.
  
      {Reed organ} (Mus.), an organ in which the wind acts on a set
            of free reeds, as the harmonium, melodeon, concertina,
            etc.
  
      {Reed pipe} (Mus.), a pipe of an organ furnished with a reed.
           
  
      {Reed sparrow}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Reed bunting}, above.
  
      {Reed stop} (Mus.), a set of pipes in an organ furnished with
            reeds.
  
      {Reed warbler}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A small European warbler ({Acrocephalus streperus});
                  -- called also {reed wren}.
            (b) Any one of several species of Indian and Australian
                  warblers of the genera {Acrocephalus}, {Calamoherpe},
                  and {Arundinax}. They are excellent singers.
  
      {Sea-sand reed} (Bot.), a kind of coarse grass ({Ammophila
            arundinacea}). See {Beach grass}, under {Beach}.
  
      {Wood reed grass} (Bot.), a tall, elegant grass ({Cinna
            arundinacea}), common in moist woods.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phragmocone \Phrag"mo*cone\, n. [Gr. [?], [?], a fence, an
      inclosure + [?] a cone.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The thin chambered shell attached to the anterior end of a
      belemnite. [Written also {phragmacone}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phragmosiphon \Phrag`mo*si"phon\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The siphon of a phragmocone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrase \Phrase\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Phrased}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Phrasing}.] [Cf. F. phraser.]
      To express in words, or in peculiar words; to call; to style.
      [bd]These suns -- for so they phrase 'em.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrasing \Phras"ing\, n.
      1. Method of expression; association of words.
  
      2. (Mus.) The act or method of grouping the notes so as to
            form distinct musical phrases.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phryganeid \Phry*ga"ne*id\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any insect belonging to the Phryganeides.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Phryganeides \[d8]Phryg`a*ne"i*des\, n. pl. [NL., fr.
      Phryganea, the typical genus, fr. Gr. [?] a dry stick.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A tribe of neuropterous insects which includes the caddice
      flies; -- called also {Trichoptera}. See {Trichoptera}.
      [Written also {Phryganides}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrygian \Phryg"i*an\, a. [L. Phrygius, Gr. [?], fr. [?]
      Phrygia, a country of Asia Minor.]
      Of or pertaining to Phrygia, or to its inhabitants.
  
      {Phrygian mode} (Mus.), one of the ancient Greek modes, very
            bold and vehement in style; -- so called because fabled to
            have been invented by the Phrygian Marsyas. --Moore
            (Encyc. of Music).
  
      {Phrygian stone}, a light, spongy stone, resembling a pumice,
            -- used by the ancients in dyeing, and said to be drying
            and astringent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrygian \Phryg"i*an\, n.
      1. A native or inhabitant of Phrygia.
  
      2. (Eccl. Hist.) A Montanist.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrygian cap \Phryg"i*an cap`\
      A close-fitting cap represented in Greek art as worn by
      Orientals, assumed to have been conical in shape. It has been
      adopted in modern art as the so-called {liberty cap}, or {cap
      of liberty}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrygian \Phryg"i*an\, a. [L. Phrygius, Gr. [?], fr. [?]
      Phrygia, a country of Asia Minor.]
      Of or pertaining to Phrygia, or to its inhabitants.
  
      {Phrygian mode} (Mus.), one of the ancient Greek modes, very
            bold and vehement in style; -- so called because fabled to
            have been invented by the Phrygian Marsyas. --Moore
            (Encyc. of Music).
  
      {Phrygian stone}, a light, spongy stone, resembling a pumice,
            -- used by the ancients in dyeing, and said to be drying
            and astringent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Phrygian \Phryg"i*an\, a. [L. Phrygius, Gr. [?], fr. [?]
      Phrygia, a country of Asia Minor.]
      Of or pertaining to Phrygia, or to its inhabitants.
  
      {Phrygian mode} (Mus.), one of the ancient Greek modes, very
            bold and vehement in style; -- so called because fabled to
            have been invented by the Phrygian Marsyas. --Moore
            (Encyc. of Music).
  
      {Phrygian stone}, a light, spongy stone, resembling a pumice,
            -- used by the ancients in dyeing, and said to be drying
            and astringent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Piercing \Pier"cing\, a.
      Forcibly entering, or adapted to enter, at or by a point;
      perforating; penetrating; keen; -- used also figuratively;
      as, a piercing instrument, or thrust. [bd]Piercing
      eloquence.[b8] --Shak. -- {Pier"cing*ly}, adv. --
      {Pier"cing*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pierce \Pierce\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pierced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Piercing}.] [OE. percen, F. percer, OF. percier, perchier,
      parchier; perh. fr. (assumed) LL. pertusiare for pertusare,
      fr. L. pertundere, pertusum, to beat, push, bore through; per
      through + tundere to beat: cf. OF. pertuisier to pierce, F.
      pertuis a hole. Cf. {Contuse}, {Parch}, {Pertuse}.]
      1. To thrust into, penetrate, or transfix, with a pointed
            instrument. [bd]I pierce . . . her tender side.[b8]
            --Dryden.
  
      2. To penetrate; to enter; to force a way into or through; to
            pass into or through; as, to pierce the enemy's line; a
            shot pierced the ship.
  
      3. Fig.: To penetrate; to affect deeply; as, to pierce a
            mystery. [bd]Pierced with grief.[b8] --Pope.
  
                     Can no prayers pierce thee?               --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Piercing \Pier"cing\, a.
      Forcibly entering, or adapted to enter, at or by a point;
      perforating; penetrating; keen; -- used also figuratively;
      as, a piercing instrument, or thrust. [bd]Piercing
      eloquence.[b8] --Shak. -- {Pier"cing*ly}, adv. --
      {Pier"cing*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Piercing \Pier"cing\, a.
      Forcibly entering, or adapted to enter, at or by a point;
      perforating; penetrating; keen; -- used also figuratively;
      as, a piercing instrument, or thrust. [bd]Piercing
      eloquence.[b8] --Shak. -- {Pier"cing*ly}, adv. --
      {Pier"cing*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Poor-john \Poor"-john`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A small European fish, similar to the cod, but of inferior
      quality.
  
               Poor-john and apple pies are all our fare. --Sir J.
                                                                              Harrington.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Porcine \Por"cine\, a. [L. porcinus, from porcus a swine. See
      {Pork}.]
      Of or pertaining to swine; characteristic of the hog.
      [bd]Porcine cheeks.[b8] --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Porism \Po"rism\, n. [Gr. [?] a thing procured, a deduction from
      a demonstration, fr. [?] to bring, provide: cf. F. porisme.]
      1. (Geom.) A proposition affirming the possibility of finding
            such conditions as will render a certain determinate
            problem indeterminate or capable of innumerable solutions.
            --Playfair.
  
      2. (Gr. Geom.) A corollary. --Brande & C.
  
      Note: Three books of porisms of Euclid have been lost, but
               several attempts to determine the nature of these
               propositions and to restore them have been made by
               modern geometers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Porismatic \Po`ris*mat"ic\, Porismatical \Po`ris*mat"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a porism; poristic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Porismatic \Po`ris*mat"ic\, Porismatical \Po`ris*mat"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a porism; poristic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Porousness \Por"ous*ness\, n.
      1. The quality of being porous.
  
      2. The open parts; the interstices of anything. [R.]
  
                     They will forcibly get into the porousness of it.
                                                                              --Sir K.
                                                                              Digby.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sora \So"ra\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A North American rail ({Porzana Carolina}) common in the
      Eastern United States. Its back is golden brown, varied with
      black and white, the front of the head and throat black, the
      breast and sides of the head and neck slate-colored. Called
      also {American rail}, {Carolina rail}, {Carolina crake},
      {common rail}, {sora rail}, {soree}, {meadow chicken}, and
      {orto}.
  
      {King sora}, the Florida gallinule.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ortolan \Or"to*lan\, n. [F., fr. It. ortolano ortolan, gardener,
      fr. L. hortulanus gardener, fr. hortulus, dim. of hortus
      garden. So called because it frequents the hedges of gardens.
      See {Yard} an inclosure, and cf. {Hortulan}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A European singing bird ({Emberiza hortulana}), about the
            size of the lark, with black wings. It is esteemed
            delicious food when fattened. Called also {bunting}.
      (b) In England, the wheatear ({Saxicola [d2]nanthe}).
      (c) In America, the sora, or Carolina rail ({Porzana
            Carolina}). See {Sora}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Rail \Rail\, n. [F. r[83]le, fr. r[83]ler to have a rattling in
      the throat; of German origin, and akin to E. rattle. See
      {Rattle}, v.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous species of limicoline birds of the family
      {Rallid[91]}, especially those of the genus {Rallus}, and of
      closely allied genera. They are prized as game birds.
  
      Note: The common European water rail ({Rallus aquaticus}) is
               called also {bilcock}, {skitty coot}, and {brook
               runner}. The best known American species are the
               clapper rail, or salt-marsh hen ({Rallus lonqirostris},
               var. {crepitans}); the king, or red-breasted, rail ({R.
               elegans}) (called also {fresh-water marshhen}); the
               lesser clapper, or Virginia, rail ({R. Virginianus});
               and the Carolina, or sora, rail ({Porzana Carolina}).
               See {Sora}.
  
      {Land rail} (Zo[94]l.), the corncrake.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Water crake \Wa"ter crake`\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The dipper.
      (b) The spotted crake ({Porzana maruetta}). See Illust. of
            {Crake}.
      (c) The swamp hen, or crake, of Australia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Skitty \Skit"ty\, n. [Cf. {Skittish}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A rail; as, the water rail (called also {skitty cock}, and
      {skitty coot}); the spotted crake ({Porzana maruetta}), and
      the moor hen. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yellow \Yel"low\, a. [Compar. {Yellower}; superl. {Yellowest}.]
      [OE. yelow, yelwe, [f4]elow, [f4]eoluw, from AS. geolu; akin
      to D. geel, OS. & OHG. gelo, G. gelb, Icel. gulr, Sw. gul,
      Dan. guul, L. helvus light bay, Gr. [?] young verdure, [?]
      greenish yellow, Skr. hari tawny, yellowish. [?][?][?]. Cf.
      {Chlorine}, {Gall} a bitter liquid, {Gold}, {Yolk}.]
      Being of a bright saffronlike color; of the color of gold or
      brass; having the hue of that part of the rainbow, or of the
      solar spectrum, which is between the orange and the green.
  
               Her yellow hair was browded [braided] in a tress.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
               A sweaty reaper from his tillage brought First fruits,
               the green ear and the yellow sheaf.         --Milton.
  
               The line of yellow light dies fast away. --Keble.
  
      {Yellow atrophy} (Med.), a fatal affection of the liver, in
            which it undergoes fatty degeneration, and becomes rapidly
            smaller and of a deep yellow tinge. The marked symptoms
            are black vomit, delirium, convulsions, coma, and
            jaundice.
  
      {Yellow bark}, calisaya bark.
  
      {Yellow bass} (Zo[94]l.), a North American fresh-water bass
            ({Morone interrupta}) native of the lower parts of the
            Mississippi and its tributaries. It is yellow, with
            several more or less broken black stripes or bars. Called
            also {barfish}.
  
      {Yellow berry}. (Bot.) Same as {Persian berry}, under
            {Persian}.
  
      {Yellow boy}, a gold coin, as a guinea. [Slang] --Arbuthnot.
  
      {Yellow brier}. (Bot.) See under {Brier}.
  
      {Yellow bugle} (Bot.), a European labiate plant ({Ajuga
            Cham[91]pitys}).
  
      {Yellow bunting} (Zo[94]l.), the European yellow-hammer.
  
      {Yellow cat} (Zo[94]l.), a yellow catfish; especially, the
            bashaw.
  
      {Yellow copperas} (Min.), a hydrous sulphate of iron; --
            called also {copiapite}.
  
      {Yellow copper ore}, a sulphide of copper and iron; copper
            pyrites. See {Chalcopyrite}.
  
      {Yellow cress} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered, cruciferous plant
            ({Barbarea pr[91]cox}), sometimes grown as a salad plant.
           
  
      {Yellow dock}. (Bot.) See the Note under {Dock}.
  
      {Yellow earth}, a yellowish clay, colored by iron, sometimes
            used as a yellow pigment.
  
      {Yellow fever} (Med.), a malignant, contagious, febrile
            disease of warm climates, attended with jaundice,
            producing a yellow color of the skin, and with the black
            vomit. See {Black vomit}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine},
            and 3d {Flag}.
  
      {Yellow jack}.
      (a) The yellow fever. See under 2d {Jack}.
      (b) The quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine}.
  
      {Yellow jacket} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American social wasps of the genus {Vespa}, in which the
            color of the body is partly bright yellow. These wasps are
            noted for their irritability, and for their painful
            stings.
  
      {Yellow lead ore} (Min.), wulfenite.
  
      {Yellow lemur} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow macauco} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow mackerel} (Zo[94]l.), the jurel.
  
      {Yellow metal}. Same as {Muntz metal}, under {Metal}.
  
      {Yellow ocher} (Min.), an impure, earthy variety of brown
            iron ore, which is used as a pigment.
  
      {Yellow oxeye} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered plant
            ({Chrysanthemum segetum}) closely related to the oxeye
            daisy.
  
      {Yellow perch} (Zo[94]l.), the common American perch. See
            {Perch}.
  
      {Yellow pike} (Zo[94]l.), the wall-eye.
  
      {Yellow pine} (Bot.), any of several kinds of pine; also,
            their yellowish and generally durable timber. Among the
            most common are valuable species are {Pinus mitis} and {P.
            palustris} of the Eastern and Southern States, and {P.
            ponderosa} and {P. Arizonica} of the Rocky Mountains and
            Pacific States.
  
      {Yellow plover} (Zo[94]l.), the golden plover.
  
      {Yellow precipitate} (Med. Chem.), an oxide of mercury which
            is thrown down as an amorphous yellow powder on adding
            corrosive sublimate to limewater.
  
      {Yellow puccoon}. (Bot.) Same as {Orangeroot}.
  
      {Yellow rail} (Zo[94]l.), a small American rail ({Porzana
            Noveboracensis}) in which the lower parts are dull yellow,
            darkest on the breast. The back is streaked with brownish
            yellow and with black, and spotted with white. Called also
            {yellow crake}.
  
      {Yellow rattle}, {Yellow rocket}. (Bot.) See under {Rattle},
            and {Rocket}.
  
      {Yellow Sally} (Zo[94]l.), a greenish or yellowish European
            stone fly of the genus {Chloroperla}; -- so called by
            anglers.
  
      {Yellow sculpin} (Zo[94]l.), the dragonet.
  
      {Yellow snake} (Zo[94]l.), a West Indian boa ({Chilobothrus
            inornatus}) common in Jamaica. It becomes from eight to
            ten long. The body is yellowish or yellowish green, mixed
            with black, and anteriorly with black lines.
  
      {Yellow spot}.
      (a) (Anat.) A small yellowish spot with a central pit, the
            fovea centralis, in the center of the retina where vision
            is most accurate. See {Eye}.
      (b) (Zo[94]l.) A small American butterfly ({Polites Peckius})
            of the Skipper family. Its wings are brownish, with a
            large, irregular, bright yellow spot on each of the hind
            wings, most conspicuous beneath. Called also {Peck's
            skipper}. See Illust. under {Skipper}, n., 5.
  
      {Yellow tit} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            crested titmice of the genus {Machlolophus}, native of
            India. The predominating colors of the plumage are yellow
            and green.
  
      {Yellow viper} (Zo[94]l.), the fer-de-lance.
  
      {Yellow warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American warblers of the genus {Dendroica} in which the
            predominant color is yellow, especially {D. [91]stiva},
            which is a very abundant and familiar species; -- called
            also {garden warbler}, {golden warbler}, {summer
            yellowbird}, {summer warbler}, and {yellow-poll warbler}.
           
  
      {Yellow wash} (Pharm.), yellow oxide of mercury suspended in
            water, -- a mixture prepared by adding corrosive sublimate
            to limewater.
  
      {Yellow wren} (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European willow warbler.
      (b) The European wood warbler.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Swamp \Swamp\, n. [Cf. AS. swam a fungus, OD. swam a sponge, D.
      zwam a fungus, G. schwamm a sponge, Icel. sv[94]ppr, Dan. &
      Sw. swamp, Goth. swamms, Gr. somfo`s porous, spongy.]
      Wet, spongy land; soft, low ground saturated with water, but
      not usually covered with it; marshy ground away from the
      seashore.
  
               Gray swamps and pools, waste places of the hern.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
               A swamp differs from a bog and a marsh in producing
               trees and shrubs, while the latter produce only
               herbage, plants, and mosses.                  --Farming
                                                                              Encyc. (E.
                                                                              Edwards,
                                                                              Words).
  
      {Swamp blackbird}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Redwing}
      (b) .
  
      {Swamp cabbage} (Bot.), skunk cabbage.
  
      {Swamp deer} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic deer ({Rucervus
            Duvaucelli}) of India.
  
      {Swamp hen}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) An Australian azure-breasted bird ({Porphyrio bellus});
            -- called also {goollema}.
      (b) An Australian water crake, or rail ({Porzana Tabuensis});
            -- called also {little swamp hen}.
      (c) The European purple gallinule.
  
      {Swamp honeysuckle} (Bot.), an American shrub ({Azalea, [or]
            Rhododendron, viscosa}) growing in swampy places, with
            fragrant flowers of a white color, or white tinged with
            rose; -- called also {swamp pink}.
  
      {Swamp hook}, a hook and chain used by lumbermen in handling
            logs. Cf. {Cant hook}.
  
      {Swamp itch}. (Med.) See {Prairie itch}, under {Prairie}.
  
      {Swamp laurel} (Bot.), a shrub ({Kalmia glauca}) having small
            leaves with the lower surface glaucous.
  
      {Swamp maple} (Bot.), red maple. See {Maple}.
  
      {Swamp oak} (Bot.), a name given to several kinds of oak
            which grow in swampy places, as swamp Spanish oak
            ({Quercus palustris}), swamp white oak ({Q. bicolor}),
            swamp post oak ({Q. lyrata}).
  
      {Swamp ore} (Min.), bog ore; limonite.
  
      {Swamp partridge} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several Australian
            game birds of the genera {Synoicus} and {Excalfatoria},
            allied to the European partridges.
  
      {Swamp robin} (Zo[94]l.), the chewink.
  
