DEEn Dictionary De - En
DeEs De - Es
DePt De - Pt
 Vocabulary trainer

Spec. subjects Grammar Abbreviations Random search Preferences
Search in Sprachauswahl
Search for:
Mini search box
 

   gardant
         adj 1: looking forward [syn: {guardant(ip)}, {gardant(ip)},
                  {full-face}]

English Dictionary: Gartenkamille by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden
n
  1. a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
  2. the flowers or vegetables or fruits or herbs that are cultivated in a garden
  3. a yard or lawn adjoining a house
v
  1. work in the garden; "My hobby is gardening"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden angelica
n
  1. a biennial cultivated herb; its stems are candied and eaten and its roots are used medicinally
    Synonym(s): garden angelica, archangel, Angelica Archangelica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden balm
n
  1. bushy perennial Old World mint having small white or yellowish flowers and fragrant lemon-flavored leaves; a garden escapee in northern Europe and North America
    Synonym(s): lemon balm, garden balm, sweet balm, bee balm, beebalm, Melissa officinalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden cart
n
  1. a cart for carrying small loads; has handles and one or more wheels
    Synonym(s): barrow, garden cart, lawn cart, wheelbarrow
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden centipede
n
  1. minute arthropod often infesting the underground parts of truck-garden and greenhouse crops
    Synonym(s): garden centipede, garden symphilid, symphilid, Scutigerella immaculata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden chair
n
  1. chair left outside for use on a lawn or in a garden [syn: lawn chair, garden chair]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden cress
n
  1. cress cultivated for salads and garnishes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden current
n
  1. cultivated European current bearing small edible red berries
    Synonym(s): red currant, garden current, Ribes rubrum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden egg
n
  1. hairy upright herb native to southeastern Asia but widely cultivated for its large glossy edible fruit commonly used as a vegetable
    Synonym(s): eggplant, aubergine, brinjal, eggplant bush, garden egg, mad apple, Solanum melongena
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden forget-me-not
n
  1. small biennial to perennial herb of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia having blue, purple or white flowers
    Synonym(s): garden forget-me-not, Myosotis sylvatica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden heliotrope
n
  1. tall rhizomatous plant having very fragrant flowers and rhizomes used medicinally
    Synonym(s): common valerian, garden heliotrope, Valeriana officinalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden hose
n
  1. a hose used for watering a lawn or garden
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden huckleberry
n
  1. improved garden variety of black nightshade having small edible orange or black berries
    Synonym(s): garden huckleberry, wonderberry, sunberry, Solanum nigrum guineese, Solanum melanocerasum, Solanum burbankii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden lettuce
n
  1. annual or perennial garden plant having succulent leaves used in salads; widely grown
    Synonym(s): garden lettuce, common lettuce, Lactuca sativa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden loosestrife
n
  1. frequently considered a weed; Europe and Asia [syn: {yellow loosestrife}, garden loosestrife, Lysimachia vulgaris]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden nasturtium
n
  1. strong-growing annual climber having large flowers of all shades of orange from orange-red to yellowish orange and seeds that are pickled and used like capers
    Synonym(s): garden nasturtium, Indian cress, Tropaeolum majus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Garden of Eden
n
  1. a beautiful garden where Adam and Eve were placed at the Creation; when they disobeyed and ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were driven from their paradise (the fall of man)
    Synonym(s): Eden, Garden of Eden
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden orache
n
  1. Asiatic plant resembling spinach often used as a potherb; naturalized in Europe and North America
    Synonym(s): garden orache, mountain spinach, Atriplex hortensis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden party
n
  1. a party of people assembled for social interaction out of doors
    Synonym(s): garden party, lawn party, fete champetre
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden pea
n
  1. the flattened to cylindric inflated multi-seeded fruit of the common pea plant
  2. plant producing peas usually eaten fresh rather than dried
    Synonym(s): garden pea, garden pea plant, common pea, Pisum sativum
  3. fresh pea
    Synonym(s): green pea, garden pea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden pea plant
n
  1. plant producing peas usually eaten fresh rather than dried
    Synonym(s): garden pea, garden pea plant, common pea, Pisum sativum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden pepper cress
n
  1. annual herb used as salad green and garnish [syn: {common garden cress}, garden pepper cress, pepper grass, pepperwort, Lepidium sativum]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden pink
n
  1. any of various flowers of plants of the genus Dianthus cultivated for their fragrant flowers
    Synonym(s): pink, garden pink
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden plant
n
  1. any of a variety of plants usually grown especially in a flower or herb garden
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden rake
n
  1. a rake used by gardeners
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden rhubarb
n
  1. long cultivated hybrid of Rheum palmatum; stems often cooked in pies or as sauce or preserves
    Synonym(s): pie plant, garden rhubarb, Rheum cultorum, Rheum rhabarbarum, Rheum rhaponticum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden rocket
n
  1. erect European annual often grown as a salad crop to be harvested when young and tender
    Synonym(s): rocket, roquette, garden rocket, rocket salad, arugula, Eruca sativa, Eruca vesicaria sativa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden roller
n
  1. heavy cast-iron cylinder used to flatten lawns
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden snail
n
  1. any of several inedible snails of the genus Helix; often destructive pests
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden sorrel
n
  1. low perennial with small silvery-green ovate to hastate leaves
    Synonym(s): French sorrel, garden sorrel, Rumex scutatus
