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   labdanum
         n 1: a dark brown to greenish oleoresin that has a fragrant odor
               and is used as a fixative in perfumes; obtained as a juice
               from certain rockroses [syn: {labdanum}, {gum labdanum}]
         2: a soft blackish-brown resinous exudate from various rockroses
            used in perfumes especially as a fixative [syn: {labdanum},
            {ladanum}]

English Dictionary: Lafettenkopf by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
labiodental
n
  1. a consonant whose articulation involves the lips and teeth
    Synonym(s): labiodental consonant, labiodental
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
labiodental consonant
n
  1. a consonant whose articulation involves the lips and teeth
    Synonym(s): labiodental consonant, labiodental
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lappet moth
n
  1. medium-sized hairy moths; larvae are lappet caterpillars
    Synonym(s): lappet, lappet moth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Laputan
adj
  1. relating to or characteristic of the imaginary country of Laputa or its people
  2. not practical or realizable; speculative; "airy theories about socioeconomic improvement"; "visionary schemes for getting rich"
    Synonym(s): airy, impractical, visionary, Laputan, windy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lavation
n
  1. the work of cleansing (usually with soap and water) [syn: wash, washing, lavation]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
law of diminishing returns
n
  1. a law affirming that to continue after a certain level of performance has been reached will result in a decline in effectiveness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
law-abiding
adj
  1. (of individuals) adhering strictly to laws and rules and customs; "law-abiding citizens"; "observant of the speed limit"
    Synonym(s): law-abiding, observant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left hand
n
  1. the hand that is on the left side of the body; "jab with your left"
    Synonym(s): left, left hand
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left hander
n
  1. a baseball pitcher who throws the ball with the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handed pitcher, left-hander, left hander, lefthander, lefty, southpaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left hemisphere
n
  1. the cerebral hemisphere to the left of the corpus callosum that controls the right half of the body
    Synonym(s): left hemisphere, left brain
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left wing
n
  1. those who support varying degrees of social or political or economic change designed to promote the public welfare
    Synonym(s): left, left wing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-hand
adj
  1. intended for the left hand; "I rarely lose a left-hand glove"
    Synonym(s): left(a), left-hand(a)
  2. located on or directed toward the left; "a car with left-hand drive"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-handed
adj
  1. using or intended for the left hand; "left-handed golfers need left-handed clubs"; "left-handed scissors"
    Antonym(s): ambidextrous, right-handed, two-handed
  2. (of marriages) illicit or informal; "in Colonial America left-handed marriages between Frenchmen and Indians were frequent"
  3. (of marriages) of a marriage between one of royal or noble birth and one of lower rank; valid but with the understanding that the rank of the inferior remains unchanged and offspring do not succeed to titles or property of the superior
    Synonym(s): morganatic, left-handed
  4. rotating to the left
    Synonym(s): levorotary, levorotatory, left-handed
  5. ironically ambiguous; "a left-handed compliment"
  6. lacking physical movement skills, especially with the hands; "a bumbling mechanic"; "a bungling performance"; "ham-handed governmental interference"; "could scarcely empty a scuttle of ashes, so handless was the poor creature"- Mary H. Vorse
    Synonym(s): bumbling, bungling, butterfingered, ham-fisted, ham-handed, handless, heavy-handed, left-handed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-handed pitcher
n
  1. a baseball pitcher who throws the ball with the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handed pitcher, left-hander, left hander, lefthander, lefty, southpaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-handedness
n
  1. the status of being born of a morganatic marriage
  2. preference for using the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handedness, sinistrality
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-hander
n
  1. a baseball pitcher who throws the ball with the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handed pitcher, left-hander, left hander, lefthander, lefty, southpaw
  2. a person who uses the left hand with greater skill than the right; "their pitcher was a southpaw"
    Synonym(s): left-hander, lefty, southpaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-wing
adj
  1. believing in or supporting tenets of the political left
    Synonym(s): leftist, left-of-center, left-wing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left-winger
n
  1. a person who belongs to the political left [syn: collectivist, leftist, left-winger]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lefthander
n
  1. a baseball pitcher who throws the ball with the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handed pitcher, left-hander, left hander, lefthander, lefty, southpaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leftmost
adj
  1. farthest to the left; "the leftmost non-zero digit"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepidium
n
  1. cosmopolitan genus of annual and biennial and perennial herbs: cress
    Synonym(s): Lepidium, genus Lepidium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepidium alpina
n
  1. small tufted perennial herb of mountains of central and southern Europe having very small flowers of usually leafless stems; sometimes placed in genus Lepidium
    Synonym(s): chamois cress, Pritzelago alpina, Lepidium alpina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepidium sativum
n
  1. annual herb used as salad green and garnish [syn: {common garden cress}, garden pepper cress, pepper grass, pepperwort, Lepidium sativum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lepidomelane
n
  1. a mica that is a biotite containing iron
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepiota americana
n
  1. an agaric with a pallid cap and a stalk that is enlarged near the base
    Synonym(s): American parasol, Lepiota americana
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepiota morgani
n
  1. an agaric regarded as poisonous [syn: poisonous parasol, Lepiota morgani]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lepiota naucina
n
  1. an agaric with greyish white fruiting body and gills that change from pink to dingy red
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Leptinotarsa
