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   La Fayette
         n 1: French soldier who served under George Washington in the
               American Revolution (1757-1834) [syn: {Lafayette}, {La
               Fayette}, {Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier},
               {Marquis de Lafayette}]

English Dictionary: Lafayette by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Labiatae
n
  1. a large family of aromatic herbs and shrubs having flowers resembling the lips of a mouth and four-lobed ovaries yielding four one-seeded nutlets and including mint; thyme; sage; rosemary
    Synonym(s): Labiatae, family Labiatae, Lamiaceae, family Lamiaceae, mint family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
labiate
adj
  1. having lips or parts that resemble lips [syn: labiate, liplike]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lafayette
n
  1. French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)
    Synonym(s): Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
  2. a town in south central Louisiana; settled by Acadians
  3. a university town in west central Indiana on the Wabash River
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Laffite
n
  1. French pirate who aided the United States in the War of 1812 and received an official pardon for his crimes (1780-1826)
    Synonym(s): Laffite, Lafitte, Jean Laffite, Jean Lafitte
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lafitte
n
  1. French pirate who aided the United States in the War of 1812 and received an official pardon for his crimes (1780-1826)
    Synonym(s): Laffite, Lafitte, Jean Laffite, Jean Lafitte
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lappet
n
  1. a fleshy wrinkled and often brightly colored fold of skin hanging from the neck or throat of certain birds (chickens and turkeys) or lizards
    Synonym(s): wattle, lappet
  2. a small lap on a garment or headdress
  3. medium-sized hairy moths; larvae are lappet caterpillars
    Synonym(s): lappet, lappet moth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Laputa
n
  1. a land imagined by Jonathan Swift where impractical projects were pursued and practical projects neglected
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
layabout
n
  1. person who does no work; "a lazy bum" [syn: idler, loafer, do-nothing, layabout, bum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leaf beet
n
  1. beet lacking swollen root; grown as a vegetable for its edible leaves and stalks
    Synonym(s): chard, Swiss chard, spinach beet, leaf beet, chard plant, Beta vulgaris cicla
  2. long succulent whitish stalks with large green leaves
    Synonym(s): chard, Swiss chard, spinach beet, leaf beet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leaf bud
n
  1. a bud from which leaves (but not flowers) develop
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leaf fat
n
  1. fat lining the abdomen and kidneys in hogs which is used to make lard
    Synonym(s): leaf fat, leaf lard
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leafed
adj
  1. having leaves or leaves as specified; often used in combination; "a fully leafed tree"; "broad-leafed"; "four-leaved clover"
    Synonym(s): leafed, leaved
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leap day
n
  1. the name of the day that is added during a leap year [syn: leap day, bissextile day, February 29]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leap out
v
  1. be highly noticeable [syn: leap out, jump out, jump, stand out, stick out]
  2. jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone); "The attackers leapt out from the bushes"
    Synonym(s): leap out, rush out, sally out, burst forth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leave out
v
  1. prevent from being included or considered or accepted; "The bad results were excluded from the report"; "Leave off the top piece"
    Synonym(s): exclude, except, leave out, leave off, omit, take out
    Antonym(s): include
  2. leave undone or leave out; "How could I miss that typo?"; "The workers on the conveyor belt miss one out of ten"
    Synonym(s): neglect, pretermit, omit, drop, miss, leave out, overlook, overleap
    Antonym(s): attend to, take to heart
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
leaved
adj
  1. having leaves or leaves as specified; often used in combination; "a fully leafed tree"; "broad-leafed"; "four-leaved clover"
    Synonym(s): leafed, leaved
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
left
adv
  1. toward or on the left; also used figuratively; "he looked right and left"; "the political party has moved left"
    Antonym(s): right
adj
  1. being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the west when facing north; "my left hand"; "left center field"; "the left bank of a river is bank on your left side when you are facing downstream"
    Antonym(s): right
  2. not used up; "leftover meatloaf"; "she had a little money left over so she went to a movie"; "some odd dollars left"; "saved the remaining sandwiches for supper"; "unexpended provisions"
    Synonym(s): leftover, left over(p), left(p), odd, remaining, unexpended
  3. intended for the left hand; "I rarely lose a left-hand glove"
    Synonym(s): left(a), left-hand(a)
  4. of or belonging to the political or intellectual left
    Antonym(s): center, right
n
  1. location near or direction toward the left side; i.e. the side to the north when a person or object faces east; "she stood on the left"
    Antonym(s): right
  2. those who support varying degrees of social or political or economic change designed to promote the public welfare
    Synonym(s): left, left wing
  3. the hand that is on the left side of the body; "jab with your left"
    Synonym(s): left, left hand
  4. the piece of ground in the outfield on the catcher's left; "the batter flied out to left"
    Synonym(s): left field, leftfield, left
  5. a turn toward the side of the body that is on the north when the person is facing east; "take a left at the corner"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lefty
n
  1. a person who uses the left hand with greater skill than the right; "their pitcher was a southpaw"
    Synonym(s): left-hander, lefty, southpaw
  2. a baseball pitcher who throws the ball with the left hand
    Synonym(s): left-handed pitcher, left-hander, left hander, lefthander, lefty, southpaw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lepiota
n
  1. any fungus of the genus Lepiota
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Levite
n
  1. a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi (especially the branch that provided male assistants to the temple priests)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
levity
n
  1. feeling an inappropriate lack of seriousness [ant: gravity, solemnity]
  2. a manner lacking seriousness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
libido
n
  1. (psychoanalysis) a Freudian term for sexual urge or desire
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lie about
v
  1. hang around idly; "She did all the work while he lay around"
    Synonym(s): lie about, lie around
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lie-abed
n
  1. a person who stays in bed until a relatively late hour
    Synonym(s): lie-abed, slugabed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lift
n
  1. the act of giving temporary assistance
  2. the component of the aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil that opposes gravity
    Synonym(s): aerodynamic lift, lift
  3. the event of something being raised upward; "an elevation of the temperature in the afternoon"; "a raising of the land resulting from volcanic activity"
    Synonym(s): elevation, lift, raising
  4. a wave that lifts the surface of the water or ground
    Synonym(s): lift, rise
  5. a powered conveyance that carries skiers up a hill
    Synonym(s): ski tow, ski lift, lift
  6. a device worn in a shoe or boot to make the wearer look taller or to correct a shortened leg
  7. one of the layers forming the heel of a shoe or boot
  8. lifting device consisting of a platform or cage that is raised and lowered mechanically in a vertical shaft in order to move people from one floor to another in a building
    Synonym(s): elevator, lift
  9. plastic surgery to remove wrinkles and other signs of aging from your face; an incision is made near the hair line and skin is pulled back and excess tissue is excised; "some actresses have more than one face lift"
    Synonym(s): face lift, facelift, lift, face lifting, cosmetic surgery, rhytidectomy, rhytidoplasty, nip and tuck
  10. transportation of people or goods by air (especially when other means of access are unavailable)
    Synonym(s): airlift, lift
  11. a ride in a car; "he gave me a lift home"
  12. the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up"
    Synonym(s): lift, raise, heave
v
  1. raise from a lower to a higher position; "Raise your hands"; "Lift a load"
    Synonym(s): raise, lift, elevate, get up, bring up
    Antonym(s): bring down, get down, let down, lower, take down
  2. take hold of something and move it to a different location; "lift the box onto the table"
  3. move upwards; "lift one's eyes"
    Synonym(s): lift, raise
  4. move upward; "The fog lifted"; "The smoke arose from the forest fire"; "The mist uprose from the meadows"
    Synonym(s): rise, lift, arise, move up, go up, come up, uprise
    Antonym(s): come down, descend, fall, go down
  5. make audible; "He lifted a war whoop"
  6. cancel officially; "He revoked the ban on smoking"; "lift an embargo"; "vacate a death sentence"
    Synonym(s): revoke, annul, lift, countermand, reverse, repeal, overturn, rescind, vacate
  7. make off with belongings of others
    Synonym(s): pilfer, cabbage, purloin, pinch, abstract, snarf, swipe, hook, sneak, filch, nobble, lift
  8. raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car"
    Synonym(s): hoist, lift, wind
  9. invigorate or heighten; "lift my spirits"; "lift his ego"
    Synonym(s): raise, lift
  10. raise in rank or condition; "The new law lifted many people from poverty"
    Synonym(s): lift, raise, elevate
  11. take off or away by decreasing; "lift the pressure"
  12. rise up; "The building rose before them"
    Synonym(s): rise, lift, rear
  13. pay off (a mortgage)
  14. take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property
    Synonym(s): plagiarize, plagiarise, lift
  15. take illegally; "rustle cattle"
    Synonym(s): rustle, lift
  16. fly people or goods to or from places not accessible by other means; "Food is airlifted into Bosnia"
    Synonym(s): airlift, lift
  17. take (root crops) out of the ground; "lift potatoes"
  18. call to stop the hunt or to retire, as of hunting dogs
  19. rise upward, as from pressure or moisture; "The floor is lifting slowly"
  20. put an end to; "lift a ban"; "raise a siege"
    Synonym(s): lift, raise
  21. remove (hair) by scalping
  22. remove from a seedbed or from a nursery; "lift the tulip bulbs"
  23. remove from a surface; "the detective carefully lifted some fingerprints from the table"
  24. perform cosmetic surgery on someone's face
    Synonym(s): face- lift, lift
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipid
n
  1. an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
    Synonym(s): lipid, lipide, lipoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipide
n
  1. an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
    Synonym(s): lipid, lipide, lipoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipoid
n
  1. an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
    Synonym(s): lipid, lipide, lipoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lipped
adj
  1. having a lip or lips; "a lipped bowl"; "a virgin purest lipped"- John Keats
    Antonym(s): lipless, unlipped
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
live out
v
  1. live out one's life; live to the end
  2. work in a house where one does not live; "our cook lives out; he can easily commute from his home"
    Synonym(s): live out, sleep out
    Antonym(s): live in, sleep in
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
live with
v
  1. tolerate or accommodate oneself to; "I shall have to accept these unpleasant working conditions"; "I swallowed the insult"; "She has learned to live with her husband's little idiosyncrasies"
    Synonym(s): accept, live with, swallow
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
livedo
n
  1. skin disorder characterized by patchy bluish discolorations on the skin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
livid
adj
  1. anemic looking from illness or emotion; "a face turned ashen"; "the invalid's blanched cheeks"; "tried to speak with bloodless lips"; "a face livid with shock"; "lips...livid with the hue of death"- Mary W. Shelley; "lips white with terror"; "a face white with rage"
    Synonym(s): ashen, blanched, bloodless, livid, white
  2. (of a light) imparting a deathlike luminosity; "livid lightning streaked the sky"; "a thousand flambeaux...turned all at once that deep gloom into a livid and preternatural day"- E.A.Poe
  3. furiously angry; "willful stupidity makes him absolutely livid"
  4. discolored by coagulation of blood beneath the skin; "beaten black and blue"; "livid bruises"
    Synonym(s): black-and-blue, livid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lobata
n
  1. ctenophore having tentacles only in the immature stage; body compressed vertically having two large oral lobes and four pointed processes
    Synonym(s): Lobata, order Lobata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lobate
adj
  1. having or resembling a lobe or lobes; "a lobate tongue"
    Synonym(s): lobate, lobated
  2. having deeply indented margins but with lobes not entirely separate from each other
    Synonym(s): lobed, lobate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lobed
adj
  1. having deeply indented margins but with lobes not entirely separate from each other
    Synonym(s): lobed, lobate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lobito
n
  1. a seaport on the Atlantic coast of Angola
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
loft
n
  1. floor consisting of a large unpartitioned space over a factory or warehouse or other commercial space
  2. floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage
    Synonym(s): loft, attic, garret
  3. (golf) the backward slant on the head of some golf clubs that is designed to drive the ball high in the air
  4. a raised shelter in which pigeons are kept
    Synonym(s): loft, pigeon loft
v
  1. store in a loft
  2. propel through the air; "The rocket lofted the space shuttle into the air"
  3. kick or strike high in the air; "loft a ball"
  4. lay out a full-scale working drawing of the lines of a vessel's hull
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
lofty
adj
  1. of high moral or intellectual value; elevated in nature or style; "an exalted ideal"; "argue in terms of high- flown ideals"- Oliver Franks; "a noble and lofty concept"; "a grand purpose"
    Synonym(s): exalted, elevated, sublime, grand, high-flown, high-minded, lofty, rarefied, rarified, idealistic, noble-minded
  2. of imposing height; especially standing out above others; "an eminent peak"; "lofty mountains"; "the soaring spires of the cathedral"; "towering icebergs"
    Synonym(s): eminent, lofty, soaring, towering
  3. having or displaying great dignity or nobility; "a gallant pageant"; "lofty ships"; "majestic cities"; "proud alpine peaks"
    Synonym(s): gallant, lofty, majestic, proud
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lophiidae
n
  1. large-headed marine fishes comprising the anglers [syn: Lophiidae, family Lophiidae]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Lopid
n
  1. medication (trade name Lopid) used to lower the levels of triglyceride in the blood
    Synonym(s): gemfibrozil, Lopid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
loved
adj
  1. held dear; "his loved companion of many years" [ant: unloved]
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Godwit \God"wit\, n. [Prob. from AS. g[?]d good + wiht creature,
      wight.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several species of long-billed, wading birds of the
      genus {Limosa}, and family {Tringid[91]}. The European
      black-tailed godwit ({Limosa limosa}), the American marbled
      godwit ({L. fedoa}), the Hudsonian godwit ({L.
      h[91]mastica}), and others, are valued as game birds. Called
      also {godwin}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labiate \La"bi*ate\, a. [NL. labiatus, fr. L. labium lip.]
      (Bot.)
      (a) Having the limb of a tubular corolla or calyx divided
            into two unequal parts, one projecting over the other
            like the lips of a mouth, as in the snapdragon, sage, and
            catnip.
      (b) Belonging to a natural order of plants ({Labiat[91]}), of
            which the mint, sage, and catnip are examples. They are
            mostly aromatic herbs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labiate \La"bi*ate\, v. t.
      To labialize. --Brewer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Labiate \La"bi*ate\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant of the order {Labiat[91]}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lafayette \La`fa`yette"\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The dollar fish.
      (b) A market fish, the goody, or spot ({Liostomus
            xanthurus}), of the southern coast of the United States.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spot \Spot\, n. [Cf. Scot. & D. spat, Dan. spette, Sw. spott
      spittle, slaver; from the root of E. spit. See {Spit} to
      eject from the mouth, and cf. {Spatter}.]
      1. A mark on a substance or body made by foreign matter; a
            blot; a place discolored.
  
