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   marauder
         n 1: someone who attacks in search of booty [syn: {marauder},
               {predator}, {vulture}, {piranha}]

English Dictionary: Mauerturm by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
martyr
n
  1. one who suffers for the sake of principle [syn: martyr, sufferer]
  2. one who voluntarily suffers death as the penalty for refusing to renounce their religion
v
  1. kill as a martyr; "Saint Sebastian was martyred"
  2. torture and torment like a martyr
    Synonym(s): martyr, martyrize, martyrise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
martyr operation
n
  1. killing or injuring others while annihilating yourself; usually accomplished with a bomb
    Synonym(s): suicide mission, martyr operation, sacrifice operation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
martyrdom
n
  1. death that is imposed because of the person's adherence of a religious faith or cause
  2. any experience that causes intense suffering
    Synonym(s): calvary, martyrdom
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
martyrise
v
  1. torture and torment like a martyr [syn: martyr, martyrize, martyrise]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
martyrize
v
  1. torture and torment like a martyr [syn: martyr, martyrize, martyrise]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Martyrs of al-Aqsa
n
  1. a militant offshoot of al-Fatah that is the newest and strongest and best equipped faction active in the West Bank; responsible for many deadly attacks in Israel in 2002
    Synonym(s): Aksa Martyrs Brigades, al-Aksa Martyrs Brigades, Martyrs of al-Aqsa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Mary Therese McCarthy
n
  1. United States satirical novelist and literary critic (1912-1989)
    Synonym(s): McCarthy, Mary McCarthy, Mary Therese McCarthy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meretricious
adj
  1. like or relating to a prostitute; "meretricious relationships"
  2. tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
    Synonym(s): brassy, cheap, flash, flashy, garish, gaudy, gimcrack, loud, meretricious, tacky, tatty, tawdry, trashy
  3. based on pretense; deceptively pleasing; "the gilded and perfumed but inwardly rotten nobility"; "meretricious praise"; "a meretricious argument"
    Synonym(s): gilded, meretricious, specious
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meretriciously
adv
  1. in a meretricious manner; "the boat is meretriciously decorated"
    Synonym(s): meretriciously, flashily
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meretriciousness
n
  1. an appearance of truth that is false or deceptive; seeming plausibility; "the speciousness of his argument"
    Synonym(s): speciousness, meretriciousness
  2. tasteless showiness
    Synonym(s): flashiness, garishness, gaudiness, loudness, brashness, meretriciousness, tawdriness, glitz
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meritorious
adj
  1. deserving reward or praise; "a lifetime of meritorious service"; "meritorious conduct"
    Synonym(s): meritorious, meritable
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meritoriously
adv
  1. in a meritorious manner; "he served his country meritoriously"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
meritoriousness
n
  1. the quality of being deserving (e.g., deserving assistance); "there were many children whose deservingness he recognized and rewarded"
    Synonym(s): deservingness, merit, meritoriousness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Meriwether Lewis
n
  1. United States explorer and soldier who lead led an expedition from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River (1774-1809)
    Synonym(s): Lewis, Meriwether Lewis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
moratorium
n
  1. a legally authorized postponement before some obligation must be discharged
  2. suspension of an ongoing activity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mortar
n
  1. a muzzle-loading high-angle gun with a short barrel that fires shells at high elevations for a short range
    Synonym(s): mortar, howitzer, trench mortar
  2. used as a bond in masonry or for covering a wall
  3. a bowl-shaped vessel in which substances can be ground and mixed with a pestle
v
  1. plaster with mortar; "mortar the wall"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mortar fire
n
  1. artillery fire delivered by a mortar
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mortarboard
n
  1. a square board with a handle underneath; used by masons to hold or carry mortar
    Synonym(s): mortarboard, hawk
  2. an academic cap with a flat square with a tassel on top
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
mortuary
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of death
  2. of or relating to a funeral
n
  1. a building (or room) where dead bodies are kept before burial or cremation
    Synonym(s): morgue, mortuary, dead room
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder
n
  1. unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
    Synonym(s): murder, slaying, execution
v
  1. kill intentionally and with premeditation; "The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered"
    Synonym(s): murder, slay, hit, dispatch, bump off, off, polish off, remove
  2. alter so as to make unrecognizable; "The tourists murdered the French language"
    Synonym(s): mangle, mutilate, murder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder charge
n
  1. an indictment charging someone with murder [syn: {murder charge}, murder indictment]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder conviction
n
  1. conviction for murder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder indictment
n
  1. an indictment charging someone with murder [syn: {murder charge}, murder indictment]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder mystery
n
  1. a narrative about a murder and how the murderer is discovered
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murder suspect
n
  1. someone suspected of committing murder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murdered
adj
  1. killed unlawfully; "the murdered woman"; "lay a wreath on murdered Lincoln's bier"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderee
n
  1. a victim who is murdered
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderer
n
  1. a criminal who commits homicide (who performs the unlawful premeditated killing of another human being)
    Synonym(s): murderer, liquidator, manslayer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderess
n
  1. a woman murderer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderous
adj
  1. characteristic of or capable of or having a tendency toward killing another human being ; "a homicidal rage"; "murderous thugs"
    Synonym(s): homicidal, murderous
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderously
adv
  1. as if bent on murder; "the huge dog bore down on them with bared fangs and barking murderously"
  2. in a murderous frenzy; "rioters running amuck and throwing sticks and bottles and stones"
    Synonym(s): amok, amuck, murderously
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
murderousness
n
  1. a bloodthirsty hatred arousing murderous impulses
  2. cruelty evidence by a capability to commit murder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
myrrh tree
n
  1. tree of eastern Africa and Asia yielding myrrh [syn: {myrrh tree}, Commiphora myrrha]
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Marauder \Ma*raud`er\, n. [From {Maraud}, v.: cf. F. maraudeur.]
      A rover in quest of booty or plunder; a plunderer; one who
      pillages. --De Quincey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martern \Mar"tern\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Same as {Marten}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyr \Mar"tyr\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Martyred}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Martyring}.]
      1. To put to death for adhering to some belief, esp.
            Christianity; to sacrifice on account of faith or
            profession. --Bp. Pearson.
  