  2. European sorrel with large slightly acidic sagittate leaves grown throughout north temperate zone for salad and spring greens
    Synonym(s): sour dock, garden sorrel, Rumex acetosa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden spade
n
  1. a spade used by gardeners
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden spider
n
  1. a spider common in European gardens [syn: garden spider, Aranea diademata]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Garden State
n
  1. a Mid-Atlantic state on the Atlantic; one of the original 13 colonies
    Synonym(s): New Jersey, Jersey, Garden State, NJ
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Garden Stater
n
  1. a native of resident of New Jersey [syn: New Jerseyan, New Jerseyite, Garden Stater]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden strawberry
n
  1. widely cultivated [syn: garden strawberry, {cultivated strawberry}, Fragaria ananassa]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden symphilid
n
  1. minute arthropod often infesting the underground parts of truck-garden and greenhouse crops
    Synonym(s): garden centipede, garden symphilid, symphilid, Scutigerella immaculata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden tool
n
  1. used for working in gardens or yards [syn: garden tool, lawn tool]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden trowel
n
  1. a trowel used by gardeners
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden truck
n
  1. fresh fruits and vegetable grown for the market [syn: produce, green goods, green groceries, garden truck]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden violet
n
  1. European violet typically having purple to white flowers; widely naturalized
    Synonym(s): sweet violet, garden violet, English violet, Viola odorata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
garden webworm
n
  1. a variety of webworm [syn: garden webworm, {Loxostege similalis}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gardener
n
  1. someone who takes care of a garden [syn: gardener, nurseryman]
  2. someone employed to work in a garden
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gardener's delight
n
  1. an old cottage garden plant of southeastern Europe widely cultivated for its attractive white woolly foliage and showy crimson flowers
    Synonym(s): mullein pink, rose campion, gardener's delight, dusty miller, Lychnis coronaria
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gardener's garters
n
  1. perennial grass of marshy meadows and ditches having broad leaves; Europe and North America
    Synonym(s): reed canary grass, gardener's garters, lady's laces, ribbon grass, Phalaris arundinacea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gardenia
n
  1. any of various shrubs and small trees of the genus Gardenia having large fragrant white or yellow flowers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gardenia augusta
n
  1. evergreen shrub widely cultivated for its large fragrant waxlike white flowers and glossy leaves
    Synonym(s): cape jasmine, cape jessamine, Gardenia jasminoides, Gardenia augusta
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gardenia jasminoides
n
  1. evergreen shrub widely cultivated for its large fragrant waxlike white flowers and glossy leaves
    Synonym(s): cape jasmine, cape jessamine, Gardenia jasminoides, Gardenia augusta
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gardening
n
  1. the cultivation of plants [syn: gardening, horticulture]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gardiner
n
  1. British historian remembered for his ten-volume history of England (1829-1902)
    Synonym(s): Gardiner, Samuel Rawson Gardiner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gardner
n
  1. United States collector and patron of art who built a museum in Boston to house her collection and opened it to the public in 1903 (1840-1924)
    Synonym(s): Gardner, Isabella Stewart Gardner
  2. writer of detective novels featuring Perry Mason (1889-1970)
    Synonym(s): Gardner, Erle Stanley Gardner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gartner's bacillus
n
  1. a form of salmonella that causes gastroenteritis in humans
    Synonym(s): Salmonella enteritidis, Gartner's bacillus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Giordano Bruno
n
  1. Italian philosopher who used Copernican principles to develop a pantheistic monistic philosophy; condemned for heresy by the Inquisition and burned at the stake (1548-1600)
    Synonym(s): Bruno, Giordano Bruno
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gordian
adj
  1. extremely intricate; usually in phrase `Gordian knot'
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gordian knot
n
  1. any very difficult problem; insoluble in its own terms
  2. an intricate knot tied by Gordius, the king of Phrygia, and cut by the sword of Alexander the Great after he heard that whoever undid it would become ruler of Asia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gordimer
n
  1. South African novelist and short-story writer whose work describes the effects of apartheid (born in 1923)
    Synonym(s): Gordimer, Nadine Gordimer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gordon Howe
n
  1. Canadian hockey player who holds the record for playing the most games (born 1928)
    Synonym(s): Howe, Gordie Howe, Gordon Howe
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Gordon setter
n
  1. a Scottish breed with a black-and-tan coat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
grade insignia
n
  1. V-shaped sleeve badge indicating military rank and service; "they earned their stripes in Kuwait"
    Synonym(s): chevron, stripe, stripes, grade insignia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gradient
n
  1. a graded change in the magnitude of some physical quantity or dimension
  2. the property possessed by a line or surface that departs from the horizontal; "a five-degree gradient"
    Synonym(s): gradient, slope
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
grading
n
  1. the act of arranging in a graduated series [syn: scaling, grading]
  2. changing the ground level to a smooth horizontal or gently sloping surface
    Synonym(s): grading, leveling
  3. evaluation of performance by assigning a grade or score; "what he disliked about teaching was all the grading he had to do"
    Synonym(s): marking, grading, scoring
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
grating
adj
  1. unpleasantly harsh or grating in sound; "a gravelly voice"
    Synonym(s): grating, gravelly, rasping, raspy, rough, scratchy
n
  1. a barrier that has parallel or crossed bars blocking a passage but admitting air
    Synonym(s): grate, grating
  2. a frame of iron bars to hold a fire
    Synonym(s): grate, grating
  3. optical device consisting of a surface with many parallel grooves in it; disperses a beam of light (or other electromagnetic radiation) into its wavelengths to produce its spectrum