      {Swamp sassafras} (Bot.), a small North American tree of the
            genus {Magnolia} ({M. glauca}) with aromatic leaves and
            fragrant creamy-white blossoms; -- called also {sweet
            bay}.
  
      {Swamp sparrow} (Zo[94]l.), a common North American sparrow
            ({Melospiza Georgiana}, or {M. palustris}), closely
            resembling the song sparrow. It lives in low, swampy
            places.
  
      {Swamp willow}. (Bot.) See {Pussy willow}, under {Pussy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pr91commissure \Pr[91]*com"mis*sure\, n. [Pref. pr[91] +
      commissure.] (Anat.)
      A transverse commissure in the anterior part of the third
      ventricle of the brain; the anterior cerebral commissure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatic \Prag*mat"ic\, Pragmatical \Prag*mat"ic*al\, a. [L.
      pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in
      law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. [?], fr. [?] a thing
      done, business, fr. [?] to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See
      {Practical}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature
            of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or
            manner.
  
                     The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical.
                                                                              --Evelyn.
  
                     We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or
                     pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some
                     delightful intermissions.                  --Milton.
  
                     Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel.
                                                                              --Hare.
  
      2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way;
            officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. [bd]Pragmatical
            officers of justice.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
                     The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him
                     the government of my whole family.      --Arbuthnot.
  
      3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects,
            rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of
            literature. [bd]Pragmatic history.[b8] --Sir W. Hamilton.
            [bd]Pragmatic poetry.[b8] --M. Arnold.
  
      {Pragmatic sanction}, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by
            the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters;
            -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European
            history, two decrees under this name are particularly
            celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of
            France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of
            the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of
            Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on
            his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatic \Prag*mat"ic\, n.
      1. One skilled in affairs.
  
                     My attorney and solicitor too; a fine pragmatic.
                                                                              --B. Jonson.
  
      2. A solemn public ordinance or decree.
  
                     A royal pragmatic was accordingly passed.
                                                                              --Prescott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatic \Prag*mat"ic\, Pragmatical \Prag*mat"ic*al\, a. [L.
      pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in
      law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. [?], fr. [?] a thing
      done, business, fr. [?] to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See
      {Practical}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature
            of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or
            manner.
  
                     The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical.
                                                                              --Evelyn.
  
                     We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or
                     pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some
                     delightful intermissions.                  --Milton.
  
                     Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel.
                                                                              --Hare.
  
      2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way;
            officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. [bd]Pragmatical
            officers of justice.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
                     The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him
                     the government of my whole family.      --Arbuthnot.
  
      3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects,
            rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of
            literature. [bd]Pragmatic history.[b8] --Sir W. Hamilton.
            [bd]Pragmatic poetry.[b8] --M. Arnold.
  
      {Pragmatic sanction}, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by
            the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters;
            -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European
            history, two decrees under this name are particularly
            celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of
            France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of
            the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of
            Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on
            his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatic \Prag*mat"ic\, Pragmatical \Prag*mat"ic*al\, a. [L.
      pragmaticus busy, active, skilled in business, especially in
      law and state affairs, systematic, Gr. [?], fr. [?] a thing
      done, business, fr. [?] to do: cf. F. pragmatique. See
      {Practical}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to business or to affairs; of the nature
            of business; practical; material; businesslike in habit or
            manner.
  
                     The next day . . . I began to be very pragmatical.
                                                                              --Evelyn.
  
                     We can not always be contemplative, diligent, or
                     pragmatical, abroad; but have need of some
                     delightful intermissions.                  --Milton.
  
                     Low, pragmatical, earthly views of the gospel.
                                                                              --Hare.
  
      2. Busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way;
            officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome. [bd]Pragmatical
            officers of justice.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
                     The fellow grew so pragmatical that he took upon him
                     the government of my whole family.      --Arbuthnot.
  
      3. Philosophical; dealing with causes, reasons, and effects,
            rather than with details and circumstances; -- said of
            literature. [bd]Pragmatic history.[b8] --Sir W. Hamilton.
            [bd]Pragmatic poetry.[b8] --M. Arnold.
  
      {Pragmatic sanction}, a solemn ordinance or decree issued by
            the head or legislature of a state upon weighty matters;
            -- a term derived from the Byzantine empire. In European
            history, two decrees under this name are particularly
            celebrated. One of these, issued by Charles VII. of
            France, A. D. 1438, was the foundation of the liberties of
            the Gallican church; the other, issued by Charles VI. of
            Germany, A. D. 1724, settled his hereditary dominions on
            his eldest daughter, the Archduchess Maria Theresa.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatically \Prag*mat"ic*al*ly\, adv.
      In a pragmatical manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmaticalness \Prag*mat"ic*al*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being pragmatical.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatism \Prag"ma*tism\, n.
      The quality or state of being pragmatic; in literature, the
      pragmatic, or philosophical, method.
  
               The narration of this apparently trifling circumstance
               belongs to the pragmatism of the history. --A. Murphy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatist \Prag"ma*tist\, n.
      One who is pragmatic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pragmatize \Prag"ma*tize\, v. t.
      To consider, represent, or embody (something unreal) as fact;
      to materialize. [R.] [bd]A pragmatized metaphor.[b8] --Tylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Praise-meeting \Praise"-meet`*ing\, n.
      A religious service mainly in song. [Local, U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Praisement \Praise"ment\, n.
      Appraisement. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Praise \Praise\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Praised}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Praising}.] [OE. preisen, OF. preisier, prisier, F. priser,
      L. pretiare to prize, fr. pretium price. See {Price}, n., and
      cf. {Appreciate}, {Praise}, n., {Prize}, v.]
      1. To commend; to applaud; to express approbation of; to
            laud; -- applied to a person or his acts. [bd]I praise
            well thy wit.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                     Let her own works praise her in the gates. --Prov.
                                                                              xxxi. 31.
  
                     We praise not Hector, though his name, we know, Is
                     great in arms; 't is hard to praise a foe. --Dryden.
  
      2. To extol in words or song; to magnify; to glorify on
            account of perfections or excellent works; to do honor to;
            to display the excellence of; -- applied especially to the
            Divine Being.
  
                     Praise ye him, all his angels; praise ye him, all
                     his hosts!                                          --Ps. cxlviii.
                                                                              2.
  
      3. To value; to appraise. [Obs.] --Piers Plowman.
  
      Syn: To commend; laud; eulogize; celebrate; glorify; magnify.
  
      Usage: To {Praise}, {Applaud}, {Extol}. To praise is to set
                  at high price; to applaud is to greet with clapping;
                  to extol is to bear aloft, to exalt. We may praise in
                  the exercise of calm judgment; we usually applaud from
                  impulse, and on account of some specific act; we extol
                  under the influence of high admiration, and usually in
                  strong, if not extravagant, language.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prasinous \Pras"i*nous\, a. [L. prasinus, Gr. [?], fr. [?] a
      leek.]
      Grass-green; clear, lively green, without any mixture.
      --Lindley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Praxinoscope \Prax*in"o*scope\, n. [Gr. [?] action + -scope.]
      (Opt.)
      An instrument, similar to the phenakistoscope, for presenting
      to view, or projecting upon a screen, images the natural
      motions of real objects.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pre89xamination \Pre`[89]x*am`i*na"tion\, n.
      Previous examination.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pre89xamine \Pre`[89]x*am"ine\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Pre[89]xamined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pre[89]xamining}.]
      To examine beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pre89xamine \Pre`[89]x*am"ine\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Pre[89]xamined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pre[89]xamining}.]
      To examine beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pre89xamine \Pre`[89]x*am"ine\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Pre[89]xamined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pre[89]xamining}.]
      To examine beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preach \Preach\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Preached}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Preaching}.] [OE. prechen, OF. preechier, F. pr[88]cher, fr.
      L. praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim; prae before +
      dicare to make known, dicere to say; or perhaps from
      (assumed) LL. praedictare. See {Diction}, and cf.
      {Predicate}, {Predict}.]
      1. To proclaim or publish tidings; specifically, to proclaim
            the gospel; to discourse publicly on a religious subject,
            or from a text of Scripture; to deliver a sermon.
  
                     How shall they preach, except they be sent? --Rom.
                                                                              x. 15.
  
                     From that time Jesus began to preach. --Matt. iv.
                                                                              17.
  
      2. To give serious advice on morals or religion; to discourse
            in the manner of a preacher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preaching \Preach"ing\, n.
      The act of delivering a religious discourse; the art of
      sermonizing; also, a sermon; a public religious discourse;
      serious, earnest advice. --Milner.
  
      {Preaching cross}, a cross, sometimes surmounting a pulpit,
            erected out of doors to designate a preaching place.
  
      {Preaching friars}. See {Dominican}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preaching \Preach"ing\, n.
      The act of delivering a religious discourse; the art of
      sermonizing; also, a sermon; a public religious discourse;
      serious, earnest advice. --Milner.
  
      {Preaching cross}, a cross, sometimes surmounting a pulpit,
            erected out of doors to designate a preaching place.
  
      {Preaching friars}. See {Dominican}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Black friar \Black" fri`ar\ (Eccl.)
      A friar of the Dominican order; -- called also {predicant}
      and {preaching friar}; in France, {Jacobin}. Also, sometimes,
      a Benedictine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preaching \Preach"ing\, n.
      The act of delivering a religious discourse; the art of
      sermonizing; also, a sermon; a public religious discourse;
      serious, earnest advice. --Milner.
  
      {Preaching cross}, a cross, sometimes surmounting a pulpit,
            erected out of doors to designate a preaching place.
  
      {Preaching friars}. See {Dominican}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dominican \Do*min"i*can\, n. (Eccl. Hist.)
      One of an order of mendicant monks founded by Dominic de
      Guzman, in 1215. A province of the order was established in
      England in 1221. The first foundation in the United States
      was made in 1807. The Master of the Sacred Palace at Rome is
      always a Dominican friar. The Dominicans are called also
      {preaching friars}, {friars preachers}, {black friars} (from
      their black cloak), {brothers of St. Mary}, and in France,
      {Jacobins}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preaching \Preach"ing\, n.
      The act of delivering a religious discourse; the art of
      sermonizing; also, a sermon; a public religious discourse;
      serious, earnest advice. --Milner.
  
      {Preaching cross}, a cross, sometimes surmounting a pulpit,
            erected out of doors to designate a preaching place.
  
      {Preaching friars}. See {Dominican}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dominican \Do*min"i*can\, n. (Eccl. Hist.)
      One of an order of mendicant monks founded by Dominic de
      Guzman, in 1215. A province of the order was established in
      England in 1221. The first foundation in the United States
      was made in 1807. The Master of the Sacred Palace at Rome is
      always a Dominican friar. The Dominicans are called also
      {preaching friars}, {friars preachers}, {black friars} (from
      their black cloak), {brothers of St. Mary}, and in France,
      {Jacobins}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preachman \Preach"man\, n.; pl. {Preachmen}.
      A preacher; -- so called in contempt. [Obs.] --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preachman \Preach"man\, n.; pl. {Preachmen}.
      A preacher; -- so called in contempt. [Obs.] --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preachment \Preach"ment\, n.
      A religious harangue; a sermon; -- used derogatively. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preacquaint \Pre`ac*quaint"\, v. t.
      To acquaint previously or beforehand. --Fielding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preacquaintance \Pre`ac*quaint"ance\, n.
      Previous acquaintance or knowledge. --Harris.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precant \Pre"cant\, n. [L. precans, -antis, p. pr. of precari to
      pray.]
      One who prays. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precent \Pre"cent\, n. [L. praeceptum, from praecipere to take
      beforehand, to instruct, teach; prae before + capere to take:
      cf. F. pr[82]cepte. See {Pre-}, and {Capacious}.]
      1. Any commandment, instruction, or order intended as an
            authoritative rule of action; esp., a command respecting
            moral conduct; an injunction; a rule.
  
                     For precept must be upon precept.      --Isa. xxviii.
                                                                              10.
  
                     No arts are without their precepts.   --Dryden.
  
      2. (Law) A command in writing; a species of writ or process.
            --Burrill.
  
      Syn: Commandment; injunction; mandate; law; rule; direction;
               principle; maxim. See {Doctrine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precentor \Pre*cen"tor\, n. [L. praecentor, fr. praecinere to
      sing before; prae before + canere to sing. See {Chant}.]
      A leader of a choir; a directing singer. Specifically:
      (a) The leader of the choir in a cathedral; -- called also
            the {chanter} or master of the choir. --Hook.
      (b) The leader of the congregational singing in Scottish and
            other churches.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precentorship \Pre*cen"tor*ship\, n.
      The office of a precentor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precinct \Pre"cinct\ (?; 277), n. [LL. praecinctum, fr. L.
      praecingere, praecinctum, to gird about, to encompass; prae
      before + cingere to gird, surround. See {Pre-}, and
      {Cincture}.]
      1. The limit or exterior line encompassing a place; a
            boundary; a confine; limit of jurisdiction or authority;
            -- often in the plural; as, the precincts of a state.
            [bd]The precincts of light.[b8] --Milton.
  
      2. A district within certain boundaries; a minor territorial
            or jurisdictional division; as, an election precinct; a
            school precinct.
  
      3. A parish or prescribed territory attached to a church, and
            taxed for its support. [U.S.]
  
                     The parish, or precinct, shall proceed to a new
                     choice.                                             --Laws of
                                                                              Massachusetts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precompose \Pre`com*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Precomposed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Precomposing}.]
      To compose beforehand. --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precompose \Pre`com*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Precomposed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Precomposing}.]
      To compose beforehand. --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precompose \Pre`com*pose"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Precomposed};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Precomposing}.]
      To compose beforehand. --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconceit \Pre`con*ceit"\, n.
      An opinion or notion formed beforehand; a preconception.
      --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconceive \Pre`con*ceive"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Preconceived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconceiving}.]
      To conceive, or form an opinion of, beforehand; to form a
      previous notion or idea of.
  
               In a dead plain the way seemeth the longer, because the
               eye hath preconceived it shorter than the truth.
                                                                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconceive \Pre`con*ceive"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Preconceived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconceiving}.]
      To conceive, or form an opinion of, beforehand; to form a
      previous notion or idea of.
  
               In a dead plain the way seemeth the longer, because the
               eye hath preconceived it shorter than the truth.
                                                                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconceive \Pre`con*ceive"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Preconceived}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconceiving}.]
      To conceive, or form an opinion of, beforehand; to form a
      previous notion or idea of.
  
               In a dead plain the way seemeth the longer, because the
               eye hath preconceived it shorter than the truth.
                                                                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconception \Pre`con*cep"tion\, n.
      The act of preconceiving; conception or opinion previously
      formed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcert \Pre`con*cert"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconcerted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconcerting}.]
      To concert or arrange beforehand; to settle by previous
      agreement.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcert \Pre*con"cert\, n.
      Something concerted or arranged beforehand; a previous
      agreement.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcert \Pre`con*cert"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconcerted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconcerting}.]
      To concert or arrange beforehand; to settle by previous
      agreement.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcerted \Pre`con*cert"ed\, a.
      Previously arranged; agreed upon beforehand. --
      {Pre`con*cert"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Pre`con*cert"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcerted \Pre`con*cert"ed\, a.
      Previously arranged; agreed upon beforehand. --
      {Pre`con*cert"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Pre`con*cert"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcerted \Pre`con*cert"ed\, a.
      Previously arranged; agreed upon beforehand. --
      {Pre`con*cert"ed*ly}, adv. -- {Pre`con*cert"ed*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcert \Pre`con*cert"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconcerted};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconcerting}.]
      To concert or arrange beforehand; to settle by previous
      agreement.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconcertion \Pre`con*cer"tion\, n.
      The act of preconcerting; preconcert. --Dr. T. Dwight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precondemn \Pre`con*demn`\, v. t.
      To condemn beforehand. -- {Pre*con`dem*na"tion}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precondemn \Pre`con*demn`\, v. t.
      To condemn beforehand. -- {Pre*con`dem*na"tion}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precondition \Pre`con*di"tion\, n.
      A previous or antecedent condition; a preliminary condition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconform \Pre`con*form"\, v. t. & i.
      To conform by way anticipation. --De Quincey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconformity \Pre`con*form"i*ty\, n.
      Anticipative or antecedent conformity. --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconizate \Pre*con"i*zate\, v. t. [Cf. F. pr[82]coniser.]
      To proclaim; to publish; also, to summon; to call. [Obs.]
      --Bp. Burnet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconization \Pre*con`i*za"tion\, n. [L. praeconium a crying
      out in public, fr. praeco, -onis, a crier, a herald: cf. F.
      pr[82]conisation.]
      1. A publishing by proclamation; a public proclamation. --Bp.
            Hall.
  
      2. (Eccl.) A formal approbation by the pope of a person
            nominated to an ecclesiastical dignity. --Addis & Arnold.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconize \Pre"con*ize\, v. t. (Eccl.)
      To approve by preconization.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconquer \Pre*con"quer\, v. t.
      To conquer in anticipation. [R.] --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconscious \Pre*con""scious\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a state before consciousness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconsent \Pre`con*sent"\, n.
      A previous consent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconsign \Pre`con*sign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconsigned};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconsigning}.]
      To consign beforehand; to make a previous consignment of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconsign \Pre`con*sign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconsigned};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconsigning}.]
      To consign beforehand; to make a previous consignment of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconsign \Pre`con*sign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preconsigned};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Preconsigning}.]
      To consign beforehand; to make a previous consignment of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconsolidated \Pre`con*sol"i*da`ted\, a.
      Consolidated beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preconstitute \Pre*con"sti*tute\, v. t.
      To constitute or establish beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontract \Pre`con*tract"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Precontracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Precontracting}.]
      To contract, engage, or stipulate previously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontract \Pre`con*tract"\, v. i.
      To make a previous contract or agreement. --Ayliffe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontract \Pre*con"tract\, n.
      A contract preceding another; especially (Law), a contract of
      marriage which, according to the ancient law, rendered void a
      subsequent marriage solemnized in violation of it. --Abbott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontract \Pre`con*tract"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Precontracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Precontracting}.]
      To contract, engage, or stipulate previously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontract \Pre`con*tract"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Precontracted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Precontracting}.]
      To contract, engage, or stipulate previously.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Precontrive \Pre`con*trive"\, v. t. & i.
      To contrive or plan beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnable \Preg"na*ble\, a., [F. prenable. See {Impregnable}.]
      Capable of being entered, taken, or captured; expugnable; as,
      a pregnable fort. [R.] --Cotgrave.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnance \Preg"nance\, n.
      Pregnancy. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnancy \Preg"nan*cy\, n.
      1. The condition of being pregnant; the state of being with
            young.
  
