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   main deck
         n 1: the uppermost sheltered deck that runs the entire length of
               a large vessel [syn: {main deck}, {second deck}]

English Dictionary: Mindestfaserlänge by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
main diagonal
n
  1. the diagonal of a square matrix running from the upper left entry to the lower right entry
    Synonym(s): main diagonal, principal diagonal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mammoth Cave National Park
n
  1. a national park in Kentucky having a large cavern and an underground river
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mammuthus
n
  1. extinct genus: mammoths [syn: Mammuthus, {genus Mammuthus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mammuthus columbi
n
  1. a variety of mammoth [syn: columbian mammoth, {Mammuthus columbi}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mammuthus primigenius
n
  1. very hairy mammoth common in colder portions of the northern hemisphere
    Synonym(s): woolly mammoth, northern mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mandioc
n
  1. cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
    Synonym(s): bitter cassava, manioc, mandioc, mandioca, tapioca plant, gari, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mandioca
n
  1. cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
    Synonym(s): bitter cassava, manioc, mandioc, mandioca, tapioca plant, gari, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manduca
n
  1. moths whose larvae are tobacco hornworms or tomato hornworms
    Synonym(s): Manduca, genus Manduca
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manduca quinquemaculata
n
  1. large green white-striped hawkmoth larva that feeds on tomato and potato plants; similar to tobacco hornworm
    Synonym(s): tomato hornworm, potato worm, Manduca quinquemaculata
  2. moth whose larvae are tomato hornworms
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manduca sexta
n
  1. large green white-striped hawkmoth larva that feeds on tobacco and related plants; similar to tomato hornworm
    Synonym(s): tobacco hornworm, tomato worm, Manduca sexta
  2. moth whose larvae are tobacco hornworms
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manducate
v
  1. chew (food); to bite and grind with the teeth; "He jawed his bubble gum"; "Chew your food and don't swallow it!"; "The cows were masticating the grass"
    Synonym(s): chew, masticate, manducate, jaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manduction
n
  1. the act of participating in the celebration of the Eucharist; "the governor took Communion with the rest of the congregation"
    Synonym(s): Communion, Holy Communion, sacramental manduction, manduction
  2. biting and grinding food in your mouth so it becomes soft enough to swallow
    Synonym(s): chew, chewing, mastication, manduction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
maned sheep
n
  1. wild sheep of northern Africa [syn: aoudad, arui, audad, Barbary sheep, maned sheep, Ammotragus lervia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Manihot esculenta
n
  1. cassava with long tuberous edible roots and soft brittle stems; used especially to make cassiri (an intoxicating drink) and tapioca
    Synonym(s): bitter cassava, manioc, mandioc, mandioca, tapioca plant, gari, Manihot esculenta, Manihot utilissima
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mantegna
n
  1. Italian painter and engraver noted for his frescoes (1431-1506)
    Synonym(s): Mantegna, Andrea Mantegna
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantic
adj
  1. resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy; "the high priest's divinatory pronouncement"; "mantic powers"; "a kind of sibylline book with ready and infallible answers to questions"
    Synonym(s): divinatory, mantic, sibylline, sibyllic, vatic, vatical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantichora
n
  1. a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion
    Synonym(s): manticore, mantichora, manticora, mantiger
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manticora
n
  1. a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion
    Synonym(s): manticore, mantichora, manticora, mantiger
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
manticore
n
  1. a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion
    Synonym(s): manticore, mantichora, manticora, mantiger
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantiger
n
  1. a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion
    Synonym(s): manticore, mantichora, manticora, mantiger
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantis
n
  1. predacious long-bodied large-eyed insect of warm regions; rests with forelimbs raised as in prayer
    Synonym(s): mantis, mantid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantis crab
n
  1. tropical marine burrowing crustaceans with large grasping appendages
    Synonym(s): mantis shrimp, mantis crab
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantis prawn
n
  1. a kind of mantis shrimp
    Synonym(s): squilla, mantis prawn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mantis religioso
n
  1. the common mantis [syn: praying mantis, praying mantid, Mantis religioso]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantis shrimp
n
  1. tropical marine burrowing crustaceans with large grasping appendages
    Synonym(s): mantis shrimp, mantis crab
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantispid
n
  1. insect that resembles a mantis; larvae are parasites in the nests of spiders and wasps
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mantispidae
n
  1. mantispids
    Synonym(s): Mantispidae, family Mantispidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mantissa
n
  1. the positive fractional part of the representation of a logarithm; in the expression log 643 = 2.808 the mantissa is .808
    Synonym(s): mantissa, fixed-point part
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mantoux test
n
  1. tuberculin (a derivative of tubercle bacillus) is injected intradermally; a red area appearing 1-3 days later signifies an exposure (past or present) to tubercle bacilli and the need for further testing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mean distance
n
  1. the arithmetic mean of the maximum and minimum distances of a celestial body (satellite or secondary star) from its primary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendacious
adj
  1. given to lying; "a mendacious child"
  2. intentionally untrue; "a mendacious statement"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendaciously
adv
  1. in a mendacious and untruthful manner; "I told him, quite untruthfully, that I had just returned from leave"
    Synonym(s): mendaciously, untruthfully
    Antonym(s): truthfully
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendacity
n
  1. the tendency to be untruthful
    Antonym(s): veracity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendicancy
n
  1. the state of being a beggar or mendicant; "they were reduced to mendicancy"
    Synonym(s): beggary, mendicancy, mendicity
  2. a solicitation for money or food (especially in the street by an apparently penniless person)
    Synonym(s): beggary, begging, mendicancy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendicant
adj
  1. practicing beggary; "mendicant friars"
n
  1. a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
    Synonym(s): friar, mendicant
  2. a pauper who lives by begging
    Synonym(s): beggar, mendicant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mendicity
n
  1. the state of being a beggar or mendicant; "they were reduced to mendicancy"
    Synonym(s): beggary, mendicancy, mendicity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentha aquatica
n
  1. a European mint that thrives in wet places; has a perfume like that of the bergamot orange; naturalized in eastern North America
    Synonym(s): water-mint, water mint, Mentha aquatica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentha citrata
n
  1. mint with leaves having perfume like that of the bergamot orange
    Synonym(s): bergamot mint, lemon mint, eau de cologne mint, Mentha citrata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentha spicata
n
  1. common garden herb having clusters of small purplish flowers and yielding an oil used as a flavoring
    Synonym(s): spearmint, Mentha spicata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentha suaveolens
n
  1. mint with apple-scented stems of southern and western Europe; naturalized in United States
    Synonym(s): apple mint, applemint, Mentha rotundifolia, Mentha suaveolens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menticirrhus
n
  1. kingfishes; whiting [syn: Menticirrhus, {genus Menticirrhus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menticirrhus americanus
n
  1. whiting of the southeastern coast of North America [syn: king whiting, Menticirrhus americanus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menticirrhus littoralis
n
  1. a dull silvery whiting of southern Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States
    Synonym(s): silver whiting, Menticirrhus littoralis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menticirrhus saxatilis
n
  1. whiting of the east coast of United States; closely resembles king whiting
    Synonym(s): northern whiting, Menticirrhus saxatilis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Menticirrhus undulatus
n
  1. bluish-grey whiting of California coast [syn: corbina, Menticirrhus undulatus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentzelia
n
  1. genus of bristly herbs or subshrubs of western America lacking stinging hairs
    Synonym(s): Mentzelia, genus Mentzelia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentzelia laevicaulis
n
  1. biennial of southwestern United States having white stems and toothed leaves that is grown for its large pale yellow flowers that open in early morning
    Synonym(s): blazing star, Mentzelia livicaulis, Mentzelia laevicaulis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentzelia lindleyi
n
  1. annual grown especially for its fragrant golden nocturnal flowers
    Synonym(s): bartonia, Mentzelia lindleyi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mentzelia livicaulis
n
  1. biennial of southwestern United States having white stems and toothed leaves that is grown for its large pale yellow flowers that open in early morning
    Synonym(s): blazing star, Mentzelia livicaulis, Mentzelia laevicaulis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mimetic
adj
  1. characterized by or of the nature of or using mimesis; "a mimetic dance"; "the mimetic presentation of images"
  2. exhibiting mimicry; "mimetic coloring of a butterfly"; "the mimetic tendency of infancy"- R.W.Hamilton
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Minato Ohashi Bridge
n
  1. cantilever bridge at Osaka, Japan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mind game
n
  1. any game designed to exercise the intellect
  2. deliberate actions of calculated psychological manipulation intended to intimidate or confuse (usually for competitive advantage); "football players try to play mind games with the opposition"; "the jeweler's mind game is to convince lovers that the size of a gemstone reflects the depth of their feelings"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mind's eye
n
  1. the imaging of remembered or invented scenes; "I could see her clearly in my mind's eye"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mind-expanding
adj
  1. (of hallucinogenic drugs) giving a sense of heightened or broader awareness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mind-set
n
  1. a habitual or characteristic mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to situations
    Synonym(s): mentality, outlook, mindset, mind-set
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mindset
n
  1. a habitual or characteristic mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to situations
    Synonym(s): mentality, outlook, mindset, mind-set
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mine disposal
n
  1. the disposal of explosive mines
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mint candy
n
  1. a candy that is flavored with a mint oil [syn: mint, mint candy]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mint geranium
n
  1. tansy-scented Eurasian perennial herb with buttonlike yellow flowers; used as potherb or salad green and sometimes for potpourri or tea or flavoring; sometimes placed in genus Chrysanthemum
    Synonym(s): costmary, alecost, bible leaf, mint geranium, balsam herb, Tanacetum balsamita, Chrysanthemum balsamita
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mint julep
n
  1. bourbon and sugar and mint over crushed ice [syn: julep, mint julep]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mint sauce
n
  1. sweetened diluted vinegar with chopped mint leaves
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mint-scented
adj
  1. smelling of mint
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mintage
n
  1. coins collectively [syn: coinage, mintage, specie, metal money]
  2. fee paid to a mint by the government for minting a coin
  3. act or process of minting coins
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
minute gun
n
  1. (military) gun that is discharged once every minute (usually as part of a military funeral)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
minute steak
n
  1. a thin steak that can be cooked quickly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
minutes
n
  1. a written account of what transpired at a meeting [syn: minutes, proceedings, transactions]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mnemotechnic
adj
  1. of or relating to or involved the practice of aiding the memory; "mnemonic device"
    Synonym(s): mnemonic, mnemotechnic, mnemotechnical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mnemotechnical
adj
  1. of or relating to or involved the practice of aiding the memory; "mnemonic device"
    Synonym(s): mnemonic, mnemotechnic, mnemotechnical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
n
  1. political and spiritual leader during India's struggle with Great Britain for home rule; an advocate of passive resistance (1869-1948)
    Synonym(s): Gandhi, Mahatma Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Momotus
n
  1. type genus of the Momotidae [syn: Momotus, {genus Momotus}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monadic operation
n
  1. an operation with exactly one operand [syn: {monadic operation}, unary operation]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monetisation
n
  1. establishing something (e.g. gold or silver) as the legal tender of a country
    Synonym(s): monetization, monetisation
    Antonym(s): demonetisation, demonetization
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monetise
v
  1. give legal value to or establish as the legal tender of a country; "They monetized the lira"
    Synonym(s): monetize, monetise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monetization
n
  1. establishing something (e.g. gold or silver) as the legal tender of a country
    Synonym(s): monetization, monetisation
    Antonym(s): demonetisation, demonetization
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monetize
v
  1. give legal value to or establish as the legal tender of a country; "They monetized the lira"
    Synonym(s): monetize, monetise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monmouth Court House
n
  1. a pitched battle in New Jersey during the American Revolution (1778) that ended with the withdrawal of British forces
    Synonym(s): Monmouth Court House, Battle of Monmouth Court House, Battle of Monmouth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monodic
adj
  1. having a single vocal part
    Synonym(s): monodic, monodical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monodical
adj
  1. having a single vocal part
    Synonym(s): monodic, monodical
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monotheism
n
  1. belief in a single God
    Antonym(s): polytheism
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monotheist
n
  1. a believer in one god
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
monotheistic
adj
  1. believing that there is only one god [ant: polytheistic]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
montage
n
  1. a paste-up made by sticking together pieces of paper or photographs to form an artistic image; "he used his computer to make a collage of pictures superimposed on a map"
    Synonym(s): collage, montage
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montagu
n
  1. United States anthropologist (born in England) who popularized anthropology (1905-)
    Synonym(s): Montagu, Ashley Montagu
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montagu's harrier
n
  1. brownish European harrier [syn: Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montaigne
n
  1. French writer regarded as the originator of the modern essay (1533-1592)
    Synonym(s): Montaigne, Michel Montaigne, Michel Eyquem Montaigne
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Monte Carlo
n
  1. a town and popular resort in the principality of Monaco; famous for its gambling casino
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montego Bay
n
  1. port and resort city in northwestern Jamaica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montespan
n
  1. French noblewoman who was mistress to Louis XIV until he became attracted to Madame de Maintenon (1641-1707)
    Synonym(s): Montespan, Marquise de Montespan, Francoise-Athenais de Rochechouart
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montesquieu
n
  1. French political philosopher who advocated the separation of executive and legislative and judicial powers (1689-1755)
    Synonym(s): Montesquieu, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, Charles Louis de Secondat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montessori
n
  1. Italian educator who developed a method of teaching mentally handicapped children and advocated a child- centered approach (1870-1952)
    Synonym(s): Montessori, Maria Montesorri
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montez
n
  1. Irish dancer (1818-1861) [syn: Montez, Lola Montez, Marie Dolores Eliza Rosanna Gilbert]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montezuma
n
  1. evergreen tree with large leathery leaves and large pink to orange flowers; considered a link plant between families Bombacaceae and Sterculiaceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montezuma cypress
n
  1. cypress of river valleys of Mexican highlands [syn: Montezuma cypress, Mexican swamp cypress, Taxodium mucronatum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montezuma II
n
  1. the last Aztec emperor in Mexico who was overthrown and killed by Hernando Cortes (1466-1520)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montezuma's revenge
n
  1. diarrhea contracted in Mexico or Central America
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montgolfier
n
  1. French inventor who (with his brother Josef Michel Montgolfier) pioneered hot-air ballooning (1745-1799)
    Synonym(s): Montgolfier, Jacques Etienne Montgolfier
  2. French inventor who (with his brother Jacques Etienne Montgolfier) pioneered hot-air ballooning (1740-1810)
    Synonym(s): Montgolfier, Josef Michel Montgolfier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montgomery
n
  1. Canadian novelist (1874-1942) [syn: Montgomery, {L. M. Montgomery}, Lucy Maud Montgomery]
  2. English general during World War II; won victories over Rommel in North Africa and led British ground forces in the invasion of Normandy (1887-1976)
    Synonym(s): Montgomery, Bernard Law Montgomery, Sir Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein
  3. the state capital of Alabama on the Mobile River
    Synonym(s): Montgomery, capital of Alabama
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montgomery Ward
n
  1. United States businessman who in 1872 established a successful mail-order business (1843-1913)
    Synonym(s): Ward, Montgomery Ward, Aaron Montgomery Ward
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montgomery's tubercle
n
  1. one of the sebaceous glands on the areolae of the breast that lubricate the breast during breast-feeding
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montia chamissoi
n
  1. a floating or creeping Indian lettuce having terminal racemes of pale rose flowers; wet areas at high elevations of western North America
    Synonym(s): toad lily, Montia chamissoi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montia cordifolia
n
  1. succulent plant with mostly basal leaves; stem bears 1 pair of broadly ovate or heart-shaped leaves and a loose raceme of 3-10 white flowers; western North America
    Synonym(s): broad- leaved montia, Montia cordifolia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montserrat
n
  1. a volcanic island in the Caribbean; in the West Indies
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Montserratian
adj
  1. of or relating to Montserrat or the inhabitants of Montserrat; "Montserratian natives"
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Montserrat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moon daisy
n
  1. tall leafy-stemmed Eurasian perennial with white flowers; widely naturalized; often placed in genus Chrysanthemum
    Synonym(s): oxeye daisy, ox-eyed daisy, marguerite, moon daisy, white daisy, Leucanthemum vulgare, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Asama
n
  1. a volcano in central Honshu near Nagano; one of the largest volcanoes in Japan (8,340 feet)
    Synonym(s): Asama, Mount Asama
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Carmel
n
  1. a mountain range in northwestern Israel near the Mediterranean coast; "according to the Old Testament, Elijah defeated the priests of Baal at Mount Carmel"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Communism
n
  1. the highest mountain peak in the Pamir Mountains; near the Chinese border in northeastern Tajikistan (24,590 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Communism Peak, Mount Communism, Stalin Peak, Mount Garmo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Cook lily
n
  1. showy white-flowered perennial of New Zealand [syn: mountain lily, Mount Cook lily, Ranunculus lyalii]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Garmo
n
  1. the highest mountain peak in the Pamir Mountains; near the Chinese border in northeastern Tajikistan (24,590 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Communism Peak, Mount Communism, Stalin Peak, Mount Garmo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Godwin Austen
n
  1. a mountain peak in the Karakoram Range in northern Kashmir; the 2nd highest peak in the world (28,250 feet high)
    Synonym(s): K2, Godwin Austen, Mount Godwin Austen, Dapsang
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Kanchenjunga
n
  1. a mountain the Himalayas on the border between Nepal and Tibet (28,208 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Kanchenjunga, Mount Kanchenjunga, Kanchanjanga, Kinchinjunga
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Kilimanjaro
n
  1. the highest peak in Africa; located in northeastern Tanzania; 19,340 feet high
    Synonym(s): Kilimanjaro, Mount Kilimanjaro
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Saint Helens
n
  1. an active volcano in the Cascade Range in southwestern Washington; erupted violently in 1980 after 123 years of inactivity
    Synonym(s): Mount Saint Helens, Mount St. Helens, Mt. St. Helens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Shasta
n
  1. a volcanic mountain peak in the Cascade Range in northern California (14,162 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Shasta, Mount Shasta
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Sherman
n
  1. a peak in the Rocky Mountains in central Colorado (14,036 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Sherman, Mount Sherman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Sinai
n
  1. a mountain peak in the southern Sinai Peninsula (7,500 feet high); it is believed to be the peak on which Moses received the Ten Commandments
    Synonym(s): Sinai, Mount Sinai
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount St. Helens
n
  1. an active volcano in the Cascade Range in southwestern Washington; erupted violently in 1980 after 123 years of inactivity
    Synonym(s): Mount Saint Helens, Mount St. Helens, Mt. St. Helens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mount Tacoma
n
  1. a mountain peak in central Washington; highest peak in the Cascade Range; (14,410 feet high)
    Synonym(s): Ranier, Mount Ranier, Mt. Ranier, Mount Tacoma
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mounties
n
  1. the federal police force of Canada [syn: {Royal Canadian Mounted Police}, RCMP, Mounties]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Muntiacus
n
  1. muntjacs
    Synonym(s): Muntiacus, genus Muntiacus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
muntjac
n
  1. small Asian deer with small antlers and a cry like a bark
    Synonym(s): muntjac, barking deer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Muntz metal
n
  1. a brass that has more zinc and is stronger than alpha brass; used in making castings and hot-worked products
    Synonym(s): alpha-beta brass, Muntz metal, yellow metal
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mygale \[d8]Myg"a*le\, n. [L., a field mouse, Gr. [?].]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A genus of very large hairy spiders having four lungs and
      only four spinnerets. They do not spin webs, but usually
      construct tubes in the earth, which are often furnished with
      a trapdoor. The South American bird spider ({Mygale
      avicularia}), and the crab spider, or matoutou ({M.
      cancerides}) are among the largest species. Some of the
      species are erroneously called tarantulas, as the Texas
      tarantula ({M. Hentzii}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ratel \Ra"tel\, n. [F.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any carnivore of the genus {Mellivora}, allied to the weasels
      and the skunks; -- called also {honey badger}.
  