    Synonym(s): diffraction grating, grating
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gratingly
adv
  1. in a harsh and grating manner; "her voice fell gratingly on our ears"
    Synonym(s): gratingly, raspingly, harshly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great anteater
n
  1. large shaggy-haired toothless anteater with long tongue and powerful claws; of South America
    Synonym(s): ant bear, giant anteater, great anteater, tamanoir, Myrmecophaga jubata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Great Dane
n
  1. very large powerful smooth-coated breed of dog
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great hundred
n
  1. the cardinal number that is the product of ten and twelve
    Synonym(s): long hundred, great hundred, 120
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Great Indian Desert
n
  1. a desert to the east of the Indus River in northwestern India and southeastern Pakistan
    Synonym(s): Thar Desert, Great Indian Desert
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great maple
n
  1. Eurasian maple tree with pale grey bark that peels in flakes like that of a sycamore tree; leaves with five ovate lobes yellow in autumn
    Synonym(s): sycamore, great maple, scottish maple, Acer pseudoplatanus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Great Mendenhall Glacier
n
  1. a glacier of the Piedmont type near Juneau in Alaska [syn: Mendenhall Glacier, Great Mendenhall Glacier]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great millet
n
  1. important for human and animal food; growth habit and stem form similar to Indian corn but having sawtooth-edged leaves
    Synonym(s): great millet, kaffir, kafir corn, kaffir corn, Sorghum bicolor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Great Mother
n
  1. great nature goddess of ancient Phrygia in Asia Minor; counterpart of Greek Rhea and Roman Ops
    Synonym(s): Cybele, Dindymene, Great Mother, Magna Mater, Mater Turrita
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great mullein
n
  1. tall-stalked very woolly mullein with densely packed yellow flowers; ancient Greeks and Romans dipped the stalks in tallow for funeral torches
    Synonym(s): common mullein, great mullein, Aaron's rod, flannel mullein, woolly mullein, torch, Verbascum thapsus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great-aunt
n
  1. an aunt of your father or mother [syn: great-aunt, grandaunt]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great-nephew
n
  1. a son of your niece or nephew [syn: great-nephew, grandnephew]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great-niece
n
  1. a daughter of your niece or nephew [syn: great-niece, grandniece]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
great-uncle
n
  1. an uncle of your father or mother [syn: great-uncle, granduncle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
greatness
n
  1. the property possessed by something or someone of outstanding importance or eminence
    Synonym(s): greatness, illustriousness
  2. unusual largeness in size or extent or number
    Synonym(s): enormousness, grandness, greatness, immenseness, immensity, sizeableness, vastness, wideness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
greediness
n
  1. an excessive desire for food [syn: greediness, hoggishness, piggishness]
  2. an excessive desire for wealth (usually in large amounts); "the greediness of lawyers"
    Synonym(s): greediness, voraciousness, rapaciousness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
greeting
n
  1. (usually plural) an acknowledgment or expression of good will (especially on meeting)
    Synonym(s): greeting, salutation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
greeting card
n
  1. a card sent to express personal greetings
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
grid metal
n
  1. a kind of hard lead that is used for grids in storage batteries
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
growth industry
n
  1. an industry that is growing rapidly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
growth-onset diabetes
n
  1. severe diabetes mellitus with an early onset; characterized by polyuria and excessive thirst and increased appetite and weight loss and episodic ketoacidosis; diet and insulin injections are required to control the disease
    Synonym(s): type I diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, IDDM, juvenile-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, growth- onset diabetes, ketosis-prone diabetes, ketoacidosis- prone diabetes, autoimmune diabetes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guardant
adj
  1. looking forward [syn: guardant(ip), gardant(ip), full-face]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guardian
n
  1. a person who cares for persons or property [syn: defender, guardian, protector, shielder]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guardian angel
n
  1. an angel believed to have special affection for a particular individual
    Synonym(s): guardian spirit, guardian angel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guardian spirit
n
  1. an angel believed to have special affection for a particular individual
    Synonym(s): guardian spirit, guardian angel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guardianship
n
  1. attention and management implying responsibility for safety; "he is in the care of a bodyguard"
    Synonym(s): care, charge, tutelage, guardianship
  2. the responsibility of a guardian or keeper; "he left his car in my keeping"
    Synonym(s): guardianship, keeping, safekeeping
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
guerdon
n
  1. a reward or payment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gueridon
n
  1. a small round table
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
gyration
n
  1. a single complete turn (axial or orbital); "the plane made three rotations before it crashed"; "the revolution of the earth about the sun takes one year"
    Synonym(s): rotation, revolution, gyration
  2. the act of rotating in a circle or spiral
    Synonym(s): gyration, whirling
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardant \Gar"dant\, a. [F. See {Guardant}.] (Her.)
      Turning the head towards the spectator, but not the body; --
      said of a lion or other beast.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gardened}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gardening}.]
      To lay out or cultivate a garden; to labor in a garden; to
      practice horticulture.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\, v. t.
      To cultivate as a garden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cockscomb \Cocks"comb`\ (k[ocr]ks"k[omac]m`), n. [1st cock, n. +
      comb crest.]
      1. See {Coxcomb}.
  
