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   N. Y. Stock Exchange
         n 1: a stock exchange in New York [syn: {New York Stock
               Exchange}, {N. Y. Stock Exchange}, {NYSE}, {big board}]

English Dictionary: Nichtigkeitssanktion by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Najadaceae
n
  1. monotypic family of aquatic plants having narrow leaves and small flowers
    Synonym(s): Naiadaceae, family Naiadaceae, Najadaceae, family Najadaceae, naiad family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
naked as a jaybird
adj
  1. (used informally) completely unclothed [syn: {bare- assed}, bare-ass, in the altogether, in the buff, in the raw, raw, peeled, naked as a jaybird, stark naked]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
naked as the day one was born
adj
  1. as naked as at birth [syn: mother-naked, {naked as the day one was born}, naked as the day you were born, in one's birthday suit, in your birthday suit]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
naked as the day you were born
adj
  1. as naked as at birth [syn: mother-naked, {naked as the day one was born}, naked as the day you were born, in one's birthday suit, in your birthday suit]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
NASDAQ
n
  1. a computerized data system to provide brokers with price quotations for securities traded over the counter
    Synonym(s): National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations, NASDAQ
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
NCDC
n
  1. the part of NOAA that maintains the world's largest active archive of weather data
    Synonym(s): National Climatic Data Center, NCDC
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
neostigmine
n
  1. a cholinergic drug (trade name Prostigmin) used to treat some ophthalmic conditions and to treat myasthenia gravis
    Synonym(s): neostigmine, Prostigmin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nest egg
n
  1. a fund of money put by as a reserve [syn: savings, {nest egg}]
  2. device consisting of an artificial egg left in a nest to induce hens to lay their eggs in it
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night club
n
  1. a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club"
    Synonym(s): cabaret, nightclub, night club, club, nightspot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night court
n
  1. a criminal court (in large cities) that sits at night
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night game
n
  1. a game played under artificial illumination at night [ant: day game]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night jasmine
n
  1. West Indian evergreen shrub having clusters of funnel- shaped yellow-white flowers that are fragrant by night
    Synonym(s): night jasmine, night jessamine, Cestrum nocturnum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night jessamine
n
  1. West Indian evergreen shrub having clusters of funnel- shaped yellow-white flowers that are fragrant by night
    Synonym(s): night jasmine, night jessamine, Cestrum nocturnum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night school
n
  1. a school that holds classes in the evenings for students who cannot attend during the day
    Antonym(s): day school
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night shift
n
  1. the work shift during the night (as midnight to 8 a.m.)
    Synonym(s): night shift, graveyard shift
  2. workers who work during the night (as midnight to 8 a.m.)
    Synonym(s): night shift, graveyard shift
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night snake
n
  1. nocturnal prowler of western United States and Mexico [syn: night snake, Hypsiglena torquata]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night soil
n
  1. human excreta used as fertilizer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night-sight
n
  1. the ability to see in reduced illumination (as in moonlight)
    Synonym(s): night vision, night-sight, scotopic vision, twilight vision
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
night-stop
n
  1. a break in a journey for the night
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightcap
n
  1. an alcoholic drink taken at bedtime; often alcoholic
  2. a cloth cap worn in bed
  3. the final game of a double header
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightclothes
n
  1. garments designed to be worn in bed [syn: nightwear, sleepwear, nightclothes]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightclub
n
  1. a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club"
    Synonym(s): cabaret, nightclub, night club, club, nightspot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightcrawler
n
  1. terrestrial worm that burrows into and helps aerate soil; often surfaces when the ground is cool or wet; used as bait by anglers
    Synonym(s): earthworm, angleworm, fishworm, fishing worm, wiggler, nightwalker, nightcrawler, crawler, dew worm, red worm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightgown
n
  1. lingerie consisting of a loose dress designed to be worn in bed by women
    Synonym(s): nightgown, gown, nightie, night- robe, nightdress
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nighthawk
n
  1. a person who likes to be active late at night [syn: {night owl}, nighthawk, nightbird]
  2. mainly nocturnal North American goatsucker
    Synonym(s): nighthawk, bullbat, mosquito hawk
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightjar
n
  1. mainly crepuscular or nocturnal nonpasserine birds with mottled greyish-brown plumage and large eyes; feed on insects
    Synonym(s): goatsucker, nightjar, caprimulgid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightshade
n
  1. any of numerous shrubs or herbs or vines of the genus Solanum; most are poisonous though many bear edible fruit
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightshirt
n
  1. nightclothes worn by men
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightspot
n
  1. a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club"
    Synonym(s): cabaret, nightclub, night club, club, nightspot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nightstick
n
  1. a short stout club used primarily by policemen [syn: truncheon, nightstick, baton, billy, billystick, billy club]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nikita Khrushchev
n
  1. Soviet statesman and premier who denounced Stalin (1894-1971)
    Synonym(s): Khrushchev, Nikita Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
n
  1. Soviet statesman and premier who denounced Stalin (1894-1971)
    Synonym(s): Khrushchev, Nikita Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nostoc
n
  1. found in moist places as rounded jellylike colonies
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nostocaceae
n
  1. blue-green algae
    Synonym(s): Nostocaceae, family Nostocaceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
noughts and crosses
n
  1. a game in which two players alternately put crosses and circles in one of the compartments of a square grid of nine spaces; the object is to get a row of three crosses or three circles before the opponent does
    Synonym(s): ticktacktoe, ticktacktoo, tick-tack-toe, tic-tac-toe, tit-tat- toe, noughts and crosses
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nyctaginaceae
n
  1. a family of flowering plants of the order Caryophyllales
    Synonym(s): Nyctaginaceae, family Nyctaginaceae, Allioniaceae, family Allioniaceae, four-o'clock family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nyctaginia
n
  1. a caryophyllaceous genus of the family Nyctaginaceae having only one species
    Synonym(s): Nyctaginia, genus Nyctaginia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nyctaginia capitata
n
  1. viscid branched perennial of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico having tuberous roots and deep red flowers
    Synonym(s): scarlet musk flower, Nyctaginia capitata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nycticebus
n
  1. a genus of Lorisidae [syn: Nycticebus, {genus Nycticebus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nycticebus pygmaeus
n
  1. stocky lemur of southeastern Asia [syn: slow loris, Nycticebus tardigradua, Nycticebus pygmaeus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nycticebus tardigradua
n
  1. stocky lemur of southeastern Asia [syn: slow loris, Nycticebus tardigradua, Nycticebus pygmaeus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nycticorax
n
  1. Old World night herons [syn: Nycticorax, {genus Nycticorax}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Nycticorax nycticorax
n
  1. night heron of both Old and New Worlds [syn: {black-crowned night heron}, Nycticorax nycticorax]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
nystagmus
n
  1. involuntary movements of the eyeballs; its presence or absence is used to diagnose a variety of neurological and visual disorders
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nasty \Nas"ty\, a. [Compar. {Nastier}; superl. {Nastiest}.] [For
      older nasky; cf. dial. Sw. naskug, nasket.]
      1. Offensively filthy; very dirty, foul, or defiled;
            disgusting; nauseous.
  