      2. Figuratively: The quality of being heavy with important
            contents, issue, significance, etc.; unusual consequence
            or capacity; fertility. --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnant \Preg"nant\, a. [L. praegnans, -antis; prae before +
      genere, gignere, to beget: cf. F. pr[82]gnant. See {Gender},
      2d {Kin}.]
      1. Being with young, as a female; having conceived; great
            with young; breeding; teeming; gravid; preparing to bring
            forth.
  
      2. Heavy with important contents, significance, or issue;
            full of consequence or results; weighty; as, pregnant
            replies. [bd] A pregnant argument.[b8] --Prynne. [bd] A
            pregnant brevity.[b8]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnant \Preg"nant\, n.
      A pregnant woman. [R.] --Dunglison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnant \Preg"nant\, a. [F. prenant taking. Cf. {Pregnable}.]
      Affording entrance; receptive; yielding; willing; open;
      prompt. [Obs.] [bd] Pregnant to good pity.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   --E. Everett.
  
      3. Full of promise; abounding in ability, resources, etc.;
            as, a pregnant youth. [Obs.] --Evelyn.
  
                     Wherein the pregnant enemy does much. --Shak.
  
      {Pregnant construction} (Rhet.), one in which more is implied
            than is said; as, the beasts trembled forth from their
            dens, that is, came forth trembling with fright.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnantly \Preg"nant*ly\, adv.
      In a pregnant manner; fruitfully; significantly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pregnantly \Preg"nant*ly\, adv.
      Unresistingly; openly; hence, clearly; evidently. [Obs.]
      --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preignition \Pre`ig*ni"tion\, n. (Engin.)
      Ignition in an internal-combustion engine while the inlet
      valve is open or before compression is completed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preknowledge \Pre*knowl"edge\, n.
      Prior knowledge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prescience \Pre"sci*ence\, n. [F. prescience, L. praescientia.
      See {Prescient}.]
      Knowledge of events before they take place; foresight.
  
               God's certain prescience of the volitions of moral
               agents.                                                   --J. Edwards.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presciendent \Pre*sciend"ent\, a. [L. praescius; prae before +
      scius knowing, fr. scire to know.]
      Foreknowing; having foreknowledge; as, prescious of ills.
      [R.] --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prescient \Pre"sci*ent\ (pr[emac]"sh[icr]*[eit]nt or
      -sh[eit]nt), a. [L. praesciens, -entis, p. pr. of praescire
      to foreknow; prae before + scire to know: cf. F. prescient.
      See {Science}.]
      Having knowledge of coming events; foreseeing; conscious
      beforehand. --Pope.
  
               Henry . . . had shown himself sensible, and almost
               prescient, of this event.                        --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presciently \Pre"sci*ent*ly\, adv.
      With prescience or foresight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prescind \Pre*scind"\ (pr[esl]*s[icr]nd"), v. t. [L.
      praescindere to cut off in front; prae before + scindere to
      cut asunder: cf. F. prescinder.]
      1. To cut off; to abstract. [Obs.] --Norris.
  
      2. (Metaph.) To consider by a separate act of attention or
            analysis. --Sir W. Hamilton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Preseance \Pre"se*ance\, n. [F. pr[82]s[82]ance. See {Preside}.]
      Priority of place in sitting.[Obs.] --Carew.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presence \Pres"ence\, n. [F. pr[82]sence, L. praesentia. See
      {Present}.]
      1. The state of being present, or of being within sight or
            call, or at hand; -- opposed to absence.
  
      2. The place in which one is present; the part of space
            within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood
            without the intervention of anything that forbids
            intercourse.
  
                     Wrath shell be no more Thenceforth, but in thy
                     presence joy entire.                           --Milton.
  
      3. Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of
            superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.
  
                     In such a presence here to plead my thoughts.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     An't please your grace, the two great cardinals.
                     Wait in the presence.                        --Shak.
  
      4. The whole of the personal qualities of an individual;
            person; personality; especially, the person of a superior,
            as a sovereign.
  
                     The Sovran Presence thus replied.      --Milton.
  
      5. An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility;
            noble company.
  
                     Odmar, of all this presence does contain, Give her
                     your wreath whom you esteem most fair. --Dryden.
  
      6. Port, mien; air; personal appearence. [bd]Rather dignity
            of presence than beauty of aspect.[b8] --Bacon.
  
                     A graceful presence bespeaks acceptance. -- Collier.
  
      {Presence chamber}, [or] {Presence room}, the room in which a
            great personage receives company. --Addison. [bd] Chambers
            of presence.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      {Presence of mind}, that state of the mind in which all its
            faculties are alert, prompt, and acting harmoniously in
            obedience to the will, enabling one to reach, as it were
            spontaneously or by intuition, just conclusions in sudden
            emergencies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presence \Pres"ence\, n. [F. pr[82]sence, L. praesentia. See
      {Present}.]
      1. The state of being present, or of being within sight or
            call, or at hand; -- opposed to absence.
  
      2. The place in which one is present; the part of space
            within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood
            without the intervention of anything that forbids
            intercourse.
  
                     Wrath shell be no more Thenceforth, but in thy
                     presence joy entire.                           --Milton.
  
      3. Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of
            superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.
  
                     In such a presence here to plead my thoughts.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     An't please your grace, the two great cardinals.
                     Wait in the presence.                        --Shak.
  
      4. The whole of the personal qualities of an individual;
            person; personality; especially, the person of a superior,
            as a sovereign.
  
                     The Sovran Presence thus replied.      --Milton.
  
      5. An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility;
            noble company.
  
                     Odmar, of all this presence does contain, Give her
                     your wreath whom you esteem most fair. --Dryden.
  
      6. Port, mien; air; personal appearence. [bd]Rather dignity
            of presence than beauty of aspect.[b8] --Bacon.
  
                     A graceful presence bespeaks acceptance. -- Collier.
  
      {Presence chamber}, [or] {Presence room}, the room in which a
            great personage receives company. --Addison. [bd] Chambers
            of presence.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      {Presence of mind}, that state of the mind in which all its
            faculties are alert, prompt, and acting harmoniously in
            obedience to the will, enabling one to reach, as it were
            spontaneously or by intuition, just conclusions in sudden
            emergencies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presence \Pres"ence\, n. [F. pr[82]sence, L. praesentia. See
      {Present}.]
      1. The state of being present, or of being within sight or
            call, or at hand; -- opposed to absence.
  
      2. The place in which one is present; the part of space
            within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood
            without the intervention of anything that forbids
            intercourse.
  
                     Wrath shell be no more Thenceforth, but in thy
                     presence joy entire.                           --Milton.
  
      3. Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of
            superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.
  
                     In such a presence here to plead my thoughts.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     An't please your grace, the two great cardinals.
                     Wait in the presence.                        --Shak.
  
      4. The whole of the personal qualities of an individual;
            person; personality; especially, the person of a superior,
            as a sovereign.
  
                     The Sovran Presence thus replied.      --Milton.
  
      5. An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility;
            noble company.
  
                     Odmar, of all this presence does contain, Give her
                     your wreath whom you esteem most fair. --Dryden.
  
      6. Port, mien; air; personal appearence. [bd]Rather dignity
            of presence than beauty of aspect.[b8] --Bacon.
  
                     A graceful presence bespeaks acceptance. -- Collier.
  
      {Presence chamber}, [or] {Presence room}, the room in which a
            great personage receives company. --Addison. [bd] Chambers
            of presence.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      {Presence of mind}, that state of the mind in which all its
            faculties are alert, prompt, and acting harmoniously in
            obedience to the will, enabling one to reach, as it were
            spontaneously or by intuition, just conclusions in sudden
            emergencies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presence \Pres"ence\, n. [F. pr[82]sence, L. praesentia. See
      {Present}.]
      1. The state of being present, or of being within sight or
            call, or at hand; -- opposed to absence.
  
      2. The place in which one is present; the part of space
            within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood
            without the intervention of anything that forbids
            intercourse.
  
                     Wrath shell be no more Thenceforth, but in thy
                     presence joy entire.                           --Milton.
  
      3. Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of
            superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.
  
                     In such a presence here to plead my thoughts.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     An't please your grace, the two great cardinals.
                     Wait in the presence.                        --Shak.
  
      4. The whole of the personal qualities of an individual;
            person; personality; especially, the person of a superior,
            as a sovereign.
  
                     The Sovran Presence thus replied.      --Milton.
  
      5. An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility;
            noble company.
  
                     Odmar, of all this presence does contain, Give her
                     your wreath whom you esteem most fair. --Dryden.
  
      6. Port, mien; air; personal appearence. [bd]Rather dignity
            of presence than beauty of aspect.[b8] --Bacon.
  
                     A graceful presence bespeaks acceptance. -- Collier.
  
      {Presence chamber}, [or] {Presence room}, the room in which a
            great personage receives company. --Addison. [bd] Chambers
            of presence.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      {Presence of mind}, that state of the mind in which all its
            faculties are alert, prompt, and acting harmoniously in
            obedience to the will, enabling one to reach, as it were
            spontaneously or by intuition, just conclusions in sudden
            emergencies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presensation \Pre`sen*sa"tion\, n.
      Previous sensation, notion, or idea. [Obs.] --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presension \Pre*sen"sion\, n. [L. praesensio, fr. praesentire to
      perceive beforehand. See {Presentient}.]
      Previous perception. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pres"ent\, n. [Cf. F. pr[82]sent. See {Present}, a.]
      1. Present time; the time being; time in progress now, or at
            the moment contemplated; as, at this present.
  
                     Past and present, wound in one.         --Tennyson.
  
      2. pl. (Law) Present letters or instrument, as a deed of
            conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney, or other writing;
            as in the phrase, [bd] Know all men by these presents,[b8]
            that is, by the writing itself, [bd] per has literas
            praesentes; [b8] -- in this sense, rarely used in the
            singular.
  
      3. (Gram.) A present tense, or the form of the verb denoting
            the present tense.
  
      {At present}, at the present time; now.
  
      {For the present}, for the tine being; temporarily.
  
      {In present}, at once, without delay. [Obs.] [bd]With them,
            in present, half his kingdom; the rest to follow at his
            death.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pres"ent\, a. [F. pr[82]sent, L. praesens,-entis, that
      is before one, in sight or at hand, p. p. of praeesse to be
      before; prae before + esse to be. See {Essence}.]
      1. Being at hand, within reach or call, within certain
            contemplated limits; -- opposed to absent.
  
                     These things have I spoken unto you, being yet
                     present with you.                              --John xiv.
                                                                              25.
  
      2. Now existing, or in process; begun but not ended; now in
            view, or under consideration; being at this time; not past
            or future; as, the present session of Congress; the
            present state of affairs; the present instance.
  
                     I'll bring thee to the present business --Shak.
  
      3. Not delayed; immediate; instant; coincident. [bd]A present
            recompense.[b8] [bd]A present pardon.[b8] --Shak.
  
                     An ambassador . . . desires a present audience.
                                                                              --Massinger.
  
      4. Ready; quick in emergency; as a present wit. [R.]
  
      5. Favorably attentive; propitious. [Archaic]
  
                     To find a god so present to my prayer. --Dryden.
  
      {Present tense} (Gram.), the tense or form of a verb which
            expresses action or being in the present time; as, I am
            writing, I write, or I do write.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pre*sent"\, v. i. (Med.)
      To appear at the mouth of the uterus so as to be perceptible
      to the finger in vaginal examination; -- said of a part of an
      infant during labor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pres"ent\, n. [F. pr[82]sent .]
      Anything presented or given; a gift; a donative; as, a
      Christmas present.
  
      Syn: Gift; donation; donative; benefaction. See {Gift}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pre*sent"\, n. (Mil.)
      The position of a soldier in presenting arms; as, to stand at
      present.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pre*sent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presented}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presenting}.] [F. pr[82]senter, L. praesentare, fr.
      praesens, a. See {Present}, a.]
      1. To bring or introduce into the presence of some one,
            especially of a superior; to introduce formally; to offer
            for acquaintance; as, to present an envoy to the king;
            (with the reciprocal pronoun) to come into the presence of
            a superior.
  
                     Now there was a day when the sons of God came to
                     present themselves before the lord.   --Job i. 6
  
      2. To exhibit or offer to view or notice; to lay before one's
            perception or cognizance; to set forth; to present a fine
            appearance.
  
                     Lectorides's memory is ever . . . presenting him
                     with the thoughts of other persons.   --I. Watts.
  
      3. To pass over, esp. in a ceremonious manner; to give in
            charge or possession; to deliver; to make over.
  
                     So ladies in romance assist their knight, Present
                     the spear, and arm him for the fight. --Pope.
  
      4. To make a gift of; to bestow; to give, generally in a
            formal or ceremonious manner; to grant; to confer.
  
                     My last, least offering, I present thee now.
                                                                              --Cowper.
  
      5. Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with
            a donation; also, to court by gifts.
  
                     Octavia presented the poet for him admirable elegy
                     on her son Marcellus.                        --Dryden.
  
      6. To present; to personate. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      7. In specific uses;
            (a) To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to
                  the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.
  
                           The patron of a church may present his clerk to
                           a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him
                           to the bishop of the diocese to be instituted.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
            (b) To nominate for support at a public school or other
                  institution . --Lamb.
            (c) To lay before a public body, or an official, for
                  consideration, as before a legislature, a court of
                  judicature, a corporation, etc.; as, to present a
                  memorial, petition, remonstrance, or indictment.
            (d) To lay before a court as an object of inquiry; to give
                  notice officially of, as a crime of offence; to find
                  or represent judicially; as, a grand jury present
                  certain offenses or nuisances, or whatever they think
                  to be public injuries.
            (e) To bring an indictment against . [U.S]
            (f) To aim, point, or direct, as a weapon; as, to present
                  a pistol or the point of a sword to the breast of
                  another.
  
      {Pesent arms} (Mil.), the command in response to which the
            gun is carried perpendicularly in front of the center of
            the body, and held there with the left hand grasping it at
            the lower band, and the right hand grasping the small of
            the stock, in token of respect, as in saluting a superior
            officer; also, the position taken at such a command.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pres"ent\, a. [F. pr[82]sent, L. praesens,-entis, that
      is before one, in sight or at hand, p. p. of praeesse to be
      before; prae before + esse to be. See {Essence}.]
      1. Being at hand, within reach or call, within certain
            contemplated limits; -- opposed to absent.
  
                     These things have I spoken unto you, being yet
                     present with you.                              --John xiv.
                                                                              25.
  
      2. Now existing, or in process; begun but not ended; now in
            view, or under consideration; being at this time; not past
            or future; as, the present session of Congress; the
            present state of affairs; the present instance.
  
                     I'll bring thee to the present business --Shak.
  
      3. Not delayed; immediate; instant; coincident. [bd]A present
            recompense.[b8] [bd]A present pardon.[b8] --Shak.
  
                     An ambassador . . . desires a present audience.
                                                                              --Massinger.
  
      4. Ready; quick in emergency; as a present wit. [R.]
  
      5. Favorably attentive; propitious. [Archaic]
  
                     To find a god so present to my prayer. --Dryden.
  
      {Present tense} (Gram.), the tense or form of a verb which
            expresses action or being in the present time; as, I am
            writing, I write, or I do write.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present value \Pres"ent value\ [or] worth \worth\ (of money
      payable at a future date).
      The principal which, drawing interest at a given rate, will
      amount to the given sum at the date on which this is to be
      paid; thus, interest being at 6%, the present value of $106
      due one year hence is $100.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentable \Pre*sent"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. pr[82]sentable.]
      1. Capable or admitting of being presented; suitable to be
            exhibited, represented, or offered; fit to be brought
            forward or set forth; hence, fitted to be introduced to
            another, or to go into society; as, ideas that are
            presentable in simple language; she is not presentable in
            such a gown.
  
      2. Admitting of the presentation of a clergiman; as, a church
            presentable. [R.] --Ayliffe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentaneous \Pres`en*ta"ne*ous\, a. [L. praesentaneus. See
      {Present}, a.]
      Ready; quick; immediate in effect; as, presentaneous poison.
      [Obs.] --Harvey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentation \Pres`en*ta"tion\, n. [L. praesentatio a showing,
      representation: cf. F. pr[82]sentation.]
      1. The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a
            setting forth; an offering; bestowal.
  
                     Prayers are sometimes a presentation of mere
                     desires.                                             --Hooker.
  
      2. Hence, exhibition; representation; display; appearance;
            semblance; show.
  
                     Under the presentation of the shoots his wit.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as,
            the picture was a presentation. [R.]
  
      4. (Eccl.) The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or
            ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of
            presenting a clergyman.
  
                     If the bishop admits the patron's presentation, the
                     clerk so admitted is next to be instituted by him.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
  
      5. (Med.) The particular position of the child during labor
            relatively to the passage though which it is to be brought
            forth; -- specifically designated by the part which first
            appears at the mouth of the uterus; as, a breech
            presentation.
  
      {Presentation copy}, a copy of a book, engraving, etc.,
            presented to some one by the author or artist, as a token
            of regard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentation \Pres`en*ta"tion\, n. [L. praesentatio a showing,
      representation: cf. F. pr[82]sentation.]
      1. The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a
            setting forth; an offering; bestowal.
  
                     Prayers are sometimes a presentation of mere
                     desires.                                             --Hooker.
  
      2. Hence, exhibition; representation; display; appearance;
            semblance; show.
  
                     Under the presentation of the shoots his wit.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as,
            the picture was a presentation. [R.]
  
      4. (Eccl.) The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or
            ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of
            presenting a clergyman.
  
                     If the bishop admits the patron's presentation, the
                     clerk so admitted is next to be instituted by him.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
  
      5. (Med.) The particular position of the child during labor
            relatively to the passage though which it is to be brought
            forth; -- specifically designated by the part which first
            appears at the mouth of the uterus; as, a breech
            presentation.
  
      {Presentation copy}, a copy of a book, engraving, etc.,
            presented to some one by the author or artist, as a token
            of regard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentative \Pre*sent"a*tive\, a.
      1. (Eccl.) Having the right of presentation, or offering a
            clergyman to the bishop for institution; as, advowsons are
            presentative, collative, or donative. --Blackstone.
  
      2. Admitting the presentation of a clergyman; as, a
            presentative parsonage. --Spelman.
  
      3. (Metaph.) Capable of being directly known by, or presented
            to, the mind; intuitive; directly apprehensible, as
            objects; capable of apprehending, as faculties.
  