n
  1. Colorado potato beetles [syn: Leptinotarsa, {genus Leptinotarsa}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Leptinotarsa decemlineata
n
  1. black-and-yellow beetle that feeds in adult and larval stages on potato leaves; originally of eastern Rocky Mountains; now worldwide
    Synonym(s): Colorado potato beetle, Colorado beetle, potato bug, potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leptomeninges
n
  1. the two innermost layers of the meninges; cerebrospinal fluid circulates between these innermost layers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leptomeningitis
n
  1. inflammation of the leptomeninges
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lepton
n
  1. 100 lepta equal 1 drachma in Greece
  2. an elementary particle that participates in weak interactions; has a baryon number of 0
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leviathan
n
  1. the largest or most massive thing of its kind; "it was a leviathan among redwoods"; "they were assigned the leviathan of textbooks"
  2. monstrous sea creature symbolizing evil in the Old Testament
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
libation
n
  1. (facetious) a serving of an alcoholic beverage
  2. a serving (of wine) poured out in honor of a deity
  3. the act of pouring a liquid offering (especially wine) as a religious ceremony
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
libidinal
adj
  1. belonging to the libido; "libidinal impulses"; "libidinal gratification"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
libidinal energy
n
  1. (psychoanalysis) psychic energy produced by the libido
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
libidinous
adj
  1. driven by lust; preoccupied with or exhibiting lustful desires; "libidinous orgies"
    Synonym(s): lascivious, lewd, libidinous, lustful
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
life tenant
n
  1. a tenant whose legal right to retain possession of buildings or lands lasts as long as they (or some other person) live
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
life-time
n
  1. the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"
    Synonym(s): life, lifetime, life- time, lifespan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lifetime
n
  1. the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"
    Synonym(s): life, lifetime, life- time, lifespan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lifting device
n
  1. a device for lifting heavy loads
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
liftman
n
  1. a man employed to operate an elevator; "in England they call an elevator man a liftman"
    Synonym(s): elevator man, elevator boy, liftman
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipidaemia
n
  1. presence of excess lipids in the blood [syn: lipemia, lipaemia, lipidemia, lipidaemia, lipoidemia, lipoidaemia, hyperlipemia, hyperlipaemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperlipoidemia, hyperlipoidaemia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipidemia
n
  1. presence of excess lipids in the blood [syn: lipemia, lipaemia, lipidemia, lipidaemia, lipoidemia, lipoidaemia, hyperlipemia, hyperlipaemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperlipoidemia, hyperlipoidaemia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipoidaemia
n
  1. presence of excess lipids in the blood [syn: lipemia, lipaemia, lipidemia, lipidaemia, lipoidemia, lipoidaemia, hyperlipemia, hyperlipaemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperlipoidemia, hyperlipoidaemia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipoidemia
n
  1. presence of excess lipids in the blood [syn: lipemia, lipaemia, lipidemia, lipidaemia, lipoidemia, lipoidaemia, hyperlipemia, hyperlipaemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidaemia, hyperlipoidemia, hyperlipoidaemia]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
live down
v
  1. live so as to annul some previous behavior; "You can never live this down!"
    Synonym(s): unlive, live down
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lividness
n
  1. unnatural lack of color in the skin (as from bruising or sickness or emotional distress)
    Synonym(s): lividness, lividity, luridness, paleness, pallidness, pallor, wanness, achromasia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lobotomy
n
  1. surgical interruption of nerve tracts to and from the frontal lobe of the brain; often results in marked cognitive and personality changes
    Synonym(s): lobotomy, leukotomy, leucotomy, prefrontal lobotomy, prefrontal leukotomy, prefrontal leucotomy, frontal lobotomy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lofoten
n
  1. a string of islands off the northwestern coast of Norway in the Norwegian Sea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
loftiness
n
  1. the quality of being high or lofty [syn: highness, loftiness]
    Antonym(s): lowness
  2. impressiveness in scale or proportion
    Synonym(s): stateliness, majesty, loftiness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
loved one
n
  1. a person who you love, usually a member of your family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
low-fat milk
n
  1. milk from which some of the cream has been removed
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ladanum \Lad"a*num\, n. [L. ladanum, ledanum, Gr. la`danon,
      lh`danon, fr. lh^don name of a shrub, mastic; cf. Per.
      l[be]dan, l[be]den. Cf. {Laudanum}.]
      A gum resin gathered from certain Oriental species of
      {Cistus}. It has a pungent odor and is chiefly used in making
      plasters, and for fumigation. [Written also {labdanum}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labdanum \Lab"da*num\, n. (Bot.)
      See {Ladanum}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ladanum \Lad"a*num\, n. [L. ladanum, ledanum, Gr. la`danon,
      lh`danon, fr. lh^don name of a shrub, mastic; cf. Per.
      l[be]dan, l[be]den. Cf. {Laudanum}.]
      A gum resin gathered from certain Oriental species of
      {Cistus}. It has a pungent odor and is chiefly used in making
      plasters, and for fumigation. [Written also {labdanum}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labdanum \Lab"da*num\, n. (Bot.)
      See {Ladanum}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labidometer \Lab`i*dom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. labi`s, -i`dos, a forceps
      + meter: cf. F. labidometre.] (Med.)
      A forceps with a measuring attachment for ascertaining the
      size of the fetal head.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labiodental \La`bi*o*den"tal\, a. [Labium + dental.] (Phonetics)
      Formed or pronounced by the cooperation of the lips and
      teeth, as f and v. -- n. A labiodental sound or letter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lappet \Lap"pet\, n. [Dim. of lap a fold.]
      A small decorative fold or flap, esp, of lace or muslin, in a
      garment or headdress. --Swift.
  