      Note: Several species are known in Africa and India. The Cape
               ratel ({M. Capensis}) and the Indian ratel ({M.
               Indica}) are the best known. The back is gray; the
               lower parts, face, and tail are black. They are fond of
               honey, and rob the nests of wild bees.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mango \Man"go\, n.; pl. {Mangoes}. [Pg. manga, fr. Tamil
      m[be]nk[be]y.]
      1. The fruit of the mango tree. It is rather larger than an
            apple, and of an ovoid shape. Some varieties are fleshy
            and luscious, and others tough and tasting of turpentine.
            The green fruit is pickled for market.
  
      2. A green muskmelon stuffed and pickled.
  
      {Mango bird} (Zo[94]l.), an oriole ({Oriolus kundoo}), native
            of India.
  
      {Mango fish} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the Ganges ({Polynemus
            risua}), highly esteemed for food. It has several long,
            slender filaments below the pectoral fins. It appears
            about the same time with the mango fruit, in April and
            May, whence the name.
  
      {Mango tree} (Bot.), an East Indian tree of the genus
            {Mangifera} ({M. Indica}), related to the cashew and the
            sumac. It grows to a large size, and produces the mango of
            commerce. It is now cultivated in tropical America.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mahometism \Ma*hom"et*ism\, n.
      See {Mohammedanism}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mahometist \Ma*hom"et*ist\, n.
      A Mohammedan. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Main \Main\, a. [From {Main} strength, possibly influenced by
      OF. maine, magne, great, L. magnus. Cf. {Magnate}.]
      1. Very or extremely strong. [Obs.]
  
                     That current with main fury ran.         --Daniel.
  
      2. Vast; huge. [Obs.] [bd]The main abyss.[b8] --Milton.
  
      3. Unqualified; absolute; entire; sheer. [Obs.] [bd]It's a
            man untruth.[b8] --Sir W. Scott.
  
      4. Principal; chief; first in size, rank, importance, etc.
  
                     Our main interest is to be happy as we can.
                                                                              --Tillotson.
  
      5. Important; necessary. [Obs.]
  
                     That which thou aright Believest so main to our
                     success, I bring.                              --Milton.
  
      {By main force}, by mere force or sheer force; by violent
            effort; as, to subdue insurrection by main force.
  
                     That Maine which by main force Warwick did win.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {By main strength}, by sheer strength; as, to lift a heavy
            weight by main strength.
  
      {Main beam} (Steam Engine), working beam.
  
      {Main boom} (Naut.), the boom which extends the foot of the
            mainsail in a fore and aft vessel.
  
      {Main brace}.
            (a) (Mech.) The brace which resists the chief strain. Cf.
                  {Counter brace}.
            (b) (Naut.) The brace attached to the main yard.
  
      {Main center} (Steam Engine), a shaft upon which a working
            beam or side lever swings.
  
      {Main chance}. See under {Chance}.
  
      {Main couple} (Arch.), the principal truss in a roof.
  
      {Main deck} (Naut.), the deck next below the spar deck; the
            principal deck.
  
      {Main keel} (Naut.), the principal or true keel of a vessel,
            as distinguished from the false keel.
  
      Syn: Principal; chief; leading; cardinal; capital.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mammodis \Mam"mo*dis\, n. [F. mamoudis, fr. Hind.
      mahm[umac]d[c6] a muslin.]
      Coarse plain India muslins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mandioc \Man"di*oc\, d8Mandioca \[d8]Man`di*o"ca\, n. (Bot.)
      See {Manioc}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manioc \Ma"ni*oc\, n. [Pg. mandioca, fr. Braz.] (Bot.)
      The tropical plants ({Manihot utilissima}, and {M. Aipi}),
      from which cassava and tapioca are prepared; also, cassava.
      [Written also {mandioc}, {manihoc}, {manihot}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mandioc \Man"di*oc\, d8Mandioca \[d8]Man`di*o"ca\, n. (Bot.)
      See {Manioc}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manioc \Ma"ni*oc\, n. [Pg. mandioca, fr. Braz.] (Bot.)
      The tropical plants ({Manihot utilissima}, and {M. Aipi}),
      from which cassava and tapioca are prepared; also, cassava.
      [Written also {mandioc}, {manihoc}, {manihot}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducable \Man"du*ca*ble\, a. [Cf. F. manducable. See
      {Manducate}.]
      Such as can be chewed; fit to be eaten. [R.]
  
               Any manducable creature.                        --Sir T.
                                                                              Herbert.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducate \Man"du*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Manducated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Manducating}.] [L. manducatus, p. p. of
      manducare to chew. See {Manger}.]
      To masticate; to chew; to eat. [R.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducate \Man"du*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Manducated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Manducating}.] [L. manducatus, p. p. of
      manducare to chew. See {Manger}.]
      To masticate; to chew; to eat. [R.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducate \Man"du*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Manducated}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Manducating}.] [L. manducatus, p. p. of
      manducare to chew. See {Manger}.]
      To masticate; to chew; to eat. [R.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducation \Man`du*ca"tion\, n. [L. manducatio: cf. F.
      manducation.]
      The act of chewing. [R.] --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manducatory \Man"du*ca*to*ry\, a.
      Pertaining to, or employed in, chewing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manductor \Man`duc"tor\, n. [L. manus the hand + ductor a
      leader, ducere to lead: cf. F. manuducteur.] (Mus.)
      A conductor; an officer in the ancient church who gave the
      signal for the choir to sing, and who beat time with the
      hand, and regulated the music. --Moore (Encyc. of Music.)

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maned \Maned\, a.
      Having a mane.
  
      {Maned seal} (Zo[94]l.), the sea lion.
  
      {Maned sheep} (Zo[94]l.), the aoudad.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sheep \Sheep\, n. sing. & pl. [OE. shep, scheep, AS. sc[?]p,
      sce[a0]p; akin to OFries. sk[?]p, LG. & D. schaap, G. schaf,
      OHG. sc[be]f, Skr. ch[be]ga. [root]295. Cf. {Sheepherd}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of several species of ruminants of the
            genus {Ovis}, native of the higher mountains of both
            hemispheres, but most numerous in Asia.
  
      Note: The domestic sheep ({Ovis aries}) varies much in size,
               in the length and texture of its wool, the form and
               size of its horns, the length of its tail, etc. It was
               domesticated in prehistoric ages, and many distinct
               breeds have been produced; as the merinos, celebrated
               for their fine wool; the Cretan sheep, noted for their
               long horns; the fat-tailed, or Turkish, sheep,
               remarkable for the size and fatness of the tail, which
               often has to be supported on trucks; the Southdowns, in
               which the horns are lacking; and an Asiatic breed which
               always has four horns.
  
      2. A weak, bashful, silly fellow. --Ainsworth.
  
      3. pl. Fig.: The people of God, as being under the government
            and protection of Christ, the great Shepherd.
  
      {Rocky mountain sheep}.(Zo[94]l.) See {Bighorn}.
  
      {Maned sheep}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Aoudad}.
  
      {Sheep bot} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of the sheep botfly. See
            {Estrus}.
  
      {Sheep dog} (Zo[94]l.), a shepherd dog, or collie.
  
      {Sheep laurel} (Bot.), a small North American shrub ({Kalmia
            angustifolia}) with deep rose-colored flowers in corymbs.
           
  
      {Sheep pest} (Bot.), an Australian plant ({Ac[91]na ovina})
            related to the burnet. The fruit is covered with barbed
            spines, by which it adheres to the wool of sheep.
  
      {Sheep run}, an extensive tract of country where sheep range
            and graze.
  
      {Sheep's beard} (Bot.), a cichoraceous herb ({Urospermum
            Dalechampii}) of Southern Europe; -- so called from the
            conspicuous pappus of the achenes.
  
      {Sheep's bit} (Bot.), a European herb ({Jasione montana})
            having much the appearance of scabious.
  
      {Sheep pox} (Med.), a contagious disease of sheep,
            characterixed by the development of vesicles or pocks upon
            the skin.
  
      {Sheep scabious}. (Bot.) Same as {Sheep's bit}.
  