                     Out, damned spot! Out, I say!            --Shak.
  
      2. A stain on character or reputation; something that soils
            purity; disgrace; reproach; fault; blemish.
  
                     Yet Chloe, sure, was formed without a spot. --Pope.
  
      3. A small part of a different color from the main part, or
            from the ground upon which it is; as, the spots of a
            leopard; the spots on a playing card.
  
      4. A small extent of space; a place; any particular place.
            [bd]Fixed to one spot.[b8] --Otway.
  
                     That spot to which I point is Paradise. --Milton.
  
                     [bd]A jolly place,[b8] said he, [bd]in times of old!
                     But something ails it now: the spot is cursed.[b8]
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) A variety of the common domestic pigeon, so
            called from a spot on its head just above its beak.
  
      6. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A sci[91]noid food fish ({Liostomus xanthurus}) of the
                  Atlantic coast of the United States. It has a black
                  spot behind the shoulders and fifteen oblique dark
                  bars on the sides. Called also {goody}, {Lafayette},
                  {masooka}, and {old wife}.
            (b) The southern redfish, or red horse, which has a spot
                  on each side at the base of the tail. See {Redfish}.
  
      7. pl. Commodities, as merchandise and cotton, sold for
            immediate delivery. [Broker's Cant]
  
      {Crescent spot} (Zo[94]l.), any butterfly of the family
            {Melit[91]id[91]} having crescent-shaped white spots along
            the margins of the red or brown wings.
  
      {Spot lens} (Microscopy), a condensing lens in which the
            light is confined to an annular pencil by means of a
            small, round diaphragm (the spot), and used in dark-field
            ilumination; -- called also {spotted lens}.
  
      {Spot rump} (Zo[94]l.), the Hudsonian godwit ({Limosa
            h[91]mastica}).
  
      {Spots on the sun}. (Astron.) See {Sun spot}, ander {Sun}.
  
      {On}, [or] {Upon}, {the spot}, immediately; before moving;
            without changing place.
  
                     It was determined upon the spot.         --Swift.
  