      2. (Bot.) A plant ({Celosia cristata}), of many varieties,
            cultivated for its broad, fantastic spikes of brilliant
            flowers; -- sometimes called {garden cockscomb}. Also the
            {Pedicularis}, or lousewort, the {Rhinanthus
            Crista-galli}, and the {Onobrychis Crista-galli}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Orach \Or"ach\, Orache \Or"ache\, n. [F. arroche, corrupted fr.
      L. atriplex, Gr. [?]. Cf. {Arrach}.] (Bot.)
      A genus ({Atriplex}) of herbs or low shrubs of the Goosefoot
      family, most of them with a mealy surface.
  
      {Garden orache}, a plant ({Atriplex hortensis}), often used
            as a pot herb; -- also called {mountain spinach}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pink \Pink\, n. [Perh. akin to pick; as if the edges of the
      petals were picked out. Cf. {Pink}, v. t.]
      1. (Bot.) A name given to several plants of the
            caryophyllaceous genus {Dianthus}, and to their flowers,
            which are sometimes very fragrant and often double in
            cultivated varieties. The species are mostly perennial
            herbs, with opposite linear leaves, and handsome
            five-petaled flowers with a tubular calyx.
  
      2. A color resulting from the combination of a pure vivid red
            with more or less white; -- so called from the common
            color of the flower. --Dryden.
  
      3. Anything supremely excellent; the embodiment or perfection
            of something. [bd]The very pink of courtesy.[b8] --Shak.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) The European minnow; -- so called from the
            color of its abdomen in summer. [Prov. Eng.]
  
      {Bunch pink} is {Dianthus barbatus}.
  
      {China}, [or] {Indian}, {pink}. See under {China}.
  