      2. Hence, loosely: Offensive; disagreeable; unpropitious;
            wet; drizzling; as, a nasty rain, day, sky.
  
      3. Characterized by obcenity; indecent; indelicate; gross;
            filthy.
  
      Syn: {Nasty}, {Filthy}, {Foul}, {Dirty}.
  
      Usage: Anything nasty is usually wet or damp as well as
                  filthy or dirty, and disgusts by its stickness or
                  odor; but filthy and foul imply that a thing is filled
                  or covered with offensive matter, while dirty
                  describes it as defiled or sullied with dirt of any
                  kind; as, filthy clothing, foul vapors, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Naughty \Naugh"ty\, a. [Compar. {Naughtier}; superl.
      {Naughtiest}.]
      1. Having little or nothing. [Obs.]
  
                     [Men] that needy be and naughty, help them with thy
                     goods.                                                --Piers
                                                                              Plowman.
  
      2. Worthless; bad; good for nothing. [Obs.]
  
                     The other basket had very naughty figs. --Jer. xxiv.
                                                                              2.
  
      3. hence, corrupt; wicked. [Archaic]
  
                     So shines a good deed in a naughty world. --Shak.
  
      4. Mischievous; perverse; froward; guilty of disobedient or
            improper conduct; as, a naughty child.
  
      Note: This word is now seldom used except in the latter
               sense, as applied to children, or in sportive censure.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nectocalyx \[d8]Nec`to*ca"lyx\, n.; pl. {Nectocalyces}. [NL.,
      fr. gr. [?] swimming + [?] a calyx.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The swimming bell or umbrella of a jellyfish of medusa.
      (b) One of the zooids of certain Siphonophora, having
            somewhat the form, and the essential structure, of the
            bell of a jellyfish, and acting as a swimming organ.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nectosac \Nec"to*sac\, Nectosack \Nec"to*sack\, n. [Gr. [?]
      swimming + E. sac, sack.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The cavity of a nectocalyx.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nectosac \Nec"to*sac\, Nectosack \Nec"to*sack\, n. [Gr. [?]
      swimming + E. sac, sack.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The cavity of a nectocalyx.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nectostem \Nec"to*stem\, n. [Gr. [?] swimming + E. stem.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      That portion of the axis which bears the nectocalyces in the
      Siphonophora.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Negotiosity \Ne*go`ti*os"i*ty\, n. [L. negotiositas.]
      The state of being busy; multitude of business. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Negotious \Ne*go"tious\, a. [L. negotiosus.]
      Very busy; attentive to business; active. [R.] --D. Rogers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Negotiousness \Ne*go"tious*ness\, n.
      The state of being busily occupied; activity. [R.] --D.
      Rogers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nest \Nest\, n. [AS. nest; akin to D. & G. nest, Sw. n[84]ste,
      L. nidus, for nisdus, Skr. n[c6][?]a resting place, nest; cf.
      Lith. lizdas, Arm. neiz, Gael. & Ir. nead. Prob. from the
      particle ni down, Skr. ni + the root of E. sit, and thus
      orig., a place to sit down in. [root] 264. See {Nether}, and
      {Sit}, and cf. {Eyas}, {Nidification}, {Nye}.]
      1. The bed or receptacle prepared by a fowl for holding her
            eggs and for hatching and rearing her young.
  
                     The birds of the air have nests.         --Matt. viii.
                                                                              20.
  