      2. To persecute; to torment; to torture. --Chaucer.
  
                     The lovely Amoret, whose gentle heart Thou martyrest
                     with sorrow and with smart.               --Spenser.
  
                     Racked with sciatics, martyred with the stone.
                                                                              --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyr \Mar"tyr\, n. [AS., from L. martyr, Gr. ma`rtyr, ma`rtys,
      prop., a witness; cf. Skr. sm[rsdot] to remember, E. memory.]
      1. One who, by his death, bears witness to the truth of the
            gospel; one who is put to death for his religion; as,
            Stephen was the first Christian martyr. --Chaucer.
  
                     To be a martyr, signifies only to witness the truth
                     of Christ; but the witnessing of the truth was then
                     so generally attended with persecution, that
                     martyrdom now signifies not only to witness, but to
                     witness by death                                 --South.
  
      2. Hence, one who sacrifices his life, his station, or what
            is of great value to him, for the sake of principle, or to
            sustain a cause.
  
                     Then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a
                     blessed martyr !                                 --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrdom \Mar"tyr*dom\, n. [Martyr + -dom.]
      1. The condition of a martyr; the death of a martyr; the
            suffering of death on account of adherence to the
            Christian faith, or to any cause. --Bacon.
  
                     I came from martyrdom unto this peace. --Longfellow.
  
      2. Affliction; torment; torture. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyr \Mar"tyr\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Martyred}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Martyring}.]
      1. To put to death for adhering to some belief, esp.
            Christianity; to sacrifice on account of faith or
            profession. --Bp. Pearson.
  
      2. To persecute; to torment; to torture. --Chaucer.
  
                     The lovely Amoret, whose gentle heart Thou martyrest
                     with sorrow and with smart.               --Spenser.
  
                     Racked with sciatics, martyred with the stone.
                                                                              --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyr \Mar"tyr\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Martyred}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Martyring}.]
      1. To put to death for adhering to some belief, esp.
            Christianity; to sacrifice on account of faith or
            profession. --Bp. Pearson.
  