      {Clove pink} is {Dianthus Caryophyllus}, the stock from which
            carnations are derived.
  
      {Garden pink}. See {Pheasant's eye}.
  
      {Meadow pink} is applied to {Dianthus deltoides}; also, to
            the ragged robin.
  
      {Maiden pink}, {Dianthus deltoides}.
  
      {Moss pink}. See under {Moss}.
  
      {Pink needle}, the pin grass; -- so called from the long,
            tapering points of the carpels. See {Alfilaria}.
  
      {Sea pink}. See {Thrift}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Syringe \Syr"inge\, n. [F. seringue (cf. Pr. siringua, Sp.
      jeringa, It. sciringa, scilinga), fg. Gr. [?], [?], a pipe or
      tube; cf. Skr. svar to sound, and E. swarum. Cf. {Syringa}.]
      A kind of small hand-pump for throwing a stream of liquid, or
      for purposes of aspiration. It consists of a small
      cylindrical barrel and piston, or a bulb of soft elastic
      material, with or without valves, and with a nozzle which is
      sometimes at the end of a flexible tube; -- used for
      injecting animal bodies, cleansing wounds, etc.
  
      {Garden syringe}. See {Garden}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Truck \Truck\, n. [Cf. F. troc.]
      1. Exchange of commodities; barter. --Hakluyt.
  
      2. Commodities appropriate for barter, or for small trade;
            small commodities; esp., in the United States, garden
            vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
  
      3. The practice of paying wages in goods instead of money; --
            called also {truck system}.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for market. [Colloq.] [U.
            S.]
  
      {Truck farming}, raising vegetables for market: market
            gardening. [Colloq. U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wagtail \Wag"tail`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of many species of Old World singing birds belonging
      to {Motacilla} and several allied genera of the family
      {Motacillid[91]}. They have the habit of constantly jerking
      their long tails up and down, whence the name.
  
      {Field wagtail}, any one of several species of wagtails of
            the genus {Budytes} having the tail shorter, the legs
            longer, and the hind claw longer and straighter, than do
            the water wagtails. Most of the species are yellow
            beneath. Called also {yellow wagtail}.
  
      {Garden wagtail}, the Indian black-breasted wagtail
            ({Nemoricola Indica}).
  
      {Pied wagtail}, the common European water wagtail ({Motacilla
            lugubris}). It is variegated with black and white. The
            name is applied also to other allied species having
            similar colors. Called also {pied dishwasher}.
  
      {Wagtail flycatcher}, a true flycatcher ({Sauloprocta
            motacilloides}) common in Southern Australia, where it is
            very tame, and frequents stock yards and gardens and often
            builds its nest about houses; -- called also {black
            fantail}.
  
      {Water wagtail}.
      (a) Any one of several species of wagtails of the restricted
            genus {Motacilla}. They live chiefly on the shores of
            ponds and streams.
      (b) The American water thrush. See {Water thrush}.
  
      {Wood wagtail}, an Asiatic wagtail; ({Calobates sulphurea})
            having a slender bill and short legs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Yellow \Yel"low\, a. [Compar. {Yellower}; superl. {Yellowest}.]
      [OE. yelow, yelwe, [f4]elow, [f4]eoluw, from AS. geolu; akin
      to D. geel, OS. & OHG. gelo, G. gelb, Icel. gulr, Sw. gul,
      Dan. guul, L. helvus light bay, Gr. [?] young verdure, [?]
      greenish yellow, Skr. hari tawny, yellowish. [?][?][?]. Cf.
      {Chlorine}, {Gall} a bitter liquid, {Gold}, {Yolk}.]
      Being of a bright saffronlike color; of the color of gold or
      brass; having the hue of that part of the rainbow, or of the
      solar spectrum, which is between the orange and the green.
  
               Her yellow hair was browded [braided] in a tress.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
               A sweaty reaper from his tillage brought First fruits,
               the green ear and the yellow sheaf.         --Milton.
  
               The line of yellow light dies fast away. --Keble.
  
      {Yellow atrophy} (Med.), a fatal affection of the liver, in
            which it undergoes fatty degeneration, and becomes rapidly
            smaller and of a deep yellow tinge. The marked symptoms
            are black vomit, delirium, convulsions, coma, and
            jaundice.
  
      {Yellow bark}, calisaya bark.
  
      {Yellow bass} (Zo[94]l.), a North American fresh-water bass
            ({Morone interrupta}) native of the lower parts of the
            Mississippi and its tributaries. It is yellow, with
            several more or less broken black stripes or bars. Called
            also {barfish}.
  