      Syn: Stain; flaw; speck; blot; disgrace; reproach; fault;
               blemish; place; site; locality.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dollar \Dol"lar\, n. [D. daalder, LG. dahler, G. thaler, an
      abbreviation of Joachimsthaler, i. e., a piece of money first
      coined, about the year 1518, in the valley (G. thal) of St.
      Joachim, in Bohemia. See {Dale}.]
      1.
            (a) A silver coin of the United States containing 371.25
                  grains of silver and 41.25 grains of alloy, that is,
                  having a total weight of 412.5 grains.
            (b) A gold coin of the United States containing 23.22
                  grains of gold and 2.58 grains of alloy, that is,
                  having a total weight of 25.8 grains, nine-tenths
                  fine. It is no longer coined.
  
      Note: Previous to 1837 the silver dollar had a larger amount
               of alloy, but only the same amount of silver as now,
               the total weight being 416 grains. The gold dollar as a
               distinct coin was first made in 1849. The eagles, half
               eagles, and quarter eagles coined before 1834 contained
               24.75 grains of gold and 2.25 grains of alloy for each
               dollar.
  
      2. A coin of the same general weight and value, though
            differing slightly in different countries, current in
            Mexico, Canada, parts of South America, also in Spain, and
            several other European countries.
  
      3. The value of a dollar; the unit commonly employed in the
            United States in reckoning money values.
  
      {Chop dollar}. See under 9th {Chop}.
  
      {Dollar fish} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the United States coast
            ({Stromateus triacanthus}), having a flat, roundish form
            and a bright silvery luster; -- called also {butterfish},
            and {Lafayette}. See {Butterfish}.
  
      {Trade dollar}, a silver coin formerly made at the United
            States mint, intended for export, and not legal tender at
            home. It contained 378 grains of silver and 42 grains of
            alloy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Laft \Laft\, obs.
      p. p. of {Leave}. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lafte \Laf"te\, obs.
      imp. of {Leave}. --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lap \Lap\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lapped}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lapping}.]
      1. To rest or recline in a lap, or as in a lap.
  
                     To lap his head on lady's breast.      --Praed.
  
      2. To cut or polish with a lap, as glass, gems, cutlery, etc.
            See 1st {Lap}, 10.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lappet \Lap"pet\, n. [Dim. of lap a fold.]
      A small decorative fold or flap, esp, of lace or muslin, in a
      garment or headdress. --Swift.
  
      {Lappet moth} (Zo[94]l.), one of several species of bombycid
            moths, which have stout, hairy caterpillars, flat beneath.
            Two common American species ({Gastropacha Americana}, and
            {Tolype velleda}) feed upon the apple tree.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lappet \Lap"pet\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lappeted}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Lappeting}.]
      To decorate with, or as with, a lappet. [R.] --Landor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lave \Lave\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laved}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Laving}.] [F. laver, L. lavare, akin to luere to wash, Gr.
      [?]. Cf. {Ablution}, {Deluge}, {Lavender}, {Lava}, {Lotion}.]
      To wash; to bathe; as, to lave a bruise.
  
               His feet the foremost breakers lave.      --Byron.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leaf \Leaf\, n.; pl. {Leaves}. [OE. leef, lef, leaf, AS.
      le[a0]f; akin to S. l[?]f, OFries. laf, D. loof foliage, G.
      laub,OHG. loub leaf, foliage, Icel. lauf, Sw. l[94]f, Dan.
      l[94]v, Goth. laufs; cf. Lith. lapas. Cf. {Lodge}.]
      1. (Bot.) A colored, usually green, expansion growing from
            the side of a stem or rootstock, in which the sap for the
            use of the plant is elaborated under the influence of
            light; one of the parts of a plant which collectively
            constitute its foliage.
  
      Note: Such leaves usually consist of a blade, or lamina,
               supported upon a leafstalk or petiole, which, continued
               through the blade as the midrib, gives off woody ribs
               and veins that support the cellular texture. The
               petiole has usually some sort of an appendage on each
               side of its base, which is called the stipule. The
               green parenchyma of the leaf is covered with a thin
               epiderm pierced with closable microscopic openings,
               known as stomata.
  
      2. (Bot.) A special organ of vegetation in the form of a
            lateral outgrowth from the stem, whether appearing as a
            part of the foliage, or as a cotyledon, a scale, a bract,
            a spine, or a tendril.
  
      Note: In this view every part of a plant, except the root and
               the stem, is either a leaf, or is composed of leaves
               more or less modified and transformed.
  
      3. Something which is like a leaf in being wide and thin and
            having a flat surface, or in being attached to a larger
            body by one edge or end; as :
            (a) A part of a book or folded sheet containing two pages
                  upon its opposite sides.
            (b) A side, division, or part, that slides or is hinged,
                  as of window shutters, folding doors, etc.
            (c) The movable side of a table.
            (d) A very thin plate; as, gold leaf.
            (e) A portion of fat lying in a separate fold or layer.
            (f) One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.
  
      {Leaf beetle} (Zo[94]l.), any beetle which feeds upon leaves;
            esp., any species of the family {Chrysomelid[91]}, as the
            potato beetle and helmet beetle.
  
      {Leaf bridge}, a draw-bridge having a platform or leaf which
            swings vertically on hinges.
  
      {Leaf bud} (Bot.), a bud which develops into leaves or a
            leafy branch.
  
      {Leaf butterfly} (Zo[94]l.), any butterfly which, in the form
            and colors of its wings, resembles the leaves of plants
            upon which it rests; esp., butterflies of the genus
            {Kallima}, found in Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf crumpler} (Zo[94]l.), a small moth ({Phycis
            indigenella}), the larva of which feeds upon leaves of the
            apple tree, and forms its nest by crumpling and fastening
            leaves together in clusters.
  
      {Leaf cutter} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various species of wild
            bees of the genus {Megachile}, which cut rounded pieces
            from the edges of leaves, or the petals of flowers, to be
            used in the construction of their nests, which are made in
            holes and crevices, or in a leaf rolled up for the
            purpose. Among the common American species are {M. brevis}
            and {M. centuncularis}. Called also {rose-cutting bee}.
  
      {Leaf fat}, the fat which lies in leaves or layers within the
            body of an animal.
  
      {Leaf flea} (Zo[94]l.), a jumping plant louse of the family
            {Psyllid[91]}.
  
      {Leaf frog} (Zo[94]l.), any tree frog of the genus
            {Phyllomedusa}.
  
      {Leaf green}.(Bot.) See {Chlorophyll}.
  
      {Leaf hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any small jumping hemipterous
            insect of the genus {Tettigonia}, and allied genera. They
            live upon the leaves and twigs of plants. See {Live
            hopper}.
  
      {Leaf insect} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several genera and
            species of orthopterous insects, esp. of the genus
            {Phyllium}, in which the wings, and sometimes the legs,
            resemble leaves in color and form. They are common in
            Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf lard}, lard from leaf fat. See under {Lard}.
  
      {Leaf louse} (Zo[94]l.), an aphid.
  
      {Leaf metal}, metal in thin leaves, as gold, silver, or tin.
           
  
      {Leaf miner} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various small
            lepidopterous and dipterous insects, which, in the larval
            stages, burrow in and eat the parenchyma of leaves; as,
            the pear-tree leaf miner ({Lithocolletis geminatella}).
  
      {Leaf notcher} (Zo[94]l.), a pale bluish green beetle
            ({Artipus Floridanus}), which, in Florida, eats the edges
            of the leaves of orange trees.
  
      {Leaf roller} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any tortricid moth
            which makes a nest by rolling up the leaves of plants. See
            {Tortrix}.
  
      {Leaf scar} (Bot.), the cicatrix on a stem whence a leaf has
            fallen.
  
      {Leaf sewer} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth, whose caterpillar
            makes a nest by rolling up a leaf and fastening the edges
            together with silk, as if sewn; esp., {Phoxopteris
            nubeculana}, which feeds upon the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf sight}, a hinges sight on a firearm, which can be
            raised or folded down.
  
      {Leaf trace} (Bot.), one or more fibrovascular bundles, which
            may be traced down an endogenous stem from the base of a
            leaf.
  
      {Leaf tier} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth whose larva makes a
            nest by fastening the edges of a leaf together with silk;
            esp., {Teras cinderella}, found on the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf valve}, a valve which moves on a hinge.
  
      {Leaf wasp} (Zo[94]l.), a sawfiy.
  
      {To turn over a new leaf}, to make a radical change for the
            better in one's way of living or doing. [Colloq.]
  