      2. To persecute; to torment; to torture. --Chaucer.
  
                     The lovely Amoret, whose gentle heart Thou martyrest
                     with sorrow and with smart.               --Spenser.
  
                     Racked with sciatics, martyred with the stone.
                                                                              --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrization \Mar`tyr*i*za"tion\, n.
      Act of martyrizing, or state of being martyrized; torture.
      --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrize \Mar"tyr*ize\, v. t. [Cf. F. martyriser, LL.
      martyrizare.]
      To make a martyr of. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrly \Mar"tyr*ly\, adv.
      In the manner of a martyr.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrologe \Mar"tyr*o*loge\, n. [LL. martyrologium: cf. F.
      martyrologe.]
      A martyrology. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrologic \Mar`tyr*o*log"ic\, Martyrological
   \Mar`tyr*o*log"ic*al\, a.
      Pertaining to martyrology or martyrs; registering, or
      registered in, a catalogue of martyrs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrologic \Mar`tyr*o*log"ic\, Martyrological
   \Mar`tyr*o*log"ic*al\, a.
      Pertaining to martyrology or martyrs; registering, or
      registered in, a catalogue of martyrs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrologist \Mar`tyr*ol"o*gist\, n. [Cf. F. martyrologiste.]
      A writer of martyrology; an historian of martyrs. --T.
      Warton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrology \Mar`tyr*ol"o*gy\, n.; pl. {-gies}. [Martyr +
      -logy.]
      A history or account of martyrs; a register of martyrs. --Bp.
      Stillingfleet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Martyrship \Mar"tyr*ship\, n.
      Martyrdom. [R.] --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meretricious \Mer`e*tri"cious\, a. [L. meretricius, from
      meretrix, -icis, a prostitute, lit., one who earns money, i.
      e., by prostitution, fr. merere to earn, gain. See {Merit}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to prostitutes; having to do with
            harlots; lustful; as, meretricious traffic.
  
      2. Resembling the arts of a harlot; alluring by false show;
            gaudily and deceitfully ornamental; tawdry; as,
            meretricious dress or ornaments. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ly},
            adv. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meretricious \Mer`e*tri"cious\, a. [L. meretricius, from
      meretrix, -icis, a prostitute, lit., one who earns money, i.
      e., by prostitution, fr. merere to earn, gain. See {Merit}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to prostitutes; having to do with
            harlots; lustful; as, meretricious traffic.
  
      2. Resembling the arts of a harlot; alluring by false show;
            gaudily and deceitfully ornamental; tawdry; as,
            meretricious dress or ornaments. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ly},
            adv. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meretricious \Mer`e*tri"cious\, a. [L. meretricius, from
      meretrix, -icis, a prostitute, lit., one who earns money, i.
      e., by prostitution, fr. merere to earn, gain. See {Merit}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to prostitutes; having to do with
            harlots; lustful; as, meretricious traffic.
  
      2. Resembling the arts of a harlot; alluring by false show;
            gaudily and deceitfully ornamental; tawdry; as,
            meretricious dress or ornaments. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ly},
            adv. -- {Mer`e*tri"cious*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meritorious \Mer`i*to"ri*ous\, a. [L. meritorius that brings in
      money.]
      Possessing merit; deserving of reward or honor; worthy of
      recompense; valuable.
  
               And meritorious shall that hand be called, Canonized,
               and worshiped as a saint.                        --Shak.
      -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meritorious \Mer`i*to"ri*ous\, a. [L. meritorius that brings in
      money.]
      Possessing merit; deserving of reward or honor; worthy of
      recompense; valuable.
  
               And meritorious shall that hand be called, Canonized,
               and worshiped as a saint.                        --Shak.
      -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meritorious \Mer`i*to"ri*ous\, a. [L. meritorius that brings in
      money.]
      Possessing merit; deserving of reward or honor; worthy of
      recompense; valuable.
  