      {Lappet moth} (Zo[94]l.), one of several species of bombycid
            moths, which have stout, hairy caterpillars, flat beneath.
            Two common American species ({Gastropacha Americana}, and
            {Tolype velleda}) feed upon the apple tree.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lappet \Lap"pet\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lappeted}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Lappeting}.]
      To decorate with, or as with, a lappet. [R.] --Landor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Laputan \La*pu"tan\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Laputa, an imaginary flying island
      described in Gulliver's Travels as the home of chimerical
      philosophers. Hence, fanciful; preposterous; absurd in
      science or philosophy. [bd]Laputan ideas.[b8] --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lavation \La*va"tion\, n. [L. lavatio: cf. OF. lavation.]
      A washing or cleansing. [Obs. or R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Law-abiding \Law"-a*bid`ing\, a.
      Abiding the law; waiting for the operation of law for the
      enforcement of rights; also, abiding by the law; obedient to
      the law; as, law-abiding people.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-hand \Left"-hand`\ (l[ecr]ft"h[acr]nd`), a.
      Situated on the left; nearer the left hand than the right;
      as, the left-hand side; the left-hand road.
  
      {Left-hand rope}, rope laid up and twisted over from right to
            left, or against the sun; -- called also {water-laid
            rope}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-hand \Left"-hand`\ (l[ecr]ft"h[acr]nd`), a.
      Situated on the left; nearer the left hand than the right;
      as, the left-hand side; the left-hand road.
  
      {Left-hand rope}, rope laid up and twisted over from right to
            left, or against the sun; -- called also {water-laid
            rope}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handed \Left"-hand`ed\, a.
      1. Having the left hand or arm stronger and more dexterous
            than the right; using the left hand and arm with more
            dexterity than the right.
  
      2. Clumsy; awkward; unlucky; insincere; sinister; malicious;
            as, a left-handed compliment.
  
                     The commendations of this people are not always
                     left-handed and detractive.               --Landor.
  
      3. Having a direction contrary to that of the hands of a
            watch when seen in front; -- said of a twist, a rotary
            motion, etc., looked at from a given direction.
  
      {Left-handed marriage}, a morganatic marriage. See
            {Morganatic}.
  
      {Left-handed screw}, a screw constructed to advance away from
            the observer, when turned, as in a nut, with a left-handed
            rotation. An ordinary wood screw is right-handed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handed \Left"-hand`ed\, a.
      1. Having the left hand or arm stronger and more dexterous
            than the right; using the left hand and arm with more
            dexterity than the right.
  
      2. Clumsy; awkward; unlucky; insincere; sinister; malicious;
            as, a left-handed compliment.
  
                     The commendations of this people are not always
                     left-handed and detractive.               --Landor.
  
      3. Having a direction contrary to that of the hands of a
            watch when seen in front; -- said of a twist, a rotary
            motion, etc., looked at from a given direction.
  
      {Left-handed marriage}, a morganatic marriage. See
            {Morganatic}.
  
      {Left-handed screw}, a screw constructed to advance away from
            the observer, when turned, as in a nut, with a left-handed
            rotation. An ordinary wood screw is right-handed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Morganatic \Mor`ga*nat"ic\, a. [LL. matrimonium ad morganaticam,
      fr. morganatica a morning gift, a kind of dowry paid on the
      morning before or after the marriage, fr. OHG. morgan
      morning, in morgangeba morning gift, G. morgengabe. See
      {Morn}.]
      Pertaining to, in the manner of, or designating, a kind of
      marriage, called also {left-handed marriage}, between a man
      of superior rank and a woman of inferior, in which it is
      stipulated that neither the latter nor her children shall
      enjoy the rank or inherit the possessions of her husband.
      --Brande & C. -- {Mor`ga*nat"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handed \Left"-hand`ed\, a.
      1. Having the left hand or arm stronger and more dexterous
            than the right; using the left hand and arm with more
            dexterity than the right.
  
      2. Clumsy; awkward; unlucky; insincere; sinister; malicious;
            as, a left-handed compliment.
  
                     The commendations of this people are not always
                     left-handed and detractive.               --Landor.
  
      3. Having a direction contrary to that of the hands of a
            watch when seen in front; -- said of a twist, a rotary
            motion, etc., looked at from a given direction.
  
      {Left-handed marriage}, a morganatic marriage. See
            {Morganatic}.
  
      {Left-handed screw}, a screw constructed to advance away from
            the observer, when turned, as in a nut, with a left-handed
            rotation. An ordinary wood screw is right-handed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Morganatic \Mor`ga*nat"ic\, a. [LL. matrimonium ad morganaticam,
      fr. morganatica a morning gift, a kind of dowry paid on the
      morning before or after the marriage, fr. OHG. morgan
      morning, in morgangeba morning gift, G. morgengabe. See
      {Morn}.]
      Pertaining to, in the manner of, or designating, a kind of
      marriage, called also {left-handed marriage}, between a man
      of superior rank and a woman of inferior, in which it is
      stipulated that neither the latter nor her children shall
      enjoy the rank or inherit the possessions of her husband.
      --Brande & C. -- {Mor`ga*nat"ic*al*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handed \Left"-hand`ed\, a.
      1. Having the left hand or arm stronger and more dexterous
            than the right; using the left hand and arm with more
            dexterity than the right.
  
      2. Clumsy; awkward; unlucky; insincere; sinister; malicious;
            as, a left-handed compliment.
  
                     The commendations of this people are not always
                     left-handed and detractive.               --Landor.
  