      2. Hence: the place in which the eggs of other animals, as
            insects, turtles, etc., are laid and hatched; a snug place
            in which young animals are reared. --Bentley.
  
      3. A snug, comfortable, or cozy residence or situation; a
            retreat, or place of habitual resort; hence, those who
            occupy a nest, frequent a haunt, or are associated in the
            same pursuit; as, a nest of traitors; a nest of bugs.
  
                     A little cottage, like some poor man's nest.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      4. (Geol.) An aggregated mass of any ore or mineral, in an
            isolated state, within a rock.
  
      5. A collection of boxes, cases, or the like, of graduated
            size, each put within the one next larger.
  
      6. (Mech.) A compact group of pulleys, gears, springs, etc.,
            working together or collectively.
  
      {Nest egg}, an egg left in the nest to prevent the hen from
            forsaking it, and to induce her to lay more in the same
            place; hence, figuratively, something laid up as the
            beginning of a fund or collection. --Hudibras.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trehala \Tre*ha"la\, n. (Chem.)
      An amorphous variety of manna obtained from the nests and
      cocoons of a Syrian coleopterous insect ({Larinus maculatus},
      {L. nidificans}, etc.) which feeds on the foliage of a
      variety of thistle. It is used as an article of food, and is
      called also {nest sugar}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nicety \Ni"ce*ty\, n.; pl. {Niceties}. [OE. nicet[82]
      foolishness.]
      1. The quality or state of being nice (in any of the senses
            of that word.).
  
                     The miller smiled of her nicety.         --Chaucer.
  
      2. Delicacy or exactness of perception; minuteness of
            observation or of discrimination; precision.
  
      3. A delicate expression, act, mode of treatment,
            distinction, or the like; a minute distinction.
  
                     The fineness and niceties of words.   --Locke.
  
      {To a nicety}, with great exactness or accuracy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lobster \Lob"ster\, n. [AS. loppestre, lopystre prob., corrupted
      fr. L. locusta a marine shellfish, a kind of lobster, a
      locust. Cf. {Locust}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any large macrurous crustacean used as food, esp. those of
      the genus {Homarus}; as the American lobster ({H.
      Americanus}), and the European lobster ({H. vulgaris}). The
      Norwegian lobster ({Nephrops Norvegicus}) is similar in form.
      All these have a pair of large unequal claws. The spiny
      lobsters of more southern waters, belonging to {Palinurus},
      {Panulirus}, and allied genera, have no large claws. The
      fresh-water crayfishes are sometimes called lobsters.
  
      {Lobster caterpillar} (Zo[94]l.), the caterpillar of a
            European bombycid moth ({Stauropus fagi}); -- so called
            from its form.
  
      {Lobster louse} (Zo[94]l.), a copepod crustacean
            ({Nicotho[89] astaci}) parasitic on the gills of the
            European lobster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nicotic \Ni*cot"ic\, a. (Chem.)
      Nicotinic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eve \Eve\, n. [See {Even}, n.]
      1. Evening. [Poetic]
  
                     Winter oft, at eve resumes the breeze. --Thomson.
  
      2. The evening before a holiday, -- from the Jewish mode of
            reckoning the day as beginning at sunset. not at midnight;
            as, Christians eve is the evening before Christmas; also,
            the period immediately preceding some important event.
            [bd]On the eve of death.[b8] --Keble.
  
      {Eve churr} (Zo[94]l), the European goatsucker or nightjar;
            -- called also {night churr}, and {churr owl}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eve \Eve\, n. [See {Even}, n.]
      1. Evening. [Poetic]
  
                     Winter oft, at eve resumes the breeze. --Thomson.
  
      2. The evening before a holiday, -- from the Jewish mode of
            reckoning the day as beginning at sunset. not at midnight;
            as, Christians eve is the evening before Christmas; also,
            the period immediately preceding some important event.
            [bd]On the eve of death.[b8] --Keble.
  
      {Eve churr} (Zo[94]l), the European goatsucker or nightjar;
            -- called also {night churr}, and {churr owl}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Iodine \I"o*dine\ (?; 104), n. [Gr. [?] violetlike; [?] a violet
      + [?] form: cf. F. iode, iodine. The name was given from the
      violet color of its vapor. See {Violet}, {Idyl}.] (Chem.)
      A nonmetallic element, of the halogen group, occurring always
      in combination, as in the iodides. When isolated it is in the
      form of dark gray metallic scales, resembling plumbago, soft
      but brittle, and emitting a chlorinelike odor. Symbol I.
      Atomic weight 126.5. If heated, iodine volatilizes in
      beautiful violet vapors.
  
      Note: Iodine was formerly obtained from the ashes of seaweed
               (kelp or varec), but is now also extracted from certain
               natural brines. In the free state, iodine, even in very
               minute quantities, colors starch blue. Iodine and its
               compounds are largely used in medicine (as in
               liniments, antisyphilitics, etc.), in photography, in
               the preparation of aniline dyes, and as an indicator in
               titration.
  
      {Iodine green}, an artificial green dyestuff, consisting of
            an iodine derivative of rosaniline; -- called also {night
            green}.
  
      {Iodine scarlet}, a pigment of an intense scarlet color,
            consisting of mercuric iodide.
  