               And meritorious shall that hand be called, Canonized,
               and worshiped as a saint.                        --Shak.
      -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ly}, adv. -- {Mer`i*to"ri*ous*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meritory \Mer"i*to*ry\, a.
      Meritorious. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mirador \Mir`a*dor"\, n. [Sp., fr. mirar to behold, view. See
      {Mirror}.] (Arch.)
      Same as {Belvedere}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mire \Mire\, n. [OE. mire, myre; akin to Icel. m[?]rr swamp, Sw.
      myra marshy ground, and perh. to E. moss.]
      Deep mud; wet, spongy earth. --Chaucer.
  
               He his rider from the lofty steed Would have cast down
               and trod in dirty mire.                           --Spenser.
  
      {Mire crow} (Zo[94]l.), the pewit, or laughing gull. [Prov.
            Eng.]
  
      {Mire drum}, the European bittern. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Moratory \Mor"a*to*ry\, a. [L. moratorius delaying, fr. morari
      to delay.]
      Of or pertaining to delay; esp., designating a law passed, as
      in a time of financial panic, to postpone or delay for a
      period the time at which notes, bills of exchange, and other
      obligations, shall mature or become due.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. mortier, F. mortier, L. mortarium
      mortar, a large basin or trough in which mortar is made, a
      mortar (in sense 1, above). See 1st {Mortar}.] (Arch.)
      A building material made by mixing lime, cement, or plaster
      of Paris, with sand, water, and sometimes other materials; --
      used in masonry for joining stones, bricks, etc., also for
      plastering, and in other ways.
  
      {Mortar bed}, a shallow box or receptacle in which mortar is
            mixed.
  
      {Mortar board}.
      (a) A small square board with a handle beneath, for holding
            mortar; a hawk.
      (b) A cap with a broad, projecting, square top; -- worn by
            students in some colleges. [Slang]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, v. t.
      To plaster or make fast with mortar.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [F. mortier. See {Mortar} a vessel.]
      A chamber lamp or light. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. morter, AS. mort[c7]re, L. mortarium:
      cf. F. mortier mortar. Cf. sense 2 (below), also 2d {Mortar},
      {Martel}, {Morter}.]
      1. A strong vessel, commonly in form of an inverted bell, in
            which substances are pounded or rubbed with a pestle.
  
      2. [F. mortier, fr. L. mortarium mortar (for trituarating).]
            (Mil.) A short piece of ordnance, used for throwing bombs,
            carcasses, shells, etc., at high angles of elevation, as
            45[deg], and even higher; -- so named from its resemblance
            in shape to the utensil above described.
  
      {Mortar bed} (Mil.), a framework of wood and iron, suitably
            hollowed out to receive the breech and trunnions of a
            mortar.
  
      {Mortar boat} [or] {vessel} (Naut.), a boat strongly built
            and adapted to carrying a mortar or mortars for
            bombarding; a bomb ketch.
  
      {Mortar piece}, a mortar. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. mortier, F. mortier, L. mortarium
      mortar, a large basin or trough in which mortar is made, a
      mortar (in sense 1, above). See 1st {Mortar}.] (Arch.)
      A building material made by mixing lime, cement, or plaster
      of Paris, with sand, water, and sometimes other materials; --
      used in masonry for joining stones, bricks, etc., also for
      plastering, and in other ways.
  
      {Mortar bed}, a shallow box or receptacle in which mortar is
            mixed.
  
      {Mortar board}.
      (a) A small square board with a handle beneath, for holding
            mortar; a hawk.
      (b) A cap with a broad, projecting, square top; -- worn by
            students in some colleges. [Slang]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. morter, AS. mort[c7]re, L. mortarium:
      cf. F. mortier mortar. Cf. sense 2 (below), also 2d {Mortar},
      {Martel}, {Morter}.]
      1. A strong vessel, commonly in form of an inverted bell, in
            which substances are pounded or rubbed with a pestle.
  
      2. [F. mortier, fr. L. mortarium mortar (for trituarating).]
            (Mil.) A short piece of ordnance, used for throwing bombs,
            carcasses, shells, etc., at high angles of elevation, as
            45[deg], and even higher; -- so named from its resemblance
            in shape to the utensil above described.
  