      {Yellow berry}. (Bot.) Same as {Persian berry}, under
            {Persian}.
  
      {Yellow boy}, a gold coin, as a guinea. [Slang] --Arbuthnot.
  
      {Yellow brier}. (Bot.) See under {Brier}.
  
      {Yellow bugle} (Bot.), a European labiate plant ({Ajuga
            Cham[91]pitys}).
  
      {Yellow bunting} (Zo[94]l.), the European yellow-hammer.
  
      {Yellow cat} (Zo[94]l.), a yellow catfish; especially, the
            bashaw.
  
      {Yellow copperas} (Min.), a hydrous sulphate of iron; --
            called also {copiapite}.
  
      {Yellow copper ore}, a sulphide of copper and iron; copper
            pyrites. See {Chalcopyrite}.
  
      {Yellow cress} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered, cruciferous plant
            ({Barbarea pr[91]cox}), sometimes grown as a salad plant.
           
  
      {Yellow dock}. (Bot.) See the Note under {Dock}.
  
      {Yellow earth}, a yellowish clay, colored by iron, sometimes
            used as a yellow pigment.
  
      {Yellow fever} (Med.), a malignant, contagious, febrile
            disease of warm climates, attended with jaundice,
            producing a yellow color of the skin, and with the black
            vomit. See {Black vomit}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Yellow flag}, the quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine},
            and 3d {Flag}.
  
      {Yellow jack}.
      (a) The yellow fever. See under 2d {Jack}.
      (b) The quarantine flag. See under {Quarantine}.
  
      {Yellow jacket} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American social wasps of the genus {Vespa}, in which the
            color of the body is partly bright yellow. These wasps are
            noted for their irritability, and for their painful
            stings.
  
      {Yellow lead ore} (Min.), wulfenite.
  
      {Yellow lemur} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow macauco} (Zo[94]l.), the kinkajou.
  
      {Yellow mackerel} (Zo[94]l.), the jurel.
  
      {Yellow metal}. Same as {Muntz metal}, under {Metal}.
  
      {Yellow ocher} (Min.), an impure, earthy variety of brown
            iron ore, which is used as a pigment.
  
      {Yellow oxeye} (Bot.), a yellow-flowered plant
            ({Chrysanthemum segetum}) closely related to the oxeye
            daisy.
  
      {Yellow perch} (Zo[94]l.), the common American perch. See
            {Perch}.
  
      {Yellow pike} (Zo[94]l.), the wall-eye.
  
      {Yellow pine} (Bot.), any of several kinds of pine; also,
            their yellowish and generally durable timber. Among the
            most common are valuable species are {Pinus mitis} and {P.
            palustris} of the Eastern and Southern States, and {P.
            ponderosa} and {P. Arizonica} of the Rocky Mountains and
            Pacific States.
  
      {Yellow plover} (Zo[94]l.), the golden plover.
  
      {Yellow precipitate} (Med. Chem.), an oxide of mercury which
            is thrown down as an amorphous yellow powder on adding
            corrosive sublimate to limewater.
  
      {Yellow puccoon}. (Bot.) Same as {Orangeroot}.
  
      {Yellow rail} (Zo[94]l.), a small American rail ({Porzana
            Noveboracensis}) in which the lower parts are dull yellow,
            darkest on the breast. The back is streaked with brownish
            yellow and with black, and spotted with white. Called also
            {yellow crake}.
  
      {Yellow rattle}, {Yellow rocket}. (Bot.) See under {Rattle},
            and {Rocket}.
  
      {Yellow Sally} (Zo[94]l.), a greenish or yellowish European
            stone fly of the genus {Chloroperla}; -- so called by
            anglers.
  
      {Yellow sculpin} (Zo[94]l.), the dragonet.
  
      {Yellow snake} (Zo[94]l.), a West Indian boa ({Chilobothrus
            inornatus}) common in Jamaica. It becomes from eight to
            ten long. The body is yellowish or yellowish green, mixed
            with black, and anteriorly with black lines.
  
      {Yellow spot}.
      (a) (Anat.) A small yellowish spot with a central pit, the
            fovea centralis, in the center of the retina where vision
            is most accurate. See {Eye}.
      (b) (Zo[94]l.) A small American butterfly ({Polites Peckius})
            of the Skipper family. Its wings are brownish, with a
            large, irregular, bright yellow spot on each of the hind
            wings, most conspicuous beneath. Called also {Peck's
            skipper}. See Illust. under {Skipper}, n., 5.
  