      {Sheep shears}, shears in which the blades form the two ends
            of a steel bow, by the elasticity of which they open as
            often as pressed together by the hand in cutting; -- so
            called because used to cut off the wool of sheep.
  
      {Sheep sorrel}. (Bot.), a prerennial herb ({Rumex
            Acetosella}) growing naturally on poor, dry, gravelly
            soil. Its leaves have a pleasant acid taste like sorrel.
           
  
      {Sheep's-wool} (Zo[94]l.), the highest grade of Florida
            commercial sponges ({Spongia equina}, variety
            {gossypina}).
  
      {Sheep tick} (Zo[94]l.), a wingless parasitic insect
            ({Melophagus ovinus}) belonging to the Diptera. It fixes
            its proboscis in the skin of the sheep and sucks the
            blood, leaving a swelling. Called also {sheep pest}, and
            {sheep louse}.
  
      {Sheep walk}, a pasture for sheep; a sheep run.
  
      {Wild sheep}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Argali}, {Mouflon}, and
            {O[94]rial}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maned \Maned\, a.
      Having a mane.
  
      {Maned seal} (Zo[94]l.), the sea lion.
  
      {Maned sheep} (Zo[94]l.), the aoudad.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maneticness \Ma*net"ic*ness\, n.
      Magneticalness. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mannitic \Man*nit"ic\, a. (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, resembling, or derived from, mannite.
  
      {Mannitic acid} (Chem.), a white amorphous substance,
            intermediate between saccharic acid and mannite, and
            obtained by the partial oxidation of the latter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mannitic \Man*nit"ic\, a. (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, resembling, or derived from, mannite.
  
      {Mannitic acid} (Chem.), a white amorphous substance,
            intermediate between saccharic acid and mannite, and
            obtained by the partial oxidation of the latter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mannitose \Man"ni*tose`\, n. (Chem.)
      A variety of sugar obtained by the partial oxidation of
      mannite, and closely resembling levulose.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mantchoo \Mant*choo"\, a. & n.
      Same as {Manchu}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Manteau \[d8]Man`teau"\, n.; pl. F. {Manteaux}, E. {Manteaus}.
      [F. See {Mantle}, n.]
      1. A woman's cloak or mantle.
  
      2. A gown worn by women. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Manteau \[d8]Man`teau"\, n.; pl. F. {Manteaux}, E. {Manteaus}.
      [F. See {Mantle}, n.]
      1. A woman's cloak or mantle.
  
      2. A gown worn by women. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mantic \Man"tic\, a. [Gr. [?] prophetic.]
      Of or pertaining to divination, or to the condition of one
      inspired, or supposed to be inspired, by a deity; prophetic.
      [R.] [bd]Mantic fury.[b8] --Trench.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Devil \Dev"il\, n. [AS. de[a2]fol, de[a2]ful; akin to G.
      [?]eufel, Goth. diaba[a3]lus; all fr. L. diabolus the devil,
      Gr. [?] the devil, the slanderer, fr. [?] to slander,
      calumniate, orig., to throw across; [?] across + [?] to
      throw, let fall, fall; cf. Skr. gal to fall. Cf. {Diabolic}.]
      1. The Evil One; Satan, represented as the tempter and
            spiritual of mankind.
  
                     [Jesus] being forty days tempted of the devil.
                                                                              --Luke iv. 2.
  
                     That old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which
                     deceiveth the whole world.                  --Rev. xii. 9.
  
      2. An evil spirit; a demon.
  
                     A dumb man possessed with a devil.      --Matt. ix.
                                                                              32.
  
      3. A very wicked person; hence, any great evil. [bd]That
            devil Glendower.[b8] [bd]The devil drunkenness.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
                     Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a
                     devil?                                                --John vi. 70.
  
      4. An expletive of surprise, vexation, or emphasis, or,
            ironically, of negation. [Low]
  
                     The devil a puritan that he is, . . . but a
                     timepleaser.                                       --Shak.
  
                     The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare, But
                     wonder how the devil they got there.   --Pope.
  
      5. (Cookery) A dish, as a bone with the meat, broiled and
            excessively peppered; a grill with Cayenne pepper.
  
                     Men and women busy in baking, broiling, roasting
                     oysters, and preparing devils on the gridiron. --Sir
                                                                              W. Scott.
  
      6. (Manuf.) A machine for tearing or cutting rags, cotton,
            etc.
  
      {Blue devils}. See under {Blue}.
  
      {Cartesian devil}. See under {Cartesian}.
  
      {Devil bird} (Zo[94]l.), one of two or more South African
            drongo shrikes ({Edolius retifer}, and {E. remifer}),
            believed by the natives to be connected with sorcery.
  
      {Devil may care}, reckless, defiant of authority; -- used
            adjectively. --Longfellow.
  
      {Devil's apron} (Bot.), the large kelp ({Laminaria
            saccharina}, and {L. longicruris}) of the Atlantic ocean,
            having a blackish, leathery expansion, shaped somewhat
            like an apron.
  
      {Devil's coachhorse}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The black rove beetle ({Ocypus olens}). [Eng.]
            (b) A large, predacious, hemipterous insect ({Prionotus
                  cristatus}); the wheel bug. [U.S.]
  
      {Devil's darning-needle}. (Zo[94]l.) See under {Darn}, v. t.
           
  
      {Devil's fingers}, {Devil's hand} (Zo[94]l.), the common
            British starfish ({Asterias rubens}); -- also applied to a
            sponge with stout branches. [Prov. Eng., Irish & Scot.]
  
      {Devil's riding-horse} (Zo[94]l.), the American mantis
            ({Mantis Carolina}).
  
      {The Devil's tattoo}, a drumming with the fingers or feet.
            [bd]Jack played the Devil's tattoo on the door with his
            boot heels.[b8] --F. Hardman (Blackw. Mag.).
  
      {Devil worship}, worship of the power of evil; -- still
            practiced by barbarians who believe that the good and evil
            forces of nature are of equal power.
  
      {Printer's devil}, the youngest apprentice in a printing
            office, who runs on errands, does dirty work (as washing
            the ink rollers and sweeping), etc. [bd]Without fearing
            the printer's devil or the sheriff's officer.[b8]
            --Macaulay.
  
      {Tasmanian devil} (Zo[94]l.), a very savage carnivorous
            marsupial of Tasmania ({Dasyurus, [or] Diabolus,
            ursinus}).
  
      {To play devil with}, to molest extremely; to ruin. [Low]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Praying \Pray"ing\,
      a. & n. from {Pray}, v.
  
      {Praying insect}, {locust}, [or] mantis (Zo[94]l.), a mantis,
            especially {Mantis religiosa}. See {Mantis}.
  
      {Praying machine}, [or] {Praying wheel}, a wheel on which
            prayers are pasted by Buddhist priests, who then put the
            wheel in rapid revolution. Each turn in supposed to have
            the efficacy of an oral repetition of all the prayers on
            the wheel. Sometimes it is moved by a stream.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Squilla \[d8]Squil"la\, n.; pl. E. {Squillas}, L.
      {Squill[91]}. [L., a sea onion, also, a prawn or shrimp. See
      {Squill}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous stomapod crustaceans of the genus
      {Squilla} and allied genera. They make burrows in mud or
      beneath stones on the seashore. Called also {mantis shrimp}.
      See Illust. under {Stomapoda}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mantis \[d8]Man"tis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] a prophet.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous species of voracious orthopterous insects
      of the genus {Mantis}, and allied genera. They are remarkable
      for their slender grotesque forms, and for holding their
      stout anterior legs in a manner suggesting hands folded in
      prayer. The common American species is {M. Carolina}.
  
      {Mantis shrimp}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Sguilla}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Squilla \[d8]Squil"la\, n.; pl. E. {Squillas}, L.
      {Squill[91]}. [L., a sea onion, also, a prawn or shrimp. See
      {Squill}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous stomapod crustaceans of the genus
      {Squilla} and allied genera. They make burrows in mud or
      beneath stones on the seashore. Called also {mantis shrimp}.
      See Illust. under {Stomapoda}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mantis \[d8]Man"tis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] a prophet.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of numerous species of voracious orthopterous insects
      of the genus {Mantis}, and allied genera. They are remarkable
      for their slender grotesque forms, and for holding their
      stout anterior legs in a manner suggesting hands folded in
      prayer. The common American species is {M. Carolina}.
  
      {Mantis shrimp}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Sguilla}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Opera \Op"er*a\, n. [It., fr. opera work, composition, opposed
      to an improvisation, fr. L. opera pains work, fr. opus,
      operis, work, labor: cf. F. op[82]ra. See {Operate}.]
      1. A drama, either tragic or comic, of which music forms an
            essential part; a drama wholly or mostly sung, consisting
            of recitative, arials, choruses, duets, trios, etc., with
            orchestral accompaniment, preludes, and interludes,
            together with appropriate costumes, scenery, and action; a
            lyric drama.
  
      2. The score of a musical drama, either written or in print;
            a play set to music.
  
      3. The house where operas are exhibited.
  
      {[d8]Op[82]ra bouffe} [F. op[82]ra opera + bouffe comic, It.
            buffo], {[d8]Opera buffa} [It.], light, farcical,
            burlesque opera.
  
      {Opera box}, a partially inclosed portion of the auditorium
            of an opera house for the use of a small private party.
  
      {[d8]Op[82]ra comique} [F.], comic or humorous opera.
  
      {Opera flannel}, a light flannel, highly finished. --Knight.
  
      {Opera girl} (Bot.), an East Indian plant ({Mantisia
            saltatoria}) of the Ginger family, sometimes seen in
            hothouses. It has curious flowers which have some
            resemblance to a ballet dancer, whence the popular name.
            Called also {dancing girls}.
  
      {Opera glass}, a short telescope with concave eye lenses of
            low power, usually made double, that is, with a tube and
            set of glasses for each eye; a lorgnette; -- so called
            because adapted for use at the opera, theater, etc.
  
      {Opera hat}, a gentleman's folding hat.
  
      {Opera house}, specifically, a theater devoted to the
            performance of operas.
  
      {[d8]Opera seria} [It.], serious or tragic opera; grand
            opera.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mantispid \Man*tis"pid\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any neuropterous insect of the genus {Mantispa}, and allied
      genera. The larv[91] feed on plant lice. Also used
      adjectively. See Illust. under {Neuroptera}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mantissa \Man*tis*sa\, n. [L., an addition, makeweight; of
      Tuscan origin.] (Math.)
      The decimal part of a logarithm, as distinguished from the
      integral part, or characteristic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manuducent \Man`u*du"cent\, n.
      One who leads by the hand; a manuductor. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Manuduction \Man`u*duc"tion\, n. [L. manus hand + ductio a
      leading, ducere to lead: cf. F. manuduction.]
      Guidance by the hand. [Obs.] --Glanvill. South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Maundy coins \Maundy coins\ [or] money \money\ .
      Silver coins or money of the nominal value of 1d., 2d., 3d.,
      and 4d., struck annually for the Maundy alms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mean \Mean\, a. [OE. mene, OF. meiien, F. moyen, fr. L. medianus
      that is in the middle, fr. medius; akin to E. mid. See
      {Mid}.]
      1. Occupying a middle position; middle; being about midway
            between extremes.
  
                     Being of middle age and a mean stature. --Sir. P.
                                                                              Sidney.
  
      2. Intermediate in excellence of any kind.
  
                     According to the fittest style of lofty, mean, or
                     lowly.                                                --Milton.
  
      3. (Math.) Average; having an intermediate value between two
            extremes, or between the several successive values of a
            variable quantity during one cycle of variation; as, mean
            distance; mean motion; mean solar day.
  
      {Mean distance} (of a planet from the sun) (Astron.), the
            average of the distances throughout one revolution of the
            planet, equivalent to the semi-major axis of the orbit.
  
      {Mean error} (Math. Phys.), the average error of a number of
            observations found by taking the mean value of the
            positive and negative errors without regard to sign.
  
      {Mean-square error}, [or] {Error of the mean square} (Math.
            Phys.), the error the square of which is the mean of the
            squares of all the errors; -- called also, especially by
            European writers, {mean error}.
  
      {Mean line}. (Crystallog.) Same as {Bisectrix}.
  
      {Mean noon}, noon as determined by mean time.
  
      {Mean proportional} (between two numbers) (Math.), the square
            root of their product.
  
      {Mean sun}, a fictitious sun supposed to move uniformly in
            the equator so as to be on the meridian each day at mean
            noon.
  
      {Mean time}, time as measured by an equable motion, as of a
            perfect clock, or as reckoned on the supposition that all
            the days of the year are of a mean or uniform length, in
            contradistinction from apparent time, or that actually
            indicated by the sun, and from sidereal time, or that
            measured by the stars.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendacious \Men*da"cious\, a. [L. mendax, -acis, lying, cf.
      mentiri to lie.]
      1. Given to deception or falsehood; lying; as, a mendacious
            person.
  
      2. False; counterfeit; containing falsehood; as, a mendacious
            statement. -- {Men*da"cious*ly}, adv. --
            {Men*da"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendacious \Men*da"cious\, a. [L. mendax, -acis, lying, cf.
      mentiri to lie.]
      1. Given to deception or falsehood; lying; as, a mendacious
            person.
  
      2. False; counterfeit; containing falsehood; as, a mendacious
            statement. -- {Men*da"cious*ly}, adv. --
            {Men*da"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendacious \Men*da"cious\, a. [L. mendax, -acis, lying, cf.
      mentiri to lie.]
      1. Given to deception or falsehood; lying; as, a mendacious
            person.
  
      2. False; counterfeit; containing falsehood; as, a mendacious
            statement. -- {Men*da"cious*ly}, adv. --
            {Men*da"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendacity \Men*dac"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Mendacities}. [L.
      mendacitas.]
      1. The quality or state of being mendacious; a habit of
            lying. --Macaulay.
  