                     The latter term, presentative faculty, I use . . .
                     in contrast and correlation to a [bd]representative
                     faculty.[b8]                                       --Sir W.
                                                                              Hamilton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pre*sent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presented}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presenting}.] [F. pr[82]senter, L. praesentare, fr.
      praesens, a. See {Present}, a.]
      1. To bring or introduce into the presence of some one,
            especially of a superior; to introduce formally; to offer
            for acquaintance; as, to present an envoy to the king;
            (with the reciprocal pronoun) to come into the presence of
            a superior.
  
                     Now there was a day when the sons of God came to
                     present themselves before the lord.   --Job i. 6
  
      2. To exhibit or offer to view or notice; to lay before one's
            perception or cognizance; to set forth; to present a fine
            appearance.
  
                     Lectorides's memory is ever . . . presenting him
                     with the thoughts of other persons.   --I. Watts.
  
      3. To pass over, esp. in a ceremonious manner; to give in
            charge or possession; to deliver; to make over.
  
                     So ladies in romance assist their knight, Present
                     the spear, and arm him for the fight. --Pope.
  
      4. To make a gift of; to bestow; to give, generally in a
            formal or ceremonious manner; to grant; to confer.
  
                     My last, least offering, I present thee now.
                                                                              --Cowper.
  
      5. Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with
            a donation; also, to court by gifts.
  
                     Octavia presented the poet for him admirable elegy
                     on her son Marcellus.                        --Dryden.
  
      6. To present; to personate. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      7. In specific uses;
            (a) To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to
                  the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.
  
                           The patron of a church may present his clerk to
                           a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him
                           to the bishop of the diocese to be instituted.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
            (b) To nominate for support at a public school or other
                  institution . --Lamb.
            (c) To lay before a public body, or an official, for
                  consideration, as before a legislature, a court of
                  judicature, a corporation, etc.; as, to present a
                  memorial, petition, remonstrance, or indictment.
            (d) To lay before a court as an object of inquiry; to give
                  notice officially of, as a crime of offence; to find
                  or represent judicially; as, a grand jury present
                  certain offenses or nuisances, or whatever they think
                  to be public injuries.
            (e) To bring an indictment against . [U.S]
            (f) To aim, point, or direct, as a weapon; as, to present
                  a pistol or the point of a sword to the breast of
                  another.
  
      {Pesent arms} (Mil.), the command in response to which the
            gun is carried perpendicularly in front of the center of
            the body, and held there with the left hand grasping it at
            the lower band, and the right hand grasping the small of
            the stock, in token of respect, as in saluting a superior
            officer; also, the position taken at such a command.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentee \Pres`en*tee"\, n. [F. pr[82]sent[82], p. p. See
      {Present}, v. t. ]
      One to whom something is presented; also, one who is
      presented; specifically (Eccl.), one presented to benefice.
      --Ayliffe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presenter \Pre*sent"er\, n.
      One who presents.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presential \Pre*sen"tial\, a. [LL. praesentialis.]
      Implying actual presence; present, immediate. [Obs.]
  
               God's mercy is made presential to us.      --Jer. Taylor.
      -- {Pre*sen"tial*ly}, adv. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentiality \Pre*sen`ti*al"i*ty\, n.
      State of being actually present. [Obs.] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presential \Pre*sen"tial\, a. [LL. praesentialis.]
      Implying actual presence; present, immediate. [Obs.]
  
               God's mercy is made presential to us.      --Jer. Taylor.
      -- {Pre*sen"tial*ly}, adv. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentiate \Pre*sen"ti*ate\, v. t.
      To make present. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentient \Pre*sen"tient\, a. [L. praesentiens, p. pr. of
      praesentire to perceive beforehand; prae before + sentire to
      feel.]
      Feeling or perceiving beforehand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentific \Pres`en*tif"ic\, a. [L. praesens, -entis, present +
      facere to make.]
      Making present. [Obs.] -- {Pres`en*tif"ic*ly}, adv. [Obs.]
      --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentifical \Pres`en*tif"ic*al\, a.
      Presentific. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentific \Pres`en*tif"ic\, a. [L. praesens, -entis, present +
      facere to make.]
      Making present. [Obs.] -- {Pres`en*tif"ic*ly}, adv. [Obs.]
      --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentiment \Pre*sen"ti*ment\, n. [Pref. pre- + sentiment: cf.
      F. pressentiment. See {Presentient}.]
      Previous sentiment, conception, or opinion; previous
      apprehension; especially, an antecedent impression or
      conviction of something unpleasant, distressing, or
      calamitous, about to happen; anticipation of evil;
      foreboding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentimental \Pre*sen`ti*men"tal\, a.
      Of nature of a presentiment; foreboding. [R.] --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Present \Pre*sent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presented}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presenting}.] [F. pr[82]senter, L. praesentare, fr.
      praesens, a. See {Present}, a.]
      1. To bring or introduce into the presence of some one,
            especially of a superior; to introduce formally; to offer
            for acquaintance; as, to present an envoy to the king;
            (with the reciprocal pronoun) to come into the presence of
            a superior.
  
                     Now there was a day when the sons of God came to
                     present themselves before the lord.   --Job i. 6
  
      2. To exhibit or offer to view or notice; to lay before one's
            perception or cognizance; to set forth; to present a fine
            appearance.
  
                     Lectorides's memory is ever . . . presenting him
                     with the thoughts of other persons.   --I. Watts.
  
      3. To pass over, esp. in a ceremonious manner; to give in
            charge or possession; to deliver; to make over.
  
                     So ladies in romance assist their knight, Present
                     the spear, and arm him for the fight. --Pope.
  
      4. To make a gift of; to bestow; to give, generally in a
            formal or ceremonious manner; to grant; to confer.
  
                     My last, least offering, I present thee now.
                                                                              --Cowper.
  
      5. Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with
            a donation; also, to court by gifts.
  
                     Octavia presented the poet for him admirable elegy
                     on her son Marcellus.                        --Dryden.
  
      6. To present; to personate. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      7. In specific uses;
            (a) To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to
                  the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.
  
                           The patron of a church may present his clerk to
                           a parsonage or vicarage; that is, may offer him
                           to the bishop of the diocese to be instituted.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
            (b) To nominate for support at a public school or other
                  institution . --Lamb.
            (c) To lay before a public body, or an official, for
                  consideration, as before a legislature, a court of
                  judicature, a corporation, etc.; as, to present a
                  memorial, petition, remonstrance, or indictment.
            (d) To lay before a court as an object of inquiry; to give
                  notice officially of, as a crime of offence; to find
                  or represent judicially; as, a grand jury present
                  certain offenses or nuisances, or whatever they think
                  to be public injuries.
            (e) To bring an indictment against . [U.S]
            (f) To aim, point, or direct, as a weapon; as, to present
                  a pistol or the point of a sword to the breast of
                  another.
  
      {Pesent arms} (Mil.), the command in response to which the
            gun is carried perpendicularly in front of the center of
            the body, and held there with the left hand grasping it at
            the lower band, and the right hand grasping the small of
            the stock, in token of respect, as in saluting a superior
            officer; also, the position taken at such a command.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presention \Pre*sen"tion\, n.
      See {Presension}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentive \Pre*sent"ive\, a. (Philol.)
      Bringing a conception or notion directly before the mind;
      presenting an object to the memory of imagination; --
      distinguished from symbolic.
  
               How greatly the word [bd]will[b8] is felt to have lost
               presentive power in the last three centuries. --Earle.
      -- {Pre*sent"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Pre*sent"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentive \Pre*sent"ive\, a. (Philol.)
      Bringing a conception or notion directly before the mind;
      presenting an object to the memory of imagination; --
      distinguished from symbolic.
  
               How greatly the word [bd]will[b8] is felt to have lost
               presentive power in the last three centuries. --Earle.
      -- {Pre*sent"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Pre*sent"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentive \Pre*sent"ive\, a. (Philol.)
      Bringing a conception or notion directly before the mind;
      presenting an object to the memory of imagination; --
      distinguished from symbolic.
  
               How greatly the word [bd]will[b8] is felt to have lost
               presentive power in the last three centuries. --Earle.
      -- {Pre*sent"ive*ly}, adv. -- {Pre*sent"ive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presently \Pres"ent*ly\, adv.
      1. At present; at this time; now. [Obs.]
  
                     The towns and forts you presently have. --Sir P.
                                                                              Sidney.
  
      2. At once; without delay; forthwith; also, less definitely,
            soon; shortly; before long; after a little while; by and
            by. --Shak.
  
                     And presently the fig tree withered away. --Matt.
                                                                              xxi. 19.
  
      3. With actual presence; actually . [Obs.]
  
                     His precious body and blood presently three. --Bp.
                                                                              Gardiner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentment \Pre*sent"ment\, n.
      1. The act of presenting, or the state of being presented;
            presentation. [bd] Upon the heels of my presentment.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      2. Setting forth to view; delineation; appearance;
            representation; exhibition.
  
                     Power to cheat the eye with blear illusion, And give
                     it false presentment.                        --Milton.
  
      3. (Law)
            (a) The notice taken by a grand jury of any offence from
                  their own knowledge or observation, without any bill
                  of indictment laid before them, as, the presentment of
                  a nuisance, a libel, or the like; also, an inquisition
                  of office and indictment by a grand jury; an official
                  accusation presented to a tribunal by the grand jury
                  in an indictment, or the act of offering an
                  indictment; also, the indictment itself.
            (b) The official notice (formerly required to be given in
                  court) of the surrender of a copyhold estate.
                  --Blackstone.
  
      {Presentment of a bill of exchange}, the offering of a bill
            to the drawee for acceptance, or to the acceptor for
            payment. See {Bill of exchange}, under {Bill}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentment \Pre*sent"ment\, n.
      1. The act of presenting, or the state of being presented;
            presentation. [bd] Upon the heels of my presentment.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      2. Setting forth to view; delineation; appearance;
            representation; exhibition.
  
                     Power to cheat the eye with blear illusion, And give
                     it false presentment.                        --Milton.
  
      3. (Law)
            (a) The notice taken by a grand jury of any offence from
                  their own knowledge or observation, without any bill
                  of indictment laid before them, as, the presentment of
                  a nuisance, a libel, or the like; also, an inquisition
                  of office and indictment by a grand jury; an official
                  accusation presented to a tribunal by the grand jury
                  in an indictment, or the act of offering an
                  indictment; also, the indictment itself.
            (b) The official notice (formerly required to be given in
                  court) of the surrender of a copyhold estate.
                  --Blackstone.
  
      {Presentment of a bill of exchange}, the offering of a bill
            to the drawee for acceptance, or to the acceptor for
            payment. See {Bill of exchange}, under {Bill}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentness \Pres"ent*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being present; presence. [Obs.]
      [bd]Presentness of mind in danger.[b8] --Clarendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presentoir \Pres`en*toir"\, n. [Formed after analogy of French.]
      An ornamental tray, dish, or the like, used as a salver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Press \Press\, n. [For prest, confused with press.]
      A commission to force men into public service, particularly
      into the navy.
  
               I have misused the king's press.            --Shak.
  
      {Press gang}, [or] {Pressgang}, a detachment of seamen under
            the command of an officer empowered to force men into the
            naval service. See {Impress gang}, under {Impress}.
  
      {Press money}, money paid to a man enlisted into public
            service. See {Prest money}, under {Prest}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Press \Press\, n. [For prest, confused with press.]
      A commission to force men into public service, particularly
      into the navy.
  
               I have misused the king's press.            --Shak.
  
      {Press gang}, [or] {Pressgang}, a detachment of seamen under
            the command of an officer empowered to force men into the
            naval service. See {Impress gang}, under {Impress}.
  
      {Press money}, money paid to a man enlisted into public
            service. See {Prest money}, under {Prest}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Press \Press\, n. [For prest, confused with press.]
      A commission to force men into public service, particularly
      into the navy.
  
               I have misused the king's press.            --Shak.
  
      {Press gang}, [or] {Pressgang}, a detachment of seamen under
            the command of an officer empowered to force men into the
            naval service. See {Impress gang}, under {Impress}.
  
      {Press money}, money paid to a man enlisted into public
            service. See {Prest money}, under {Prest}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressgang \Press"gang`\, n.
      See {Press gang}, under {Press}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Press \Press\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pressed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Pressing}.] [F. presser, fr. L. pressare to press, fr.
      premere, pressum, to press. Cf. {Print}, v.]
      1. To urge, or act upon, with force, as weight; to act upon
            by pushing or thrusting, in distinction from pulling; to
            crowd or compel by a gradual and continued exertion; to
            bear upon; to squeeze; to compress; as, we press the
            ground with the feet when we walk; we press the couch on
            which we repose; we press substances with the hands,
            fingers, or arms; we are pressed in a crowd.
  
                     Good measure, pressed down, and shaken together.
                                                                              --Luke vi. 38.
  
      2. To squeeze, in order to extract the juice or contents of;
            to squeeze out, or express, from something.
  
                     From sweet kernels pressed, She tempers dulcet
                     creams.                                             --Milton.
  
                     And I took the grapes, and pressed them into
                     Pharaoh's cup, and I gave the cup into Pharaoh's
                     hand.                                                --Gen. xl. 11.
  
      3. To squeeze in or with suitable instruments or apparatus,
            in order to compact, make dense, or smooth; as, to press
            cotton bales, paper, etc.; to smooth by ironing; as, to
            press clothes.
  
      4. To embrace closely; to hug.
  
                     Leucothoe shook at these alarms, And pressed Palemon
                     closer in her arms.                           --Pope.
  
      5. To oppress; to bear hard upon.
  
                     Press not a falling man too far.         --Shak.
  
      6. To straiten; to distress; as, to be pressed with want or
            hunger.
  
      7. To exercise very powerful or irresistible influence upon
            or over; to constrain; to force; to compel.
  
                     Paul was pressed in the spirit, and testified to the
                     Jews that Jesus was Christ.               --Acts xviii.
                                                                              5.
  
      8. To try to force (something upon some one); to urge or
            inculcate with earnestness or importunity; to enforce; as,
            to press divine truth on an audience.
  
                     He pressed a letter upon me within this hour.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     Be sure to press upon him every motive. --Addison.
  
      9. To drive with violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard;
            as, to press a horse in a race.
  
                     The posts . . . went cut, being hastened and pressed
                     on, by the king's commandment.            --Esther viii.
                                                                              14.
  
      Note: Press differs from drive and strike in usually denoting
               a slow or continued application of force; whereas drive
               and strike denote a sudden impulse of force.
  
      {Pressed brick}. See under {Brick}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressing \Press"ing\, a.
      Urgent; exacting; importunate; as, a pressing necessity. --
      {Press"ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressing \Press"ing\, a.
      Urgent; exacting; importunate; as, a pressing necessity. --
      {Press"ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pression \Pres"sion\, n. [L. pressio: cf. F. pression. See 4th
      {Press}.]
      1. The act of pressing; pressure. --Sir I. Newton.
  
      2. (Cartesian Philos.) An endeavor to move.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressman \Press"man\, n.; pl. {Pressmen}.
      1. One who manages, or attends to, a press, esp. a printing
            press.
  
      2. One who presses clothes; as, a tailor's pressman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressman \Press"man\, n. [See 2d {Press}.]
      One of a press gang, who aids in forcing men into the naval
      service; also, one forced into the service.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressman \Press"man\, n.; pl. {Pressmen}.
      1. One who manages, or attends to, a press, esp. a printing
            press.
  
      2. One who presses clothes; as, a tailor's pressman.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumable \Pre*sum"a*ble\, a. [Cf. F. pr[82]sumable.]
      Such as may be presumed or supposed to be true; that seems
      entitled to belief without direct evidence.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumably \Pre*sum"a*bly\, adv.
      In a presumable manner; by, or according to, presumption.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presume \Pre*sume"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presumed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presuming}.] [F. pr[82]sumer, L. praesumere,
      praesumptum; prae before + sumere to take. See {Assume},
      {Redeem}.]
      1. To assume or take beforehand; esp., to do or undertake
            without leave or authority previously obtained.
  
                     Dare he presume to scorn us in this manner? --Shak.
  
                     Bold deed thou hast presumed, adventurous Eve.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief,
            without examination or proof, or on the strength of
            probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.
  
                     Every man is to be presumed innocent till he is
                     proved to be guilty.                           --Blackstone.
  
                     What rests but that the mortal sentence pass, . . .
                     Which he presumes already vain and void, Because not
                     yet inflicted?                                    --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presume \Pre*sume"\, v. i.
      1. To suppose or assume something to be, or to be true, on
            grounds deemed valid, though not amounting to proof; to
            believe by anticipation; to infer; as, we may presume too
            far.
  
      2. To venture, go, or act, by an assumption of leave or
            authority not granted; to go beyond what is warranted by
            the circumstances of the case; to venture beyond license;
            to take liberties; -- often with on or upon before the
            ground of confidence.
  
                     Do not presume too much upon my love. --Shak.
  
                     This man presumes upon his parts.      --Locke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presume \Pre*sume"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presumed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presuming}.] [F. pr[82]sumer, L. praesumere,
      praesumptum; prae before + sumere to take. See {Assume},
      {Redeem}.]
      1. To assume or take beforehand; esp., to do or undertake
            without leave or authority previously obtained.
  
                     Dare he presume to scorn us in this manner? --Shak.
  
                     Bold deed thou hast presumed, adventurous Eve.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief,
            without examination or proof, or on the strength of
            probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.
  
                     Every man is to be presumed innocent till he is
                     proved to be guilty.                           --Blackstone.
  
                     What rests but that the mortal sentence pass, . . .
                     Which he presumes already vain and void, Because not
                     yet inflicted?                                    --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumedly \Pre*sum"ed*ly\, adv.
      By presumption.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumer \Pre*sum"er\, n.
      One who presumes; also, an arrogant person. --Sir H. Wotton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presume \Pre*sume"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Presumed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Presuming}.] [F. pr[82]sumer, L. praesumere,
      praesumptum; prae before + sumere to take. See {Assume},
      {Redeem}.]
      1. To assume or take beforehand; esp., to do or undertake
            without leave or authority previously obtained.
  
                     Dare he presume to scorn us in this manner? --Shak.
  
                     Bold deed thou hast presumed, adventurous Eve.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief,
            without examination or proof, or on the strength of
            probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.
  