      {Iodine yellow}, a brilliant yellow pigment, consisting of
            plumbic iodide.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Iodine \I"o*dine\ (?; 104), n. [Gr. [?] violetlike; [?] a violet
      + [?] form: cf. F. iode, iodine. The name was given from the
      violet color of its vapor. See {Violet}, {Idyl}.] (Chem.)
      A nonmetallic element, of the halogen group, occurring always
      in combination, as in the iodides. When isolated it is in the
      form of dark gray metallic scales, resembling plumbago, soft
      but brittle, and emitting a chlorinelike odor. Symbol I.
      Atomic weight 126.5. If heated, iodine volatilizes in
      beautiful violet vapors.
  
      Note: Iodine was formerly obtained from the ashes of seaweed
               (kelp or varec), but is now also extracted from certain
               natural brines. In the free state, iodine, even in very
               minute quantities, colors starch blue. Iodine and its
               compounds are largely used in medicine (as in
               liniments, antisyphilitics, etc.), in photography, in
               the preparation of aniline dyes, and as an indicator in
               titration.
  
      {Iodine green}, an artificial green dyestuff, consisting of
            an iodine derivative of rosaniline; -- called also {night
            green}.
  
      {Iodine scarlet}, a pigment of an intense scarlet color,
            consisting of mercuric iodide.
  
      {Iodine yellow}, a brilliant yellow pigment, consisting of
            plumbic iodide.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kakapo \Ka`ka*po"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singular nocturnal parrot ({Strigops habroptilus}), native
      of New Zealand. It lives in holes during the day, but is
      active at night. It resembles an owl in its colors and
      general appearance. It has large wings, but can fly only a
      short distance. Called also {owl parrot}, {night parrot}, and
      {night kaka}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kaka \Ka"ka\, n. [Maori kaka a parrot; -- so named from its
      note.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A New Zealand parrot of the genus {Nestor}, especially the
      {brown parrot} ({Nestor meridionalis}).
  
      Note: The {mountain kaka}, or {kea} ({N. notabilis}), is
               remarkable for having recently acquired carnivorous
               habits. It attacks and kills lambs and pigs, sometimes
               doing great damage.
  
      {Night kaka}. (Zo[94]l.) The kakapo.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kakapo \Ka`ka*po"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singular nocturnal parrot ({Strigops habroptilus}), native
      of New Zealand. It lives in holes during the day, but is
      active at night. It resembles an owl in its colors and
      general appearance. It has large wings, but can fly only a
      short distance. Called also {owl parrot}, {night parrot}, and
      {night kaka}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Kaka \Ka"ka\, n. [Maori kaka a parrot; -- so named from its
      note.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A New Zealand parrot of the genus {Nestor}, especially the
      {brown parrot} ({Nestor meridionalis}).
  
      Note: The {mountain kaka}, or {kea} ({N. notabilis}), is
               remarkable for having recently acquired carnivorous
               habits. It attacks and kills lambs and pigs, sometimes
               doing great damage.
  
      {Night kaka}. (Zo[94]l.) The kakapo.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Very's \Ver"y's\, [or] Very \Ver"y\, night signals \night
   signals\ . [After Lieut. Samuel W. Very, who invented the system
      in 1877.] (Naut.)
      A system of signaling in which balls of red and green fire
      are fired from a pistol, the arrangement in groups denoting
      numbers having a code significance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightcap \Night"cap`\, n.
      1. A cap worn in bed to protect the head, or in undress.
  
      2. A potion of spirit drank at bedtime. [Cant] --Wright.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightgown \Night"gown`\, n.
      A loose gown used for undress; also, a gown used for a
      sleeping garnment.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightish \Night"ish\, a.
      Of or pertaining to night.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightjar \Night"jar`\, n.
      A goatsucker, esp. the European species. See Illust. of
      {Goatsucker}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightjar \Night"jar`\, n.
      A goatsucker, esp. the European species. See Illust. of
      {Goatsucker}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Goatsucker \Goat"suck`er\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of insectivorous birds, belonging to
      {Caprimulgus} and allied genera, esp. the European species
      ({Caprimulgus Europ[91]us}); -- so called from the mistaken
      notion that it sucks goats. The European species is also
      {goat-milker}, {goat owl}, {goat chaffer}, {fern owl}, {night
      hawk}, {nightjar}, {night churr}, {churr-owl}, {gnat hawk},
      and {dorhawk}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightshade \Night"shade`\, n. [AS. nichtscadu.] (Bot.)
      A common name of many species of the genus {Solanum}, given
      esp. to the {Solanum nigrum}, or black nightshade, a low,
      branching weed with small white flowers and black berries
      reputed to be poisonous.
  
      {Deadly nightshade}. Same as {Belladonna}
      (a) .
  
      {Enchanter's nightshade}. See under {Enchanter}.
  
      {Stinking nightshade}. See {Henbane}.
  
      {Three-leaved nightshade}. See {Trillium}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nightshirt \Night"shirt`\, n.
      A kind of nightgown for men.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Noctograph \Noc"to*graph\, n. [L. nox, noctis, night + -graph.]
      1. A kind of writing frame for the blind.
  
      2. An instrument or register which records the presence of
            watchmen on their beats. --Knight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nostoc \Nos"toc\, n. [F.] (Bot.)
      A genus of alg[91]. The plants are composed of moniliform
      cells imbedded in a gelatinous substance.
  