      2. A falsehood; a lie. --Sir T. Browne.
  
      Syn: Lying; deceit; untruth; falsehood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendacity \Men*dac"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Mendacities}. [L.
      mendacitas.]
      1. The quality or state of being mendacious; a habit of
            lying. --Macaulay.
  
      2. A falsehood; a lie. --Sir T. Browne.
  
      Syn: Lying; deceit; untruth; falsehood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicancy \Men"di*can*cy\, n.
      The condition of being mendicant; beggary; begging. --Burke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicant \Men"di*cant\, a. [L. mendicans, -antis, p. pr. of
      mendicare to beg, fr. mendicus beggar, indigent.]
      Practicing beggary; begging; living on alms; as, mendicant
      friars.
  
      {Mendicant orders} (R. C. Ch.), certain monastic orders which
            are forbidden to acquire landed property and are required
            to be supported by alms, esp. the Franciscans, the
            Dominicans, the Carmelites, and the Augustinians.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicant \Men"di*cant\, n.
      A beggar; esp., one who makes a business of begging;
      specifically, a begging friar.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicant \Men"di*cant\, a. [L. mendicans, -antis, p. pr. of
      mendicare to beg, fr. mendicus beggar, indigent.]
      Practicing beggary; begging; living on alms; as, mendicant
      friars.
  
      {Mendicant orders} (R. C. Ch.), certain monastic orders which
            are forbidden to acquire landed property and are required
            to be supported by alms, esp. the Franciscans, the
            Dominicans, the Carmelites, and the Augustinians.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicate \Men"di*cate\, v. t.& i. [L. mendicatus, p. p. of
      mendicare to beg.]
      To beg. [R.] --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendication \Men`di*ca"tion\, n.
      The act or practice of begging; beggary; mendicancy. --Sir T.
      Browne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mendicity \Men*dic"i*ty\, n. [L. mendicitas: cf. F.
      mendicit[82]. See {Mendicant}.]
      The practice of begging; the life of a beggar; mendicancy.
      --Rom. of R.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mends \Mends\, n.
      See {Amends}. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Water mint \Wa"ter mint`\
      A kind of mint ({Mentha aquatica}) growing in wet places, and
      sometimes having a perfume resembling bergamot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bergamot \Ber"ga*mot\ (b[etil]r"g[adot]*m[ocr]t), n. [F.
      bergamote, fr. It. bergamotta; prob. a corruption of Turk.
      beg arm[umac]di a lord's pear.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) A tree of the Orange family ({Citrus bergamia}),
                  having a roundish or pear-shaped fruit, from the rind
                  of which an essential oil of delicious odor is
                  extracted, much prized as a perfume. Also, the fruit.
            (b) A variety of mint ({Mentha aquatica, var. glabrata}).
  
      2. The essence or perfume made from the fruit.
  
      3. A variety of pear. --Johnson.
  
      4. A variety of snuff perfumed with bergamot.
  
                     The better hand . . . gives the nose its bergamot.
                                                                              --Cowper.
  
      5. A coarse tapestry, manufactured from flock of cotton or
            hemp, mixed with ox's or goat's hair; -- said to have been
            invented at Bergamo, Italy. Encyc. Brit.
  
      {Wild bergamot} (Bot.), an American herb of the Mint family
            ({Monarda fistulosa}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Yerba \[d8]Yer"ba\, n. [Sp.] (Bot.)
      An herb; a plant.
  
      Note: This word is much used in compound names of plants in
               Spanish; as, yerba buena [Sp., a good herb], a name
               applied in Spain to several kinds of mint ({Mentha
               sativa}, {viridis}, etc.), but in California
               universally applied to a common, sweet-scented labiate
               plant ({Micromeria Douglasii}).
  
      {Yerba dol osa}. [Sp., herb of the she-bear.] A kind of
            buckthorn ({Rhamnus Californica}).
  
      {Yerba mansa}. [Sp., a mild herb, soft herb.] A plant
            ({Anemopsis Californica}) with a pungent, aromatic
            rootstock, used medicinally by the Mexicans and the
            Indians.
  
      {Yerba reuma}. [Cf. Sp. reuma rheum, rheumatism.] A low
            California undershrub ({Frankenia grandifolia}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Horsemint \Horse"mint`\, n. (Bot.)
      (a) A coarse American plant of the Mint family ({Monarda
            punctata}).
      (b) In England, the wild mint ({Mentha sylvestris}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bullhead \Bull"head`\, n.
      1. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A fresh-water fish of many species, of the genus
                  {Uranidea}, esp. {U. gobio} of Europe, and {U.
                  Richardsoni} of the United States; -- called also
                  {miller's thumb}.
            (b) In America, several species of {Amiurus}; -- called
                  also {catfish}, {horned pout}, and {bullpout}.
            (c) A marine fish of the genus {Cottus}; the sculpin.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The black-bellied plover ({Squatarola helvetica}); --
                  called also {beetlehead}.
            (b) The golden plover.
  
      3. A stupid fellow; a lubber. [Colloq.] --Jonson.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) A small black water insect. --E. Phillips.
  
      {Bullhead whiting} (Zo[94]l.), the kingfish of Florida
            ({Menticirrus alburnus}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Silver steel}, an alloy of steel with a very small
            proportion of silver.
  
      {Silver stick}, a title given to the title field officer of
            the Life Guards when on duty at the palace. [Eng.]
            --Thackeray.
  
      {Silver tree} (Bot.), a South African tree ({Leucadendron
            argenteum}) with long, silvery, silky leaves.
  
      {Silver trout}, (Zo[94]l.) See {Trout}.
  
      {Silver wedding}. See under {Wedding}.
  
      {Silver whiting} (Zo[94]l.), a marine sci[91]noid food fish
            ({Menticirrus littoralis}) native of the Southern United
            States; -- called also {surf whiting}.
  
      {Silver witch} (Zo[94]l.), A lepisma.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sucker \Suck"er\ (s[ucr]k"[etil]r), n.
      1. One who, or that which, sucks; esp., one of the organs by
            which certain animals, as the octopus and remora, adhere
            to other bodies.
  
      2. A suckling; a sucking animal. --Beau. & Fl.
  
      3. The embolus, or bucket, of a pump; also, the valve of a
            pump basket. --Boyle.
  
      4. A pipe through which anything is drawn.
  
      5. A small piece of leather, usually round, having a string
            attached to the center, which, when saturated with water
            and pressed upon a stone or other body having a smooth
            surface, adheres, by reason of the atmospheric pressure,
            with such force as to enable a considerable weight to be
            thus lifted by the string; -- used by children as a
            plaything.
  
      6. (Bot.) A shoot from the roots or lower part of the stem of
            a plant; -- so called, perhaps, from diverting nourishment
            from the body of the plant.
  
      7. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any one of numerous species of North American
                  fresh-water cyprinoid fishes of the family
                  {Catostomid[91]}; so called because the lips are
                  protrusile. The flesh is coarse, and they are of
                  little value as food. The most common species of the
                  Eastern United States are the northern sucker
                  ({Catostomus Commersoni}), the white sucker ({C.
                  teres}), the hog sucker ({C. nigricans}), and the
                  chub, or sweet sucker ({Erimyzon sucetta}). Some of
                  the large Western species are called {buffalo fish},
                  {red horse}, {black horse}, and {suckerel}.
            (b) The remora.
            (c) The lumpfish.
            (d) The hagfish, or myxine.
            (e) A California food fish ({Menticirrus undulatus})
                  closely allied to the kingfish
            (a); -- called also {bagre}.
  
      8. A parasite; a sponger. See def. 6, above.
  
                     They who constantly converse with men far above
                     their estates shall reap shame and loss thereby; if
                     thou payest nothing, they will count thee a sucker,
                     no branch.                                          --Fuller.
  
      9. A hard drinker; a soaker. [Slang]
  
      10. A greenhorn; one easily gulled. [Slang, U.S.]
  
      11. A nickname applied to a native of Illinois. [U. S.]
  
      {Carp sucker}, {Cherry sucker}, etc. See under {Carp},
            {Cherry}, etc.
  
      {Sucker fish}. See {Sucking fish}, under {Sucking}.
  
      {Sucker rod}, a pump rod. See under {Pump}.
  
      {Sucker tube} (Zo[94]l.), one of the external ambulacral
            tubes of an echinoderm, -- usually terminated by a sucker
            and used for locomotion. Called also {sucker foot}. See
            {Spatangoid}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menticultural \Men`ti*cul"tur*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to mental culture; serving to improve or
      strengthen the mind. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mimetic \Mi*met"ic\ (?; 277), Mimetical \Mi*met"ic*al\, [Gr.
      [?], fr. [?] to imitate.]
      1. Apt to imitate; given to mimicry; imitative.
  
      2. (Biol.) Characterized by mimicry; -- applied to animals
            and plants; as, mimetic species; mimetic organisms. See
            {Mimicry}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mimetic \Mi*met"ic\ (?; 277), Mimetical \Mi*met"ic*al\, [Gr.
      [?], fr. [?] to imitate.]
      1. Apt to imitate; given to mimicry; imitative.
  
      2. (Biol.) Characterized by mimicry; -- applied to animals
            and plants; as, mimetic species; mimetic organisms. See
            {Mimicry}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mimetism \Mim"e*tism\, n. [From Gr. [?] to mimic.] (Biol.)
      Same as {Mimicry}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menthol \Men"thol\, n. [Mentha + -ol.] (Chem.)
      A white, crystalline, aromatic substance resembling camphor,
      extracted from oil of peppermint ({Mentha}); -- called also
      {mint camphor} or {peppermint camphor}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note:
  
      {Corn mint} is {Mentha arvensis}.
  
      {Horsemint} is {M. sylvestris}, and in the United States
            {Monarda punctata}, which differs from the true mints in
            several respects.
  
      {Mountain mint} is any species of the related genus
            {Pycnanthemum}, common in North America.
  
      {Peppermint} is {M. piperita}.
  
      {Spearmint} is {M. viridis}.
  
      {Water mint} is {M. aquatica}.
  
      {Mint camphor}. (Chem.) See {Menthol}.
  
      {Mint julep}. See {Julep}.
  
      {Mint sauce}, a sauce flavored with spearmint, for meats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Menthol \Men"thol\, n. [Mentha + -ol.] (Chem.)
      A white, crystalline, aromatic substance resembling camphor,
      extracted from oil of peppermint ({Mentha}); -- called also
      {mint camphor} or {peppermint camphor}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note:
  
      {Corn mint} is {Mentha arvensis}.
  
      {Horsemint} is {M. sylvestris}, and in the United States
            {Monarda punctata}, which differs from the true mints in
            several respects.
  
      {Mountain mint} is any species of the related genus
            {Pycnanthemum}, common in North America.
  
      {Peppermint} is {M. piperita}.
  
      {Spearmint} is {M. viridis}.
  
      {Water mint} is {M. aquatica}.
  
      {Mint camphor}. (Chem.) See {Menthol}.
  
      {Mint julep}. See {Julep}.
  
      {Mint sauce}, a sauce flavored with spearmint, for meats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Julep \Ju"lep\, n. [F., fr. Sp. julepe, fr. Ar. & Per. jul[be]b,
      jull[be]b, fr. Per. gul[be]b rose water and julep; gul rose +
      [be]b water.]
      1. A refreshing drink flavored with aromatic herbs; esp.
            (Med.), a sweet, demulcent, acidulous, or mucilaginous
            mixture, used as a vehicle. --Milton.
  
                     Honey in woods, juleps in brooks.      -- H. Vaughan.
  
      2. A beverage composed of brandy, whisky, or some other
            spirituous liquor, with sugar, pounded ice, and sprigs of
            mint; -- called also {mint julep}. [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note:
  
      {Corn mint} is {Mentha arvensis}.
  
      {Horsemint} is {M. sylvestris}, and in the United States
            {Monarda punctata}, which differs from the true mints in
            several respects.
  
      {Mountain mint} is any species of the related genus
            {Pycnanthemum}, common in North America.
  
      {Peppermint} is {M. piperita}.
  
      {Spearmint} is {M. viridis}.
  
      {Water mint} is {M. aquatica}.
  
      {Mint camphor}. (Chem.) See {Menthol}.
  
      {Mint julep}. See {Julep}.
  
      {Mint sauce}, a sauce flavored with spearmint, for meats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Julep \Ju"lep\, n. [F., fr. Sp. julepe, fr. Ar. & Per. jul[be]b,
      jull[be]b, fr. Per. gul[be]b rose water and julep; gul rose +
      [be]b water.]
      1. A refreshing drink flavored with aromatic herbs; esp.
            (Med.), a sweet, demulcent, acidulous, or mucilaginous
            mixture, used as a vehicle. --Milton.
  
                     Honey in woods, juleps in brooks.      -- H. Vaughan.
  
      2. A beverage composed of brandy, whisky, or some other
            spirituous liquor, with sugar, pounded ice, and sprigs of
            mint; -- called also {mint julep}. [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note:
  
      {Corn mint} is {Mentha arvensis}.
  
      {Horsemint} is {M. sylvestris}, and in the United States
            {Monarda punctata}, which differs from the true mints in
            several respects.
  
      {Mountain mint} is any species of the related genus
            {Pycnanthemum}, common in North America.
  
      {Peppermint} is {M. piperita}.
  
      {Spearmint} is {M. viridis}.
  
      {Water mint} is {M. aquatica}.
  
      {Mint camphor}. (Chem.) See {Menthol}.
  
      {Mint julep}. See {Julep}.
  
      {Mint sauce}, a sauce flavored with spearmint, for meats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      Note:
  
      {Corn mint} is {Mentha arvensis}.
  
      {Horsemint} is {M. sylvestris}, and in the United States
            {Monarda punctata}, which differs from the true mints in
            several respects.
  
      {Mountain mint} is any species of the related genus
            {Pycnanthemum}, common in North America.
  
      {Peppermint} is {M. piperita}.
  
      {Spearmint} is {M. viridis}.
  
      {Water mint} is {M. aquatica}.
  
      {Mint camphor}. (Chem.) See {Menthol}.
  
      {Mint julep}. See {Julep}.
  