                     Every man is to be presumed innocent till he is
                     proved to be guilty.                           --Blackstone.
  
                     What rests but that the mortal sentence pass, . . .
                     Which he presumes already vain and void, Because not
                     yet inflicted?                                    --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumingly \Pre*sum"ing*ly\, adv.
      Confidently; arrogantly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumption \Pre*sump"tion\ (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F.
      pr[82]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.]
      1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence;
            the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon
            incomplete proof.
  
      2. Ground for presuming; evidence probable, but not
            conclusive; strong probability; reasonable supposition;
            as, the presumption is that an event has taken place.
  
      3. That which is presumed or assumed; that which is supposed
            or believed to be real or true, on evidence that is
            probable but not conclusive. [bd]In contradiction to these
            very plausible presumptions.[b8] --De Quincey.
  
      4. The act of venturing beyond due beyond due bounds; an
            overstepping of the bounds of reverence, respect, or
            courtesy; forward, overconfident, or arrogant opinion or
            conduct; presumptuousness; arrogance; effrontery.
  
                     Thy son I killed for his presumption. --Shak.
  
                     I had the presumption to dedicate to you a very
                     unfinished piece.                              --Dryden.
  
      {Conclusive presumption}. See under {Conclusive}.
  
      {Presumption of fact} (Law), an argument of a fact from a
            fact; an inference as to the existence of one fact not
            certainly known, from the existence of some other fact
            known or proved, founded on a previous experience of their
            connection; supposition of the truth or real existence of
            something, without direct or positive proof of the fact,
            but grounded on circumstantial or probable evidence which
            entitles it to belief. --Burrill. --Best. --Wharton.
  
      {Presumption of law} (Law), a postulate applied in advance to
            all cases of a particular class; e. g., the presumption of
            innocence and of regularity of records. Such a presumption
            is rebuttable or irrebuttable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumption \Pre*sump"tion\ (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F.
      pr[82]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.]
      1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence;
            the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon
            incomplete proof.
  
      2. Ground for presuming; evidence probable, but not
            conclusive; strong probability; reasonable supposition;
            as, the presumption is that an event has taken place.
  
      3. That which is presumed or assumed; that which is supposed
            or believed to be real or true, on evidence that is
            probable but not conclusive. [bd]In contradiction to these
            very plausible presumptions.[b8] --De Quincey.
  
      4. The act of venturing beyond due beyond due bounds; an
            overstepping of the bounds of reverence, respect, or
            courtesy; forward, overconfident, or arrogant opinion or
            conduct; presumptuousness; arrogance; effrontery.
  
                     Thy son I killed for his presumption. --Shak.
  
                     I had the presumption to dedicate to you a very
                     unfinished piece.                              --Dryden.
  
      {Conclusive presumption}. See under {Conclusive}.
  
      {Presumption of fact} (Law), an argument of a fact from a
            fact; an inference as to the existence of one fact not
            certainly known, from the existence of some other fact
            known or proved, founded on a previous experience of their
            connection; supposition of the truth or real existence of
            something, without direct or positive proof of the fact,
            but grounded on circumstantial or probable evidence which
            entitles it to belief. --Burrill. --Best. --Wharton.
  
      {Presumption of law} (Law), a postulate applied in advance to
            all cases of a particular class; e. g., the presumption of
            innocence and of regularity of records. Such a presumption
            is rebuttable or irrebuttable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumption \Pre*sump"tion\ (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F.
      pr[82]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.]
      1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence;
            the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon
            incomplete proof.
  
      2. Ground for presuming; evidence probable, but not
            conclusive; strong probability; reasonable supposition;
            as, the presumption is that an event has taken place.
  
      3. That which is presumed or assumed; that which is supposed
            or believed to be real or true, on evidence that is
            probable but not conclusive. [bd]In contradiction to these
            very plausible presumptions.[b8] --De Quincey.
  
      4. The act of venturing beyond due beyond due bounds; an
            overstepping of the bounds of reverence, respect, or
            courtesy; forward, overconfident, or arrogant opinion or
            conduct; presumptuousness; arrogance; effrontery.
  
                     Thy son I killed for his presumption. --Shak.
  
                     I had the presumption to dedicate to you a very
                     unfinished piece.                              --Dryden.
  
      {Conclusive presumption}. See under {Conclusive}.
  
      {Presumption of fact} (Law), an argument of a fact from a
            fact; an inference as to the existence of one fact not
            certainly known, from the existence of some other fact
            known or proved, founded on a previous experience of their
            connection; supposition of the truth or real existence of
            something, without direct or positive proof of the fact,
            but grounded on circumstantial or probable evidence which
            entitles it to belief. --Burrill. --Best. --Wharton.
  
      {Presumption of law} (Law), a postulate applied in advance to
            all cases of a particular class; e. g., the presumption of
            innocence and of regularity of records. Such a presumption
            is rebuttable or irrebuttable.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptive \Pre*sump"tive\, a. [Cf. F. pr[82]somptif.]
      1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable
            evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof.
  
      2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.
  
      {Presumptive evidence} (Law), that which is derived from
            circumstances which necessarily or usually attend a fact,
            as distinct from direct evidence or positive proof;
            indirect or circumstantial evidence. [bd]Presumptive
            evidence of felony should be cautiously admitted.[b8]
            --Blackstone. The distinction, however, between direct and
            presumptive (or circumstantial) evidence is now generally
            abandoned; all evidence being now more or less direct and
            more or less presumptive.
  
      {Presumptive heir}. See {Heir presumptive}, under {Heir}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptive \Pre*sump"tive\, a. [Cf. F. pr[82]somptif.]
      1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable
            evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof.
  
      2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.
  
      {Presumptive evidence} (Law), that which is derived from
            circumstances which necessarily or usually attend a fact,
            as distinct from direct evidence or positive proof;
            indirect or circumstantial evidence. [bd]Presumptive
            evidence of felony should be cautiously admitted.[b8]
            --Blackstone. The distinction, however, between direct and
            presumptive (or circumstantial) evidence is now generally
            abandoned; all evidence being now more or less direct and
            more or less presumptive.
  
      {Presumptive heir}. See {Heir presumptive}, under {Heir}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptive \Pre*sump"tive\, a. [Cf. F. pr[82]somptif.]
      1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable
            evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof.
  
      2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.
  
      {Presumptive evidence} (Law), that which is derived from
            circumstances which necessarily or usually attend a fact,
            as distinct from direct evidence or positive proof;
            indirect or circumstantial evidence. [bd]Presumptive
            evidence of felony should be cautiously admitted.[b8]
            --Blackstone. The distinction, however, between direct and
            presumptive (or circumstantial) evidence is now generally
            abandoned; all evidence being now more or less direct and
            more or less presumptive.
  
      {Presumptive heir}. See {Heir presumptive}, under {Heir}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptively \Pre*sump"tive*ly\, adv.
      By presumption, or supposition grounded or probability;
      presumably.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptuous \Pre*sump"tu*ous\ (?; 135), a. [L. praesumptuosus:
      cf. F. pr[82]somptueux, OF. also presumptuous. See
      {Presumption}.]
      1. Full of presumption; presuming; overconfident or
            venturesome; audacious; rash; taking liberties unduly;
            arrogant; insolent; as, a presumptuous commander;
            presumptuous conduct.
  
                     A class of presumptuous men, whom age has not made
                     cautious, nor adversity wise.            --Buckminster.
  
      2. Founded on presumption; as, a presumptuous idea.
            [bd]False, presumptuous hope.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. Done with hold design, rash confidence, or in violation of
            known duty; willful. [bd]Keep back the servant also from
            presumptuous sins.[b8] --Ps. xix. 13.
  
      Syn: Overconfident; foolhardy; rash; presuming; forward;
               arrogant; insolent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptuously \Pre*sump"tu*ous*ly\, adv.
      In a presumptuous manner; arrogantly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Presumptuousness \Pre*sump"tu*ous*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being presumptuous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Price \Price\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Priced}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Pricing}.]
      1. To pay the price of. [Obs.]
  
                     With thine own blood to price his blood. --Spenser.
  
      2. To set a price on; to value. See {Prize}.
  
      3. To ask the price of; as, to price eggs. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prick \Prick\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pricked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Pricking}.] [AS. prician; akin to LG. pricken, D. prikken,
      Dan. prikke, Sw. pricka. See {Prick}, n., and cf. {Prink},
      {Prig}.]
      1. To pierce slightly with a sharp-pointed instrument or
            substance; to make a puncture in, or to make by
            puncturing; to drive a fine point into; as, to prick one
            with a pin, needle, etc.; to prick a card; to prick holes
            in paper.
  
      2. To fix by the point; to attach or hang by puncturing; as,
            to prick a knife into a board. --Sir I. Newton.
  
                     The cooks prick it [a slice] on a prong of iron.
                                                                              --Sandys.
  
      3. To mark or denote by a puncture; to designate by pricking;
            to choose; to mark; -- sometimes with off.
  
                     Some who are pricked for sheriffs.      --Bacon.
  
                     Let the soldiers for duty be carefully pricked off.
                                                                              --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     Those many, then, shall die: their names are
                     pricked.                                             --Shak.
  
      4. To mark the outline of by puncturing; to trace or form by
            pricking; to mark by punctured dots; as, to prick a
            pattern for embroidery; to prick the notes of a musical
            composition. --Cowper.
  
      5. To ride or guide with spurs; to spur; to goad; to incite;
            to urge on; -- sometimes with on, or off.
  
                     Who pricketh his blind horse over the fallows.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     The season pricketh every gentle heart. --Chaucer.
  
                     My duty pricks me on to utter that.   --Shak.
  
      6. To affect with sharp pain; to sting, as with remorse.
            [bd]I was pricked with some reproof.[b8] --Tennyson.
  
                     Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their
                     heart.                                                --Acts ii. 37.
  
      7. To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as
            something pointed; -- said especially of the ears of an
            animal, as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up; --
            hence, to prick up the ears, to listen sharply; to have
            the attention and interest strongly engaged. [bd]The
            courser . . . pricks up his ears.[b8] --Dryden.
  
      8. To render acid or pungent. [Obs.] --Hudibras.
  
      9. To dress; to prink; -- usually with up. [Obs.]
  
      10. (Naut)
            (a) To run a middle seam through, as the cloth of a sail.
            (b) To trace on a chart, as a ship's course.
  
      11. (Far.)
            (a) To drive a nail into (a horse's foot), so as to cause
                  lameness.
            (b) To nick.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pricking \Prick"ing\, n.
      1. The act of piercing or puncturing with a sharp point.
            [bd]There is that speaketh like the prickings of a
            sword.[b8] --Prov. xii. 18 [1583].
  
      2. (Far.)
            (a) The driving of a nail into a horse's foot so as to
                  produce lameness.
            (b) Same as {Nicking}.
  
      3. A sensation of being pricked. --Shak.
  
      4. The mark or trace left by a hare's foot; a prick; also,
            the act of tracing a hare by its footmarks. [Obs.]
  
      5. Dressing one's self for show; prinking. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pricking-up \Prick"ing-up\, n. (Arch.)
      The first coating of plaster in work of three coats upon
      laths. Its surface is scratched once to form a better key for
      the next coat. In the United States called {scratch coat}.
      --Brande & C.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prickmadam \Prick"mad`am\, n. [F. trique-madame. Cf.
      {Tripmadam}.] (Bot.)
      A name given to several species of stonecrop, used as
      ingredients of vermifuge medicines. See {Stonecrop}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pricksong \Prick"song`\ (?; 115), n. [See {Prick}, v. t., 4.]
      Music written, or noted, with dots or points; -- so called
      from the points or dots with which it is noted down. [Obs.]
  
               He fights as you sing pricksong.            --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prig \Prig\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Prigged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Prigging}.] [A modification of prick.]
      To haggle about the price of a commodity; to bargain hard.
      [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prism \Prism\ (pr[icr]z'm), n. [L. prisma, Gr. pri`sma, fr.
      pri`zein, pri`ein, to saw: cf. F. prisme.]
      1. (Geom.) A solid whose bases or ends are any similar,
            equal, and parallel plane figures, and whose sides are
            parallelograms.
  
      Note: Prisms of different forms are often named from the
               figure of their bases; as, a triangular prism, a
               quadrangular prism, a rhombic prism, etc.
  
      2. (Opt.) A transparent body, with usually three rectangular
            plane faces or sides, and two equal and parallel
            triangular ends or bases; -- used in experiments on
            refraction, dispersion, etc.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) A form the planes of which are parallel to
            the vertical axis. See {Form}, n., 13.
  
      {Achromatic prism} (Opt.), a prism composed usually of two
            prisms of different transparent substances which have
            unequal dispersive powers, as two different kinds of
            glass, especially flint glass and crown glass, the
            difference of dispersive power being compensated by giving
            them different refracting angles, so that, when placed
            together so as to have opposite relative positions, a ray
            of light passed through them is refracted or bent into a
            new position, but is free from color.
  
      {Nicol's prism}, {Nicol prism}. [So called from Wm. Nicol, of
            Edinburgh, who first proposed it.] (Opt.) An instrument
            for experiments in polarization, consisting of a rhomb of
            Iceland spar, which has been bisected obliquely at a
            certain angle, and the two parts again joined with
            transparent cement, so that the ordinary image produced by
            double refraction is thrown out of the field by total
            reflection from the internal cemented surface, and the
            extraordinary, or polarized, image alone is transmitted.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prism glass \Prism glass\
      Glass with one side smooth and the other side formed into
      sharp-edged ridges so as to reflect the light that passes
      through, used at windows to throw the light into the
      interior.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Teinoscope \Tei"no*scope\, n. [Gr. [?] to extend + -scope.]
      (Physics)
      An instrument formed by combining prisms so as to correct the
      chromatic aberration of the light while linear dimensions of
      objects seen through the prisms are increased or diminished;
      -- called also {prism telescope}. --Sir D. Brewster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telescope \Tel"e*scope\, n. [Gr. [?] viewing afar, farseeing;
      [?] far, far off + [?] a watcher, akin to [?] to view: cf. F.
      t[82]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and {-scope}.]
      An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the
      heavenly bodies.
  
      Note: A telescope assists the eye chiefly in two ways; first,
               by enlarging the visual angle under which a distant
               object is seen, and thus magnifying that object; and,
               secondly, by collecting, and conveying to the eye, a
               larger beam of light than would enter the naked organ,
               thus rendering objects distinct and visible which would
               otherwise be indistinct and or invisible. Its essential
               parts are the object glass, or concave mirror, which
               collects the beam of light, and forms an image of the
               object, and the eyeglass, which is a microscope, by
               which the image is magnified.
  
      {Achromatic telescope}. See under {Achromatic}.
  
      {Aplanatic telescope}, a telescope having an aplanatic
            eyepiece.
  
      {Astronomical telescope}, a telescope which has a simple
            eyepiece so constructed or used as not to reverse the
            image formed by the object glass, and consequently
            exhibits objects inverted, which is not a hindrance in
            astronomical observations.
  
      {Cassegrainian telescope}, a reflecting telescope invented by
            Cassegrain, which differs from the Gregorian only in
            having the secondary speculum convex instead of concave,
            and placed nearer the large speculum. The Cassegrainian
            represents objects inverted; the Gregorian, in their
            natural position. The Melbourne telescope (see Illust.
            under {Reflecting telescope}, below) is a Cassegrainian
            telescope.
  
      {Dialytic telescope}. See under {Dialytic}.
  
      {Equatorial telescope}. See the Note under {Equatorial}.
  
      {Galilean telescope}, a refracting telescope in which the
            eyeglass is a concave instead of a convex lens, as in the
            common opera glass. This was the construction originally
            adopted by Galileo, the inventor of the instrument. It
            exhibits the objects erect, that is, in their natural
            positions.
  
      {Gregorian telescope}, a form of reflecting telescope. See
            under {Gregorian}.
  
      {Herschelian telescope}, a reflecting telescope of the form
            invented by Sir William Herschel, in which only one
            speculum is employed, by means of which an image of the
            object is formed near one side of the open end of the
            tube, and to this the eyeglass is applied directly.
  
      {Newtonian telescope}, a form of reflecting telescope. See
            under {Newtonian}.
  
      {Photographic telescope}, a telescope specially constructed
            to make photographs of the heavenly bodies.
  
      {Prism telescope}. See {Teinoscope}.
  
      {Reflecting telescope}, a telescope in which the image is
            formed by a speculum or mirror (or usually by two
            speculums, a large one at the lower end of the telescope,
            and the smaller one near the open end) instead of an
            object glass. See {Gregorian, Cassegrainian, Herschelian,
            [and] Newtonian, telescopes}, above.
  
      {Refracting telescope}, a telescope in which the image is
            formed by refraction through an object glass.
  
      {Telescope carp} (Zo[94]l.), the telescope fish.
  
      {Telescope fish} (Zo[94]l.), a monstrous variety of the
            goldfish having very protuberant eyes.
  
      {Telescope fly} (Zo[94]l.), any two-winged fly of the genus
            {Diopsis}, native of Africa and Asia. The telescope flies
            are remarkable for having the eyes raised on very long
            stalks.
  
      {Telescope shell} (Zo[94]l.), an elongated gastropod
            ({Cerithium telescopium}) having numerous flattened
            whorls.
  
      {Telescope sight} (Firearms), a slender telescope attached to
            the barrel, having cross wires in the eyepiece and used as
            a sight.
  
      {Terrestrial telescope}, a telescope whose eyepiece has one
            or two lenses more than the astronomical, for the purpose
            of inverting the image, and exhibiting objects erect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Teinoscope \Tei"no*scope\, n. [Gr. [?] to extend + -scope.]
      (Physics)
      An instrument formed by combining prisms so as to correct the
      chromatic aberration of the light while linear dimensions of
      objects seen through the prisms are increased or diminished;
      -- called also {prism telescope}. --Sir D. Brewster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Telescope \Tel"e*scope\, n. [Gr. [?] viewing afar, farseeing;
      [?] far, far off + [?] a watcher, akin to [?] to view: cf. F.
      t[82]lescope. See {Telegraph}, and {-scope}.]
      An optical instrument used in viewing distant objects, as the
      heavenly bodies.
  
      Note: A telescope assists the eye chiefly in two ways; first,
               by enlarging the visual angle under which a distant
               object is seen, and thus magnifying that object; and,
               secondly, by collecting, and conveying to the eye, a
               larger beam of light than would enter the naked organ,
               thus rendering objects distinct and visible which would
               otherwise be indistinct and or invisible. Its essential
               parts are the object glass, or concave mirror, which
               collects the beam of light, and forms an image of the
               object, and the eyeglass, which is a microscope, by
               which the image is magnified.
  