      Note: Nostoc commune is found on the ground, and is
               ordinarily not seen; but after a rain it swells up into
               a conspicuous jellylike mass, whish was formerly
               supposed to have fallen from the sky, whence the
               popular names, fallen star and star jelly. Also called
               witches' butter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Witch \Witch\, n. [OE. wicche, AS. wicce, fem., wicca, masc.;
      perhaps the same word as AS. w[c6]tiga, w[c6]tga, a
      soothsayer (cf. {Wiseacre}); cf. Fries. wikke, a witch, LG.
      wikken to predict, Icel. vitki a wizard, vitka to bewitch.]
      1. One who practices the black art, or magic; one regarded as
            possessing supernatural or magical power by compact with
            an evil spirit, esp. with the Devil; a sorcerer or
            sorceress; -- now applied chiefly or only to women, but
            formerly used of men as well.
  
                     There was a man in that city whose name was Simon, a
                     witch.                                                --Wyclif (Acts
                                                                              viii. 9).
  
                     He can not abide the old woman of Brentford; he
                     swears she's a witch.                        --Shak.
  
      2. An ugly old woman; a hag. --Shak.
  
      3. One who exercises more than common power of attraction; a
            charming or bewitching person; also, one given to
            mischief; -- said especially of a woman or child.
            [Colloq.]
  
      4. (Geom.) A certain curve of the third order, described by
            Maria Agnesi under the name versiera.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) The stormy petrel.
  
      {Witch balls}, a name applied to the interwoven rolling
            masses of the stems of herbs, which are driven by the
            winds over the steppes of Tartary. Cf. {Tumbleweed}.
            --Maunder (Treas. of Bot.)
  
      {Witches' besoms} (Bot.), tufted and distorted branches of
            the silver fir, caused by the attack of some fungus.
            --Maunder (Treas. of Bot.)
  
      {Witches' butter} (Bot.), a name of several gelatinous
            cryptogamous plants, as {Nostoc commune}, and {Exidia
            glandulosa}. See {Nostoc}.
  
      {Witch grass} (Bot.), a kind of grass ({Panicum capillare})
            with minute spikelets on long, slender pedicels forming a
            light, open panicle.
  
      {Witch meal} (Bot.), vegetable sulphur. See under
            {Vegetable}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Blazing star}, {Double star}, {Multiple star}, {Shooting
      star}, etc. See under {Blazing}, {Double}, etc.
  
      {Nebulous star} (Astron.), a small well-defined circular
            nebula, having a bright nucleus at its center like a star.
           
  
      {Star anise} (Bot.), any plant of the genus Illicium; -- so
            called from its star-shaped capsules.
  
      {Star apple} (Bot.), a tropical American tree ({Chrysophyllum
            Cainito}), having a milky juice and oblong leaves with a
            silky-golden pubescence beneath. It bears an applelike
            fruit, the carpels of which present a starlike figure when
            cut across. The name is extended to the whole genus of
            about sixty species, and the natural order
            ({Sapotace[91]}) to which it belongs is called the
            Star-apple family.
  
      {Star conner}, one who cons, or studies, the stars; an
            astronomer or an astrologer. --Gascoigne.
  
      {Star coral} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of stony
            corals belonging to {Astr[91]a}, {Orbicella}, and allied
            genera, in which the calicles are round or polygonal and
            contain conspicuous radiating septa.
  
      {Star cucumber}. (Bot.) See under {Cucumber}.
  
      {Star flower}. (Bot.)
            (a) A plant of the genus {Ornithogalum};
                  star-of-Bethlehem.
            (b) See {Starwort}
            (b) .
            (c) An American plant of the genus {Trientalis}
                  ({Trientalis Americana}). --Gray.
  
      {Star fort} (Fort.), a fort surrounded on the exterior with
            projecting angles; -- whence the name.
  
      {Star gauge} (Ordnance), a long rod, with adjustable points
            projecting radially at its end, for measuring the size of
            different parts of the bore of a gun.
  
      {Star grass}. (Bot.)
            (a) A small grasslike plant ({Hypoxis erecta}) having
                  star-shaped yellow flowers.
            (b) The colicroot. See {Colicroot}.
  
      {Star hyacinth} (Bot.), a bulbous plant of the genus {Scilla}
            ({S. autumnalis}); -- called also {star-headed hyacinth}.
           
  
      {Star jelly} (Bot.), any one of several gelatinous plants
            ({Nostoc commune}, {N. edule}, etc.). See {Nostoc}.
  
      {Star lizard}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Stellion}.
  
      {Star-of-Bethlehem} (Bot.), a bulbous liliaceous plant
            ({Ornithogalum umbellatum}) having a small white starlike
            flower.
  
      {Star-of-the-earth} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Plantago}
            ({P. coronopus}), growing upon the seashore.
  
      {Star polygon} (Geom.), a polygon whose sides cut each other
            so as to form a star-shaped figure.
  
      {Stars and Stripes}, a popular name for the flag of the
            United States, which consists of thirteen horizontal
            stripes, alternately red and white, and a union having, in
            a blue field, white stars to represent the several States,
            one for each.
  
                     With the old flag, the true American flag, the
                     Eagle, and the Stars and Stripes, waving over the
                     chamber in which we sit.                     --D. Webster.
  