                     They were both determined to turn over a new leaf.
                                                                              --Richardson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leaf \Leaf\, n.; pl. {Leaves}. [OE. leef, lef, leaf, AS.
      le[a0]f; akin to S. l[?]f, OFries. laf, D. loof foliage, G.
      laub,OHG. loub leaf, foliage, Icel. lauf, Sw. l[94]f, Dan.
      l[94]v, Goth. laufs; cf. Lith. lapas. Cf. {Lodge}.]
      1. (Bot.) A colored, usually green, expansion growing from
            the side of a stem or rootstock, in which the sap for the
            use of the plant is elaborated under the influence of
            light; one of the parts of a plant which collectively
            constitute its foliage.
  
      Note: Such leaves usually consist of a blade, or lamina,
               supported upon a leafstalk or petiole, which, continued
               through the blade as the midrib, gives off woody ribs
               and veins that support the cellular texture. The
               petiole has usually some sort of an appendage on each
               side of its base, which is called the stipule. The
               green parenchyma of the leaf is covered with a thin
               epiderm pierced with closable microscopic openings,
               known as stomata.
  
      2. (Bot.) A special organ of vegetation in the form of a
            lateral outgrowth from the stem, whether appearing as a
            part of the foliage, or as a cotyledon, a scale, a bract,
            a spine, or a tendril.
  
      Note: In this view every part of a plant, except the root and
               the stem, is either a leaf, or is composed of leaves
               more or less modified and transformed.
  
      3. Something which is like a leaf in being wide and thin and
            having a flat surface, or in being attached to a larger
            body by one edge or end; as :
            (a) A part of a book or folded sheet containing two pages
                  upon its opposite sides.
            (b) A side, division, or part, that slides or is hinged,
                  as of window shutters, folding doors, etc.
            (c) The movable side of a table.
            (d) A very thin plate; as, gold leaf.
            (e) A portion of fat lying in a separate fold or layer.
            (f) One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.
  
      {Leaf beetle} (Zo[94]l.), any beetle which feeds upon leaves;
            esp., any species of the family {Chrysomelid[91]}, as the
            potato beetle and helmet beetle.
  
      {Leaf bridge}, a draw-bridge having a platform or leaf which
            swings vertically on hinges.
  
      {Leaf bud} (Bot.), a bud which develops into leaves or a
            leafy branch.
  
      {Leaf butterfly} (Zo[94]l.), any butterfly which, in the form
            and colors of its wings, resembles the leaves of plants
            upon which it rests; esp., butterflies of the genus
            {Kallima}, found in Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf crumpler} (Zo[94]l.), a small moth ({Phycis
            indigenella}), the larva of which feeds upon leaves of the
            apple tree, and forms its nest by crumpling and fastening
            leaves together in clusters.
  
      {Leaf cutter} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various species of wild
            bees of the genus {Megachile}, which cut rounded pieces
            from the edges of leaves, or the petals of flowers, to be
            used in the construction of their nests, which are made in
            holes and crevices, or in a leaf rolled up for the
            purpose. Among the common American species are {M. brevis}
            and {M. centuncularis}. Called also {rose-cutting bee}.
  
      {Leaf fat}, the fat which lies in leaves or layers within the
            body of an animal.
  
      {Leaf flea} (Zo[94]l.), a jumping plant louse of the family
            {Psyllid[91]}.
  
      {Leaf frog} (Zo[94]l.), any tree frog of the genus
            {Phyllomedusa}.
  
      {Leaf green}.(Bot.) See {Chlorophyll}.
  
      {Leaf hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any small jumping hemipterous
            insect of the genus {Tettigonia}, and allied genera. They
            live upon the leaves and twigs of plants. See {Live
            hopper}.
  
      {Leaf insect} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several genera and
            species of orthopterous insects, esp. of the genus
            {Phyllium}, in which the wings, and sometimes the legs,
            resemble leaves in color and form. They are common in
            Southern Asia and the East Indies.
  
      {Leaf lard}, lard from leaf fat. See under {Lard}.
  
      {Leaf louse} (Zo[94]l.), an aphid.
  
      {Leaf metal}, metal in thin leaves, as gold, silver, or tin.
           
  
      {Leaf miner} (Zo[94]l.), any one of various small
            lepidopterous and dipterous insects, which, in the larval
            stages, burrow in and eat the parenchyma of leaves; as,
            the pear-tree leaf miner ({Lithocolletis geminatella}).
  
      {Leaf notcher} (Zo[94]l.), a pale bluish green beetle
            ({Artipus Floridanus}), which, in Florida, eats the edges
            of the leaves of orange trees.
  
      {Leaf roller} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any tortricid moth
            which makes a nest by rolling up the leaves of plants. See
            {Tortrix}.
  
      {Leaf scar} (Bot.), the cicatrix on a stem whence a leaf has
            fallen.
  
      {Leaf sewer} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth, whose caterpillar
            makes a nest by rolling up a leaf and fastening the edges
            together with silk, as if sewn; esp., {Phoxopteris
            nubeculana}, which feeds upon the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf sight}, a hinges sight on a firearm, which can be
            raised or folded down.
  
      {Leaf trace} (Bot.), one or more fibrovascular bundles, which
            may be traced down an endogenous stem from the base of a
            leaf.
  
      {Leaf tier} (Zo[94]l.), a tortricid moth whose larva makes a
            nest by fastening the edges of a leaf together with silk;
            esp., {Teras cinderella}, found on the apple tree.
  
      {Leaf valve}, a valve which moves on a hinge.
  
      {Leaf wasp} (Zo[94]l.), a sawfiy.
  
      {To turn over a new leaf}, to make a radical change for the
            better in one's way of living or doing. [Colloq.]
  
                     They were both determined to turn over a new leaf.
                                                                              --Richardson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leaf \Leaf\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leafed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Leafing}.]
      To shoot out leaves; to produce leaves; to leave; as, the
      trees leaf in May.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leafed \Leafed\, a.
      Having (such) a leaf or (so many) leaves; -- used in
      composition; as, broad-leafed; four-leafed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leafet \Leaf"et\, n. (Bot.)
      A leaflet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leap \Leap\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leaped}, rarely {Leapt}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Leaping}.] [OE. lepen, leapen, AS. hle[a0]pan
      to leap, jump, run; akin to OS. [be]hl[?]pan, OFries. hlapa,
      D. loopen, G. laufen, OHG. louffan, hlauffan, Icel. hlaupa,
      Sw. l[94]pa, Dan. l[94]be, Goth. ushlaupan. Cf. {Elope},
      {Lope}, {Lapwing}, {Loaf} to loiter.]
      1. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to
            vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a
            horse. --Bacon.
  
                     Leap in with me into this angry flood. --Shak.
  
      2. To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to
            bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig.
  
                     My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the
                     sky.                                                   --Wordsworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leap \Leap\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leaped}, rarely {Leapt}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Leaping}.] [OE. lepen, leapen, AS. hle[a0]pan
      to leap, jump, run; akin to OS. [be]hl[?]pan, OFries. hlapa,
      D. loopen, G. laufen, OHG. louffan, hlauffan, Icel. hlaupa,
      Sw. l[94]pa, Dan. l[94]be, Goth. ushlaupan. Cf. {Elope},
      {Lope}, {Lapwing}, {Loaf} to loiter.]
      1. To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to
            vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a
            horse. --Bacon.
  
                     Leap in with me into this angry flood. --Shak.
  
      2. To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to
            bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig.
  
                     My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the
                     sky.                                                   --Wordsworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leave \Leave\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leaved}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Leaving}]
      To send out leaves; to leaf; -- often with out. --G.
      Fletcher.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leaved \Leaved\, a. [From {Leaf}.]
      Bearing, or having, a leaf or leaves; having folds; -- used
      in combination; as, a four-leaved clover; a two-leaved gate;
      long-leaved.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Leave \Leave\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Left}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Leaving}.] [OE. leven, AS. l[?]fan, fr. l[be]f remnant,
      heritage; akin to lifian, libban, to live, orig., to remain;
      cf. bel[c6]fan to remain, G. bleiben, Goth. bileiban. [?].
      See {Live}, v.]
      1. To withdraw one's self from; to go away from; to depart
            from; as, to leave the house.
  
                     Therefore shall a man leave his father and his
                     mother, and shall cleave unto his wife. --Gen. ii.
                                                                              24.
  
      2. To let remain unremoved or undone; to let stay or
            continue, in distinction from what is removed or changed.
  
                     If grape gatherers come to thee, would they not
                     leave some gleaning grapes ?               --Jer. xlix.
                                                                              9.
  
                     These ought ye to have done, and not to leave the
                     other undone.                                    --Matt. xxiii.
                                                                              23.
  
                     Besides it leaveth a suspicion, as if more might be
                     said than is expressed.                     --Bacon.
  