      {Mint sauce}, a sauce flavored with spearmint, for meats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mint sauce \Mint sauce\
      1. A sauce of vinegar and sugar flavored with spearmint
            leaves.
  
      2. Money. [Slang, Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mintage \Mint"age\, n.
      1. The coin, or other production, made in a mint.
  
                     Stamped in clay, a heavenly mintage.   --Sterling.
  
      2. The duty paid to the mint for coining.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minute \Min"ute\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a minute or minutes; occurring at or
      marking successive minutes.
  
      {Minute bell}, a bell tolled at intervals of a minute, as to
            give notice of a death or a funeral.
  
      {Minute book}, a book in which written minutes are entered.
           
  
      {Minute glass}, a glass measuring a minute or minutes by the
            running of sand.
  
      {Minute gun}, a discharge of a cannon repeated every minute
            as a sign of distress or mourning.
  
      {Minute hand}, the long hand of a watch or clock, which makes
            the circuit of the dial in an hour, and marks the minutes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minute \Min"ute\, a.
      Of or pertaining to a minute or minutes; occurring at or
      marking successive minutes.
  
      {Minute bell}, a bell tolled at intervals of a minute, as to
            give notice of a death or a funeral.
  
      {Minute book}, a book in which written minutes are entered.
           
  
      {Minute glass}, a glass measuring a minute or minutes by the
            running of sand.
  
      {Minute gun}, a discharge of a cannon repeated every minute
            as a sign of distress or mourning.
  
      {Minute hand}, the long hand of a watch or clock, which makes
            the circuit of the dial in an hour, and marks the minutes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Minute-jack \Mi*nute"-jack`\, n.
      1. A figure which strikes the hour on the bell of some
            fanciful clocks; -- called also {jack of the clock house}.
  
      2. A timeserver; an inconstant person. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mnemotechny \Mne"mo*tech`ny\, n. [Gr. [?] memory + [?] art: cf.
      F. mn[82]motechnie.]
      Mnemonics.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mohammedanism \Mo*ham"med*an*ism\, Mohammedism \Mo*ham"med*ism\
   ,   n.
      The religion, or doctrines and precepts, of Mohammed,
      contained in the Koran; Islamism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mohammedanize \Mo*ham"med*an*ize\, Mohammedize \Mo*ham"med*ize\
   ,   v. t.
      To make conformable to the principles, or customs and rites,
      of Mohammedanism. [Written also {Mahometanize}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monadic \Mo*nad"ic\, Monadical \Mo*nad"ic*al\, a.
      Of, pertaining to, or like, a monad, in any of its senses.
      See {Monad}, n. --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monadic \Mo*nad"ic\, Monadical \Mo*nad"ic*al\, a.
      Of, pertaining to, or like, a monad, in any of its senses.
      See {Monad}, n. --Dr. H. More.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mond2cian \Mo*n[d2]"cian\, a.
      1. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to the Mon[d2]cia; mon[d2]cious.
            -- n. One of the Mon[d2]cia.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A mon[d2]cious animal, as certain mollusks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mond2cious \Mo*n[d2]"cious\, a. (Biol.)
      Having the sexes united in one individual, as when male and
      female flowers grow upon the same individual plant;
      hermaphrodite; -- opposed to {di[d2]cious}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mond2cism \Mo*n[d2]"cism\, n. (Biol.)
      The state or condition of being mon[d2]cious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Musk \Musk\, n. [F. musc, L. muscus, Per. musk, fr. Skr. mushka
      testicle, orig., a little mouse. See {Mouse}, and cd.
      {Abelmosk}, {Muscadel}, {Muscovy duck}, {Nutmeg}.]
      1. A substance of a reddish brown color, and when fresh of
            the consistence of honey, obtained from a bag being behind
            the navel of the male musk deer. It has a slightly bitter
            taste, but is specially remarkable for its powerful and
            enduring odor. It is used in medicine as a stimulant
            antispasmodic. The term is also applied to secretions of
            various other animals, having a similar odor.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The musk deer. See {Musk deer} (below).
  
      3. The perfume emitted by musk, or any perfume somewhat
            similar.
  
      4. (Bot.)
            (a) The musk plant ({Mimulus moschatus}).
            (b) A plant of the genus {Erodium} ({E. moschatum}); --
                  called also {musky heron's-bill}.
            (c) A plant of the genus {Muscari}; grape hyacinth.
  
      {Musk beaver} (Zo[94]l.), muskrat (1).
  
      {Musk beetle} (Zo[94]l.), a European longicorn beetle
            ({Aromia moschata}), having an agreeable odor resembling
            that of attar of roses.
  
      {Musk cat}. See {Bondar}.
  
      {Musk cattle} (Zo[94]l.), musk oxen. See {Musk ox} (below).
           
  
      {Musk deer} (Zo[94]l.), a small hornless deer ({Moschus
            moschiferus}), which inhabits the elevated parts of
            Central Asia. The upper canine teeth of the male are
            developed into sharp tusks, curved downward. The male has
            scent bags on the belly, from which the musk of commerce
            is derived. The deer is yellow or red-brown above, whitish
            below. The pygmy musk deer are chevrotains, as the kanchil
            and napu.
  
      {Musk duck}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The Muscovy duck.
            (b) An Australian duck ({Biziura lobata}).
  
      {Musk lorikeet} (Zo[94]l.), the Pacific lorikeet
            ({Glossopsitta australis}) of Australia.
  
      {Musk mallow} (Bot.), a name of two malvaceous plants:
            (a) A species of mallow ({Malva moschata}), the foliage of
                  which has a faint musky smell.
            (b) An Asiatic shrub. See {Abelmosk}.
  
      {Musk orchis} (Bot.), a European plant of the Orchis family
            ({Herminium Minorchis}); -- so called from its peculiar
            scent.
  
      {Musk ox} (Zo[94]l.), an Arctic hollow-horned ruminant
            ({Ovibos moschatus}), now existing only in America, but
            found fossil in Europe and Asia. It is covered with a
            thick coat of fine yellowish wool, and with long dark
            hair, which is abundant and shaggy on the neck and
            shoulders. The full-grown male weighs over four hundred
            pounds.
  
      {Musk parakeet}. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Musk lorikeet} (above).
           
  
      {Musk pear} (Bot.), a fragrant kind of pear much resembling
            the Seckel pear.
  
      {Musk plant} (Bot.), the {Mimulus moschatus}, a plant found
            in Western North America, often cultivated, and having a
            strong musky odor.
  
      {Musk root} (Bot.), the name of several roots with a strong
            odor, as that of the nard ({Nardostachys Jatamansi}) and
            of a species of {Angelica}.
  
      {Musk rose} (Bot.), a species of rose ({Rosa moschata}),
            having peculiarly fragrant white blossoms.
  
      {Musk seed} (Bot.), the seed of a plant of the Mallow family
            ({Hibiscus moschatus}), used in perfumery and in
            flavoring. See {Abelmosk}.
  
      {Musk sheep} (Zo[94]l.), the musk ox.
  
      {Musk shrew} (Zo[94]l.), a shrew ({Sorex murinus}), found in
            India. It has a powerful odor of musk. Called also
            {sondeli}, and {mondjourou}.
  
      {Musk thistle} (Bot.), a species of thistle ({Carduus
            nutans}), having fine large flowers, and leaves smelling
            strongly of musk.
  
      {Musk tortoise}, {Musk turtle} (Zo[94]l.), a small American
            fresh-water tortoise ({Armochelys, [or] Ozotheca,
            odorata}), which has a distinct odor of musk; -- called
            also {stinkpot}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monetization \Mon`e*ti*za"tion\, n.
      The act or process of converting into money, or of adopting
      as money; as, the monetization of silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monetize \Mon"e*tize\, v. t.
      To convert into money; to adopt as current money; as, to
      monetize silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monodactylous \Mon`o*dac"tyl*ous\, a. [Gr. [?]; [?] single + [?]
      finger: cf. F. monodactyle.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Having but one finger or claw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monodic \Mo*nod"ic\, Monodical \Mo*nod"ic*al\, a. [Gr. [?].]
      1. Belonging to a monody.
  
      2. (Mus.)
            (a) For one voice; monophonic.
            (b) Homophonic; -- applied to music in which the melody is
                  confined to one part, instead of being shared by all
                  the parts as in the style called polyphonic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monodic \Mo*nod"ic\, Monodical \Mo*nod"ic*al\, a. [Gr. [?].]
      1. Belonging to a monody.
  
      2. (Mus.)
            (a) For one voice; monophonic.
            (b) Homophonic; -- applied to music in which the melody is
                  confined to one part, instead of being shared by all
                  the parts as in the style called polyphonic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monody \Mon"o*dy\, n.; pl. {Monodies}. [L. monodia, Gr. [?], fr.
      [?] singing alone; [?] single + [?] song: cf. F. monodie. See
      {Ode}.]
      A species of poem of a mournful character, in which a single
      mourner expresses lamentation; a song for one voice.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monodist \Mon"o*dist\, n.
      A writer of a monody.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monotessaron \Mon`o*tes"sa*ron\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] single +
      [?] four.]
      A single narrative framed from the statements of the four
      evangelists; a gospel harmony. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monothecal \Mon`o*the"cal\, a. [Mono- + Br. [?] box.] (Bot.)
      Having a single loculament.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monotheism \Mon"o*the*ism\, n. [Mono- + Gr. [?] god: cf. F.
      monoth[82]isme.]
      The doctrine or belief that there is but one God.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monotheist \Mon"o*the*ist\, n. [Cf. F. monoth[82]iste.]
      One who believes that there is but one God.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monotheistic \Mon`o*the*is"tic\, a.
      Of or pertaining to monotheism.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monotocous \Mo*not"o*cous\, a. [Mono- + Gr. [?] birth,
      offspring.]
      1. (Bot.) Bearing fruit but once; monocarpic.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Uniparous; laying a single egg.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Montaigne \Mon"taigne\, n.
      A mountain. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monte-acid \Monte`-ac"id\, n. [F. monter to raise + acide acid.]
      (Chem.)
      An acid elevator, as a tube through which acid is forced to
      some height in a sulphuric acid manufactory.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Montessori Method \Mon`tes*so"ri Meth"od\ (Pedagogy)
      A system of training and instruction, primarily for use with
      normal children aged from three to six years, devised by Dr.
      Maria Montessori while teaching in the [bd]Houses of
      Childhood[b8] (schools in the poorest tenement districts of
      Rome, Italy), and first fully described by her in 1909.
      Leading features are freedom for physical activity (no
      stationary desks and chairs), informal and individual
      instruction, the very early development of writing, and an
      extended sensory and motor training (with special emphasis on
      vision, touch, perception of movement, and their
      interconnections), mediated by a patented, standardized
      system of [bd]didactic apparatus,[b8] which is declared to be
      [bd]auto-regulative.[b8] Most of the chief features of the
      method are borrowed from current methods used in many
      institutions for training feeble-minded children, and dating
      back especially to the work of the French-American physician
      Edouard O. Seguin (1812-80).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticle \Mon"ti*cle\, n. [L. monticulus, dim. of mons, montis,
      mountain: cf. F. monticule. See {Mount}, n.]
      A little mount; a hillock; a small elevation or prominence.
      [Written also {monticule}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticulate \Mon*tic"u*late\, a.
      Furnished with monticles or little elevations.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticle \Mon"ti*cle\, n. [L. monticulus, dim. of mons, montis,
      mountain: cf. F. monticule. See {Mount}, n.]
      A little mount; a hillock; a small elevation or prominence.
      [Written also {monticule}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticule \Mon"ti*cule\, n.
      See {Monticle}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticle \Mon"ti*cle\, n. [L. monticulus, dim. of mons, montis,
      mountain: cf. F. monticule. See {Mount}, n.]
      A little mount; a hillock; a small elevation or prominence.
      [Written also {monticule}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticule \Mon"ti*cule\, n.
      See {Monticle}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Monticulous \Mon*tic"u*lous\, a.
      Monticulate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Montigenous \Mon*tig"e*nous\, a. [L. montigena; mons, montis,
      mountain + the root of gignere to beget.]
      Produced on a mountain.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moonflower \Moon"flow`er\, n. (Bot.)
      (a) The oxeye daisy; -- called also {moon daisy}.
      (b) A kind of morning glory ({Ipom[d2]a Bona-nox}) with large
            white flowers opening at night.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mundic \Mun"dic\, n.
      Iron pyrites, or arsenical pyrites; -- so called by the
      Cornish miners.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Muntjac \Munt"jac\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several species of small Asiatic deer of the genus
      {Cervulus}, esp. {C. muntjac}, which occurs both in India and
      on the East Indian Islands. [Written also {muntjak}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Muntjac \Munt"jac\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several species of small Asiatic deer of the genus
      {Cervulus}, esp. {C. muntjac}, which occurs both in India and
      on the East Indian Islands. [Written also {muntjak}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Metal \Met"al\ (? [or] ?; 277), n. [F. m[82]tal, L. metallum
      metal, mine, Gr. [?] mine; cf. Gr. [?] to search after. Cf.
      {Mettle}, {Medal}.]
      1. (Chem.) An elementary substance, as sodium, calcium, or
            copper, whose oxide or hydroxide has basic rather than
            acid properties, as contrasted with the nonmetals, or
            metalloids. No sharp line can be drawn between the metals
            and nonmetals, and certain elements partake of both acid
            and basic qualities, as chromium, manganese, bismuth, etc.
  
      Note: Popularly, the name is applied to certain hard, fusible
               metals, as gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, lead, zinc,
               nickel, etc., and also to the mixed metals, or metallic
               alloys, as brass, bronze, steel, bell metal, etc.
  
      2. Ore from which a metal is derived; -- so called by miners.
            --Raymond.
  
      3. A mine from which ores are taken. [Obs.]
  
                     Slaves . . . and persons condemned to metals. --Jer.
                                                                              Taylor.
  
      4. The substance of which anything is made; material; hence,
            constitutional disposition; character; temper.
  
                     Not till God make men of some other metal than
                     earth.                                                --Shak.
  