      3. Having a direction contrary to that of the hands of a
            watch when seen in front; -- said of a twist, a rotary
            motion, etc., looked at from a given direction.
  
      {Left-handed marriage}, a morganatic marriage. See
            {Morganatic}.
  
      {Left-handed screw}, a screw constructed to advance away from
            the observer, when turned, as in a nut, with a left-handed
            rotation. An ordinary wood screw is right-handed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handedness \Left"-hand`ed*ness\, Left-handiness
   \Left"-hand`i*ness\ (-[icr]*n[ecr]s), n.
      The state or quality of being left-handed; awkwardness.
  
               An awkward address, ungraceful attitudes and actions,
               and a certain left-handiness (if I may use the
               expression) proclaim low education.         --Chesterfield.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left-handedness \Left"-hand`ed*ness\, Left-handiness
   \Left"-hand`i*ness\ (-[icr]*n[ecr]s), n.
      The state or quality of being left-handed; awkwardness.
  
               An awkward address, ungraceful attitudes and actions,
               and a certain left-handiness (if I may use the
               expression) proclaim low education.         --Chesterfield.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leipothymic \Lei`po*thym"ic\ (l[imac]`p[osl]*th[icr]m"[icr]k),
      a.
      See {Lipothymic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipothymic \Li`po*thym"ic\ (l[imac]`p[osl]*th[icr]m"[icr]k), a.
      [Gr. leipoqymiko`s, lipoqymiko`s.]
      Tending to swoon; fainting. [Written also {leipothymic}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leipothymic \Lei`po*thym"ic\ (l[imac]`p[osl]*th[icr]m"[icr]k),
      a.
      See {Lipothymic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipothymic \Li`po*thym"ic\ (l[imac]`p[osl]*th[icr]m"[icr]k), a.
      [Gr. leipoqymiko`s, lipoqymiko`s.]
      Tending to swoon; fainting. [Written also {leipothymic}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Iridoline \I*rid"o*line\, n. [Iridescent + L. oleum oil.]
      (Chem.)
      A nitrogenous base {C10H9N}, extracted from coal-tar naphtha,
      as an oily liquid. It is a member of the quinoline series,
      and is probably identical with {lepidine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lepidine \Lep"i*dine\ (l[ecr]p"[icr]*d[icr]n or *d[emac]n), n.
      (Chem.)
      An organic base, {C9H6.N.CH3}, metameric with quinaldine, and
      obtained by the distillation of cinchonine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Iridoline \I*rid"o*line\, n. [Iridescent + L. oleum oil.]
      (Chem.)
      A nitrogenous base {C10H9N}, extracted from coal-tar naphtha,
      as an oily liquid. It is a member of the quinoline series,
      and is probably identical with {lepidine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lepidine \Lep"i*dine\ (l[ecr]p"[icr]*d[icr]n or *d[emac]n), n.
      (Chem.)
      An organic base, {C9H6.N.CH3}, metameric with quinaldine, and
      obtained by the distillation of cinchonine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spanish \Span"ish\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards.
  
      {Spanish bayonet} (Bot.), a liliaceous plant ({Yucca
            alorifolia}) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is
            also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern
            United States and mexico. Called also {Spanish daggers}.
           
  
      {Spanish bean} (Bot.) See the Note under {Bean}.
  
      {Spanish black}, a black pigment obtained by charring cork.
            --Ure.
  
      {Spanish broom} (Bot.), a leguminous shrub ({Spartium
            junceum}) having many green flexible rushlike twigs.
  
      {Spanish brown}, a species of earth used in painting, having
            a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of
            sesquioxide of iron.
  
      {Spanish buckeye} (Bot.), a small tree ({Ungnadia speciosa})
            of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but
            having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit.
  
      {Spanish burton} (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single
            blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two
            single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship).
  
      {Spanish chalk} (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called
            because obtained from Aragon in Spain.
  
      {Spanish cress} (Bot.), a cruciferous plant ({lepidium
            Cadamines}), a species of peppergrass.
  
      {Spanish curiew} (Zo[94]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.]
           
  
      {Spanish daggers} (Bot.) See {Spanish bayonet}.
  
      {Spanish elm} (Bot.), a large West Indian tree ({Cordia
            Gerascanthus}) furnishing hard and useful timber.
  
      {Spanish feretto}, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by
            calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles.
           
  
      {Spanish flag} (Zo[94]l.), the California rockfish
            ({Sebastichthys rubrivinctus}). It is conspicuously
            colored with bands of red and white.
  
      {Spanish fly} (Zo[94]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in
            the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See
            {Blister beetle} under {Blister}, and {Cantharis}.
  
      {Spanish fox} (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay.
  
      {Spanish grass}. (Bot.) See {Esparto}.
  
      {Spanish juice} (Bot.), licorice.
  
      {Spanish leather}. See {Cordwain}.
  
      {Spanish mackerel}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A species of mackerel ({Scomber colias}) found both in
            Europe and America. In America called {chub mackerel},
            {big-eyed mackerel}, and {bull mackerel}.
      (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright
            yellow round spots ({Scomberomorus maculatus}), highly
            esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes
            erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under
            Mackerel.
  
      {Spanish main}, the name formerly given to the southern
            portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous
            coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure
            ships from the New to the Old World.
  
      {Spanish moss}. (Bot.) See {Tillandsia}.
  
      {Spanish needles} (Bot.), a composite weed ({Bidens
            bipinnata}) having achenia armed with needlelike awns.
  