      {Mortar bed} (Mil.), a framework of wood and iron, suitably
            hollowed out to receive the breech and trunnions of a
            mortar.
  
      {Mortar boat} [or] {vessel} (Naut.), a boat strongly built
            and adapted to carrying a mortar or mortars for
            bombarding; a bomb ketch.
  
      {Mortar piece}, a mortar. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. mortier, F. mortier, L. mortarium
      mortar, a large basin or trough in which mortar is made, a
      mortar (in sense 1, above). See 1st {Mortar}.] (Arch.)
      A building material made by mixing lime, cement, or plaster
      of Paris, with sand, water, and sometimes other materials; --
      used in masonry for joining stones, bricks, etc., also for
      plastering, and in other ways.
  
      {Mortar bed}, a shallow box or receptacle in which mortar is
            mixed.
  
      {Mortar board}.
      (a) A small square board with a handle beneath, for holding
            mortar; a hawk.
      (b) A cap with a broad, projecting, square top; -- worn by
            students in some colleges. [Slang]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trencher \Trench"er\, n. [OE. trencheoir, F. tranchoir, fr.
      trancher to cut, carve. See {Trench}, v. t.]
      1. One who trenches; esp., one who cuts or digs ditches.
  
      2. A large wooden plate or platter, as for table use.
  
      3. The table; hence, the pleasures of the table; food.
  
                     It could be no ordinary declension of nature that
                     could bring some men, after an ingenuous education,
                     to place their [bd]summum bonum[b8] upon their
                     trenchers.                                          --South.
  
      {Trencher cap}, the cap worn by studens at Oxford and
            Cambridge Universities, having a stiff, flat, square
            appendage at top. A similar cap used in the United States
            is called {Oxford cap}, {mortar board}, etc.
  
      {Trencher fly}, a person who haunts the tables of others; a
            parasite. [R.] --L'Estrange.
  
      {Trencher friend}, one who frequents the tables of others; a
            sponger.
  
      {Trencher mate}, a table companion; a parasite; a trencher
            fly. --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. mortier, F. mortier, L. mortarium
      mortar, a large basin or trough in which mortar is made, a
      mortar (in sense 1, above). See 1st {Mortar}.] (Arch.)
      A building material made by mixing lime, cement, or plaster
      of Paris, with sand, water, and sometimes other materials; --
      used in masonry for joining stones, bricks, etc., also for
      plastering, and in other ways.
  
      {Mortar bed}, a shallow box or receptacle in which mortar is
            mixed.
  
      {Mortar board}.
      (a) A small square board with a handle beneath, for holding
            mortar; a hawk.
      (b) A cap with a broad, projecting, square top; -- worn by
            students in some colleges. [Slang]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trencher \Trench"er\, n. [OE. trencheoir, F. tranchoir, fr.
      trancher to cut, carve. See {Trench}, v. t.]
      1. One who trenches; esp., one who cuts or digs ditches.
  
      2. A large wooden plate or platter, as for table use.
  
      3. The table; hence, the pleasures of the table; food.
  
                     It could be no ordinary declension of nature that
                     could bring some men, after an ingenuous education,
                     to place their [bd]summum bonum[b8] upon their
                     trenchers.                                          --South.
  
      {Trencher cap}, the cap worn by studens at Oxford and
            Cambridge Universities, having a stiff, flat, square
            appendage at top. A similar cap used in the United States
            is called {Oxford cap}, {mortar board}, etc.
  
      {Trencher fly}, a person who haunts the tables of others; a
            parasite. [R.] --L'Estrange.
  
      {Trencher friend}, one who frequents the tables of others; a
            sponger.
  
      {Trencher mate}, a table companion; a parasite; a trencher
            fly. --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. morter, AS. mort[c7]re, L. mortarium:
      cf. F. mortier mortar. Cf. sense 2 (below), also 2d {Mortar},
      {Martel}, {Morter}.]
      1. A strong vessel, commonly in form of an inverted bell, in
            which substances are pounded or rubbed with a pestle.
  
      2. [F. mortier, fr. L. mortarium mortar (for trituarating).]
            (Mil.) A short piece of ordnance, used for throwing bombs,
            carcasses, shells, etc., at high angles of elevation, as
            45[deg], and even higher; -- so named from its resemblance
            in shape to the utensil above described.
  