      {Star showers}. See {Shooting star}, under {Shooting}.
  
      {Star thistle} (Bot.), an annual composite plant ({Centaurea
            solstitialis}) having the involucre armed with radiating
            spines.
  
      {Star wheel} (Mach.), a star-shaped disk, used as a kind of
            ratchet wheel, in repeating watches and the feed motions
            of some machines.
  
      {Star worm} (Zo[94]l.), a gephyrean.
  
      {Temporary star} (Astron.), a star which appears suddenly,
            shines for a period, and then nearly or quite disappears.
            These stars are supposed by some astronometers to be
            variable stars of long and undetermined periods.
  
      {Variable star} (Astron.), a star whose brilliancy varies
            periodically, generally with regularity, but sometimes
            irregularly; -- called {periodical star} when its changes
            occur at fixed periods.
  
      {Water star grass} (Bot.), an aquatic plant ({Schollera
            graminea}) with small yellow starlike blossoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Snowy \Snow"y\, a.
      1. White like snow. [bd]So shows a snowy dove trooping with
            crows.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. Abounding with snow; covered with snow. [bd]The snowy top
            of cold Olympus.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. Fig.: Pure; unblemished; unstained; spotless.
  
                     There did he lose his snowy innocence. --J. Hall
                                                                              (1646).
  
      {Snowy heron} (Zo[94]l.), a white heron, or egret ({Ardea
            candidissima}), found in the Southern United States, and
            southward to Chili; -- called also {plume bird}.
  
      {Snowy lemming} (Zo[94]l.), the collared lemming ({Cuniculus
            torquatus}), which turns white in winter.
  
      {Snowy owl} (Zo[94]l.), a large arctic owl ({Nyctea
            Scandiaca}, or {N. nivea}) common all over the northern
            parts of the United States and Europe in winter time. Its
            plumage is sometimes nearly pure white, but it is usually
            more or less marked with blackish spots. Called also
            {white owl}.
  
      {Snowy plover} (Zo[94]l.), a small plover ({[92]gialitis
            nivosa}) of the western parts of the United States and
            Mexico. It is light gray above, with the under parts and
            portions of the head white.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lemur \Le"mur\ (l[emac]"m[ucr]r), n. [L., a ghost, specter. So
      called on account of its habit of going abroad by night.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      One of a family ({Lemurid[91]}) of nocturnal mammals allied
      to the monkeys, but of small size, and having a sharp and
      foxlike muzzle, and large eyes. They feed upon birds,
      insects, and fruit, and are mostly natives of Madagascar and
      the neighboring islands, one genus ({Galago}) occurring in
      Africa. The slow lemur or kukang of the East Indies is
      {Nycticebus tardigradus}. See {Galago}, {Indris}, and
      {Colugo}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Slow \Slow\, a. [Compar. {Slower}; superl. {Slowest}.] [OE.
      slow, slaw, AS. sl[be]w; akin to OS. sl[?]u blunt, dull, D.
      sleeuw, slee, sour, OHG. sl[?]o blunt, dull, Icel. sl[?]r,
      sl[?]r, Dan. sl[94]v, Sw. sl[94]. Cf. {Sloe}, and {Sloth}.]
      1. Moving a short space in a relatively long time; not swift;
            not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate; as,
            a slow stream; a slow motion.
  
      2. Not happening in a short time; gradual; late.
  
                     These changes in the heavens, though slow, produced
                     Like change on sea and land, sidereal blast.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      3. Not ready; not prompt or quick; dilatory; sluggish; as,
            slow of speech, and slow of tongue.
  
                     Fixed on defense, the Trojans are not slow To guard
                     their shore from an expected foe.      --Dryden.
  
      4. Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation;
            tardy; inactive.
  
                     He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding.
                                                                              --Prov. xiv.
                                                                              29.
  
      5. Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true
            time; as, the clock or watch is slow.
  
      6. Not advancing or improving rapidly; as, the slow growth of
            arts and sciences.
  
      7. Heavy in wit; not alert, prompt, or spirited; wearisome;
            dull. [Colloq.] --Dickens. Thackeray.
  
      Note: Slow is often used in the formation of compounds for
               the most part self-explaining; as, slow-gaited,
               slow-paced, slow-sighted, slow-winged, and the like.
  
      {Slow coach}, a slow person. See def.7, above. [Colloq.]
  
      {Slow lemur}, or {Slow loris} (Zo[94]l.), an East Indian
            nocturnal lemurine animal ({Nycticebus tardigradus}) about
            the size of a small cat; -- so called from its slow and
            deliberate movements. It has very large round eyes and is
            without a tail. Called also {bashful Billy}.
  
      {Slow match}. See under {Match}.
  
      Syn: Dilatory; late; lingering; tardy; sluggish; dull;
               inactive.
  
      Usage: {Slow}, {Tardy}, {Dilatory}. Slow is the wider term,
                  denoting either a want of rapid motion or inertness of
                  intellect. Dilatory signifies a proneness to defer, a
                  habit of delaying the performance of what we know must
                  be done. Tardy denotes the habit of being behind hand;
                  as, tardy in making up one's acounts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nankeen \Nan*keen"\, n. [So called from its being originally
      manufactured at Nankin, in China.] [Written also {nankin}.]
      1. A species of cloth, of a firm texture, originally brought
            from China, made of a species of cotton ({Gossypium
            religiosum}) that is naturally of a brownish yellow color
            quite indestructible and permanent.
  