      {Spanish nut} (Bot.), a bulbous plant ({Iris Sisyrinchium})
            of the south of Europe.
  
      {Spanish potato} (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under
            {Potato}.
  
      {Spanish red}, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian
            red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt.
  
      {Spanish reef} (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a
            jib-headed sail.
  
      {Spanish sheep} (Zo[94]l.), a merino.
  
      {Spanish white}, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by
            pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white
            pigment.
  
      {Spanish windlass} (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope
            wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to
            serve as a lever.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yellowseed \Yel"low*seed`\, n. (Bot.)
      A kind of pepper grass ({Lepidium campestre}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dittander \Dit*tan"der\, n. [See {Dittany}.] (Bot.)
      A kind of peppergrass ({Lepidium latifolium}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mustard \Mus"tard\, n. [OF. moustarde, F. moutarde, fr. L.
      mustum must, -- mustard was prepared for use by being mixed
      with must. See {Must}, n.]
      1. (Bot.) The name of several cruciferous plants of the genus
            {Brassica} (formerly {Sinapis}), as white mustard ({B.
            alba}), black mustard ({B. Nigra}), wild mustard or
            charlock ({B. Sinapistrum}).
  
      Note: There are also many herbs of the same family which are
               called mustard, and have more or less of the flavor of
               the true mustard; as, bowyer's mustard ({Lepidium
               ruderale}); hedge mustard ({Sisymbrium officinale});
               Mithridate mustard ({Thlaspi arvense}); tower mustard
               ({Arabis perfoliata}); treacle mustard ({Erysimum
               cheiranthoides}).
  
      2. A powder or a paste made from the seeds of black or white
            mustard, used as a condiment and a rubefacient. Taken
            internally it is stimulant and diuretic, and in large
            doses is emetic.
  
      {Mustard oil} (Chem.), a substance obtained from mustard, as
            a transparent, volatile and intensely pungent oil. The
            name is also extended to a number of analogous compounds
            produced either naturally or artificially.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Peppergrass \Pep"per*grass`\, n. (Bot.)
      (a) Any herb of the cruciferous genus {Lepidium}, especially
            the garden peppergrass, or garden cress, {Lepidium
            sativum}; -- called also {pepperwort}. All the species
            have a pungent flavor.
      (b) The common pillwort of Europe ({Pilularia globulifera}).
            See {Pillwort}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cress \Cress\ (kr[ecr]s), n.; pl. {Cresses} (kr[ecr]s"[ecr]z).
      [OE. ces, cresse, kers, kerse, AS. cresse, cerse; akin to D.
      kers, G. kresse, Dan. karse, Sw. krasse, and possibly also to
      OHG. chresan to creep.] (Bot.)
      A plant of various species, chiefly cruciferous. The leaves
      have a moderately pungent taste, and are used as a salad and
      antiscorbutic.
  
      Note: The garden cress, called also {peppergrass}, is the
               {Lepidium sativum}; the water cress is the {Nasturtium
               officinale}. Various other plants are sometimes called
               cresses.
  
                        To strip the brook with mantling cresses spread.
                                                                              --Goldsmith.
  
      {Bitter cress}. See under {Bitter}.
  
      {Not worth a cress}, [or] {[bd]not worth a kers.[b8]} a
            common old proverb, now turned into the meaningless
            [bd]not worth a curse.[b8] --Skeat.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lepidomelane \Lep`i*dom"e*lane\
      (l[ecr]p`[icr]*d[ocr]m"[esl]*l[amac]n), n. [Gr. lepi`s
      -i`dos, a scale + me`las, me`laina, black.] (Min.)
      An iron-potash mica, of a raven-black color, usually found in
      granitic rocks in small six-sided tables, or as an
      aggregation of minute opaque scales. See {Mica}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mica \Mi"ca\, n. [L. mica crumb, grain, particle; cf. F. mica.]
      (Min.)
      The name of a group of minerals characterized by highly
      perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very
      thin leaves, more or less elastic. They differ widely in
      composition, and vary in color from pale brown or yellow to
      green or black. The transparent forms are used in lanterns,
      the doors of stoves, etc., being popularly called
      {isinglass}. Formerly called also {cat-silver}, and
      {glimmer}.
  
      Note: The important species of the mica group are:
               {muscovite}, common or potash mica, pale brown or
               green, often silvery, including {damourite} (also
               called {hydromica}); {biotite}, iron-magnesia mica,
               dark brown, green, or black; {lepidomelane}, iron,
               mica, black; {phlogopite}, magnesia mica, colorless,
               yellow, brown; {lepidolite}, lithia mica, rose-red,
               lilac. Mica (usually muscovite, also biotite) is an
               essential constituent of granite, gneiss, and mica
               slate; {biotite} is common in many eruptive rocks;
               {phlogopite} in crystalline limestone and serpentine.
  
      {Mica diorite} (Min.), an eruptive rock allied to diorite but
            containing mica (biotite) instead of hornblende.
  
      {Mica powder}, a kind of dynamite containing fine scales of
            mica.
  