      {Mortar bed} (Mil.), a framework of wood and iron, suitably
            hollowed out to receive the breech and trunnions of a
            mortar.
  
      {Mortar boat} [or] {vessel} (Naut.), a boat strongly built
            and adapted to carrying a mortar or mortars for
            bombarding; a bomb ketch.
  
      {Mortar piece}, a mortar. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortar \Mor"tar\, n. [OE. morter, AS. mort[c7]re, L. mortarium:
      cf. F. mortier mortar. Cf. sense 2 (below), also 2d {Mortar},
      {Martel}, {Morter}.]
      1. A strong vessel, commonly in form of an inverted bell, in
            which substances are pounded or rubbed with a pestle.
  
      2. [F. mortier, fr. L. mortarium mortar (for trituarating).]
            (Mil.) A short piece of ordnance, used for throwing bombs,
            carcasses, shells, etc., at high angles of elevation, as
            45[deg], and even higher; -- so named from its resemblance
            in shape to the utensil above described.
  
      {Mortar bed} (Mil.), a framework of wood and iron, suitably
            hollowed out to receive the breech and trunnions of a
            mortar.
  
      {Mortar boat} [or] {vessel} (Naut.), a boat strongly built
            and adapted to carrying a mortar or mortars for
            bombarding; a bomb ketch.
  
      {Mortar piece}, a mortar. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bomb \Bomb\, n. [F. bombe bombshell, fr. L. bombus a humming or
      buzzing noise, Gr. [?].]
      1. A great noise; a hollow sound. [Obs.]
  
                     A pillar of iron . . . which if you had struck,
                     would make . . . a great bomb in the chamber
                     beneath.                                             --Bacon.
  
      2. (Mil.) A shell; esp. a spherical shell, like those fired
            from mortars. See {Shell}.
  
      3. A bomb ketch.
  
      {Bomb chest} (Mil.), a chest filled with bombs, or only with
            gunpowder, placed under ground, to cause destruction by
            its explosion.
  
      {Bomb ketch}, {Bomb vessel} (Naut.), a small ketch or vessel,
            very strongly built, on which mortars are mounted to be
            used in naval bombardments; -- called also {mortar
            vessel}.
  
      {Bomb lance}, a lance or harpoon with an explosive head, used
            in whale fishing.
  
      {Volcanic bomb}, a mass of lava of a spherical or pear shape.
            [bd]I noticed volcanic bombs.[b8] --Darwin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortress \Mor"tress\, Mortrew \Mor"trew\, n. [See {Mortar}.]
      A dish of meats and other ingredients, cooked together; an
      ollapodrida. --Chaucer. Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortress \Mor"tress\, Mortrew \Mor"trew\, n. [See {Mortar}.]
      A dish of meats and other ingredients, cooked together; an
      ollapodrida. --Chaucer. Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortuary \Mor"tu*a*ry\, n.; pl. {Mortuaries}. [LL. mortuarium.
      See {Mortuary}, a.]
      1. A sort of ecclesiastical heriot, a customary gift claimed
            by, and due to, the minister of a parish on the death of a
            parishioner. It seems to have been originally a voluntary
            bequest or donation, intended to make amends for any
            failure in the payment of tithes of which the deceased had
            been guilty.
  
      2. A burial place; a place for the dead.
  
      3. A place for the reception of the dead before burial; a
            deadhouse; a morgue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortuary \Mor"tu*a*ry\, n.; pl. {Mortuaries}. [LL. mortuarium.
      See {Mortuary}, a.]
      1. A sort of ecclesiastical heriot, a customary gift claimed
            by, and due to, the minister of a parish on the death of a
            parishioner. It seems to have been originally a voluntary
            bequest or donation, intended to make amends for any
            failure in the payment of tithes of which the deceased had
            been guilty.
  