      {Achromatic telescope}. See under {Achromatic}.
  
      {Aplanatic telescope}, a telescope having an aplanatic
            eyepiece.
  
      {Astronomical telescope}, a telescope which has a simple
            eyepiece so constructed or used as not to reverse the
            image formed by the object glass, and consequently
            exhibits objects inverted, which is not a hindrance in
            astronomical observations.
  
      {Cassegrainian telescope}, a reflecting telescope invented by
            Cassegrain, which differs from the Gregorian only in
            having the secondary speculum convex instead of concave,
            and placed nearer the large speculum. The Cassegrainian
            represents objects inverted; the Gregorian, in their
            natural position. The Melbourne telescope (see Illust.
            under {Reflecting telescope}, below) is a Cassegrainian
            telescope.
  
      {Dialytic telescope}. See under {Dialytic}.
  
      {Equatorial telescope}. See the Note under {Equatorial}.
  
      {Galilean telescope}, a refracting telescope in which the
            eyeglass is a concave instead of a convex lens, as in the
            common opera glass. This was the construction originally
            adopted by Galileo, the inventor of the instrument. It
            exhibits the objects erect, that is, in their natural
            positions.
  
      {Gregorian telescope}, a form of reflecting telescope. See
            under {Gregorian}.
  
      {Herschelian telescope}, a reflecting telescope of the form
            invented by Sir William Herschel, in which only one
            speculum is employed, by means of which an image of the
            object is formed near one side of the open end of the
            tube, and to this the eyeglass is applied directly.
  
      {Newtonian telescope}, a form of reflecting telescope. See
            under {Newtonian}.
  
      {Photographic telescope}, a telescope specially constructed
            to make photographs of the heavenly bodies.
  
      {Prism telescope}. See {Teinoscope}.
  
      {Reflecting telescope}, a telescope in which the image is
            formed by a speculum or mirror (or usually by two
            speculums, a large one at the lower end of the telescope,
            and the smaller one near the open end) instead of an
            object glass. See {Gregorian, Cassegrainian, Herschelian,
            [and] Newtonian, telescopes}, above.
  
      {Refracting telescope}, a telescope in which the image is
            formed by refraction through an object glass.
  
      {Telescope carp} (Zo[94]l.), the telescope fish.
  
      {Telescope fish} (Zo[94]l.), a monstrous variety of the
            goldfish having very protuberant eyes.
  
      {Telescope fly} (Zo[94]l.), any two-winged fly of the genus
            {Diopsis}, native of Africa and Asia. The telescope flies
            are remarkable for having the eyes raised on very long
            stalks.
  
      {Telescope shell} (Zo[94]l.), an elongated gastropod
            ({Cerithium telescopium}) having numerous flattened
            whorls.
  
      {Telescope sight} (Firearms), a slender telescope attached to
            the barrel, having cross wires in the eyepiece and used as
            a sight.
  
      {Terrestrial telescope}, a telescope whose eyepiece has one
            or two lenses more than the astronomical, for the purpose
            of inverting the image, and exhibiting objects erect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cleavage \Cleav"age\, n.
      1. The act of cleaving or splitting.
  
      2. (Crystallog.) The quality possessed by many crystallized
            substances of splitting readily in one or more definite
            directions, in which the cohesive attraction is a minimum,
            affording more or less smooth surfaces; the direction of
            the dividing plane; a fragment obtained by cleaving, as of
            a diamond. See {Parting}.
  
      3. (Geol.) Division into lamin[91], like slate, with the
            lamination not necessarily parallel to the plane of
            deposition; -- usually produced by pressure.
  
      {Basal cleavage}, cleavage parallel to the base of a crystal,
            or to the plane of the lateral axes.
  
      {Cell cleavage} (Biol.), multiplication of cells by fission.
            See {Segmentation}.
  
      {Cubic cleavage}, cleavage parallel to the faces of a cube.
           
  
      {Diagonal cleavage}, cleavage parallel to ta diagonal plane.
           
  
      {Egg clavage}. (Biol.) See {Segmentation}.
  
      {Lateral cleavage}, cleavage parallel to the lateral planes.
           
  
      {Octahedral, Dodecahedral, [or] Rhombohedral, {cleavage},
            cleavage parallel to the faces of an octahedron,
            dodecahedron, or rhombohedron.
  
      {Prismatic cleavage}, cleavage parallel to a vertical prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spectrum \Spec"trum\, n.; pl. {Spectra}. [L. See {Specter}.]
      1. An apparition; a specter. [Obs.]
  
      2. (Opt.)
            (a) The several colored and other rays of which light is
                  composed, separated by the refraction of a prism or
                  other means, and observed or studied either as spread
                  out on a screen, by direct vision, by photography, or
                  otherwise. See Illust. of {Light}, and {Spectroscope}.
            (b) A luminous appearance, or an image seen after the eye
                  has been exposed to an intense light or a strongly
                  illuminated object. When the object is colored, the
                  image appears of the complementary color, as a green
                  image seen after viewing a red wafer lying on white
                  paper. Called also {ocular spectrum}.
  
      {Absorption spectrum}, the spectrum of light which has passed
            through a medium capable of absorbing a portion of the
            rays. It is characterized by dark spaces, bands, or lines.
           
  
      {Chemical spectrum}, a spectrum of rays considered solely
            with reference to their chemical effects, as in
            photography. These, in the usual photogrophic methods,
            have their maximum influence at and beyond the violet
            rays, but are not limited to this region.
  
      {Chromatic spectrum}, the visible colored rays of the solar
            spectrum, exhibiting the seven principal colors in their
            order, and covering the central and larger portion of the
            space of the whole spectrum.
  
      {Continous spectrum}, a spectrum not broken by bands or
            lines, but having the colors shaded into each other
            continously, as that from an incandescent solid or liquid,
            or a gas under high pressure.
  
      {Diffraction spectrum}, a spectrum produced by diffraction,
            as by a grating.
  
      {Gaseous spectrum}, the spectrum of an incandesoent gas or
            vapor, under moderate, or especially under very low,
            pressure. It is characterized by bright bands or lines.
  
      {Normal spectrum}, a representation of a spectrum arranged
            upon conventional plan adopted as standard, especially a
            spectrum in which the colors are spaced proportionally to
            their wave lengths, as when formed by a diffraction
            grating.
  
      {Ocular spectrum}. See {Spectrum}, 2
            (b), above.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum}, a spectrum produced by means of a
            prism.
  
      {Solar spectrum}, the spectrum of solar light, especially as
            thrown upon a screen in a darkened room. It is
            characterized by numerous dark lines called Fraunhofer
            lines.
  
      {Spectrum analysis}, chemical analysis effected by comparison
            of the different relative positions and qualities of the
            fixed lines of spectra produced by flames in which
            different substances are burned or evaporated, each
            substance having its own characteristic system of lines.
           
  
      {Thermal spectrum}, a spectrum of rays considered solely with
            reference to their heating effect, especially of those
            rays which produce no luminous phenomena.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatic \Pris*mat"ic\, Prismatical \Pris*mat"ic*al\, a. [Cf.
      F. prismatique.]
      1. Resembling, or pertaining to, a prism; as, a prismatic
            form or cleavage.
  
      2. Separated or distributed by a prism; formed by a prism;
            as, prismatic colors.
  
      3. (Crystallog.) Same as {Orthorhombic}.
  
      {Prismatic borax} (Chem.), borax crystallized in the form of
            oblique prisms, with ten molecules of water; --
            distinguished from octahedral borax.
  
      {Prismatic colors} (Opt.), the seven colors into which light
            is resolved when passed through a prism; primary colors.
            See {Primary colors}, under {Color}.
  
      {Prismatic compass} (Surv.), a compass having a prism for
            viewing a distant object and the compass card at the same
            time.
  
      {Prismatic spectrum} (Opt.), the spectrum produced by the
            passage of light through a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatically \Pris*mat"ic*al*ly\, adv.
      In the form or manner of a prism; by means of a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismatoidal \Pris`ma*toid"al\, a. [Gr. [?], [?], prism + -oid:
      F. prismato[8b]de.]
      Having a prismlike form. --Ure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismoid \Pris"moid\ (pr[icr]z"moid), n. [Cf. F. prismto[8b]de.]
      A body that approaches to the form of a prism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismoidal \Pris*moid"al\, a.
      Having the form of a prismoid; as, prismoidal solids.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prismy \Pris"my\, a.
      Pertaining to a prism. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prisoned}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Prisoning}.]
      1. To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to
            confine; to restrain from liberty.
  
                     The prisoned eagle dies for rage.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     His true respect will prison false desire. --Shak.
  
      2. To bind (together); to enchain. [Obs.]
  
                     Sir William Crispyn with the duke was led Together
                     prisoned.                                          --Robert of
                                                                              Brunne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      5. (Chem.) The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a
            substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the
            latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides
            of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain
            organic bodies resembling them in their property of
            forming salts with acids.
  
      6. (Pharmacy) The chief ingredient in a compound.
  
      7. (Dyeing) A substance used as a mordant. --Ure.
  
      8. (Fort.) The exterior side of the polygon, or that
            imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two
            adjacent bastions.
  
      9. (Geom.) The line or surface constituting that part of a
            figure on which it is supposed to stand.
  
      10. (Math.) The number from which a mathematical table is
            constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.
  
      11. [See {Base} low.] A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.)
            (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice.
            (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.
                  [Now commonly written {bass}.]
  
                           The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      12. (Mil.) A place or tract of country, protected by
            fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the
            operations of an army proceed, forward movements are
            made, supplies are furnished, etc.
  
      13. (Mil.) The smallest kind of cannon. [Obs.]
  
      14. (Zo[94]l.) That part of an organ by which it is attached
            to another more central organ.
  
      15. (Crystallog.) The basal plane of a crystal.
  
      16. (Geol.) The ground mass of a rock, especially if not
            distinctly crystalline.
  
      17. (Her.) The lower part of the field. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      18. The housing of a horse. [Obs.]
  
      19. pl. A kind of skirt ( often of velvet or brocade, but
            sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to
            about the knees, or lower. [Obs.]
  
      20. The lower part of a robe or petticoat. [Obs.]
  
      21. An apron. [Obs.] [bd]Bakers in their linen bases.[b8]
            --Marston.
  
      22. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting
            place or a goal in various games.
  
                     To their appointed base they went.   --Dryden.
  
      23. (Surv.) A line in a survey which, being accurately
            determined in length and position, serves as the origin
            from which to compute the distances and positions of any
            points or objects connected with it by a system of
            triangles. --Lyman.
  
      24. A rustic play; -- called also {prisoner's base}, {prison
            base}, or {bars}. [bd]To run the country base.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      25. (Baseball) Any one of the four bounds which mark the
            circuit of the infield.
  
      {Altern base}. See under {Altern}.
  
      {Attic base}. (Arch.) See under {Attic}.
  
      {Base course}. (Arch.)
            (a) The first or lower course of a foundation wall, made
                  of large stones of a mass of concrete; -- called also
                  {foundation course}.
            (b) The architectural member forming the transition
                  between the basement and the wall above.
  
      {Base hit} (Baseball), a hit, by which the batsman, without
            any error on the part of his opponents, is able to reach
            the first base without being put out.
  
      {Base line}.
            (a) A main line taken as a base, as in surveying or in
                  military operations.
            (b) A line traced round a cannon at the rear of the vent.
                 
  
      {Base plate}, the foundation plate of heavy machinery, as of
            the steam engine; the bed plate.
  
      {Base ring} (Ordnance), a projecting band of metal around the
            breech, connected with the body of the gun by a concave
            molding. --H. L. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      5. (Chem.) The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a
            substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the
            latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides
            of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain
            organic bodies resembling them in their property of
            forming salts with acids.
  
      6. (Pharmacy) The chief ingredient in a compound.
  
      7. (Dyeing) A substance used as a mordant. --Ure.
  
      8. (Fort.) The exterior side of the polygon, or that
            imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two
            adjacent bastions.
  
      9. (Geom.) The line or surface constituting that part of a
            figure on which it is supposed to stand.
  
      10. (Math.) The number from which a mathematical table is
            constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.
  
      11. [See {Base} low.] A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.)
            (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice.
            (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.
                  [Now commonly written {bass}.]
  
                           The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      12. (Mil.) A place or tract of country, protected by
            fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the
            operations of an army proceed, forward movements are
            made, supplies are furnished, etc.
  
      13. (Mil.) The smallest kind of cannon. [Obs.]
  
      14. (Zo[94]l.) That part of an organ by which it is attached
            to another more central organ.
  
      15. (Crystallog.) The basal plane of a crystal.
  
      16. (Geol.) The ground mass of a rock, especially if not
            distinctly crystalline.
  
      17. (Her.) The lower part of the field. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      18. The housing of a horse. [Obs.]
  
      19. pl. A kind of skirt ( often of velvet or brocade, but
            sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to
            about the knees, or lower. [Obs.]
  
      20. The lower part of a robe or petticoat. [Obs.]
  
      21. An apron. [Obs.] [bd]Bakers in their linen bases.[b8]
            --Marston.
  
      22. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting
            place or a goal in various games.
  
                     To their appointed base they went.   --Dryden.
  
      23. (Surv.) A line in a survey which, being accurately
            determined in length and position, serves as the origin
            from which to compute the distances and positions of any
            points or objects connected with it by a system of
            triangles. --Lyman.
  
      24. A rustic play; -- called also {prisoner's base}, {prison
            base}, or {bars}. [bd]To run the country base.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      25. (Baseball) Any one of the four bounds which mark the
            circuit of the infield.
  
      {Altern base}. See under {Altern}.
  
      {Attic base}. (Arch.) See under {Attic}.
  
      {Base course}. (Arch.)
            (a) The first or lower course of a foundation wall, made
                  of large stones of a mass of concrete; -- called also
                  {foundation course}.
            (b) The architectural member forming the transition
                  between the basement and the wall above.
  
      {Base hit} (Baseball), a hit, by which the batsman, without
            any error on the part of his opponents, is able to reach
            the first base without being put out.
  
      {Base line}.
            (a) A main line taken as a base, as in surveying or in
                  military operations.
            (b) A line traced round a cannon at the rear of the vent.
                 
  
      {Base plate}, the foundation plate of heavy machinery, as of
            the steam engine; the bed plate.
  
      {Base ring} (Ordnance), a projecting band of metal around the
            breech, connected with the body of the gun by a concave
            molding. --H. L. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Limit \Lim"it\ (l[icr]m"[icr]t), n. [From L. limes, limitis: cf.
      F. limite; or from E. limit, v. See {Limit}, v. t.]
      1. That which terminates, circumscribes, restrains, or
            confines; the bound, border, or edge; the utmost extent;
            as, the limit of a walk, of a town, of a country; the
            limits of human knowledge or endeavor.
  
                     As eager of the chase, the maid Beyond the forest's
                     verdant limits strayed.                     --Pope.
  
      2. The space or thing defined by limits.
  
                     The archdeacon hath divided it Into three limits
                     very equally.                                    --Shak.
  
      3. That which terminates a period of time; hence, the period
            itself; the full time or extent.
  
                     The dateless limit of thy dear exile. --Shak.
  
                     The limit of your lives is out.         --Shak.
  
      4. A restriction; a check; a curb; a hindrance.
  
                     I prithee, give no limits to my tongue. --Shak.
  
      5. (Logic & Metaph.) A determining feature; a distinguishing
            characteristic; a differentia.
  
      6. (Math.) A determinate quantity, to which a variable one
            continually approaches, and may differ from it by less
            than any given difference, but to which, under the law of
            variation, the variable can never become exactly
            equivalent.
  
      {Elastic limit}. See under {Elastic}.
  
      {Prison limits}, a definite extent of space in or around a
            prison, within which a prisoner has liberty to go and
            come.
  
      Syn: Boundary; border; edge; termination; restriction; bound;
               confine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\ (?; 277), n. [F., fr. L. prehensio, prensio, a
      seizing, arresting, fr. prehendre, prendere, to lay hold of,
      to seize. See {Prehensile}, and cf. {Prize}, n.,
      {Misprision}.]
      1. A place where persons are confined, or restrained of
            personal liberty; hence, a place or state o[?]
            confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
  
                     Bring my soul out of prison, that I may praise thy
                     name.                                                --Ps. cxlii.
                                                                              7.
  
                     The tyrant [92]olus, . . . With power imperial,
                     curbs the struggling winds, And sounding tempests in
                     dark prisons binds.                           --Dryden.
  
      2. Specifically, a building for the safe custody or
            confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful
            authority.
  
      {Prison bars}, [or] {Prison base}. See {Base}, n., 24.
  
      {Prison breach}. (Law) See Note under 3d {Escape}, n., 4.
  
      {Prison house}, a prison. --Shak.
  
      {Prison ship} (Naut.), a ship fitted up for the confinement
            of prisoners.
  
      {Prison van}, a carriage in which prisoners are conveyed to
            and from prison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yard \Yard\, n. [OE. yard, yerd, AS. geard; akin to OFries.
      garda garden, OS. gardo garden, gard yard, D. gaard garden,
      G. garten, OHG. garto garden, gari inclosure, Icel. gar[edh]r
      yard, house, Sw. g[86]rd, Dan. gaard, Goth. gards a house,
      garda sheepfold, L. hortus garden, Gr. cho`rtos an inclosure.
      Cf. {Court}, {Garden}, {Garth}, {Horticulture}, {Orchard}.]
      1. An inclosure; usually, a small inclosed place in front of,
            or around, a house or barn; as, a courtyard; a cowyard; a
            barnyard.
  
                     A yard . . . inclosed all about with sticks In which
                     she had a cock, hight chanticleer.      --Chaucer.
  
      2. An inclosure within which any work or business is carried
            on; as, a dockyard; a shipyard.
  
      {Liberty of the yard}, a liberty, granted to persons
            imprisoned for debt, of walking in the yard, or within any
            other limits prescribed by law, on their giving bond not
            to go beyond those limits.
  
      {Prison yard}, an inclosure about a prison, or attached to
            it.
  
      {Yard grass} (Bot.), a low-growing grass ({Eleusine Indica})
            having digitate spikes. It is common in dooryards, and
            like places, especially in the Southern United States.
            Called also {crab grass}.
  