      {Mica schist}, {Mica slate} (Geol.), a schistose rock,
            consisting of mica and quartz with, usually, some
            feldspar.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lepidomelane \Lep`i*dom"e*lane\
      (l[ecr]p`[icr]*d[ocr]m"[esl]*l[amac]n), n. [Gr. lepi`s
      -i`dos, a scale + me`las, me`laina, black.] (Min.)
      An iron-potash mica, of a raven-black color, usually found in
      granitic rocks in small six-sided tables, or as an
      aggregation of minute opaque scales. See {Mica}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mica \Mi"ca\, n. [L. mica crumb, grain, particle; cf. F. mica.]
      (Min.)
      The name of a group of minerals characterized by highly
      perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very
      thin leaves, more or less elastic. They differ widely in
      composition, and vary in color from pale brown or yellow to
      green or black. The transparent forms are used in lanterns,
      the doors of stoves, etc., being popularly called
      {isinglass}. Formerly called also {cat-silver}, and
      {glimmer}.
  
      Note: The important species of the mica group are:
               {muscovite}, common or potash mica, pale brown or
               green, often silvery, including {damourite} (also
               called {hydromica}); {biotite}, iron-magnesia mica,
               dark brown, green, or black; {lepidomelane}, iron,
               mica, black; {phlogopite}, magnesia mica, colorless,
               yellow, brown; {lepidolite}, lithia mica, rose-red,
               lilac. Mica (usually muscovite, also biotite) is an
               essential constituent of granite, gneiss, and mica
               slate; {biotite} is common in many eruptive rocks;
               {phlogopite} in crystalline limestone and serpentine.
  
      {Mica diorite} (Min.), an eruptive rock allied to diorite but
            containing mica (biotite) instead of hornblende.
  
      {Mica powder}, a kind of dynamite containing fine scales of
            mica.
  
      {Mica schist}, {Mica slate} (Geol.), a schistose rock,
            consisting of mica and quartz with, usually, some
            feldspar.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Culver's physic \Cul"ver's phys"ic\, or Culver's root \Cul"ver's
   root`\ [So called after a Dr. Culver, who used it.] (Bot.)
      The root of a handsome erect herb ({Leptandra, syn. Veronica,
      Virginica}) common in most moist woods of North America, used
      as an active cathartic and emetic; also, the plant itself.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sea leopard \Sea" leop"ard\ (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several species of spotted seals, especially
      {Ogmorhinus leptonyx}, and {Leptonychotes Weddelli}, of the
      Antarctic Ocean. The North Pacific sea leopard is the harbor
      seal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leptynite \Lep"ty*nite\ (l[ecr]p"t[icr]*n[imac]t), n. (Min.)
      See {Granulite}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Levation \Le*va"tion\ (l[esl]*v[amac]"sh[ucr]n), n. [L.
      levatio.]
      The act of raising; elevation; upward motion, as that
      produced by the action of a levator muscle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leviathan \Le*vi"a*than\ (l[esl]*v[imac]"[adot]*th[ait]n), n.
      [Heb. livy[be]th[be]n.]
      1. An aquatic animal, described in the book of Job, ch. xli.,
            and mentioned in other passages of Scripture.
  
      Note: It is not certainly known what animal is intended,
               whether the crocodile, the whale, or some sort of
               serpent.
  
      2. The whale, or a great whale. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libation \Li*ba"tion\ (l[isl]*b[amac]"sh[ucr]n), n. [L. libatio,
      fr. libare to take a little from anything, to taste, to pour
      out as an offering: cf. F. libation.]
      The act of pouring a liquid or liquor, usually wine, either
      on the ground or on a victim in sacrifice, in honor of some
      deity; also, the wine or liquid thus poured out. --Dryden.
  
               A heathen sacrifice or libation to the earth. --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libethenite \Li*beth"en*ite\ (l[icr]*b[ecr]th"[ecr]n*[imac]t),
      n. [From Libethen, in Hungary, where it was first found.]
      (Min.)
      A mineral of an olive-green color, commonly in orthorhombic
      crystals. It is a hydrous phosphate of copper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libidinist \Li*bid"i*nist\ (l[icr]*b[icr]d"[icr]*n[icr]st), n.
      [See {Libidinous}.]
      One given to lewdness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libidinosity \Li*bid`i*nos"i*ty\ (-n[ocr]s"[icr]*t[ycr]), n.
      The state or quality of being libidinous; libidinousness.
                                                                              --Skelton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libidinous \Li*bid"i*nous\ (-n[ucr]s), a. [L. libidinosus, fr.
      libido, libidinis, pleasure, desire, lust, fr. libet, lubet,
      it pleases: cf. F. libidineux. See {Lief}.]
      Having lustful desires; characterized by lewdness; sensual;
      lascivious. -- {Li*bid"i*nous*ly}, adv. --
      {Li*bid"i*nous*ness}, n.
  
      Syn: Lewd; lustful; lascivious; unchaste; impure; sensual;
               licentious; lecherous; salacious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libidinous \Li*bid"i*nous\ (-n[ucr]s), a. [L. libidinosus, fr.
      libido, libidinis, pleasure, desire, lust, fr. libet, lubet,
      it pleases: cf. F. libidineux. See {Lief}.]
      Having lustful desires; characterized by lewdness; sensual;
      lascivious. -- {Li*bid"i*nous*ly}, adv. --
      {Li*bid"i*nous*ness}, n.
  
      Syn: Lewd; lustful; lascivious; unchaste; impure; sensual;
               licentious; lecherous; salacious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Libidinous \Li*bid"i*nous\ (-n[ucr]s), a. [L. libidinosus, fr.
      libido, libidinis, pleasure, desire, lust, fr. libet, lubet,
      it pleases: cf. F. libidineux. See {Lief}.]
      Having lustful desires; characterized by lewdness; sensual;
      lascivious. -- {Li*bid"i*nous*ly}, adv. --
      {Li*bid"i*nous*ness}, n.
  