      2. A burial place; a place for the dead.
  
      3. A place for the reception of the dead before burial; a
            deadhouse; a morgue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortuary \Mor"tu*a*ry\, a. [L. mortuarius, fr. mortuus dead: cf.
      F. mortuaire. See {Mortal}.]
      Of or pertaining to the dead; as, mortuary monuments.
  
      {Mortuary urn}, an urn for holding the ashes of the dead.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mortuary \Mor"tu*a*ry\, a. [L. mortuarius, fr. mortuus dead: cf.
      F. mortuaire. See {Mortal}.]
      Of or pertaining to the dead; as, mortuary monuments.
  
      {Mortuary urn}, an urn for holding the ashes of the dead.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murder \Mur"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Murdered}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Murdering}.] [OE. mortheren, murtheren, AS. myr[?]rian;
      akin to OHG. murdiren, Goth. ma[a3]r[?]rjan. See {Murder},
      n.]
      1. To kill with premediated malice; to kill (a human being)
            willfully, deliberately, and unlawfully. See {Murder}, n.
  
      2. To destroy; to put an end to.
  
                     [Canst thou] murder thy breath in middle of a word?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. To mutilate, spoil, or deform, as if with malice or
            cruelty; to mangle; as, to murder the king's English.
  
      Syn: To kill; assassinate; slay. See {Kill}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murder \Mur"der\, n. [OE. morder, morther, AS. mor[edh]or, fr.
      mor[edh] murder; akin to D. moord, OS. mor[edh], G., Dan., &
      Sw. mord, Icel. mor[edh], Goth. ma[a3]r[thorn]r, OSlav.
      mr[c7]ti to die, Lith. mirti, W. marw dead, L. mors, mortis,
      death, mori, moriri, to die, Gr. broto`s (for mroto`s)
      mortal, 'a`mbrotos immortal, Skr. m[rsdot] to die, m[rsdot]ta
      death. [fb]105. Cf. {Amaranth}, {Ambrosia}, {Mortal}.]
      The offense of killing a human being with malice prepense or
      aforethought, express or implied; intentional and unlawful
      homicide. [bd]Mordre will out.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
               The killing of their children had, in the account of
               God, the guilt of murder, as the offering them to idols
               had the guilt of idolatry.                     --Locke.
  
               Slaughter grows murder when it goes too far. --Dryden.
  
      Note: Murder in the second degree, in most jurisdictions, is
               a malicious homicide committed without a specific
               intention to take life. --Wharton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murder \Mur"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Murdered}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Murdering}.] [OE. mortheren, murtheren, AS. myr[?]rian;
      akin to OHG. murdiren, Goth. ma[a3]r[?]rjan. See {Murder},
      n.]
      1. To kill with premediated malice; to kill (a human being)
            willfully, deliberately, and unlawfully. See {Murder}, n.
  
      2. To destroy; to put an end to.
  
                     [Canst thou] murder thy breath in middle of a word?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. To mutilate, spoil, or deform, as if with malice or
            cruelty; to mangle; as, to murder the king's English.
  
      Syn: To kill; assassinate; slay. See {Kill}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderer \Mur"der*er\, n.
      1. One guilty of murder; a person who, in possession of his
            reason, unlawfully kills a human being with premeditated
            malice.
  
      2. A small cannon, formerly used for clearing a ship's decks
            of boarders; -- called also {murdering piece}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderess \Mur"der*ess\, n.
      A woman who commits murder.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murder \Mur"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Murdered}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Murdering}.] [OE. mortheren, murtheren, AS. myr[?]rian;
      akin to OHG. murdiren, Goth. ma[a3]r[?]rjan. See {Murder},
      n.]
      1. To kill with premediated malice; to kill (a human being)
            willfully, deliberately, and unlawfully. See {Murder}, n.
  
      2. To destroy; to put an end to.
  
                     [Canst thou] murder thy breath in middle of a word?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. To mutilate, spoil, or deform, as if with malice or
            cruelty; to mangle; as, to murder the king's English.
  
      Syn: To kill; assassinate; slay. See {Kill}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderer \Mur"der*er\, n.
      1. One guilty of murder; a person who, in possession of his
            reason, unlawfully kills a human being with premeditated
            malice.
  