      2. An imitation of this cloth by artificial coloring.
  
      3. pl. Trousers made of nankeen. --Ld. Lytton.
  
      {Nankeen bird} (Zo[94]l.), the Australian night heron
            ({Nycticorax Caledonicus}); -- called also {quaker}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Heron \Her"on\, n. [OE. heiroun, heroun, heron, hern, OF.
      hairon, F. h[82]ron, OHG. heigir; cf. Icel. hegri, Dan.
      heire, Sw. h[84]ger, and also G. h[84]her jay, jackdaw, OHG.
      hehara, higere, woodpecker, magpie, D. reiger heron, G.
      reiher, AS. hr[amac]gra. Cf. {Aigret}, {Egret}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any wading bird of the genus {Ardea} and allied genera, of
      the family {Ardeid[91]}. The herons have a long, sharp bill,
      and long legs and toes, with the claw of the middle toe
      toothed. The common European heron ({Ardea cinerea}) is
      remarkable for its directly ascending flight, and was
      formerly hunted with the larger falcons.
  
      Note: There are several common American species; as, the
               great blue heron ({Ardea herodias}); the little blue
               ({A. c[d2]rulea}); the green ({A. virescens}); the
               snowy ({A. candidissima}); the night heron or qua-bird
               ({Nycticorax nycticorax}). The plumed herons are called
               {egrets}.
  
      {Heron's bill} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Erodium}; -- so
            called from the fancied resemblance of the fruit to the
            head and beak of the heron.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Night \Night\, n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D.
      nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[?]tt, Sw. natt,
      Dan. nat, Goth. nachts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos,
      Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, gr. [?], [?], Skr. nakta, nakti.
      [root] 265. Cf. {Equinox}, {Nocturnal}.]
      1. That part of the natural day when the sun is beneath the
            horizon, or the time from sunset to sunrise; esp., the
            time between dusk and dawn, when there is no light of the
            sun, but only moonlight, starlight, or artificial light.
  
                     And God called the light Day, and the darkness he
                     called Night.                                    --Gen. i. 5.
  
      2. Hence:
            (a) Darkness; obscurity; concealment.
  
                           Nature and nature's laws lay hid in night.
                                                                              --Pope.
            (b) Intellectual and moral darkness; ignorance.
            (c) A state of affliction; adversity; as, a dreary night
                  of sorrow.
            (d) The period after the close of life; death.
  
                           She closed her eyes in everlasting night.
                                                                              --Dryden.
            (e) A lifeless or unenlivened period, as when nature seems
                  to sleep. [bd]Sad winter's night[b8]. --Spenser.
  
      Note: Night is sometimes used, esp. with participles, in the
               formation of self-explaining compounds; as,
               night-blooming, night-born, night-warbling, etc.
  
      {Night by night}, {Night after night}, nightly; many nights.
  
                     So help me God, as I have watched the night, Ay,
                     night by night, in studying good for England.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night bird}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The moor hen ({Gallinula chloropus}).
            (b) The Manx shearwater ({Puffinus Anglorum}).
  
      {Night blindness}. (Med.) See {Hemeralopia}.
  
      {Night cart}, a cart used to remove the contents of privies
            by night.
  
      {Night churr}, (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night crow}, a bird that cries in the night.
  
      {Night dog}, a dog that hunts in the night, -- used by
            poachers.
  
      {Night fire}.
            (a) Fire burning in the night.
            (b) Ignis fatuus; Will-o'-the-wisp; Jask-with-a-lantern.
                 
  
      {Night flyer} (Zo[94]l.), any creature that flies in the
            night, as some birds and insects.
  
      {night glass}, a spyglass constructed to concentrate a large
            amount of light, so as see objects distinctly at night.
            --Totten.
  
      {Night green}, iodine green.
  
      {Night hag}, a witch supposed to wander in the night.
  
      {Night hawk} (Zo[94]l.), an American bird ({Chordeiles
            Virginianus}), allied to the goatsucker. It hunts the
            insects on which it feeds toward evening, on the wing, and
            often, diving down perpendicularly, produces a loud
            whirring sound, like that of a spinning wheel. Also
            sometimes applied to the European goatsuckers. It is
            called also {bull bat}.
  
      {Night heron} ({Zo[94]l}.), any one of several species of
            herons of the genus {Nycticorax}, found in various parts
            of the world. The best known species is {Nycticorax
            griseus}, or {N. nycticorax}, of Europe, and the American
            variety (var. n[91]vius). The yellow-crowned night heron
            ({Nycticorax violaceus}) inhabits the Southern States.
            Called also {qua-bird}, and {squawk}.
  
      {Night house}, a public house, or inn, which is open at
            night.
  
      {Night key}, a key for unfastening a night latch.
  
      {Night latch}, a kind of latch for a door, which is operated
            from the outside by a key.
  
      {Night monkey} (Zo[94]l.), an owl monkey.
  
      {night moth} (Zo[94]l.), any one of the noctuids.
  
      {Night parrot} (Zo[94]l.), the kakapo.
  