      {Yard of land}. See {Yardland}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prisoned}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Prisoning}.]
      1. To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to
            confine; to restrain from liberty.
  
                     The prisoned eagle dies for rage.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     His true respect will prison false desire. --Shak.
  
      2. To bind (together); to enchain. [Obs.]
  
                     Sir William Crispyn with the duke was led Together
                     prisoned.                                          --Robert of
                                                                              Brunne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prisoner \Pris"on*er\, n. [F. prisonnier.]
      1. One who is confined in a prison. --Piers Plowman.
  
      2. A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in prison or
            not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive;
            as, a prisoner at the bar of a court. --Bouvier.
  
                     Prisoner of Hope thou art, -- look up and sing.
                                                                              --Keble.
  
      {Prisoner's base}. See {Base}, n., 24.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prisoner \Pris"on*er\, n. [F. prisonnier.]
      1. One who is confined in a prison. --Piers Plowman.
  
      2. A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in prison or
            not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive;
            as, a prisoner at the bar of a court. --Bouvier.
  
                     Prisoner of Hope thou art, -- look up and sing.
                                                                              --Keble.
  
      {Prisoner's base}. See {Base}, n., 24.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      5. (Chem.) The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a
            substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the
            latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides
            of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain
            organic bodies resembling them in their property of
            forming salts with acids.
  
      6. (Pharmacy) The chief ingredient in a compound.
  
      7. (Dyeing) A substance used as a mordant. --Ure.
  
      8. (Fort.) The exterior side of the polygon, or that
            imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two
            adjacent bastions.
  
      9. (Geom.) The line or surface constituting that part of a
            figure on which it is supposed to stand.
  
      10. (Math.) The number from which a mathematical table is
            constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.
  
      11. [See {Base} low.] A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.)
            (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice.
            (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.
                  [Now commonly written {bass}.]
  
                           The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      12. (Mil.) A place or tract of country, protected by
            fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the
            operations of an army proceed, forward movements are
            made, supplies are furnished, etc.
  
      13. (Mil.) The smallest kind of cannon. [Obs.]
  
      14. (Zo[94]l.) That part of an organ by which it is attached
            to another more central organ.
  
      15. (Crystallog.) The basal plane of a crystal.
  
      16. (Geol.) The ground mass of a rock, especially if not
            distinctly crystalline.
  
      17. (Her.) The lower part of the field. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      18. The housing of a horse. [Obs.]
  
      19. pl. A kind of skirt ( often of velvet or brocade, but
            sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to
            about the knees, or lower. [Obs.]
  
      20. The lower part of a robe or petticoat. [Obs.]
  
      21. An apron. [Obs.] [bd]Bakers in their linen bases.[b8]
            --Marston.
  
      22. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting
            place or a goal in various games.
  
                     To their appointed base they went.   --Dryden.
  
      23. (Surv.) A line in a survey which, being accurately
            determined in length and position, serves as the origin
            from which to compute the distances and positions of any
            points or objects connected with it by a system of
            triangles. --Lyman.
  
      24. A rustic play; -- called also {prisoner's base}, {prison
            base}, or {bars}. [bd]To run the country base.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      25. (Baseball) Any one of the four bounds which mark the
            circuit of the infield.
  
      {Altern base}. See under {Altern}.
  
      {Attic base}. (Arch.) See under {Attic}.
  
      {Base course}. (Arch.)
            (a) The first or lower course of a foundation wall, made
                  of large stones of a mass of concrete; -- called also
                  {foundation course}.
            (b) The architectural member forming the transition
                  between the basement and the wall above.
  
      {Base hit} (Baseball), a hit, by which the batsman, without
            any error on the part of his opponents, is able to reach
            the first base without being put out.
  
      {Base line}.
            (a) A main line taken as a base, as in surveying or in
                  military operations.
            (b) A line traced round a cannon at the rear of the vent.
                 
  
      {Base plate}, the foundation plate of heavy machinery, as of
            the steam engine; the bed plate.
  
      {Base ring} (Ordnance), a projecting band of metal around the
            breech, connected with the body of the gun by a concave
            molding. --H. L. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prisoner \Pris"on*er\, n. [F. prisonnier.]
      1. One who is confined in a prison. --Piers Plowman.
  
      2. A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in prison or
            not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive;
            as, a prisoner at the bar of a court. --Bouvier.
  
                     Prisoner of Hope thou art, -- look up and sing.
                                                                              --Keble.
  
      {Prisoner's base}. See {Base}, n., 24.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      5. (Chem.) The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a
            substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the
            latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides
            of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain
            organic bodies resembling them in their property of
            forming salts with acids.
  
      6. (Pharmacy) The chief ingredient in a compound.
  
      7. (Dyeing) A substance used as a mordant. --Ure.
  
      8. (Fort.) The exterior side of the polygon, or that
            imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two
            adjacent bastions.
  
      9. (Geom.) The line or surface constituting that part of a
            figure on which it is supposed to stand.
  
      10. (Math.) The number from which a mathematical table is
            constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.
  
      11. [See {Base} low.] A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.)
            (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice.
            (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.
                  [Now commonly written {bass}.]
  
                           The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      12. (Mil.) A place or tract of country, protected by
            fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the
            operations of an army proceed, forward movements are
            made, supplies are furnished, etc.
  
      13. (Mil.) The smallest kind of cannon. [Obs.]
  
      14. (Zo[94]l.) That part of an organ by which it is attached
            to another more central organ.
  
      15. (Crystallog.) The basal plane of a crystal.
  
      16. (Geol.) The ground mass of a rock, especially if not
            distinctly crystalline.
  
      17. (Her.) The lower part of the field. See {Escutcheon}.
  
      18. The housing of a horse. [Obs.]
  
      19. pl. A kind of skirt ( often of velvet or brocade, but
            sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to
            about the knees, or lower. [Obs.]
  
      20. The lower part of a robe or petticoat. [Obs.]
  
      21. An apron. [Obs.] [bd]Bakers in their linen bases.[b8]
            --Marston.
  
      22. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting
            place or a goal in various games.
  
                     To their appointed base they went.   --Dryden.
  
      23. (Surv.) A line in a survey which, being accurately
            determined in length and position, serves as the origin
            from which to compute the distances and positions of any
            points or objects connected with it by a system of
            triangles. --Lyman.
  
      24. A rustic play; -- called also {prisoner's base}, {prison
            base}, or {bars}. [bd]To run the country base.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      25. (Baseball) Any one of the four bounds which mark the
            circuit of the infield.
  
      {Altern base}. See under {Altern}.
  
      {Attic base}. (Arch.) See under {Attic}.
  
      {Base course}. (Arch.)
            (a) The first or lower course of a foundation wall, made
                  of large stones of a mass of concrete; -- called also
                  {foundation course}.
            (b) The architectural member forming the transition
                  between the basement and the wall above.
  
      {Base hit} (Baseball), a hit, by which the batsman, without
            any error on the part of his opponents, is able to reach
            the first base without being put out.
  
      {Base line}.
            (a) A main line taken as a base, as in surveying or in
                  military operations.
            (b) A line traced round a cannon at the rear of the vent.
                 
  
      {Base plate}, the foundation plate of heavy machinery, as of
            the steam engine; the bed plate.
  
      {Base ring} (Ordnance), a projecting band of metal around the
            breech, connected with the body of the gun by a concave
            molding. --H. L. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prison \Pris"on\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prisoned}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Prisoning}.]
      1. To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to
            confine; to restrain from liberty.
  
                     The prisoned eagle dies for rage.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     His true respect will prison false desire. --Shak.
  
      2. To bind (together); to enchain. [Obs.]
  
                     Sir William Crispyn with the duke was led Together
                     prisoned.                                          --Robert of
                                                                              Brunne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prisonment \Pris"on*ment\, n.
      Imprisonment. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prize \Prize\, n. [F. prise a seizing, hold, grasp, fr. pris, p.
      p. of prendre to take, L. prendere, prehendere; in some
      senses, as 2
      (b), either from, or influenced by, F. prix price. See
            {Prison}, {Prehensile}, and cf. {Pry}, and also {Price}.]
  
      1. That which is taken from another; something captured; a
            thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power.
  
                     I will depart my pris, or may prey, by deliberation.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     His own prize, Whom formerly he had in battle won.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. Hence, specifically;
            (a) (Law) Anything captured by a belligerent using the
                  rights of war; esp., property captured at sea in
                  virtue of the rights of war, as a vessel. --Kent.
                  --Brande & C.
            (b) An honor or reward striven for in a competitive
                  contest; anything offered to be competed for, or as an
                  inducement to, or reward of, effort.
  
                           I'll never wrestle for prize more. --Shak.
  
                           I fought and conquered, yet have lost the prize.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (c) That which may be won by chance, as in a lottery.
  
      3. Anything worth striving for; a valuable possession held or
            in prospect.
  
                     I press toward the mark for the prize of the high
                     calling of God in Christ Jesus.         --Phil. iii.
                                                                              14.
  
      4. A contest for a reward; competition. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      5. A lever; a pry; also, the hold of a lever. [Written also
            {prise}.]
  
      {Prize court}, a court having jurisdiction of all captures
            made in war on the high seas. --Bouvier.
  
      {Prize fight}, an exhibition contest, esp. one of pugilists,
            for a stake or wager.
  
      {Prize fighter}, one who fights publicly for a reward; --
            applied esp. to a professional boxer or pugilist. --Pope.
  
      {Prize fighting}, fighting, especially boxing, in public for
            a reward or wager.
  
      {Prize master}, an officer put in charge or command of a
            captured vessel.
  
      {Prize medal}, a medal given as a prize.
  
      {Prize money}, a dividend from the proceeds of a captured
            vessel, etc., paid to the captors.
  
      {Prize ring}, the ring or inclosure for a prize fight; the
            system and practice of prize fighting.
  
      {To make prize of}, to capture. --Hawthorne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prize \Prize\, n. [F. prise a seizing, hold, grasp, fr. pris, p.
      p. of prendre to take, L. prendere, prehendere; in some
      senses, as 2
      (b), either from, or influenced by, F. prix price. See
            {Prison}, {Prehensile}, and cf. {Pry}, and also {Price}.]
  
      1. That which is taken from another; something captured; a
            thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power.
  
                     I will depart my pris, or may prey, by deliberation.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     His own prize, Whom formerly he had in battle won.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. Hence, specifically;
            (a) (Law) Anything captured by a belligerent using the
                  rights of war; esp., property captured at sea in
                  virtue of the rights of war, as a vessel. --Kent.
                  --Brande & C.
            (b) An honor or reward striven for in a competitive
                  contest; anything offered to be competed for, or as an
                  inducement to, or reward of, effort.
  
                           I'll never wrestle for prize more. --Shak.
  
                           I fought and conquered, yet have lost the prize.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (c) That which may be won by chance, as in a lottery.
  
      3. Anything worth striving for; a valuable possession held or
            in prospect.
  
                     I press toward the mark for the prize of the high
                     calling of God in Christ Jesus.         --Phil. iii.
                                                                              14.
  
      4. A contest for a reward; competition. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      5. A lever; a pry; also, the hold of a lever. [Written also
            {prise}.]
  
      {Prize court}, a court having jurisdiction of all captures
            made in war on the high seas. --Bouvier.
  
      {Prize fight}, an exhibition contest, esp. one of pugilists,
            for a stake or wager.
  
      {Prize fighter}, one who fights publicly for a reward; --
            applied esp. to a professional boxer or pugilist. --Pope.
  
      {Prize fighting}, fighting, especially boxing, in public for
            a reward or wager.
  
      {Prize master}, an officer put in charge or command of a
            captured vessel.
  
      {Prize medal}, a medal given as a prize.
  
      {Prize money}, a dividend from the proceeds of a captured
            vessel, etc., paid to the captors.
  
      {Prize ring}, the ring or inclosure for a prize fight; the
            system and practice of prize fighting.
  
      {To make prize of}, to capture. --Hawthorne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prize \Prize\, n. [F. prise a seizing, hold, grasp, fr. pris, p.
      p. of prendre to take, L. prendere, prehendere; in some
      senses, as 2
      (b), either from, or influenced by, F. prix price. See
            {Prison}, {Prehensile}, and cf. {Pry}, and also {Price}.]
  
      1. That which is taken from another; something captured; a
            thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power.
  
                     I will depart my pris, or may prey, by deliberation.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     His own prize, Whom formerly he had in battle won.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. Hence, specifically;
            (a) (Law) Anything captured by a belligerent using the
                  rights of war; esp., property captured at sea in
                  virtue of the rights of war, as a vessel. --Kent.
                  --Brande & C.
            (b) An honor or reward striven for in a competitive
                  contest; anything offered to be competed for, or as an
                  inducement to, or reward of, effort.
  
                           I'll never wrestle for prize more. --Shak.
  
                           I fought and conquered, yet have lost the prize.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (c) That which may be won by chance, as in a lottery.
  
      3. Anything worth striving for; a valuable possession held or
            in prospect.
  
                     I press toward the mark for the prize of the high
                     calling of God in Christ Jesus.         --Phil. iii.
                                                                              14.
  
      4. A contest for a reward; competition. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      5. A lever; a pry; also, the hold of a lever. [Written also
            {prise}.]
  
      {Prize court}, a court having jurisdiction of all captures
            made in war on the high seas. --Bouvier.
  
      {Prize fight}, an exhibition contest, esp. one of pugilists,
            for a stake or wager.
  
      {Prize fighter}, one who fights publicly for a reward; --
            applied esp. to a professional boxer or pugilist. --Pope.
  
      {Prize fighting}, fighting, especially boxing, in public for
            a reward or wager.
  
      {Prize master}, an officer put in charge or command of a
            captured vessel.
  
      {Prize medal}, a medal given as a prize.
  
      {Prize money}, a dividend from the proceeds of a captured
            vessel, etc., paid to the captors.
  
      {Prize ring}, the ring or inclosure for a prize fight; the
            system and practice of prize fighting.
  
      {To make prize of}, to capture. --Hawthorne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prizeman \Prize"man\, n.; pl. {Prizemen}.
      The winner of a prize.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prizeman \Prize"man\, n.; pl. {Prizemen}.
      The winner of a prize.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prize \Prize\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prized}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Prizing}.] [F. priser, OF. prisier, preisier, fr. L.
      pretiare, fr. pretium worth, value, price. See {Price}, and
      cf. {Praise}.] [Formerly written also {prise}. ]
      1. To set or estimate the value of; to appraise; to price; to
            rate.
  
                     A goodly price that I was prized at.   --Zech. xi.
                                                                              13.
  
                     I prize it [life] not a straw, but for mine honor.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To value highly; to estimate to be of great worth; to
            esteem. [bd][I] do love, prize, honor you. [b8] --Shak.
  
                     I prized your person, but your crown disdain.
                                                                              --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prizing \Priz"ing\, n. [See 2d {Prize}.]
      The application of a lever to move any weighty body, as a
      cask, anchor, cannon, car, etc. See {Prize}, n., 5.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Pro \[d8]Pro\, prep. [L.; akin to prae before, Gr. [?], and E.
      for. See {For}, prep., and cf. {Prior}, a.]
      A Latin preposition signifying for, before, forth.
  
      {Pro confesso} [L.] (Law), taken as confessed. The action of
            a court of equity on that portion of the pleading in a
            particular case which the pleading on the other side does
            not deny.
  
      {Pro rata}. [L. See {Prorate}.] In proportion; proportion.
  
      {Pro re nata} [L.] (Law), for the existing occasion; as
            matters are.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prochein \Pro"chein\, a. [F. prochain, fr. L. (assumed)
      proximanus, fr. proximus.]
      Next; nearest.
  
      {Prochein ami} [or] {amy}(Law), the next friend. See under
            {Next}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prochein \Pro"chein\, a. [F. prochain, fr. L. (assumed)
      proximanus, fr. proximus.]
      Next; nearest.
  
      {Prochein ami} [or] {amy}(Law), the next friend. See under
            {Next}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Procinct \Pro*cinct"\, n. [L. procinctus, fr. procingere,
      procinctum, to gird up.]
      A state of complete readiness for action. [Obs.] [bd]War in
      procinct.[b8] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proconsul \Pro*con"sul\, n. [L., fr. pro for + consul consul.]
      (Rom. Antiq.)
      An officer who discharged the duties of a consul without
      being himself consul; a governor of, or a military commander
      in, a province. He was usually one who had previously been
      consul.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proconsular \Pro*con"su*lar\, Proconsulary \Pro*con"su*la*ry\,
      a. [L. proconsularis: cf. F. proconsulaire.]
      1. Of or pertaining of a proconsul; as, proconsular powers.
  
      2. Under the government of a proconsul; as, a proconsular
            province.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proconsular \Pro*con"su*lar\, Proconsulary \Pro*con"su*la*ry\,
      a. [L. proconsularis: cf. F. proconsulaire.]
      1. Of or pertaining of a proconsul; as, proconsular powers.
  
      2. Under the government of a proconsul; as, a proconsular
            province.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proconsulate \Pro*con"su*late\, n. [L. proconsulatus: cf. F.
      proconsulat.]
      The office jurisdiction of a proconsul, or the term of his
      office.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proconsulship \Pro*con"sul*ship\, n.
      Proconsulate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Procumbent \Pro*cum"bent\, a. [L. procumbens, -entis, p. pr. of
      procumbere to fall, bend, or lean forward; pro forward +
      cumbere (in comp.), akin to cubare to lie down: cf. F.
      procombant. Cf. {Incumbent}.]
      1. Lying down, or on the face; prone. [bd] Procumbent each
            obeyed.[b8] --Cowper.
  
      2. (Bot.) Lying on the ground, but without putting forth
            roots; trailing; prostrate; as, a procumbent stem.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Procyon \Pro"cy*on\, n. [L., a constellation which rises before
      the Dog Star, Gr. [?]; [?] before + [?] a dog. ]
      1. (Astron.) A star of the first magnitude in the
            constellation Canis Minor, or the Little Dog.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A genus of mammals including the raccoon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Agouara \[d8]A*gou"a*ra\, n. [Native name.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The crab-eating raccoon ({Procyon cancrivorus}), found in the
      tropical parts of America.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Raccoon \Rac*coon"\, n. [F. raton, prop., a little rat, fr. rat
      rat, perhaps of German origin. See {Rat}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A North American nocturnal carnivore ({Procyon lotor}) allied
      to the bears, but much smaller, and having a long, full tail,
      banded with black and gray. Its body is gray, varied with
      black and white. Called also {coon}, and {mapach}.
  