      3. To cease from; to desist from; to abstain from.
  
                     Now leave complaining and begin your tea. --Pope.
  
      4. To desert; to abandon; to forsake; hence, to give up; to
            relinquish.
  
                     Lo, we have left all, and have followed thee. --Mark
                                                                              x. 28.
  
                     The heresies that men do leave.         --Shak.
  
      5. To let be or do without interference; as, I left him to
            his reflections; I leave my hearers to judge.
  
                     I will leave you now to your gossiplike humor.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      6. To put; to place; to deposit; to deliver; to commit; to
            submit -- with a sense of withdrawing one's self from; as,
            leave your hat in the hall; we left our cards; to leave
            the matter to arbitrators.
  
                     Leave there thy gift before the altar and go thy
                     way.                                                   --Matt. v. 24.
  
                     The foot That leaves the print of blood where'er it
                     walks.                                                --Shak.
  
      7. To have remaining at death; hence, to bequeath; as, he
            left a large estate; he left a good name; he left a legacy
            to his niece.
  
      {To leave alone}.
            (a) To leave in solitude.
            (b) To desist or refrain from having to do with; as, to
                  leave dangerous chemicals alone.
  
      {To leave off}.
            (a) To desist from; to forbear; to stop; as, to leave off
                  work at six o'clock.
            (b) To cease wearing or using; to omit to put in the usual
                  position; as, to leave off a garment; to leave off the
                  tablecloth.
            (c) To forsake; as, to leave off a bad habit.
  
      {To leave out}, to omit; as, to leave out a word or name in
            writing.
  
      {To leave to one's self}, to let (one) be alone; to cease
            caring for (one).
  
      Syn: Syn>- To quit; depart from; forsake; abandon;
               relinquish; deliver; bequeath; give up; forego; resign;
               surrender; forbear. See {Quit}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left \Left\ (l[ecr]ft), imp. & p. p.
      of {Leave}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left \Left\, a. [OE. left, lift, luft; akin to Fries. leeft, OD.
      lucht, luft; cf. AS. left (equiv. to L. inanis), lyft[be]dl
      palsy; or cf. AS. l[emac]f weak.]
      Of or pertaining to that side of the body in man on which the
      muscular action of the limbs is usually weaker than on the
      other side; -- opposed to {right}, when used in reference to
      a part of the body; as, the left hand, or arm; the left ear.
      Also said of the corresponding side of the lower animals.
  
      {Left bank of a river}, that which is on the left hand of a
            person whose face is turned downstream.
  
      {Left bower}. See under 2d {Bower}.
  
      {Left center}, the members whose sympathies are, in the main,
            with the members of the Left, but who do not favor extreme
            courses, and on occasions vote with the government. They
            sit between the Center and the extreme Left.
  
      {Over the left shoulder}, or {Over the left}, an old but
            still current colloquialism, or slang expression, used as
            an aside to indicate insincerity, negation, or disbelief;
            as, he said it, and it is true, -- over the left.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left \Left\, n.
      1. That part of surrounding space toward which the left side
            of one's body is turned; as, the house is on the left when
            you face North.
  
                     Put that rose a little more to the left. --Ld.
                                                                              Lytton.
  
      2. Those members of a legislative assembly (as in France) who
            are in the opposition; the advanced republicans and
            extreme radicals. They have their seats at the left-hand
            side of the presiding officer. See {Center}, and {Right}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Left \Left\, a.
      Situated so that the left side of the body is toward it; as,
      the left side of a deliberative meeting is that to the left
      of the presiding officer; the left wing of an army is that to
      the left of the center to one facing an enemy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lepid \Lep"id\ (-[icr]d), a. [L. lepidus.]
      Pleasant; jocose. [R.]
  
               The joyous and lepid consul.                  --Sydney
                                                                              Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Levet \Lev"et\ (l[ecr]v"[ecr]t), n. [Cf. F. lever to raise.]
      A trumpet call for rousing soldiers; a reveille. [Obs.]
      --Hudibras.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Levy \Lev"y\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Levied} (l[ecr]v"[icr]d); p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Levying}.]
      1. To raise, as a siege. [Obs.] --Holland.
  
      2. To raise; to collect; said of troops, to form into an army
            by enrollment, conscription, etc.
  
                     Augustine . . . inflamed Ethelbert, king of Kent, to
                     levy his power, and to war against them. --Fuller.
  
      3. To raise or collect by assessment; to exact by authority;
            as, to levy taxes, toll, tribute, or contributions.
  
                     If they do this . . . my ransom, then, Will soon be
                     levied.                                             --Shak.
  
      4. (Law)
            (a) To gather or exact; as, to levy money.
            (b) To erect, build, or set up; to make or construct; to
                  raise or cast up; as, to levy a mill, dike, ditch, a
                  nuisance, etc. [Obs.] --Cowell. --Blackstone.
            (c) To take or seize on execution; to collect by
                  execution.
  
      {To levy a fine}, to commence and carry on a suit for
            assuring the title to lands or tenements. --Blackstone.
  
      {To levy war}, to make or begin war; to take arms for attack;
            to attack.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Levite \Le"vite\ (l[emac]"v[imac]t), n. [L. Levites, Gr.
      Leyi:`ths, fr. Heb. Levi, one of the sons of Jacob.]
      1. (Bib. Hist.) One of the tribe or family of Levi; a
            descendant of Levi; esp., one subordinate to the priests
            (who were of the same tribe) and employed in various
            duties connected with the tabernacle first, and afterward
            the temple, such as the care of the building, bringing of
            wood and other necessaries for the sacrifices, the music
            of the services, etc.
  
      2. A priest; -- so called in contempt or ridicule.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Levity \Lev"i*ty\ (l[ecr]v"[icr]*t[ycr]), n. [L. levitas, fr.
      levis light in weight; akin to levare to raise. See {Lever},
      n.]
      1. The quality of weighing less than something else of equal
            bulk; relative lightness, especially as shown by rising
            through, or floating upon, a contiguous substance;
            buoyancy; -- opposed to {gravity}.
  
                     He gave the form of levity to that which ascended;
                     to that which descended, the form of gravity. --Sir.
                                                                              W. Raleigh.
  
                     This bubble by reason of its comparative levity to
                     the fluidity that incloses it, would ascend to the
                     top.                                                   --Bentley.
  
      2. Lack of gravity and earnestness in deportment or
            character; trifling gayety; frivolity; sportiveness;
            vanity. [bd] A spirit of levity and libertinism.[b8]
            --Atterbury.
  
                     He never employed his omnipotence out of levity.
                                                                              --Calamy.
  
      3. Lack of steadiness or constancy; disposition to change;
            fickleness; volatility.
  
                     The levity that is fatigued and disgusted with
                     everything of which it is in possession. --Burke.
  
      Syn: Inconstancy; thoughtlessness; unsteadiness;
               inconsideration; volatility; flightiness.
  
      Usage: {Levity}, {Volatility}, {Flightiness}. All these words
                  relate to outward conduct. Levity springs from a
                  lightness of mind which produces a disregard of the
                  proprieties of time and place.Volatility is a degree
                  of levity which causes the thoughts to fly from one
                  object to another, without resting on any for a
                  moment. Flightiness is volatility carried to an
                  extreme which often betrays its subject into gross
                  impropriety or weakness. Levity of deportment, of
                  conduct, of remark; volatility of temper, of spirits;
                  flightiness of mind or disposition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lift \Lift\ (l[icr]ft), n. [AS. lyft air. See {Loft}.]
      The sky; the atmosphere; the firmament. [Obs. or Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lift \Lift\ (l[icr]ft), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lifted}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Lifting}.] [Icel. lypta, fr. lopt air; akin to Sw.
      lyfta to lift, Dan. l[94]fte, G. l[81]ften; -- prop., to
      raise into the air. See {Loft}, and cf. 1st {Lift}.]
      1. To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to
            raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a
            higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support
            or holding in the higher place; -- said of material
            things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair
            or a burden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lift \Lift\ (l[icr]ft), v. i.
      1. To try to raise something; to exert the strength for
            raising or bearing.
  
                     Strained by lifting at a weight too heavy. --Locke.
  
      2. To rise; to become or appear raised or elevated; as, the
            fog lifts; the land lifts to a ship approaching it.
  
      3. [See {Lift}, v. t., 5.] To live by theft. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lift \Lift\, n.
      1. Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted.
  