      2. A small cannon, formerly used for clearing a ship's decks
            of boarders; -- called also {murdering piece}. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderment \Mur"der*ment\, n.
      Murder. [Obs.] --Farfax.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderous \Mur"der*ous\, a.
      Of or pertaining to murder; characterized by, or causing,
      murder or bloodshed; having the purpose or quality of murder;
      bloody; sanguinary; as, the murderous king; murderous rapine;
      murderous intent; a murderous assault. [bd]Murderous
      coward.[b8] --Shak. -- {Mur"der*ous*ly}, adv.
  
      Syn: Bloody; sanguinary; bloodguilty; bloodthirsty; fell;
               savage; cruel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murderous \Mur"der*ous\, a.
      Of or pertaining to murder; characterized by, or causing,
      murder or bloodshed; having the purpose or quality of murder;
      bloody; sanguinary; as, the murderous king; murderous rapine;
      murderous intent; a murderous assault. [bd]Murderous
      coward.[b8] --Shak. -- {Mur"der*ous*ly}, adv.
  
      Syn: Bloody; sanguinary; bloodguilty; bloodthirsty; fell;
               savage; cruel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murdress \Mur"dress\, n.
      A battlement in ancient fortifications with interstices for
      firing through.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murther \Mur"ther\, n. & v.
      Murder, n. & v. [Obs. or Prov.] [bd]The treason of the
      murthering.[b8] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Murtherer \Mur"ther*er\, n.
      A murderer. [Obs. or Prov.]

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Martorell, PR (comunidad, FIPS 51657)
      Location: 18.07539 N, 65.89817 W
      Population (1990): 2889 (904 housing units)
      Area: 2.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Meriwether County, GA (county, FIPS 199)
      Location: 33.04341 N, 84.68501 W
      Population (1990): 22411 (8409 housing units)
      Area: 1303.7 sq km (land), 5.3 sq km (water)

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   MORTRAN
  
      A {public domain} {Fortran} {preprocessor} for {structured
      programming}.
  
      (1995-09-20)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Martyr
      one who bears witness of the truth, and suffers death in the
      cause of Christ (Acts 22:20; Rev. 2:13; 17:6). In this sense
      Stephen was the first martyr. The Greek word so rendered in all
      other cases is translated "witness." (1.) In a court of justice
      (Matt. 18:16; 26:65; Acts 6:13; 7:58; Heb. 10:28; 1 Tim. 5:19).
      (2.) As of one bearing testimony to the truth of what he has
      seen or known (Luke 24:48; Acts 1:8, 22; Rom. 1:9; 1 Thess. 2:5,
      10; 1 John 1:2).
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Mortar
      (Heb. homer), cement of lime and sand (Gen. 11:3; Ex. 1:14);
      also potter's clay (Isa. 41:25; Nah. 3:14). Also Heb. 'aphar,
      usually rendered "dust," clay or mud used for cement in building
      (Lev. 14:42, 45).
     
         Mortar for pulverizing (Prov. 27:22) grain or other substances
      by means of a pestle instead of a mill. Mortars were used in the
      wilderness for pounding the manna (Num. 11:8). It is commonly
      used in Palestine at the present day to pound wheat, from which
      the Arabs make a favourite dish called kibby.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Murder
      Wilful murder was distinguished from accidental homicide, and
      was invariably visited with capital punishment (Num. 35:16, 18,
      21, 31; Lev. 24:17). This law in its principle is founded on the
      fact of man's having been made in the likeness of God (Gen. 9:5,
      6; John 8:44; 1 John 3:12, 15). The Mosiac law prohibited any
      compensation for murder or the reprieve of the murderer (Ex.
      21:12, 14; Deut. 19:11, 13; 2 Sam. 17:25; 20:10). Two witnesses
      were required in any capital case (Num. 35:19-30; Deut.
      17:6-12). If the murderer could not be discovered, the city
      nearest the scene of the murder was required to make expiation
      for the crime committed (Deut. 21:1-9). These offences also were
      to be punished with death, (1) striking a parent; (2) cursing a
      parent; (3) kidnapping (Ex. 21:15-17; Deut. 27:16).
     
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