      {Raccoon dog} (Zo[94]l.), the tanate.
  
      {Raccoon fox} (Zo[94]l.), the cacomixle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proeguminal \Pro`e*gu"mi*nal\, a. [Gr. [?], p. pr. of [?] to
      lead the way: cf. F. pro[82]gum[8a]ne.] (Med.)
      Serving to predispose; predisposing; as, a proeguminal cause
      of disease.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progenerate \Pro*gen"er*ate\, v. t. [L. progeneratus, p. p. of
      progenerare to beget; pro forth, forward + generare to
      generate.]
      To beget; to generate; to produce; to procreate; as, to
      progenerate a race. [R.] --Landor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progeneration \Pro*gen`er*a"tion\, n. [L. progeneratio.]
      The act of begetting; propagation. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progenitor \Pro*gen"i*tor\, n. [OF. progeniteur, L. progenitor,
      fr. progignere, progenitum, to bring forth, to beget; pro
      forth + gignere to beget. See {Gender} kind.]
      An ancestor in the direct line; a forefather.
  
               And reverence thee their great progenitor. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progenitorship \Pro*gen"i*tor*ship\, n.
      The state of being a progenitor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progenitress \Pro*gen"i*tress\, n.
      A female progenitor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progeniture \Pro*gen"i*ture\, n. [F. prog[82]niture.]
      A begetting, or birth. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progeny \Prog"e*ny\, n. [OE. progenie, F. prog[82]nie, fr. L.
      progenies, fr. progignere. See {Progenitor}.]
      Descendants of the human kind, or offspring of other animals;
      children; offspring; race, lineage. [bd] Issued from the
      progeny of kings.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prog \Prog\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Progged}. p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Progging}.] [Cf. D. prachen, G. prachern, Dan. prakke, Sw.
      pracka, to beg, L. procare, procari, to ask, demand, and E.
      prowl.]
      1. To wander about and beg; to seek food or other supplies by
            low arts; to seek for advantage by mean shift or tricks.
            [Low]
  
                     A perfect artist in progging for money. --Fuller.
  
                     I have been endeavoring to prog for you. --Burke.
  
      2. To steal; to rob; to filch. [Low] --Johnson.
  
      3. To prick; to goad; to progue. [Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognathic \Prog*nath"ic\, a. (Anat.)
      Prognathous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognathism \Prog"na*thism\, n. (Anat.)
      Projection of the jaws. -- {Prog"na*thy}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognathous \Prog"na*thous\, a. [Gr. [?] before + [?] the jaw]
      (Anat.)
      Having the jaws projecting beyond the upper part of the face;
      -- opposed to orthognathous. See {Gnathic index}, under
      {Gnathic}.
  
               Their countenances had the true prognathous character.
                                                                              --Kane.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognathism \Prog"na*thism\, n. (Anat.)
      Projection of the jaws. -- {Prog"na*thy}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Progne \Prog"ne\, n. [L., a swallow, traditionally said to be
      fr. Progne (The sister of Philomela), who was changed into a
      swallow, Gr. [?].] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A swallow.
      (b) A genus of swallows including the purple martin. See
            {Martin}.
      (c) An American butterfly ({Polygonia, [or] Vanessa,
            Progne}). It is orange and black above, grayish beneath,
            with an L-shaped silver mark on the hind wings. Called
            also {gray comma}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martin \Mar"tin\, n. [F. martin, from the proper name Martin.
      Cf. {Martlet}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of swallows, usually having the tail
      less deeply forked than the tail of the common swallows.
      [Written also {marten}.]
  
      Note: The American purple martin, or bee martin ({Progne
               subis, [or] purpurea}), and the European house, or
               window, martin ({Hirundo, [or] Chelidon, urbica}), are
               the best known species.
  
      {Bank martin}.
      (a) The bank swallow. See under {Bank}.
      (b) The fairy martin. See under {Fairy}.
  
      {Bee martin}.
      (a) The purple martin.
      (b) The kingbird.
  
      {Sand martin}, the bank swallow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosis \Prog*no"sis\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?], fr. [?] to know
      beforehand; [?] before + [?] to know. See {Know}.] (Med.)
      The act or art of foretelling the course and termination of a
      disease; also, the outlook afforded by this act of judgment;
      as, the prognosis of hydrophobia is bad.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognostic \Prog*nos"tic\, a. [Gr. [?]. See {Prognosis}.]
      Indicating something future by signs or symptoms;
      foreshowing; aiding in prognosis; as, the prognostic symptoms
      of a disease; prognostic signs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognostic \Prog*nos"tic\, n. [L. prognosticum, Gr. [?]: cf. F.
      pronostic, prognostic. See {Prognostic}, a.]
      1. That which prognosticates; a sign by which a future event
            may be known or foretold; an indication; a sign or omen;
            hence, a foretelling; a prediction.
  
                     That choice would inevitably be considered by the
                     country as a prognostic of the highest import.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      2. (Med.) A sign or symptom indicating the course and
            termination of a disease. --Parr.
  
      Syn: Sign; omen; presage; token; indication.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognostic \Prog*nos"tic\, v. t.
      To prognosticate. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosticable \Prog*nos"tic*a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being prognosticated or foretold. --Sir T. Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosticate \Prog*nos"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Prognosticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prognosticating}.] [See
      {Prognostic}.]
      To indicate as future; to foretell from signs or symptoms; to
      prophesy; to foreshow; to predict; as, to prognosticate evil.
      --Burke.
  
               I neither will nor can prognosticate To the young
               gaping heir his father's fate.               --Dryden.
  
      Syn: To foreshow; foretoken; betoken; forebode; presage;
               predict; prophesy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosticate \Prog*nos"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Prognosticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prognosticating}.] [See
      {Prognostic}.]
      To indicate as future; to foretell from signs or symptoms; to
      prophesy; to foreshow; to predict; as, to prognosticate evil.
      --Burke.
  
               I neither will nor can prognosticate To the young
               gaping heir his father's fate.               --Dryden.
  
      Syn: To foreshow; foretoken; betoken; forebode; presage;
               predict; prophesy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosticate \Prog*nos"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Prognosticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prognosticating}.] [See
      {Prognostic}.]
      To indicate as future; to foretell from signs or symptoms; to
      prophesy; to foreshow; to predict; as, to prognosticate evil.
      --Burke.
  
               I neither will nor can prognosticate To the young
               gaping heir his father's fate.               --Dryden.
  
      Syn: To foreshow; foretoken; betoken; forebode; presage;
               predict; prophesy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognostication \Prog*nos`ti*ca"tion\, n. [Cf. F.
      prognostication.]
      1. The act of foreshowing or foretelling something future by
            present signs; prediction.
  
      2. That which foreshows; a foretoken. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prognosticator \Prog*nos"ti*ca`tor\, n.
      One who prognosticates; a foreknower or foreteller of a
      future course or event by present signs. --Isa. xlvii. 13.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pro \Pro\, adv.
      For, on, or in behalf of, the affirmative side; -- in
      contrast with {con}.
  
      {Pro and con}, for and against, on the affirmative and on the
            negative side; as, they debated the question pro and con;
            -- formerly used also as a verb.
  
      {Pros and cons}, the arguments or reasons on either side.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proscenium \Pro*sce"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Proscenia}. [L., fr. Gr.
      [?]; [?] before + [?] a tent, a wooden stage, the stage. See
      {Scene}.]
      1. (Anc. Theater) The part where the actors performed; the
            stage.
  
      2. (Modern Theater) The part of the stage in front of the
            curtain; sometimes, the curtain and its framework.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proscenium \Pro*sce"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Proscenia}. [L., fr. Gr.
      [?]; [?] before + [?] a tent, a wooden stage, the stage. See
      {Scene}.]
      1. (Anc. Theater) The part where the actors performed; the
            stage.
  
      2. (Modern Theater) The part of the stage in front of the
            curtain; sometimes, the curtain and its framework.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proseman \Prose"man\, n.
      A writer of prose. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proseminary \Pro*sem"i*na*ry\, n.
      A seminary which prepares pupils for a higher institution.
      --T. Warton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosemination \Pro*sem`i*na"tion\, n. [L. proseminare,
      proseminatum, to disseminate.]
      Propagation by seed. [Obs.] --Sir M. Hale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosencephalic \Pros*en`ce*phal"ic\, a. (Anat.)
      Of or pertaining to the prosencephalon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosencephalon \Pros`en*ceph"a*lon\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?]
      toward, near to + E. encephalon.] [Sometimes abbreviated to
      proen.] (Anat.)
      (a) The anterior segment of the brain, including the cerebrum
            and olfactory lobes; the forebrain.
      (b) The cerebrum. --Huxley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosenchyma \Pros*en"chy*ma\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] near +
      -enchyma, as in parenchyma.] (Bot.)
      A general term applied to the tissues formed of elongated
      cells, especially those with pointed or oblique extremities,
      as the principal cells of ordinary wood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosimetrical \Pros`i*met"ric*al\, a. [Prose + metrical.]
      Consisting both of prose and verse. --Clarke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosiness \Pros"i*ness\, n.
      The quality or state of being prosy; tediousness;
      tiresomeness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prose \Prose\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prosed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Prosing}.]
      1. To write in prose.
  
      2. To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosing \Pros"ing\, n.
      Writing prose; speaking or writing in a tedious or prosy
      manner. --Sir W. Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Prosingly \Pros"ing*ly\, adv.
      Prosily.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Prosoma \[d8]Pro*so"ma\, n.; pl. {Prosomata}. [NL., fr. Gr.
      [?] before + [?], [?], body.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The anterior of the body of an animal, as of a cephalopod;
      the thorax of an arthropod.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nol-pros \Nol`-pros"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {-prossed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {-prossing}.]
      To discontinue by entering a nolle prosequi; to decline to
      prosecute.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proxene \Prox"ene\, n. [Cf. [?]; [?] before + [?] a guest,
      stranger: cf. F. prox[8a]ne.] (Gr. Antiq.)
      An officer who had the charge of showing hospitality to those
      who came from a friendly city or state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proxenet \Prox"e*net\, n. [L. proxeneta, Gr. [?].]
      A negotiator; a factor. [R.] --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proxenetism \Prox`e*ne"tism\, n. [Gr. [?] agent + -ism; cf. F.
      prox[82]n[82]tisme.]
      The action of a go-between or broker in negotiating immoral
      bargains between the sexes; procuring.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximad \Prox"i*mad\, adv. [Proximal + L. ad to.] (Anat.)
      Toward a proximal part; on the proximal side of; proximally.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximal \Prox"i*mal\, a.
      1. Toward or nearest, as to a body, or center of motion of
            dependence; proximate.
  
      2. (Biol.)
            (a) Situated near the point of attachment or origin; as,
                  the proximal part of a limb.
            (b) Of or pertaining to that which is proximal; as, the
                  proximal bones of a limb. Opposed to {distal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximally \Prox"i*mal*ly\, adv. (Anat.)
      On or toward a proximal part; proximad.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximate \Prox"i*mate\, a. [L. proximatus, p. p. of proximare
      to come near, to approach, fr. proximus the nearest, nest,
      superl. of propior nearer, and prope, adv., near.]
      Nearest; next immediately preceding or following.
      [bd]Proximate ancestors.[b8] --J. S. Harford.
  
               The proximate natural causes of it [the deluge]. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
      {Proximate analysis} (Chem.), an analysis which determines
            the proximate principles of any substance, as contrasted
            with an ultimate analysis.
  
      {Proximate cause}.
      (a) A cause which immediately precedes and produces the
            effect, as distinguished from the remote, mediate, or
            predisposing cause. --I. Watts.
      (b) That which in ordinary natural sequence produces a
            specific result, no independent disturbing agencies
            intervening.
  
      {Proximate principle} (Physiol. Chem.), one of a class of
            bodies existing ready formed in animal and vegetable
            tissues, and separable by chemical analysis, as albumin,
            sugar, collagen, fat, etc.
  
      Syn: Nearest; next; closest; immediate; direct.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Analysis \A*nal"y*sis\, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. [?], fr. [?] to
      unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; [?] up +
      [?] to loose. See {Loose}.]
      1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses
            or of the intellect, into its constituent or original
            elements; an examination of the component parts of a
            subject, each separately, as the words which compose a
            sentence, the tones of a tune, or the simple propositions
            which enter into an argument. It is opposed to
            {synthesis}.
  
      2. (Chem.) The separation of a compound substance, by
            chemical processes, into its constituents, with a view to
            ascertain either (a) what elements it contains, or (b) how
            much of each element is present. The former is called
            {qualitative}, and the latter {quantitative analysis}.
  
      3. (Logic) The tracing of things to their source, and the
            resolving of knowledge into its original principles.
  
      4. (Math.) The resolving of problems by reducing the
            conditions that are in them to equations.
  
      5.
            (a) A syllabus, or table of the principal heads of a
                  discourse, disposed in their natural order.
            (b) A brief, methodical illustration of the principles of
                  a science. In this sense it is nearly synonymous with
                  synopsis.
  
      6. (Nat. Hist.) The process of ascertaining the name of a
            species, or its place in a system of classification, by
            means of an analytical table or key.
  
      {Ultimate}, {Proximate}, {Qualitative}, {Quantitative}, and
      {Volumetric analysis}. (Chem.) See under {Ultimate},
            {Proximate}, {Qualitative}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximate \Prox"i*mate\, a. [L. proximatus, p. p. of proximare
      to come near, to approach, fr. proximus the nearest, nest,
      superl. of propior nearer, and prope, adv., near.]
      Nearest; next immediately preceding or following.
      [bd]Proximate ancestors.[b8] --J. S. Harford.
  
               The proximate natural causes of it [the deluge]. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
      {Proximate analysis} (Chem.), an analysis which determines
            the proximate principles of any substance, as contrasted
            with an ultimate analysis.
  
      {Proximate cause}.
      (a) A cause which immediately precedes and produces the
            effect, as distinguished from the remote, mediate, or
            predisposing cause. --I. Watts.
      (b) That which in ordinary natural sequence produces a
            specific result, no independent disturbing agencies
            intervening.
  
      {Proximate principle} (Physiol. Chem.), one of a class of
            bodies existing ready formed in animal and vegetable
            tissues, and separable by chemical analysis, as albumin,
            sugar, collagen, fat, etc.
  
      Syn: Nearest; next; closest; immediate; direct.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximate \Prox"i*mate\, a. [L. proximatus, p. p. of proximare
      to come near, to approach, fr. proximus the nearest, nest,
      superl. of propior nearer, and prope, adv., near.]
      Nearest; next immediately preceding or following.
      [bd]Proximate ancestors.[b8] --J. S. Harford.
  
               The proximate natural causes of it [the deluge]. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
      {Proximate analysis} (Chem.), an analysis which determines
            the proximate principles of any substance, as contrasted
            with an ultimate analysis.
  
      {Proximate cause}.
      (a) A cause which immediately precedes and produces the
            effect, as distinguished from the remote, mediate, or
            predisposing cause. --I. Watts.
      (b) That which in ordinary natural sequence produces a
            specific result, no independent disturbing agencies
            intervening.
  
      {Proximate principle} (Physiol. Chem.), one of a class of
            bodies existing ready formed in animal and vegetable
            tissues, and separable by chemical analysis, as albumin,
            sugar, collagen, fat, etc.
  
      Syn: Nearest; next; closest; immediate; direct.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cause \Cause\ (k[add]z), n. [F. cause, fr. L. causa. Cf.
      {Cause}, v., {Kickshaw}.]
      1. That which produces or effects a result; that from which
            anything proceeds, and without which it would not exist.
  
                     Cause is substance exerting its power into act, to
                     make one thing begin to be.               --Locke.
  
      2. That which is the occasion of an action or state; ground;
            reason; motive; as, cause for rejoicing.
  
      3. Sake; interest; advantage. [Obs.]
  
                     I did it not for his cause.               --2 Cor. vii.
                                                                              12.
  
      4. (Law) A suit or action in court; any legal process by
            which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he
            regards as his right; case; ground of action.
  
      5. Any subject of discussion or debate; matter; question;
            affair in general.
  
                     What counsel give you in this weighty cause! --Shak.
  
      6. The side of a question, which is espoused, advocated, and
            upheld by a person or party; a principle which is
            advocated; that which a person or party seeks to attain.
  
                     God befriend us, as our cause is just. --Shak.
  
                     The part they take against me is from zeal to the
                     cause.                                                --Burke.
  
      {Efficient cause}, the agent or force that produces a change
            or result.
  
      {Final cause}, the end, design, or object, for which anything
            is done.
  
      {Formal cause}, the elements of a conception which make the
            conception or the thing conceived to be what it is; or the
            idea viewed as a formative principle and co[94]perating
            with the matter.
  
      {Material cause}, that of which anything is made.
  
      {Proximate cause}. See under {Proximate}.
  
      {To make common cause with}, to join with in purposes and
            aims. --Macaulay.
  
      Syn: Origin; source; mainspring; motive; reason; incitement;
               inducement; purpose; object; suit; action.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximate \Prox"i*mate\, a. [L. proximatus, p. p. of proximare
      to come near, to approach, fr. proximus the nearest, nest,
      superl. of propior nearer, and prope, adv., near.]
      Nearest; next immediately preceding or following.
      [bd]Proximate ancestors.[b8] --J. S. Harford.
  
               The proximate natural causes of it [the deluge]. --T.
                                                                              Burnet.
  
      {Proximate analysis} (Chem.), an analysis which determines
            the proximate principles of any substance, as contrasted
            with an ultimate analysis.
  
      {Proximate cause}.
      (a) A cause which immediately precedes and produces the
            effect, as distinguished from the remote, mediate, or
            predisposing cause. --I. Watts.
      (b) That which in ordinary natural sequence produces a
            specific result, no independent disturbing agencies
            intervening.
  
      {Proximate principle} (Physiol. Chem.), one of a class of
            bodies existing ready formed in animal and vegetable
            tissues, and separable by chemical analysis, as albumin,
            sugar, collagen, fat, etc.
  
      Syn: Nearest; next; closest; immediate; direct.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximately \Prox"i*mate*ly\, adv.
      In a proximate manner, position, or degree; immediately.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proxime \Prox"ime\, a. [L. proximus. See {Proximate}.]
      Next; immediately preceding or following. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proximious \Prox*im"i*ous\, a.
      Proximate. [Obs.]