      2. The space or distance through which anything is lifted;
            as, a long lift. --Bacon.
  
      3. Help; assistance, as by lifting; as, to give one a lift in
            a wagon. [Colloq.]
  
                     The goat gives the fox a lift.            --L'Estrange.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lip \Lip\ (l[icr]p), n. [OE. lippe, AS. lippa; akin to D. lip,
      G. lippe, lefze, OHG. lefs, Dan. l[91]be, Sw. l[84]pp, L.
      labium, labrum. Cf. {Labial}.]
      1. One of the two fleshy folds which surround the orifice of
            the mouth in man and many other animals. In man the lips
            are organs of speech essential to certain articulations.
            Hence, by a figure they denote the mouth, or all the
            organs of speech, and sometimes speech itself.
  
                     Thine own lips testify against thee.   --Job xv. 6.
  
      2. An edge of an opening; a thin projecting part of anything;
            a kind of short open spout; as, the lip of a vessel.
  
      3. The sharp cutting edge on the end of an auger.
  
      4. (Bot.)
            (a) One of the two opposite divisions of a labiate
                  corolla. (b) The odd and peculiar petal in the
                  {Orchis} family. See {Orchidaceous}.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) One of the edges of the aperture of a univalve
            shell.
  
      {Lip bit}, a pod auger. See {Auger}.
  
      {Lip comfort}, comfort that is given with words only.
  
      {Lip comforter}, one who comforts with words only.
  
      {Lip labor}, unfelt or insincere speech; hypocrisy. --Bale.
  
      {Lip reading}, the catching of the words or meaning of one
            speaking by watching the motion of his lips without
            hearing his voice. --Carpenter.
  
      {Lip salve}, a salve for sore lips.
  
      {Lip service}, expression by the lips of obedience and
            devotion without the performance of acts suitable to such
            sentiments.
  
      {Lip wisdom}, wise talk without practice, or unsupported by
            experience.
  
      {Lip work}.
            (a) Talk.
            (b) Kissing. [Humorous] --B. Jonson.
  
      {To make a lip}, to drop the under lip in sullenness or
            contempt. --Shak.
  
      {To shoot out the lip} (Script.), to show contempt by
            protruding the lip.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lip \Lip\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lipped} (l[icr]pt); p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Lipping} (-p[icr]ng).]
      1. To touch with the lips; to put the lips to; hence, to
            kiss.
  
                     The bubble on the wine which breaks Before you lip
                     the glass.                                          --Praed.
  
                     A hand that kings Have lipped and trembled kissing.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To utter; to speak. [R.] --Keats.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lipped \Lipped\ (l[icr]pt), a.
      1. Having a lip or lips; having a raised or rounded edge
            resembling the lip; -- often used in composition; as,
            thick-lipped, thin-lipped, etc.
  
      2. (Bot.) Labiate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Live \Live\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Lived}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Living}.] [OE. liven, livien, AS. libban, lifian; akin to
      OS. libbian, D. leven, G. leben, OHG. leb[emac]n, Dan. leve,
      Sw. lefva, Icel. lifa to live, to be left, to remain, Goth.
      liban to live; akin to E. leave to forsake, and life, Gr.
      liparei^n to persist, liparo`s oily, shining, sleek, li`pos
      fat, lard, Skr. lip to anoint, smear; -- the first sense
      prob. was, to cleave to, stick to; hence, to remain, stay;
      and hence, to live.]
      1. To be alive; to have life; to have, as an animal or a
            plant, the capacity of assimilating matter as food, and to
            be dependent on such assimilation for a continuance of
            existence; as, animals and plants that live to a great age
            are long in reaching maturity.
  
                     Thus saith the Lord God unto these bones; Behold, I
                     will . . . lay sinews upon you, and will bring up
                     flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put
                     breath in you, and ye shall live.      --Ezek.
                                                                              xxxvii. 5, 6.
  
      2. To pass one's time; to pass life or time in a certain
            manner, as to habits, conduct, or circumstances; as, to
            live in ease or affluence; to live happily or usefully.
  
                     O death, how bitter is the remembrance of thee to a
                     man that liveth at rest in his possessions!
                                                                              --Ecclus. xli.
                                                                              1.
  
      3. To make one's abiding place or home; to abide; to dwell;
            to reside.
  
                     Jacob lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years.
                                                                              --Gen. xlvii.
                                                                              28.
  
      4. To be or continue in existence; to exist; to remain; to be
            permanent; to last; -- said of inanimate objects, ideas,
            etc.
  
                     Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We
                     write in water.                                 --Shak.
  
      5. To enjoy or make the most of life; to be in a state of
            happiness.
  
                     What greater curse could envious fortune give Than
                     just to die when I began to live?      --Dryden.
  
      6. To feed; to subsist; to be nourished or supported; -- with
            on; as, horses live on grass and grain.
  
      7. To have a spiritual existence; to be quickened, nourished,
            and actuated by divine influence or faith.
  
                     The just shall live by faith.            --Gal. iii.
                                                                              ll.
  
      8. To be maintained in life; to acquire a livelihood; to
            subsist; -- with on or by; as, to live on spoils.
  
                     Those who live by labor.                     --Sir W.
                                                                              Temple.
  
      9. To outlast danger; to float; -- said of a ship, boat,
            etc.; as, no ship could live in such a storm.
  
                     A strong mast that lived upon the sea. --Shak.
  
      {To live out}, to be at service; to live away from home as a
            servant. [U. S.]
  
      {To live with}.
            (a) To dwell or to be a lodger with.
            (b) To cohabit with; to have intercourse with, as male
                  with female.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lived \Lived\, a.
      Having life; -- used only in composition; as, long-lived;
      short-lived.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Livid \Liv"id\, a. [L. lividus, from livere to be of a blush
      color, to be black and blue: cf. F. livide.]
      Black and blue; grayish blue; of a lead color; discolored, as
      flesh by contusion. --Cowper.
  
               There followed no carbuncles, no purple or livid spots,
               the mass of the blood not being tainted. --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loaf \Loaf\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Loafed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Loafing}.] [G. laufen to run, Prov. G. loofen. See {Leap}.]
      To spend time in idleness; to lounge or loiter about. [bd]
      Loafing vagabonds.[b8] --W. Black.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lobate \Lo"bate\, Lobated \Lo"ba*ted\, a. [See {Lobe}.]
      1. (Bot.) Consisting of, or having, lobes; lobed; as, a
            lobate leaf.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Having lobes; -- said of the tails of certain fishes
                  having the integument continued to the bases of the
                  fin rays.
            (b) Furnished with membranous flaps, as the toes of a
                  coot. See Illust. (m) under {Aves}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lob \Lob\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lobbed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lobbing}.]
      To let fall heavily or lazily.
  
               And their poor jades Lob down their heads. --Shak.
  
      {To lob a ball} (Lawn Tennis), to strike a ball so as to send
            it up into the air.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lobby \Lob"by\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Lobbied}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lobbying}.]
      To address or solicit members of a legislative body in the
      lobby or elsewhere, with the purpose to influence their
      votes.[U.S.] --Bartlett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lobed \Lobed\, a.
      Having lobes; lobate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, a.
      Lofty; proud. [R. & Obs.] --Surrey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, n. [Icel. lopt air, heaven, loft, upper room; akin
      to AS. lyft air, G. luft, Dan. loft loft, Goth. luftus air.
      Cf. {Lift}, v. & n. ]
      That which is lifted up; an elevation. Hence, especially:
      (a) The room or space under a roof and above the ceiling of
            the uppermost story.
      (b) A gallery or raised apartment in a church, hall, etc.;
            as, an organ loft.
      (c) A floor or room placed above another; a story.
  
                     Eutychus . . . fell down from the third loft.
                                                                              --Acts xx. 9.
  
      {On loft}, aloft; on high. Cf. {Onloft}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, n. (Golf)
      Pitch or slope of the face of a club (tending to drive the
      ball upward).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, v. t.
      To make or furnish with a loft; to cause to have loft; as, a
      lofted house; a lofted golf-club head.
  
               A wooden club with a lofted face.            --Encyc. of
                                                                              Sport.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loft \Loft\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Lofted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lofting}.]
      To raise aloft; to send into the air; esp. (Golf), to strike
      (the ball) so that it will go over an obstacle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lofty \Loft"y\, a. [Compar. {Loftier}; superl. {Loftiest}.]
      [From {Loft}.]
      1. Lifted high up; having great height; towering; high.
  
                     See lofty Lebanon his head advance.   --Pope.
  
      2. Fig.: Elevated in character, rank, dignity, spirit,
            bearing, language, etc.; exalted; noble; stately;
            characterized by pride; haughty.
  