      Syn: Lewd; lustful; lascivious; unchaste; impure; sensual;
               licentious; lecherous; salacious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifetime \Life"time`\ (-t[imac]m`), n.
      The time that life continues.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      4. That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is
            lifted; as:
            (a) A hoisting machine; an elevator; a dumb waiter.
            (b) A handle.
            (c) An exercising machine.
  
      5. A rise; a degree of elevation; as, the lift of a lock in
            canals.
  
      6. A lift gate. See {Lift gate}, below. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      7. (Naut.) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity
            of a yard below; -- used for raising or supporting the end
            of the yard.
  
      8. (Mach.) One of the steps of a cone pulley.
  
      9. (Shoemaking) A layer of leather in the heel.
  
      10. (Horology) That portion of the vibration of a balance
            during which the impulse is given. --Saunier.
  
      {Dead lift}. See under {Dead}. --Swift.
  
      {Lift bridge}, a kind of drawbridge, the movable part of
            which is lifted, instead of being drawn aside.
  
      {Lift gate}, a gate that is opened by lifting.
  
      {Lift hammer}. See {Tilt hammer}.
  
      {Lift lock}, a canal lock.
  
      {Lift pump}, a lifting pump.
  
      {Lift tenter} (Windmills), a governor for regulating the
            speed by adjusting the sails, or for adjusting the action
            of grinding machinery according to the speed.
  
      {Lift wall} (Canal Lock), the cross wall at the head of the
            lock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      4. That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is
            lifted; as:
            (a) A hoisting machine; an elevator; a dumb waiter.
            (b) A handle.
            (c) An exercising machine.
  
      5. A rise; a degree of elevation; as, the lift of a lock in
            canals.
  
      6. A lift gate. See {Lift gate}, below. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      7. (Naut.) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity
            of a yard below; -- used for raising or supporting the end
            of the yard.
  
      8. (Mach.) One of the steps of a cone pulley.
  
      9. (Shoemaking) A layer of leather in the heel.
  
      10. (Horology) That portion of the vibration of a balance
            during which the impulse is given. --Saunier.
  
      {Dead lift}. See under {Dead}. --Swift.
  
      {Lift bridge}, a kind of drawbridge, the movable part of
            which is lifted, instead of being drawn aside.
  
      {Lift gate}, a gate that is opened by lifting.
  
      {Lift hammer}. See {Tilt hammer}.
  
      {Lift lock}, a canal lock.
  
      {Lift pump}, a lifting pump.
  
      {Lift tenter} (Windmills), a governor for regulating the
            speed by adjusting the sails, or for adjusting the action
            of grinding machinery according to the speed.
  
      {Lift wall} (Canal Lock), the cross wall at the head of the
            lock.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lift \Lift\ (l[icr]ft), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lifted}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Lifting}.] [Icel. lypta, fr. lopt air; akin to Sw.
      lyfta to lift, Dan. l[94]fte, G. l[81]ften; -- prop., to
      raise into the air. See {Loft}, and cf. 1st {Lift}.]
      1. To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to
            raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a
            higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support
            or holding in the higher place; -- said of material
            things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair
            or a burden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Health \Health\, n. [OE. helthe, AS. h[?]lp, fr. h[be]l hale,
      sound, whole. See {Whole}.]
      1. The state of being hale, sound, or whole, in body, mind,
            or soul; especially, the state of being free from physical
            disease or pain.
  
                     There is no health in us.                  --Book of
                                                                              Common Prayer.
  
                     Though health may be enjoyed without gratitude, it
                     can not be sported with without loss, or regained by
                     courage.                                             --Buckminster.
  
      2. A wish of health and happiness, as in pledging a person in
            a toast. [bd]Come, love and health to all.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {Bill of health}. See under {Bill}.
  
      {Health lift}, a machine for exercise, so arranged that a
            person lifts an increasing weight, or moves a spring of
            increasing tension, in such a manner that most of the
            muscles of the body are brought into gradual action; --
            also called {lifting machine}.
  
      {Health officer}, one charged with the enforcement of the
            sanitary laws of a port or other place.
  
      {To drink a health}. See under {Drink}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Health \Health\, n. [OE. helthe, AS. h[?]lp, fr. h[be]l hale,
      sound, whole. See {Whole}.]
      1. The state of being hale, sound, or whole, in body, mind,
            or soul; especially, the state of being free from physical
            disease or pain.
  
                     There is no health in us.                  --Book of
                                                                              Common Prayer.
  
                     Though health may be enjoyed without gratitude, it
                     can not be sported with without loss, or regained by
                     courage.                                             --Buckminster.
  
      2. A wish of health and happiness, as in pledging a person in
            a toast. [bd]Come, love and health to all.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {Bill of health}. See under {Bill}.
  
      {Health lift}, a machine for exercise, so arranged that a
            person lifts an increasing weight, or moves a spring of
            increasing tension, in such a manner that most of the
            muscles of the body are brought into gradual action; --
            also called {lifting machine}.
  
      {Health officer}, one charged with the enforcement of the
            sanitary laws of a port or other place.
  
      {To drink a health}. See under {Drink}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lifting \Lift"ing\, a.
      Used in, or for, or by, lifting.
  
      {Lifting bridge}, a lift bridge.
  
      {Lifting jack}. See 2d {Jack}, 5.
  
      {Lifting machine}. See {Health lift}, under {Health}.
  