      {Yellow tit} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            crested titmice of the genus {Machlolophus}, native of
            India. The predominating colors of the plumage are yellow
            and green.
  
      {Yellow viper} (Zo[94]l.), the fer-de-lance.
  
      {Yellow warbler} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            American warblers of the genus {Dendroica} in which the
            predominant color is yellow, especially {D. [91]stiva},
            which is a very abundant and familiar species; -- called
            also {garden warbler}, {golden warbler}, {summer
            yellowbird}, {summer warbler}, and {yellow-poll warbler}.
           
  
      {Yellow wash} (Pharm.), yellow oxide of mercury suspended in
            water, -- a mixture prepared by adding corrosive sublimate
            to limewater.
  
      {Yellow wren} (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European willow warbler.
      (b) The European wood warbler.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Golden \Gold"en\, a. [OE. golden; cf. OE. gulden, AS. gylden,
      from gold. See {Gold}, and cf. {Guilder}.]
      1. Made of gold; consisting of gold.
  
      2. Having the color of gold; as, the golden grain.
  
      3. Very precious; highly valuable; excellent; eminently
            auspicious; as, golden opinions.
  
      {Golden age}.
            (a) The fabulous age of primeval simplicity and purity of
                  manners in rural employments, followed by the silver,
                  bronze, and iron ages. --Dryden.
            (b) (Roman Literature) The best part (B. C. 81 -- A. D.
                  14) of the classical period of Latinity; the time when
                  Cicero, C[91]sar, Virgil, etc., wrote. Hence:
            (c) That period in the history of a literature, etc., when
                  it flourishes in its greatest purity or attains its
                  greatest glory; as, the Elizabethan age has been
                  considered the golden age of English literature.
  
      {Golden balls}, three gilt balls used as a sign of a
            pawnbroker's office or shop; -- originally taken from the
            coat of arms of Lombardy, the first money lenders in
            London having been Lombards.
  
      {Golden bull}. See under {Bull}, an edict.
  
      {Golden chain} (Bot.), the shrub {Cytisus Laburnum}, so named
            from its long clusters of yellow blossoms.
  
      {Golden club} (Bot.), an aquatic plant ({Orontium
            aquaticum}), bearing a thick spike of minute yellow
            flowers.
  
      {Golden cup} (Bot.), the buttercup.
  
      {Golden eagle} (Zo[94]l.), a large and powerful eagle
            ({Aquila Chrysa[89]tos}) inhabiting Europe, Asia, and
            North America. It is so called from the brownish yellow
            tips of the feathers on the head and neck. A dark variety
            is called the {royal eagle}; the young in the second year
            is the {ring-tailed eagle}.
  
      {Golden fleece}.
            (a) (Mythol.) The fleece of gold fabled to have been taken
                  from the ram that bore Phryxus through the air to
                  Colchis, and in quest of which Jason undertook the
                  Argonautic expedition.
            (b) (Her.) An order of knighthood instituted in 1429 by
                  Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy; -- called also
                  {Toison d'Or}.
  
      {Golden grease}, a bribe; a fee. [Slang]
  
      {Golden hair} (Bot.), a South African shrubby composite plant
            with golden yellow flowers, the {Chrysocoma Coma-aurea}.
           
  
      {Golden Horde} (Hist.), a tribe of Mongolian Tartars who
            overran and settled in Southern Russia early in the 18th
            century.
  
      {Golden Legend}, a hagiology (the [bd]Aurea Legenda[b8])
            written by James de Voragine, Archbishop of Genoa, in the
            13th century, translated and printed by Caxton in 1483,
            and partially paraphrased by Longfellow in a poem thus
            entitled.
  
      {Golden marcasite} tin. [Obs.]
  
      {Golden mean}, the way of wisdom and safety between extremes;
            sufficiency without excess; moderation.
  
                     Angels guard him in the golden mean.   --Pope.
  
      {Golden mole} (Zo[94]l), one of several South African
            Insectivora of the family {Chrysochlorid[91]}, resembling
            moles in form and habits. The fur is tinted with green,
            purple, and gold.
  
      {Golden number} (Chronol.), a number showing the year of the
            lunar or Metonic cycle. It is reckoned from 1 to 19, and
            is so called from having formerly been written in the
            calendar in gold.
  
      {Golden oriole}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Oriole}.
  