                     The high and lofty One, that inhabiteth eternity.
                                                                              --Is. lvii.
                                                                              15.
  
                     Lofty and sour to them that loved him not. --Shak.
  
                     Himself to sing, and build the lofty rhyme.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      Syn: Tall; high; exalted; dignified; stately; majestic;
               sublime; proud; haughty. See {Tall}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loop \Loop\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Looped}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Looping}.]
      To make a loop of or in; to fasten with a loop or loops; --
      often with up; as, to loop a string; to loop up a curtain.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Looped \Looped\, a.
      1. Bent, folded, or tied, so as to make a loop; as, a looped
            wire or string.
  
      2. Full of holes. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lope \Lope\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Loped}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Loping}.] [See {Leap}.]
      1. To leap; to dance. [Prov. Eng.] [bd]He that lopes on the
            ropes.[b8] --Middleton.
  
      2. To move with a lope, as a horse. [U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lop \Lop\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lopped}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Lopping}.] [Prov. G. luppen, lubben,to cut, geld, or OD.
      luppen, D. lubben.]
      1. To cut off as the top or extreme part of anything; to
            sho[?] -- by cutting off the extremities; to cut off, or
            remove as superfluous parts; as, to lop a tree or its
            branches. [bd]With branches lopped, in wood or mountain
            felled.[b8] --Milton.
  
                     Expunge the whole, or lop the excrescent parts.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
      2. To cut partly off and bend down; as, to lop bushes in a
            hedge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Love \Love\, n. [OE. love, luve, AS. lufe, lufu; akin to E.
      lief, believe, L. lubet, libet,it pleases, Skr. lubh to be
      lustful. See {Lief}.]
      1. A feeling of strong attachment induced by that which
            delights or commands admiration; pre[89]minent kindness or
            devotion to another; affection; tenderness; as, the love
            of brothers and sisters.
  
                     Of all the dearest bonds we prove Thou countest
                     sons' and mothers' love Most sacred, most Thine own.
                                                                              --Keble.
  
      2. Especially, devoted attachment to, or tender or passionate
            affection for, one of the opposite sex.
  
                     He on his side Leaning half-raised, with looks of
                     cordial love Hung over her enamored.   --Milton.
  
      3. Courtship; -- chiefly in the phrase to make love, i. e.,
            to court, to woo, to solicit union in marriage.
  
                     Demetrius . . . Made love to Nedar's daughter,
                     Helena, And won her soul.                  --Shak.
  
      4. Affection; kind feeling; friendship; strong liking or
            desire; fondness; good will; -- opposed to {hate}; often
            with of and an object.
  
                     Love, and health to all.                     --Shak.
  
                     Smit with the love of sacred song.      --Milton.
  
                     The love of science faintly warmed his breast.
                                                                              --Fenton.
  
      5. Due gratitude and reverence to God.
  
                     Keep yourselves in the love of God.   --Jude 21.
  
      6. The object of affection; -- often employed in endearing
            address. [bd]Trust me, love.[b8] --Dryden.
  
                     Open the temple gates unto my love.   --Spenser.
  
      7. Cupid, the god of love; sometimes, Venus.
  
                     Such was his form as painters, when they show Their
                     utmost art, on naked Lores bestow.      --Dryden.
  
                     Therefore do nimble-pinioned doves draw Love.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      8. A thin silk stuff. [Obs.] --Boyle.
  
      9. (Bot.) A climbing species of Clematis ({C. Vitalba}).
  
      10. Nothing; no points scored on one side; -- used in
            counting score at tennis, etc.
  
                     He won the match by three sets to love. --The
                                                                              Field.
  
      Note: Love is often used in the formation of compounds, in
               most of which the meaning is very obvious; as,
               love-cracked, love-darting, love-killing, love-linked,
               love-taught, etc.
  
      {A labor of love}, a labor undertaken on account of regard
            for some person, or through pleasure in the work itself,
            without expectation of reward.
  
      {Free love}, the doctrine or practice of consorting with one
            of the opposite sex, at pleasure, without marriage. See
            {Free love}.
  
      {Free lover}, one who avows or practices free love.
  
      {In love}, in the act of loving; -- said esp. of the love of
            the sexes; as, to be in love; to fall in love.
  
      {Love apple} (Bot.), the tomato.
  
      {Love bird} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of small,
            short-tailed parrots, or parrakeets, of the genus
            {Agapornis}, and allied genera. They are mostly from
            Africa. Some species are often kept as cage birds, and are
            celebrated for the affection which they show for their
            mates.
  
      {Love broker}, a person who for pay acts as agent between
            lovers, or as a go-between in a sexual intrigue. --Shak.
  
      {Love charm}, a charm for exciting love. --Ld. Lytton.
  
      {Love child}. an illegitimate child. --Jane Austen.
  
      {Love day}, a day formerly appointed for an amicable
            adjustment of differences. [Obs.] --Piers Plowman.
            --Chaucer.
  
      {Love drink}, a love potion; a philter. --Chaucer.
  
      {Love favor}, something given to be worn in token of love.
  
      {Love feast}, a religious festival, held quarterly by some
            religious denominations, as the Moravians and Methodists,
            in imitation of the agap[91] of the early Christians.
  
      {Love feat}, the gallant act of a lover. --Shak.
  
      {Love game}, a game, as in tennis, in which the vanquished
            person or party does not score a point.
  
      {Love grass}. [G. liebesgras.] (Bot.) Any grass of the genus
            {Eragrostis}.
  
      {Love-in-a-mist}. (Bot.)
            (a) An herb of the Buttercup family ({Nigella Damascena})
                  having the flowers hidden in a maze of finely cut
                  bracts.
            (b) The West Indian {Passiflora f[d2]tida}, which has
                  similar bracts.
  
      {Love-in-idleness} (Bot.), a kind of violet; the small pansy.
  
                     A little western flower, Before milk-white, now
                     purple with love's wound; And maidens call it
                     love-in-idleness.                              --Shak.
  
      {Love juice}, juice of a plant supposed to produce love.
            --Shak.
  
      {Love knot}, a knot or bow, as of ribbon; -- so called from
            being used as a token of love, or as a pledge of mutual
            affection. --Milman.
  
      {Love lass}, a sweetheart.
  
      {Love letter}, a letter of courtship. --Shak.
  
      {Love-lies-bleeding} (Bot.), a species of amaranth
            ({Amarantus melancholicus}).
  
      {Love match}, a marriage brought about by love alone.
  
      {Love potion}, a compounded draught intended to excite love,
            or venereal desire.
  
      {Love rites}, sexual intercourse. --Pope
  
      {Love scene}, an exhibition of love, as between lovers on the
            stage.
  
      {Love suit}, courtship. --Shak.
  
      {Of all loves}, for the sake of all love; by all means.
            [Obs.] [bd]Mrs. Arden desired him of all loves to come
            back again.[b8] --Holinshed.
  
      {The god of love}, [or] {Love god}, Cupid.
  
      {To make love to}, to express affection for; to woo. [bd]If
            you will marry, make your loves to me.[b8] --Shak.
  
      {To play for love}, to play a game, as at cards, without
            stakes. [bd]A game at piquet for love.[b8] --Lamb.
  
      Syn: Affection; friendship; kindness; tenderness; fondness;
               delight.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Love \Love\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Loved}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Loving}.] [AS. lufian. [?]. See {Love}, n.]
      1. To have a feeling of love for; to regard with affection or
            good will; as, to love one's children and friends; to love
            one's country; to love one's God.
  
                     Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart,
                     and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.
                                                                              --Matt. xxii.
                                                                              37.
  
                     Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thy self. --Matt.
                                                                              xxii. 39.
  
      2. To regard with passionate and devoted affection, as that
            of one sex for the other.
  
      3. To take delight or pleasure in; to have a strong liking or
            desire for, or interest in; to be pleased with; to like;
            as, to love books; to love adventures.
  
                     Wit, eloquence, and poetry. Arts which I loved.
                                                                              --Cowley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Luff \Luff\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Luffed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Luffing}.] (Naut.)
      To turn the head of a vessel toward the wind; to sail nearer
      the wind; to turn the tiller so as to make the vessel sail
      nearer the wind.
  