      {Lifting pump}. (Mach.)
      (a) A kind of pump having a bucket, or valved piston, instead
            of a solid piston, for drawing water and lifting it to a
            high level.
      (b) A pump which lifts the water only to the top of the pump,
            or delivers it through a spout; a lift pump.
  
      {Lifting rod}, a vertical rod lifted by a rock shaft, and
            imparting motion to a puppet valve; -- used in the engines
            of river steamboats.
  
      {Lifting sail} (Naut.), one which tends to lift a vessel's
            bow out of water, as jibs and square foresails.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipothymic \Li`po*thym"ic\ (l[imac]`p[osl]*th[icr]m"[icr]k), a.
      [Gr. leipoqymiko`s, lipoqymiko`s.]
      Tending to swoon; fainting. [Written also {leipothymic}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipothymous \Li*poth"y*mous\ (l[isl]*p[ocr]th"[icr]*m[ucr]s), a.
      [Gr. lei`pein to leave, to lack + qymo`s soul, life.]
      Pertaining, or given, to swooning; fainting.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipothymy \Li*poth"y*my\ (-m[ycr]), n. [Gr. lipoqymi`a: cf. F.
      lipothymie.]
      A fainting; a swoon. --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lividness \Liv"id*ness\, n.
      Lividity. --Walpole.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sawtooth \Saw"tooth`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      An arctic seal ({Lobodon carcinophaga}), having the molars
      serrated; -- called also {crab-eating seal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sterrink \Ster"rink\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The crab-eating seal ({Lobodon carcinophaga}) of the
      Antarctic Ocean.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loftiness \Loft"i*ness\, n.
      The state or quality of being lofty.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Lofted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lofting}.]
      To raise aloft; to send into the air; esp. (Golf), to strike
      (the ball) so that it will go over an obstacle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lofter \Loft"er\, n. (Golf)
      An iron club used in lofting the ball; -- called also
      {lofting iron}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lofting iron \Loft"ing iron\ (Golf)
      Same as {Lofter}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lofter \Loft"er\, n. (Golf)
      An iron club used in lofting the ball; -- called also
      {lofting iron}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lofting iron \Loft"ing iron\ (Golf)
      Same as {Lofter}.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Left Hand, WV
      Zip code(s): 25251

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Levittown, NY (CDP, FIPS 42081)
      Location: 40.72375 N, 73.51311 W
      Population (1990): 53286 (16988 housing units)
      Area: 17.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 11756
   Levittown, PA (CDP, FIPS 42928)
      Location: 40.15350 N, 74.85313 W
      Population (1990): 55362 (18468 housing units)
      Area: 26.3 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 19054, 19055, 19056, 19057
   Levittown, PR (comunidad, FIPS 45336)
      Location: 18.44761 N, 66.17633 W
      Population (1990): 30807 (10078 housing units)
      Area: 5.9 sq km (land), 0.8 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Lupton, MI
      Zip code(s): 48635

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Life with UNIX a Guide for Everyone:
   Don Libes and Sandy Ressler
   Prentice-Hall, 1989
   ISBN 0-13-536657-7
  
      The authors of this book set out to tell you all the things about
   Unix that tutorials and technical books won't.   The result is gossipy,
   funny, opinionated, downright weird in spots, and invaluable.   Along
   the way they expose you to enough of Unix's history, folklore and humor
   to qualify as a first-class source for these things.   Because so much
   of today's hackerdom is involved with Unix, this in turn illuminates
   many of its in-jokes and preoccupations.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   lobotomy n.   1. What a hacker subjected to formal management
   training is said to have undergone.   At IBM and elsewhere this term
   is used by both hackers and low-level management; the latter
   doubtless intend it as a joke.   2. The act of removing the processor
   from a microcomputer in order to replace or upgrade it.   Some very
   cheap {clone} systems are sold in `lobotomized' form -- everything
   but the brain.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   lobotomy
  
      1. What a hacker subjected to formal management training is
      said to have undergone.   At {IBM} and elsewhere this term is
      used by both hackers and low-level management; the latter
      doubtless intend it as a joke.
  
      2. The act of removing the processor from a {microcomputer} in
      order to replace or upgrade it.   Some very cheap {clone}
      systems are sold in "lobotomised" form - everything but the
      brain.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Left hand
      among the Hebrews, denoted the north (Job 23:9; Gen. 14:15), the
      face of the person being supposed to be toward the east.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Left-handed
      (Judg. 3:15; 20:16), one unable to use the right hand skilfully,
      and who therefore uses the left; and also one who uses the left
      as well as the right, ambidexter. Such a condition of the hands
      is due to physical causes. This quality was common apparently in
      the tribe of Benjamin.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Leviathan
      a transliterated Hebrew word (livyathan), meaning "twisted,"
      "coiled." In Job 3:8, Revised Version, and marg. of Authorized
      Version, it denotes the dragon which, according to Eastern
      tradition, is an enemy of light; in 41:1 the crocodile is meant;
      in Ps. 104:26 it "denotes any large animal that moves by
      writhing or wriggling the body, the whale, the monsters of the
      deep." This word is also used figuratively for a cruel enemy, as
      some think "the Egyptian host, crushed by the divine power, and
      cast on the shores of the Red Sea" (Ps. 74:14). As used in Isa.
      27:1, "leviathan the piercing [R.V. 'swift'] serpent, even
      leviathan that crooked [R.V. marg. 'winding'] serpent," the word
      may probably denote the two empires, the Assyrian and the
      Babylonian.
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2022
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