      {Night piece}, a painting representing some night scene, as a
            moonlight effect, or the like.
  
      {Night rail}, a loose robe, or garment, worn either as a
            nightgown, or over the dress at night, or in sickness.
            [Obs.]
  
      {Night raven} (Zo[94]l.), a bird of ill omen that cries in
            the night; esp., the bittern.
  
      {Night rule}.
            (a) A tumult, or frolic, in the night; -- as if a
                  corruption, of night revel. [Obs.]
            (b) Such conduct as generally rules, or prevails, at
                  night.
  
                           What night rule now about this haunted grove?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {Night sight}. (Med.) See {Nyctolopia}.
  
      {Night snap}, a night thief. [Cant] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      {Night soil}, human excrement; -- so called because in cities
            it is collected by night and carried away for manure.
  
      {Night spell}, a charm against accidents at night.
  
      {Night swallow} (Zo[94]l.), the nightjar.
  
      {Night walk}, a walk in the evening or night.
  
      {Night walker}.
            (a) One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist; a
                  noctambulist.
            (b) One who roves about in the night for evil purposes;
                  specifically, a prostitute who walks the streets.
  
      {Night walking}.
            (a) Walking in one's sleep; somnambulism; noctambulism.
            (b) Walking the streets at night with evil designs.
  
      {Night warbler} (Zo[94]l.), the sedge warbler ({Acrocephalus
            phragmitis}); -- called also {night singer}. [prov. Eng.]
           
  
      {Night watch}.
            (a) A period in the night, as distinguished by the change
                  of watch.
            (b) A watch, or guard, to aford protection in the night.
                 
  
      {Night watcher}, one who watches in the night; especially,
            one who watches with evil designs.
  
      {Night witch}. Same as {Night hag}, above.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Nassawadox, VA (town, FIPS 54984)
      Location: 37.47647 N, 75.86284 W
      Population (1990): 564 (227 housing units)
      Area: 1.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Naugatuck, CT (borough, FIPS 49880)
      Location: 41.48960 N, 73.05205 W
      Population (1990): 30625 (11930 housing units)
      Area: 42.5 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 06770

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   New Stuyahok, AK (city, FIPS 53710)
      Location: 59.47318 N, 157.26202 W
      Population (1990): 391 (95 housing units)
      Area: 87.9 sq km (land), 4.3 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 99636

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   nastygram /nas'tee-gram/ n.   1. A protocol packet or item of
   email (the latter is also called a {letterbomb}) that takes
   advantage of misfeatures or security holes on the target system to
   do untoward things.   2. Disapproving mail, esp. from a {net.god},
   pursuant to a violation of {netiquette} or a complaint about failure
   to correct some mail- or news-transmission problem.   Compare
   {shitogram}, {mailbomb}.   3. A status report from an unhappy, and
   probably picky, customer.   "What'd Corporate say in today's
   nastygram?"   4. [deprecated] An error reply by mail from a {daemon};
   in particular, a {bounce message}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   nastistical
  
      A description of a method, thought by
      the programmer to be correct statistics, but which is not.   An
      example is averaging together several averages of samples of
      different sizes.   The correct way to do this is to average
      together all of the individual samples.
  
      (1997-02-12)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   nastygram
  
      /nas'tee-gram/ 1. A protocol packet or item of e-mail (the
      latter is also called a {letterbomb}) that takes advantage of
      misfeatures or security holes on the target system to do
      untoward things.
  
      2. Disapproving mail, especially from a {net.god}, pursuant to
      a violation of {netiquette} or a complaint about failure to
      correct some mail- or news-transmission problem.   Compare
      {shitogram}, {mailbomb}.
  
      3. A status report from an unhappy, and probably picky,
      customer.   "What did Corporate say in today's nastygram?"
  
      4. [deprecated] An error reply by mail from a {daemon}; in
      particular, a {bounce message}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   NEXTSTEP
  
      The original {multitasking} {operating
      system} that {NeXT, Inc.} developed to run on its proprietary
      {NeXT} computers (informally known as "black boxes").
      NEXTSTEP includes a specific {graphical user interface}, an
      interface builder, {object-oriented} application builder, and
      several "kits" of prebuilt software {objects} such as the
      Indexing Kit for {databases}.   This software runs on top of
      NeXT's version of the {Mach} operating system on {NeXT},
      {486}, {Pentium}, {HP-PA}, and {Sun} {SPARC} computers.
  
      The official spelling changed from "NeXTstep" to "NeXTStep" to
      "NeXTSTEP", and finally "NEXTSTEP".
  
      The last release of NEXTSTEP was 3.3, which NeXT then
      developed into "{OpenStep}".
  
      {TjL's Pages (http://www.peak.org/~luomat/)}.
      {Peanuts (http://www.peanuts.org/peanuts/NEXTSTEP/)}.
  
      See also: {GNUStep}.
  
      (2003-05-23)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Night-hawk
      (Heb. tahmas) occurs only in the list of unclean birds (Lev.
      11:16; Deut. 14:15). This was supposed to be the night-jar
      (Caprimulgus), allied to the swifts. The Hebrew word is derived
      from a root meaning "to scratch or tear the face," and may be
      best rendered, in accordance with the ancient versions, "an owl"
      (Strix flammea). The Revised Version renders "night-hawk."
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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