      {To luff round}, [or] {To luff alee}, to make the extreme of
            this movement, for the purpose of throwing the ship's head
            into the wind.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   La Fayette, GA (city, FIPS 44312)
      Location: 34.70756 N, 85.28105 W
      Population (1990): 6313 (2627 housing units)
      Area: 20.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 30728
   La Fayette, IL (village, FIPS 40676)
      Location: 41.10979 N, 89.97352 W
      Population (1990): 231 (92 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 61449
   La Fayette, KY
      Zip code(s): 42254
   La Fayette, NY
      Zip code(s): 13084

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   La Veta, CO (town, FIPS 44100)
      Location: 37.51001 N, 105.00728 W
      Population (1990): 726 (508 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Labadie, MO
      Zip code(s): 63055

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Labette, KS (city, FIPS 37375)
      Location: 37.23033 N, 95.18355 W
      Population (1990): 74 (34 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   LaFayette, KY (city, FIPS 43444)
      Location: 36.66012 N, 87.65815 W
      Population (1990): 106 (55 housing units)
      Area: 0.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Lafayette, AL (city, FIPS 40672)
      Location: 32.89954 N, 85.40085 W
      Population (1990): 3151 (1236 housing units)
      Area: 22.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 36862
   Lafayette, CA (city, FIPS 39122)
      Location: 37.89383 N, 122.11791 W
      Population (1990): 23501 (9270 housing units)
      Area: 39.4 sq km (land), 0.5 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 94549
   Lafayette, CO (city, FIPS 41835)
      Location: 39.99430 N, 105.09799 W
      Population (1990): 14548 (5775 housing units)
      Area: 17.9 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 80026
   Lafayette, IN (city, FIPS 40788)
      Location: 40.41085 N, 86.87068 W
      Population (1990): 43764 (19259 housing units)
      Area: 34.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 47901, 47904, 47905
   Lafayette, LA (city, FIPS 40735)
      Location: 30.21525 N, 92.02950 W
      Population (1990): 94440 (40379 housing units)
      Area: 106.0 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 70501, 70503, 70506, 70507, 70508
   Lafayette, MN (city, FIPS 33920)
      Location: 44.44828 N, 94.39329 W
      Population (1990): 462 (198 housing units)
      Area: 3.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56054
   Lafayette, MS
      Zip code(s): 38655
   Lafayette, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07848
   Lafayette, OH (village, FIPS 41118)
      Location: 40.75859 N, 83.94955 W
      Population (1990): 449 (167 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Lafayette, OR (city, FIPS 40300)
      Location: 45.24613 N, 123.11042 W
      Population (1990): 1292 (463 housing units)
      Area: 2.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 97127
   Lafayette, TN (city, FIPS 40160)
      Location: 36.52448 N, 86.03093 W
      Population (1990): 3641 (1695 housing units)
      Area: 10.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37083

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   LaFayette, KY (city, FIPS 43444)
      Location: 36.66012 N, 87.65815 W
      Population (1990): 106 (55 housing units)
      Area: 0.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Lafayette, AL (city, FIPS 40672)
      Location: 32.89954 N, 85.40085 W
      Population (1990): 3151 (1236 housing units)
      Area: 22.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 36862
   Lafayette, CA (city, FIPS 39122)
      Location: 37.89383 N, 122.11791 W
      Population (1990): 23501 (9270 housing units)
      Area: 39.4 sq km (land), 0.5 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 94549
   Lafayette, CO (city, FIPS 41835)
      Location: 39.99430 N, 105.09799 W
      Population (1990): 14548 (5775 housing units)
      Area: 17.9 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 80026
   Lafayette, IN (city, FIPS 40788)
      Location: 40.41085 N, 86.87068 W
      Population (1990): 43764 (19259 housing units)
      Area: 34.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 47901, 47904, 47905
   Lafayette, LA (city, FIPS 40735)
      Location: 30.21525 N, 92.02950 W
      Population (1990): 94440 (40379 housing units)
      Area: 106.0 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 70501, 70503, 70506, 70507, 70508
   Lafayette, MN (city, FIPS 33920)
      Location: 44.44828 N, 94.39329 W
      Population (1990): 462 (198 housing units)
      Area: 3.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56054
   Lafayette, MS
      Zip code(s): 38655
   Lafayette, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07848
   Lafayette, OH (village, FIPS 41118)
      Location: 40.75859 N, 83.94955 W
      Population (1990): 449 (167 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Lafayette, OR (city, FIPS 40300)
      Location: 45.24613 N, 123.11042 W
      Population (1990): 1292 (463 housing units)
      Area: 2.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 97127
   Lafayette, TN (city, FIPS 40160)
      Location: 36.52448 N, 86.03093 W
      Population (1990): 3641 (1695 housing units)
      Area: 10.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 37083

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Lafitte, LA (CDP, FIPS 40840)
      Location: 29.68864 N, 90.09714 W
      Population (1990): 1507 (612 housing units)
      Area: 14.5 sq km (land), 5.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 70067

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Lobata, WV
      Zip code(s): 25678

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   LPT /L-P-T/ or /lip'it/ or /lip-it'/ n.   1. Line printer
   (originally Line Printing Terminal).   Rare under Unix, more common
   among hackers who grew up with ITS, MS-DOS, CP/M and other operating
   systems that were strongly influenced by early {DEC} conventions.
   2. Local PorT.   Used among MS-DOS programmers (and so expanded in
   the MS-DOS 5 manual).   It seems likely this is a {backronym}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   L0pht
  
      /loft/ An Internet security organisation that
      merged with {@stake} in January 2000.
  
      (2003-06-12)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   LAPD
  
      1. {Link Access Procedure on the D channel}.
  
      2. Los Angeles Police Department.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   LPT
  
      /L-P-T/ or /lip'it/ or /lip-it'/ Line printer.   Rare under
      {Unix}, more common among hackers who grew up with {ITS},
      {MS-DOS}, {CP/M} and other {operating system}s that were
      strongly influenced by early {DEC} conventions.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   LVD
  
      {Low Voltage Differential}
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Levite
      a descendant of the tribe of Levi (Ex. 6:25; Lev. 25:32; Num.
      35:2; Josh. 21:3, 41). This name is, however, generally used as
      the title of that portion of the tribe which was set apart for
      the subordinate offices of the sanctuary service (1 Kings 8:4;
      Ezra 2:70), as assistants to the priests.
     
         When the Israelites left Egypt, the ancient manner of worship
      was still observed by them, the eldest son of each house
      inheriting the priest's office. At Sinai the first change in
      this ancient practice was made. A hereditary priesthood in the
      family of Aaron was then instituted (Ex. 28:1). But it was not
      till that terrible scene in connection with the sin of the
      golden calf that the tribe of Levi stood apart and began to
      occupy a distinct position (Ex. 32). The religious primogeniture
      was then conferred on this tribe, which henceforth was devoted
      to the service of the sanctuary (Num. 3:11-13). They were
      selected for this purpose because of their zeal for the glory of
      God (Ex. 32:26), and because, as the tribe to which Moses and
      Aaron belonged, they would naturally stand by the lawgiver in
      his work.
     
         The Levitical order consisted of all the descendants of Levi's
      three sons, Gershon, Kohath, and Merari; whilst Aaron, Amram's
      son (Amram, son of Kohat), and his issue constituted the
      priestly order.
     
         The age and qualification for Levitical service are specified
      in Num. 4:3, 23, 30, 39, 43, 47.
     
         They were not included among the armies of Israel (Num. 1:47;
      2:33; 26:62), but were reckoned by themselves. They were the
      special guardians of the tabernacle (Num. 1:51; 18:22-24). The
      Gershonites pitched their tents on the west of the tabernacle
      (3:23), the Kohathites on the south (3:29), the Merarites on the
      north (3:35), and the priests on the east (3:38). It was their
      duty to move the tent and carry the parts of the sacred
      structure from place to place. They were given to Aaron and his
      sons the priests to wait upon them and do work for them at the
      sanctuary services (Num. 8:19; 18:2-6).
     
         As being wholly consecrated to the service of the Lord, they
      had no territorial possessions. Jehovah was their inheritance
      (Num. 18:20; 26:62; Deut. 10:9; 18:1, 2), and for their support
      it was ordained that they should receive from the other tribes
      the tithes of the produce of the land. Forty-eight cities also
      were assigned to them, thirteen of which were for the priests
      "to dwell in", i.e., along with their other inhabitants. Along
      with their dwellings they had "suburbs", i.e., "commons", for
      their herds and flocks, and also fields and vineyards (Num.
      35:2-5). Nine of these cities were in Judah, three in Naphtali,
      and four in each of the other tribes (Josh. 21). Six of the
      Levitical cities were set apart as "cities of refuge" (q.v.).
      Thus the Levites were scattered among the tribes to keep alive
      among them the knowledge and service of God. (See {PRIEST}.)
     

From Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's) [hitchcock]:
   Lebaoth, lividness
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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