      5. Courage; spirit; mettle. See {Mettle}. --Shak.
  
      Note: The allusion is to the temper of the metal of a sword
               blade. --Skeat.
  
      6. The broken stone used in macadamizing roads and ballasting
            railroads.
  
      7. The effective power or caliber of guns carried by a vessel
            of war.
  
      8. Glass in a state of fusion. --Knight.
  
      9. pl. The rails of a railroad. [Eng.]
  
      {Base metal} (Chem.), any one of the metals, as iron, lead,
            etc., which are readily tarnished or oxidized, in contrast
            with the noble metals. In general, a metal of small value,
            as compared with gold or silver.
  
      {Fusible metal} (Metal.), a very fusible alloy, usually
            consisting of bismuth with lead, tin, or cadmium.
  
      {Heavy metals} (Chem.), the metallic elements not included in
            the groups of the alkalies, alkaline earths, or the
            earths; specifically, the heavy metals, as gold, mercury,
            platinum, lead, silver, etc.
  
      {Light metals} (Chem.), the metallic elements of the alkali
            and alkaline earth groups, as sodium, lithium, calcium,
            magnesium, etc.; also, sometimes, the metals of the
            earths, as aluminium.
  
      {Muntz metal}, an alloy for sheathing and other purposes,
            consisting of about sixty per cent of copper, and forty of
            zinc. Sometimes a little lead is added. It is named from
            the inventor.
  
      {Prince's metal} (Old Chem.), an alloy resembling brass,
            consisting of three parts of copper to one of zinc; --
            also called {Prince Rupert's metal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Muntz metal \Muntz" met`al\
      See under {Metal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Composition \Com`po*si"tion\, n. [F. composition, fr. L.
      compositio. See {Composite}.]
      1. The act or art of composing, or forming a whole or
            integral, by placing together and uniting different
            things, parts, or ingredients. In specific uses:
            (a) The invention or combination of the parts of any
                  literary work or discourse, or of a work of art; as,
                  the composition of a poem or a piece of music. [bd]The
                  constant habit of elaborate composition.[b8]
                  --Macaulay.
            (b) (Fine Arts) The art or practice of so combining the
                  different parts of a work of art as to produce a
                  harmonious whole; also, a work of art considered as
                  such. See 4, below.
            (c) The act of writing for practice in a language, as
                  English, Latin, German, etc.
            (d) (Print.) The setting up of type and arranging it for
                  printing.
  
      2. The state of being put together or composed; conjunction;
            combination; adjustment.
  
                     View them in composition with other things. --I.
                                                                              Watts.
  
                     The elementary composition of bodies. --Whewell.
  
      3. A mass or body formed by combining two or more substances;
            as, a chemical composition.
  
                     A composition that looks . . . like marble.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      4. A literary, musical, or artistic production, especially
            one showing study and care in arrangement; -- often used
            of an elementary essay or translation done as an
            educational exercise.
  
      5. Consistency; accord; congruity. [Obs.]
  
                     There is no composition in these news That gives
                     them credit.                                       --Shak.
  
      6. Mutual agreement to terms or conditions for the settlement
            of a difference or controversy; also, the terms or
            conditions of settlement; agreement.
  
                     Thus we are agreed: I crave our composition may be
                     written.                                             --Shak.
  
      7. (Law) The adjustment of a debt, or avoidance of an
            obligation, by some form of compensation agreed on between
            the parties; also, the sum or amount of compensation
            agreed upon in the adjustment.
  
                     Compositions for not taking the order of knighthood.
                                                                              --Hallam.
  
                     Cleared by composition with their creditors.
                                                                              --Blackstone.
  
      8. Synthesis as opposed to analysis.
  
                     The investigation of difficult things by the method
                     of analysis ought ever to precede the method of
                     composition.                                       --Sir I.
                                                                              Newton.
  
      {Composition cloth}, a kind of cloth covered with a
            preparation making it waterproof.
  
      {Composition deed}, an agreement for composition between a
            debtor and several creditors.
  
      {Composition plane} (Crystallog.), the plane by which the two
            individuals of a twin crystal are united in their reserved
            positions.
  
      {Composition of forces} (Mech.), the finding of a single
            force (called the resultant) which shall be equal in
            effect to two or more given forces (called the components)
            when acting in given directions. --Herbert.
  
      {Composition metal}, an alloy resembling brass, which is
            sometimes used instead of copper for sheathing vessels; --
            also called {Muntz metal} and {yellow metal}.
  
      {Composition of proportion} (Math.), an arrangement of four
            proportionals so that the sum of the first and second is
            to the second as the sum of the third and fourth to the
            fourth.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mammoth Cave Nat, KY
      Zip code(s): 42259

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mammoth Spring, AR (city, FIPS 43670)
      Location: 36.49413 N, 91.54470 W
      Population (1990): 1097 (557 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 72554

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manatee County, FL (county, FIPS 81)
      Location: 27.48136 N, 82.35974 W
      Population (1990): 211707 (115245 housing units)
      Area: 1919.7 sq km (land), 392.7 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manati] zona, PR (urbana, FIPS 50152)
      Location: 18.43096 N, 66.48424 W
      Population (1990): 16352 (5967 housing units)
      Area: 5.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manitou Springs, CO (city, FIPS 48445)
      Location: 38.85705 N, 104.91093 W
      Population (1990): 4535 (2524 housing units)
      Area: 7.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 80829

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manitowish Water, WI
      Zip code(s): 54545

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manitowoc, WI (city, FIPS 48500)
      Location: 44.09863 N, 87.67742 W
      Population (1990): 32520 (13728 housing units)
      Area: 37.3 sq km (land), 0.8 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 54220

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manitowoc County, WI (county, FIPS 71)
      Location: 44.14547 N, 87.55333 W
      Population (1990): 80421 (31843 housing units)
      Area: 1532.1 sq km (land), 2336.9 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mantachie, MS (town, FIPS 44920)
      Location: 34.32398 N, 88.49303 W
      Population (1990): 651 (265 housing units)
      Area: 4.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 38855

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Manteca, CA (city, FIPS 45484)
      Location: 37.80233 N, 121.22347 W
      Population (1990): 40773 (13981 housing units)
      Area: 22.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 95336

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mendocino, CA
      Zip code(s): 95460

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mendocino County, CA (county, FIPS 45)
      Location: 39.43115 N, 123.43163 W
      Population (1990): 80345 (33649 housing units)
      Area: 9089.0 sq km (land), 956.3 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mentasta Lake, AK (CDP, FIPS 48540)
      Location: 62.85179 N, 143.76088 W
      Population (1990): 96 (51 housing units)
      Area: 203.1 sq km (land), 4.9 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Minidoka, ID (city, FIPS 53110)
      Location: 42.75395 N, 113.48904 W
      Population (1990): 67 (43 housing units)
      Area: 0.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 83343

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Minidoka County, ID (county, FIPS 67)
      Location: 42.84776 N, 113.64288 W
      Population (1990): 19361 (7044 housing units)
      Area: 1967.6 sq km (land), 8.7 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Moniteau County, MO (county, FIPS 135)
      Location: 38.63313 N, 92.58365 W
      Population (1990): 12298 (5043 housing units)
      Area: 1078.8 sq km (land), 6.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monmouth County, NJ (county, FIPS 25)
      Location: 40.28781 N, 74.15435 W
      Population (1990): 553124 (218408 housing units)
      Area: 1222.1 sq km (land), 501.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monmouth Junctio, NJ
      Zip code(s): 08852

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monmouth Junction, NJ (CDP, FIPS 47190)
      Location: 40.38003 N, 74.54523 W
      Population (1990): 1570 (543 housing units)
      Area: 3.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mont Clare, PA
      Zip code(s): 19453

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montague, CA (city, FIPS 48690)
      Location: 41.72746 N, 122.52958 W
      Population (1990): 1415 (553 housing units)
      Area: 4.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 96064
   Montague, MA
      Zip code(s): 01351
   Montague, MI (city, FIPS 55100)
      Location: 43.41234 N, 86.36291 W
      Population (1990): 2276 (970 housing units)
      Area: 6.9 sq km (land), 1.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49437
   Montague, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07827
   Montague, TX
      Zip code(s): 76251

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montague County, TX (county, FIPS 337)
      Location: 33.67219 N, 97.72513 W
      Population (1990): 17274 (9262 housing units)
      Area: 2410.6 sq km (land), 20.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montauk, NY (CDP, FIPS 48054)
      Location: 41.04746 N, 71.94525 W
      Population (1990): 3001 (3996 housing units)
      Area: 45.2 sq km (land), 5.9 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 11954

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montcalm, WV (CDP, FIPS 55372)
      Location: 37.35026 N, 81.25184 W
      Population (1990): 1023 (398 housing units)
      Area: 7.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montcalm County, MI (county, FIPS 117)
      Location: 43.31291 N, 85.14937 W
      Population (1990): 53059 (22817 housing units)
      Area: 1833.9 sq km (land), 33.5 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montclair, CA (city, FIPS 48788)
      Location: 34.07278 N, 117.69656 W
      Population (1990): 28434 (8915 housing units)
      Area: 13.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 91763
   Montclair, NJ (CDP, FIPS 47490)
      Location: 40.82453 N, 74.21160 W
      Population (1990): 37729 (15069 housing units)
      Area: 16.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 07042, 07043
   Montclair, VA (CDP, FIPS 52658)
      Location: 38.61087 N, 77.33987 W
      Population (1990): 11399 (3616 housing units)
      Area: 15.6 sq km (land), 0.3 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monte Sereno, CA (city, FIPS 48956)
      Location: 37.23825 N, 121.98857 W
      Population (1990): 3287 (1190 housing units)
      Area: 4.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 95030

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monteagle, TN (town, FIPS 49740)
      Location: 35.23823 N, 85.84067 W
      Population (1990): 1138 (444 housing units)
      Area: 11.0 sq km (land), 0.3 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37356

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montecito, CA
      Zip code(s): 93108

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montegut, LA (CDP, FIPS 51550)
      Location: 29.46984 N, 90.55988 W
      Population (1990): 1784 (626 housing units)
      Area: 11.5 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 70377

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montesano, WA (city, FIPS 46895)
      Location: 47.01463 N, 123.58392 W
      Population (1990): 3064 (1239 housing units)
      Area: 25.9 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 98563

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montezuma, CO (town, FIPS 51690)
      Location: 39.58125 N, 105.86844 W
      Population (1990): 60 (124 housing units)
      Area: 0.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Montezuma, GA (city, FIPS 52304)
      Location: 32.29959 N, 84.02678 W
      Population (1990): 4506 (1705 housing units)
      Area: 11.6 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 31063
   Montezuma, IA (city, FIPS 53490)
      Location: 41.58285 N, 92.52749 W
      Population (1990): 1651 (668 housing units)
      Area: 6.3 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 50171
   Montezuma, IN (town, FIPS 50652)
      Location: 39.79100 N, 87.36911 W
      Population (1990): 1134 (510 housing units)
      Area: 1.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 47862
   Montezuma, KS (city, FIPS 47875)
      Location: 37.59645 N, 100.44175 W
      Population (1990): 838 (340 housing units)
      Area: 1.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67867
   Montezuma, NM
      Zip code(s): 87731
   Montezuma, OH (village, FIPS 51674)
      Location: 40.48934 N, 84.54895 W
      Population (1990): 199 (92 housing units)
      Area: 0.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Montezuma, VA
      Zip code(s): 22821

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montezuma County, CO (county, FIPS 83)
      Location: 37.33574 N, 108.59552 W
      Population (1990): 18672 (8050 housing units)
      Area: 5275.7 sq km (land), 8.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montezuma Creek, UT (CDP, FIPS 51470)
      Location: 37.26011 N, 109.31331 W
      Population (1990): 345 (119 housing units)
      Area: 12.8 sq km (land), 0.5 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery, AL (city, FIPS 51000)
      Location: 32.35440 N, 86.28429 W
      Population (1990): 187106 (76636 housing units)
      Area: 349.6 sq km (land), 1.9 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 36104, 36105, 36106, 36107, 36108, 36109, 36110, 36111, 36116, 36117
   Montgomery, GA (CDP, FIPS 52332)
      Location: 31.94418 N, 81.10908 W
      Population (1990): 4327 (1655 housing units)
      Area: 13.5 sq km (land), 2.1 sq km (water)
   Montgomery, IL (village, FIPS 50218)
      Location: 41.72990 N, 88.34147 W
      Population (1990): 4267 (1705 housing units)
      Area: 9.1 sq km (land), 0.3 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 60538
   Montgomery, IN (town, FIPS 50688)
      Location: 38.66522 N, 87.04712 W
      Population (1990): 351 (147 housing units)
      Area: 0.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 47558
   Montgomery, LA (town, FIPS 51620)
      Location: 31.66449 N, 92.88917 W
      Population (1990): 645 (332 housing units)
      Area: 3.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 71454
   Montgomery, MA
      Zip code(s): 01085
   Montgomery, MI (village, FIPS 55220)
      Location: 41.77693 N, 84.80599 W
      Population (1990): 388 (140 housing units)
      Area: 2.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49255
   Montgomery, MN (city, FIPS 43738)
      Location: 44.43919 N, 93.58053 W
      Population (1990): 2399 (1019 housing units)
      Area: 3.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56069
   Montgomery, NY (village, FIPS 48142)
      Location: 41.52202 N, 74.23821 W
      Population (1990): 2696 (950 housing units)
      Area: 3.5 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 12549
   Montgomery, OH (city, FIPS 51716)
      Location: 39.24730 N, 84.34762 W
      Population (1990): 9753 (3462 housing units)
      Area: 13.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Montgomery, PA (borough, FIPS 50632)
      Location: 41.17093 N, 76.87520 W
      Population (1990): 1631 (649 housing units)
      Area: 1.4 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 17752
   Montgomery, TX (city, FIPS 49128)
      Location: 30.39119 N, 95.69577 W
      Population (1990): 356 (174 housing units)
      Area: 10.8 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 77356
   Montgomery, WV (city, FIPS 55468)
      Location: 38.17385 N, 81.31847 W
      Population (1990): 2449 (969 housing units)
      Area: 4.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 25136

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery Cente, VT
      Zip code(s): 05471

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery City, MO (city, FIPS 49574)
      Location: 38.97562 N, 91.50512 W
      Population (1990): 2281 (1021 housing units)
      Area: 5.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 63361

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery County, AL (county, FIPS 101)
      Location: 32.22435 N, 86.20379 W
      Population (1990): 209085 (84525 housing units)
      Area: 2045.8 sq km (land), 25.7 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, AR (county, FIPS 97)
      Location: 34.54597 N, 93.66019 W
      Population (1990): 7841 (4269 housing units)
      Area: 2022.7 sq km (land), 50.2 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, GA (county, FIPS 209)
      Location: 32.16757 N, 82.52981 W
      Population (1990): 7163 (2885 housing units)
      Area: 635.5 sq km (land), 5.2 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, IA (county, FIPS 137)
      Location: 41.03147 N, 95.15638 W
      Population (1990): 12076 (5363 housing units)
      Area: 1097.9 sq km (land), 2.4 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, IL (county, FIPS 135)
      Location: 39.22814 N, 89.47813 W
      Population (1990): 30728 (12456 housing units)
      Area: 1823.0 sq km (land), 15.4 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, IN (county, FIPS 107)
      Location: 40.04094 N, 86.89284 W
      Population (1990): 34436 (13957 housing units)
      Area: 1306.9 sq km (land), 2.1 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, KS (county, FIPS 125)
      Location: 37.18934 N, 95.74175 W
      Population (1990): 38816 (17920 housing units)
      Area: 1671.2 sq km (land), 16.0 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, KY (county, FIPS 173)
      Location: 38.02968 N, 83.90611 W
      Population (1990): 19561 (7759 housing units)
      Area: 514.4 sq km (land), 0.5 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, MD (county, FIPS 31)
      Location: 39.13720 N, 77.20453 W
      Population (1990): 757027 (295723 housing units)
      Area: 1280.9 sq km (land), 30.2 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, MO (county, FIPS 139)
      Location: 38.94160 N, 91.47270 W
      Population (1990): 11355 (5241 housing units)
      Area: 1395.3 sq km (land), 8.4 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, MS (county, FIPS 97)
      Location: 33.49761 N, 89.60886 W
      Population (1990): 12388 (4987 housing units)
      Area: 1053.8 sq km (land), 2.6 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, NC (county, FIPS 123)
      Location: 35.32950 N, 79.90275 W
      Population (1990): 23346 (10421 housing units)
      Area: 1271.8 sq km (land), 26.0 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, NY (county, FIPS 57)
      Location: 42.90621 N, 74.43659 W
      Population (1990): 51981 (21851 housing units)
      Area: 1048.5 sq km (land), 14.3 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, OH (county, FIPS 113)
      Location: 39.75210 N, 84.29023 W
      Population (1990): 573809 (240820 housing units)
      Area: 1195.8 sq km (land), 7.0 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, PA (county, FIPS 91)
      Location: 40.20937 N, 75.37046 W
      Population (1990): 678111 (265856 housing units)
      Area: 1251.3 sq km (land), 11.2 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, TN (county, FIPS 125)
      Location: 36.49548 N, 87.38154 W
      Population (1990): 100498 (37233 housing units)
      Area: 1396.4 sq km (land), 12.2 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, TX (county, FIPS 339)
      Location: 30.29972 N, 95.50190 W
      Population (1990): 182201 (73871 housing units)
      Area: 2704.8 sq km (land), 84.4 sq km (water)
   Montgomery County, VA (county, FIPS 121)
      Location: 37.17118 N, 80.39441 W
      Population (1990): 73913 (27770 housing units)
      Area: 1005.5 sq km (land), 3.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery Creek, CA
      Zip code(s): 96065

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomery Village, MD (CDP, FIPS 53325)
      Location: 39.18116 N, 77.19361 W
      Population (1990): 32315 (13120 housing units)
      Area: 16.8 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Montgomeryville, PA (CDP, FIPS 50672)
      Location: 40.24806 N, 75.24169 W
      Population (1990): 9114 (3322 housing units)
      Area: 12.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 18936

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Monticello, AR (city, FIPS 46580)
      Location: 33.62476 N, 91.79378 W
      Population (1990): 8116 (3267 housing units)
      Area: 25.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 71655
   Monticello, FL (city, FIPS 46500)
      Location: 30.54195 N, 83.87077 W
      Population (1990): 2573 (1057 housing units)
      Area: 8.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 32344
   Monticello, GA (city, FIPS 52416)
      Location: 33.30556 N, 83.68792 W
      Population (1990): 2289 (913 housing units)
      Area: 6.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 31064
   Monticello, IA (city, FIPS 53625)
      Location: 42.23765 N, 91.19101 W
      Population (1990): 3522 (1529 housing units)
      Area: 9.2 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 52310
   Monticello, IL (city, FIPS 50244)
      Location: 40.02582 N, 88.57468 W
      Population (1990): 4549 (1880 housing units)
      Area: 5.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 61856
   Monticello, IN (city, FIPS 50760)
      Location: 40.74670 N, 86.76395 W
      Population (1990): 5237 (2303 housing units)
      Area: 7.2 sq km (land), 0.6 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 47960
   Monticello, KY (city, FIPS 53130)
      Location: 36.84048 N, 84.84760 W
      Population (1990): 5357 (2360 housing units)
      Area: 13.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Monticello, LA (CDP, FIPS 51645)
      Location: 30.48670 N, 91.04410 W
      Population (1990): 4710 (1573 housing units)
      Area: 6.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Monticello, ME
      Zip code(s): 04760
   Monticello, MN (city, FIPS 43774)
      Location: 45.30474 N, 93.80221 W
      Population (1990): 4941 (1908 housing units)
      Area: 14.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 55362
   Monticello, MO (town, FIPS 49592)
      Location: 40.11911 N, 91.71261 W
      Population (1990): 106 (46 housing units)
      Area: 0.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 63457
   Monticello, MS (town, FIPS 48560)
      Location: 31.55035 N, 90.11265 W
      Population (1990): 1755 (799 housing units)
      Area: 8.4 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 39654
   Monticello, NY (village, FIPS 48175)
      Location: 41.65249 N, 74.68802 W
      Population (1990): 6597 (3043 housing units)
      Area: 9.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 12701
   Monticello, UT (city, FIPS 51580)
      Location: 37.87150 N, 109.33553 W
      Population (1990): 1806 (673 housing units)
      Area: 7.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 84535
   Monticello, WI (village, FIPS 54000)
      Location: 42.74580 N, 89.58967 W
      Population (1990): 1140 (482 housing units)
      Area: 2.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 53570

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mound City, IL (city, FIPS 50751)
      Location: 37.08557 N, 89.16305 W
      Population (1990): 765 (353 housing units)
      Area: 1.8 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 62963
   Mound City, KS (city, FIPS 48750)
      Location: 38.14376 N, 94.82241 W
      Population (1990): 789 (361 housing units)
      Area: 3.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 66056
   Mound City, MO (city, FIPS 50312)
      Location: 40.13597 N, 95.23425 W
      Population (1990): 1273 (628 housing units)
      Area: 3.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 64470
   Mound City, SD (town, FIPS 44020)
      Location: 45.72680 N, 100.06767 W
      Population (1990): 89 (63 housing units)
      Area: 0.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 57646

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mound Station, IL (village, FIPS 50790)
      Location: 40.00667 N, 90.87310 W
      Population (1990): 147 (63 housing units)
      Area: 1.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Moundhouse, NV
      Zip code(s): 89706

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mounds, IL (city, FIPS 50777)
      Location: 37.11484 N, 89.20125 W
      Population (1990): 1407 (568 housing units)
      Area: 3.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 62964
   Mounds, OK (town, FIPS 49550)
      Location: 35.87466 N, 96.05973 W
      Population (1990): 980 (428 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 74047

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mounds View, MN (city, FIPS 44530)
      Location: 45.10603 N, 93.20611 W
      Population (1990): 12541 (4885 housing units)
      Area: 10.7 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Moundsville, WV (city, FIPS 56020)
      Location: 39.92278 N, 80.74178 W
      Population (1990): 10753 (4618 housing units)
      Area: 7.4 sq km (land), 1.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 26041

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Calm, TX (city, FIPS 49692)
      Location: 31.75687 N, 96.88079 W
      Population (1990): 303 (150 housing units)
      Area: 2.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 76673

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Calvary, WI (village, FIPS 54650)
      Location: 43.82650 N, 88.24675 W
      Population (1990): 558 (184 housing units)
      Area: 2.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 53057

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Carbon, PA (borough, FIPS 51488)
      Location: 40.67416 N, 76.18797 W
      Population (1990): 132 (56 housing units)
      Area: 0.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Mount Carbon, WV
      Zip code(s): 25139

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Carmel, IL (city, FIPS 50868)
      Location: 38.41721 N, 87.77009 W
      Population (1990): 8287 (3579 housing units)
      Area: 10.8 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 62863
   Mount Carmel, IN (town, FIPS 51354)
      Location: 39.40746 N, 84.87573 W
      Population (1990): 108 (37 housing units)
      Area: 0.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Mount Carmel, OH (CDP, FIPS 52612)
      Location: 39.09665 N, 84.29843 W
      Population (1990): 4462 (1677 housing units)
      Area: 4.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Mount Carmel, PA (borough, FIPS 51496)
      Location: 40.79529 N, 76.41226 W
      Population (1990): 7196 (3725 housing units)
      Area: 1.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 17851
   Mount Carmel, SC (town, FIPS 48310)
      Location: 34.00610 N, 82.50794 W
      Population (1990): 117 (51 housing units)
      Area: 7.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 29840
   Mount Carmel, TN (town, FIPS 50580)
      Location: 36.56087 N, 82.65868 W
      Population (1990): 4082 (1630 housing units)
      Area: 17.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37645
   Mount Carmel, UT
      Zip code(s): 84755

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Carroll, IL (city, FIPS 50881)
      Location: 42.09545 N, 89.97692 W
      Population (1990): 1726 (809 housing units)
      Area: 4.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 61053

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Clare, IL (village, FIPS 50920)
      Location: 39.09886 N, 89.82477 W
      Population (1990): 297 (141 housing units)
      Area: 3.9 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
   Mount Clare, WV
      Zip code(s): 26408

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Clemens, MI (city, FIPS 55820)
      Location: 42.59805 N, 82.88193 W
      Population (1990): 18405 (7727 housing units)
      Area: 10.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 48043

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Cobb, PA (CDP, FIPS 51536)
      Location: 41.42856 N, 75.49724 W
      Population (1990): 2043 (843 housing units)
      Area: 42.3 sq km (land), 0.5 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Cory, OH (village, FIPS 52668)
      Location: 40.93482 N, 83.82431 W
      Population (1990): 245 (92 housing units)
      Area: 1.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 45868

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Crawford, VA (town, FIPS 53864)
      Location: 38.35688 N, 78.94095 W
      Population (1990): 228 (110 housing units)
      Area: 0.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 22841

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Crested Butte, CO (town, FIPS 52570)
      Location: 38.90785 N, 106.96624 W
      Population (1990): 264 (813 housing units)
      Area: 4.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Croghan, SC (town, FIPS 48355)
      Location: 34.76931 N, 80.22514 W
      Population (1990): 131 (62 housing units)
      Area: 2.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 29727

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Desert, ME
      Zip code(s): 04660

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Gay-Shamrock, WV (CDP, FIPS 56342)
      Location: 37.85418 N, 82.04269 W
      Population (1990): 3377 (1376 housing units)
      Area: 28.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Gilead, NC (town, FIPS 44900)
      Location: 35.21506 N, 80.00303 W
      Population (1990): 1336 (523 housing units)
      Area: 8.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 27306
   Mount Gilead, OH (village, FIPS 52738)
      Location: 40.55085 N, 82.83598 W
      Population (1990): 2846 (1239 housing units)
      Area: 4.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 43338

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Gretna, PA (borough, FIPS 51568)
      Location: 40.24537 N, 76.47156 W
      Population (1990): 303 (186 housing units)
      Area: 0.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Jackson, VA (town, FIPS 53992)
      Location: 38.74984 N, 78.63790 W
      Population (1990): 1583 (687 housing units)
      Area: 3.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Jewett, PA (borough, FIPS 51632)
      Location: 41.72473 N, 78.64395 W
      Population (1990): 1029 (477 housing units)
      Area: 6.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 16740

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Joy, PA (borough, FIPS 51656)
      Location: 40.11045 N, 76.50786 W
      Population (1990): 6398 (2628 housing units)
      Area: 6.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Judea, AR
      Zip code(s): 72655

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Juliet, TN (city, FIPS 50780)
      Location: 36.20616 N, 86.52247 W
      Population (1990): 5389 (1926 housing units)
      Area: 30.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37122

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Kisco, NY (village, FIPS 48890)
      Location: 41.20183 N, 73.73047 W
      Population (1990): 9108 (3965 housing units)
      Area: 8.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 10549

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Savage, MD
      Zip code(s): 21545

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Selman, TX
      Zip code(s): 75757

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Shasta, CA (city, FIPS 49852)
      Location: 41.32250 N, 122.31472 W
      Population (1990): 3460 (1663 housing units)
      Area: 9.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 96067

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Sherman, KY
      Zip code(s): 42764

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Sidney, VA
      Zip code(s): 24467

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Sinai, NY (CDP, FIPS 49066)
      Location: 40.93843 N, 73.01912 W
      Population (1990): 8023 (2559 housing units)
      Area: 15.5 sq km (land), 1.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 11766

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Snow, VT
      Zip code(s): 05356

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Solon, VA
      Zip code(s): 22843

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Sterling, IA (city, FIPS 54750)
      Location: 40.61898 N, 91.93891 W
      Population (1990): 53 (23 housing units)
      Area: 1.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 52573
   Mount Sterling, IL (city, FIPS 51154)
      Location: 39.98472 N, 90.76370 W
      Population (1990): 1922 (1018 housing units)
      Area: 2.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 62353
   Mount Sterling, KY (city, FIPS 54084)
      Location: 38.06037 N, 83.94526 W
      Population (1990): 5362 (2396 housing units)
      Area: 5.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 40353
   Mount Sterling, MO
      Zip code(s): 65062
   Mount Sterling, OH (village, FIPS 53046)
      Location: 39.71947 N, 83.26808 W
      Population (1990): 1647 (718 housing units)
      Area: 2.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 43143
   Mount Sterling, WI (village, FIPS 54900)
      Location: 43.31432 N, 90.93063 W
      Population (1990): 217 (96 housing units)
      Area: 3.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Storm, WV
      Zip code(s): 26739

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Summit, IN (town, FIPS 51714)
      Location: 40.00324 N, 85.38673 W
      Population (1990): 238 (107 housing units)
      Area: 0.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Washington, KY (city, FIPS 54228)
      Location: 38.04755 N, 85.55015 W
      Population (1990): 5226 (1870 housing units)
      Area: 8.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 40047
   Mount Washington, PA
      Zip code(s): 15211

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Mount Zion, GA (city, FIPS 53620)
      Location: 33.63389 N, 85.18054 W
      Population (1990): 511 (202 housing units)
      Area: 12.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Mount Zion, IL (village, FIPS 51206)
      Location: 39.77793 N, 88.87854 W
      Population (1990): 4522 (1666 housing units)
      Area: 6.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Mount Zion, WV
      Zip code(s): 26151

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   memetics /me-met'iks/ n.   [from {meme}] The study of memes.   As
   of early 1999, this is still an extremely informal and speculative
   endeavor, though the first steps towards at least statistical rigor
   have been made by H. Keith Henson and others.   Memetics is a popular
   topic for speculation among hackers, who like to see themselves as
   the architects of the new information ecologies in which memes live
   and replicate.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   menuitis /men`yoo-i:'tis/ n.   Notional disease suffered by
   software with an obsessively simple-minded menu interface and no
   escape.   Hackers find this intensely irritating and much prefer the
   flexibility of command-line or language-style interfaces, especially
   those customizable via macros or a special-purpose language in which
   one can encode useful hacks.   See {user-obsequious}, {drool-proof
   paper}, {WIMP environment}, {for the rest of us}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Main Distribution Frame
  
      (MDF) The {network closet} containing the main
      {hub}.
  
      (1995-05-05)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MANTIS
  
      A structured, full-function procedural {4GL} and
      application development system from {Cincom}.   MANTIS enables
      the developer to design prototypes, create transaction screens
      and reports, define logical data views, write structured
      procedures, and dynamically test, correct, document, secure,
      and release applications for production in a single,
      integrated, interactive session.
  
      MANTIS applications can be enhanced with gOOi, the graphical
      object-oriented interface, which creates graphical Windows
      representations of existing MANTIS screens.
  
      {Home (http://www.cincom.com/products/mantis/)}.
  
      (2003-08-08)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   mantissa
  
      1. The part of a {floating point} number which,
      when multiplied by its {radix} raised to the power of its
      {exponent}, gives its value.   The mantissa may include the
      number's sign or this may be considered to be a separate part.
  
      2. The fractional part of a {logarithm}.
  
      (1996-06-15)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   memetic algorithm
  
      A {genetic algorithm} or {evolutionary algorithm}
      which includes a non-genetic local search to improve
      genotypes.   The term comes from the Richard Dawkin's term
      "{meme}".
  
      One big difference between memes and genes is that memes are
      processed and possibly improved by the people that hold them -
      something that cannot happen to genes.   It is this advantage
      that the memetic algorithm has over simple genetic or
      evolutionary algorithms.
  
      These algorithms are useful in solving complex problems, such
      as the "{Travelling Salesman Problem}," which involves finding
      the shortest path through a large number of nodes, or in
      creating {artificial life} to test evolutionary theories.
  
      Memetic algorithms are one kind of {metaheuristic}.
  
      {UNLP memetic algorithms home page
      (http://www.ing.unlp.edu.ar/cetad/mos/memetic_home.html)}.
  
      (07 July 1997)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   memetics
  
      /me-met'iks/ The study of {memes}.
  
      As of mid-1993, this is still an extremely informal and
      speculative endeavor, though the first steps toward at least
      statistical rigor have been made by H. Keith Henson and
      others.   Memetics is a popular topic for speculation among
      hackers, who like to see themselves as the architects of the
      new information ecologies in which memes live and replicate.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (2000-01-09)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   menuitis
  
      /men"yoo-i:"tis/ A notional disease suffered by software with
      an obsessively simple-minded {menu} interface and no escape.
      Hackers find this intensely irritating and much prefer the
      flexibility of command-line or language-style interfaces,
      especially those customisable via {macro}s or a
      special-purpose language in which one can encode useful hacks.
  
      See {user-obsequious}, {drool-proof paper}, {WIMP}, {for the
      rest of us}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1994-12-02)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mini Disc
  
      A music medium designed by {Sony} as a
      portable replacement for music {Compact Discs}.   In 1994 Sony
      announced a data version which can hold 140 MB or about 100 MB
      using {error correction}.   These will be competitive with 128
      MB {magneto-optical} disks.   Mini Discs may be either a
      re-writable or mass-produced read-only type.   Sony have also
      announced a standard data format.
  
      The transfer rate is similar to {CD-ROM} which is slow
      compared to the current {magneto-optical} drives (which are
      similar to an old hard disk, with writing noticeably slower
      than reading).   Pre-recorded read-only Mini Discs can be mass
      manufactured on a modified CD press - this and the standard
      format mean it could take off as a software distribution
      medium.
  
      An article in the December 1994 PCW quotes {access time}s of
      about 300 ms and data transfer rate of about 150 kb/s (i.e.
      about single spin CD rate).
  
      (1994-12-13)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Mint Is Not TRAC
  
      (MINT) A version of {TRAC} used as the {extension
      language} in the {Freemacs} editor.
  
      {(ftp://sun.soe.clarkson.edu/pub/freemacs)}.
  
      (1994-10-31)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   monadic
  
      1. {unary}, when describing an {operator} or
      {function}.   The term is part of the {dyadic}, {niladic}
      sequence.
  
      2. See {monad}.
  
      (1998-07-24)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Montage
  
      An {object-relational database management system} from
      {Montage Software}, the commercialisation of {POSTGRES}.
  
      (1995-02-23)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Monte Carlo
  
      (After Monte Carlo, Monaco - a notorious gambling mecca) Any
      one of various methods involving statistical techniques, such
      as the use of random samples, to finding the solutions to
      mathematical or physical problems.
  
      For example, to calculate pi, generate random points in the
      square (x, y) = ([0-1], [0-1]) and find the proportion for
      which x^2 + y^2 < 1, i.e. which lie within a quadant of a
      circle with radius 1.   Since the area of the square is 1 and
      the area of the quadrant is pi/4, the proportion in the
      quadrant should be pi/4.
  
      (1995-02-23)
  
  

From The CIA World Factbook (1995) [world95]:
   Montserrat
  
   (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   Montserrat:Geography
  
   Location: Caribbean, island in the Caribbean Sea, southeast of Puerto
   Rico
  
   Map references: Central America and the Caribbean
  
   Area:
   total area: 100 sq km
   land area: 100 sq km
   comparative area: about 0.6 times the size of Washington, DC
  
   Land boundaries: 0 km
  
   Coastline: 40 km
  
   Maritime claims:
   exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm
   territorial sea: 3 nm
  
   International disputes: none
  
   Climate: tropical; little daily or seasonal temperature variation
  
   Terrain: volcanic islands, mostly mountainous, with small coastal
   lowland
  
   Natural resources: negligible
  
   Land use:
   arable land: 20%
   permanent crops: 0%
   meadows and pastures: 10%
   forest and woodland: 40%
   other: 30%
  
   Irrigated land: NA sq km
  
   Environment:
   current issues: land erosion occurs on slopes that have been cleared
   for cultivation
   natural hazards: severe hurricanes (June to November); volcanic
   eruptions (there are seven active volcanoes on the island)
   international agreements: NA
  
   Montserrat:People
  
   Population: 12,738 (July 1995 est.)
  
   Age structure:
   0-14 years: NA
   15-64 years: NA
   65 years and over: NA
  
   Population growth rate: 0.3% (1995 est.)
  
   Birth rate: 15.5 births/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Death rate: 9.81 deaths/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Net migration rate: -2.65 migrant(s)/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Infant mortality rate: 11.69 deaths/1,000 live births (1995 est.)
  
   Life expectancy at birth:
   total population: 75.69 years
   male: 73.93 years
   female: 77.49 years (1995 est.)
  
   Total fertility rate: 1.99 children born/woman (1995 est.)
  
   Nationality:
   noun: Montserratian(s)
   adjective: Montserratian
  
   Ethnic divisions: black, Europeans
  
   Religions: Anglican, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Pentecostal,
   Seventh-Day Adventist, other Christian denominations
  
   Languages: English
  
   Literacy: age 15 and over has ever attended school (1970)
   total population: 97%
   male: 97%
   female: 97%
  
   Labor force: 5,100
   by occupation: community, social, and personal services 40.5%,
   construction 13.5%, trade, restaurants, and hotels 12.3%,
   manufacturing 10.5%, agriculture, forestry, and fishing 8.8%, other
   14.4% (1983 est.)
  
   Montserrat:Government
  
   Names:
   conventional long form: none
   conventional short form: Montserrat
  
   Digraph: MH
  
   Type: dependent territory of the UK
  
   Capital: Plymouth
  
   Administrative divisions: 3 parishes; Saint Anthony, Saint Georges,
   Saint Peter's
  
   Independence: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   National holiday: Celebration of the Birthday of the Queen (second
   Saturday of June)
  
   Constitution: present constitution came into force 19 December 1989
  
   Legal system: English common law and statute law
  
   Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
  
   Executive branch:
   chief of state: Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952),
   represented by Governor Frank SAVAGE (since NA February 1993)
   head of government: Chief Minister Reuben T. MEADE (since NA October
   1991)
   cabinet: Executive Council; consists of the governor, the chief
   minister, three other ministries, the attorney-general, and the
   finance secretary
  
   Legislative branch: unicameral
   Legislative Council: elections last held 8 October 1991; results -
   percent of vote by party NA; seats - (11 total, 7 elected) NPP 4, NDP
   1, PLM 1, independent 1
  
   Judicial branch: Supreme Court
  
   Political parties and leaders: National Progressive Party (NPP) Reuben
   T. MEADE; People's Liberation Movement (PLM), Noel TUITT; National
   Development Party (NDP), Bertrand OSBORNE
  
   Member of: CARICOM, CDB, ECLAC (associate), ICFTU, INTERPOL
   (subbureau), OECS, WCL
  
   Diplomatic representation in US: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   US diplomatic representation: none (dependent territory of the UK)
  
   Flag: blue with the flag of the UK in the upper hoist-side quadrant
   and the Montserratian coat of arms centered in the outer half of the
   flag; the coat of arms features a woman standing beside a yellow harp
   with her arm around a black cross
  
   Economy
  
   Overview: The economy is small and open with economic activity
   centered on tourism and construction. Tourism is the most important
   sector and accounts for roughly one-fifth of GDP. Agriculture accounts
   for about 4% of GDP and industry 10%. The economy is heavily dependent
   on imports, making it vulnerable to fluctuations in world prices.
   Exports consist mainly of electronic parts sold to the US.
  
   National product: GDP - purchasing power parity - $55.6 million (1993
   est.)
  
   National product real growth rate: 1% (1993 est.)
  
   National product per capita: $4,380 (1993 est.)
  
   Inflation rate (consumer prices): 2.8% (1992)
  
   Unemployment rate: NA
  
   Budget:
   revenues: $12.1 million
   expenditures: $14.3 million, including capital expenditures of $3.2
   million (1988 est.)
  
   Exports: $2.8 million (f.o.b., 1992)
   commodities: electronic parts, plastic bags, apparel, hot peppers,
   live plants, cattle
   partners: NA
  
   Imports: $80.6 million (f.o.b., 1992)
   commodities: machinery and transportation equipment, foodstuffs,
   manufactured goods, fuels, lubricants, and related materials
   partners: NA
  
   External debt: $2.05 million (1987)
  
   Industrial production: growth rate 8.1% (1986); accounts for 10% of
   GDP
  
   Electricity:
   capacity: 5,271 kW
   production: 17 million kWh
   consumption per capita: 1,106 kWh (1993)
  
   Industries: tourism; light manufacturing - rum, textiles, electronic
   appliances
  
   Agriculture: accounts for 4% of GDP; small-scale farming; food crops -
   tomatoes, onions, peppers; not self-sufficient in food, especially
   livestock products
  
   Economic aid:
   recipient: Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral
   commitments (1970-89), $90 million
  
   Currency: 1 EC dollar (EC$) = 100 cents
  
   Exchange rates: East Caribbean dollars (EC$) per US$1 - 2.70 (fixed
   rate since 1976)
  
   Fiscal year: 1 April - 31 March
  
   Montserrat:Transportation
  
   Railroads: 0 km
  
   Highways:
   total: 280 km
   paved: 200 km
   unpaved: gravel, earth 80 km
  
   Ports: Plymouth
  
   Merchant marine: none
  
   Airports:
   total: 1
   with paved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 1
  
   Montserrat:Communications
  
   Telephone system: 3,000 telephones
   local: NA
   intercity: NA
   international: NA
  
   Radio:
   broadcast stations: AM 8, FM 4, shortwave 0
   radios: NA
  
   Television:
   broadcast stations: 1
   televisions: NA
  
   Montserrat:Defense Forces
  
   Branches: Police Force
  
   Note: defense is the responsibility of the UK
  
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2019
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