      {Golden pheasant}. See under {Pheasant}.
  
      {Golden pippin}, a kind of apple, of a bright yellow color.
           
  
      {Golden plover} (Zo[94]l.), one of several species of
            plovers, of the genus {Charadrius}, esp. the European ({C.
            apricarius, [or] pluvialis}; -- called also {yellow,
            black-breasted, hill, [and] whistling, plover}. The common
            American species ({C. dominicus}) is also called
            {frostbird}, and {bullhead}.
  
      {Golden robin}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Baltimore oriole}, in Vocab.
           
  
      {Golden rose} (R. C. Ch.), a gold or gilded rose blessed by
            the pope on the fourth Sunday in Lent, and sent to some
            church or person in recognition of special services
            rendered to the Holy See.
  
      {Golden rule}.
            (a) The rule of doing as we would have others do to us.
                  Cf. --Luke vi. 31.
            (b) The rule of proportion, or rule of three.
  
      {Golden samphire} (Bot.), a composite plant ({Inula
            crithmoides}), found on the seashore of Europe.
  
      {Golden saxifrage} (Bot.), a low herb with yellow flowers
            ({Chrysosplenium oppositifolium}), blossoming in wet
            places in early spring.
  
      {Golden seal} (Bot.), a perennial ranunculaceous herb
            ({Hydrastis Canadensis}), with a thick knotted rootstock
            and large rounded leaves.
  
      {Golden sulphide, [or] sulphuret}, {of antimony} (Chem.), the
            pentasulphide of antimony, a golden or orange yellow
            powder.
  
      {Golden warbler} (Zo[94]l.), a common American wood warbler
            ({Dendroica [91]stiva}); -- called also {blue-eyed yellow
            warbler}, {garden warbler}, and {summer yellow bird}.
  
      {Golden wasp} (Zo[94]l.), a bright-colored hymenopterous
            insect, of the family {Chrysidid[91]}. The colors are
            golden, blue, and green.
  
      {Golden wedding}. See under {Wedding}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\ (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin,
      jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G.
      garten; akin to AS. geard. See {Yard} an inclosure.]
      1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of
            herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables.
  
      2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country.
  
                     I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant
                     garden of great Italy.                        --Shak.
  
      Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining
               compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden
               walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse.
  
      {Garden balsam}, an ornamental plant ({Impatiens Balsamina}).
           
  
      {Garden engine}, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering
            gardens.
  
      {Garden glass}.
            (a) A bell glass for covering plants.
            (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal,
                  to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an
                  ornament in gardens in Germany.
  
      {Garden house}
            (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl.
            (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.]
  
      {Garden husbandry}, the raising on a small scale of seeds,
            fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale.
  
      {Garden} {mold [or] mould}, rich, mellow earth which is fit
            for a garden. --Mortimer.
  
      {Garden nail}, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick
            walls. --Knight.
  
      {Garden net}, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc.,
            to protect them from birds.
  
      {Garden party}, a social party held out of doors, within the
            grounds or garden attached to a private residence.
  
      {Garden plot}, a plot appropriated to a garden.
  
      {Garden pot}, a watering pot.
  
      {Garden pump}, a garden engine; a barrow pump.
  
      {Garden shears}, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges,
            pruning, etc.
  
      {Garden spider}, (Zo[94]l.), the diadem spider ({Epeira
            diadema}), common in gardens, both in Europe and America.
            It spins a geometrical web. See {Geometric spider}, and
            {Spider web}.
  
      {Garden stand}, a stand for flower pots.
  
      {Garden stuff}, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.]
  
      {Garden syringe}, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling
            them with solutions for destroying insects, etc.
  
      {Garden truck}, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.]
           
  
      {Garden ware}, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer.
  
      {Bear garden}, {Botanic garden}, etc. See under {Bear}, etc.
           
  
      {Hanging garden}. See under {Hanging}.
  
      {Kitchen garden}, a garden where vegetables are cultivated
            for household use.
  
      {Market garden}, a piece of ground where vegetable are
            cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gardened}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gardening}.]
      To lay out or cultivate a garden; to labor in a garden; to
      practice horticulture.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardener \Gar"den*er\, n.
      One who makes and tends a garden; a horticulturist.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Jasmine \Jas"mine\, n. [F. jasmin, Sp. jazmin, Ar. y[be]sm[c6]n,
      Pers. y[be]sm[c6]n; cf. It. gesmino, gelsomino. Cf.
      {Jessamine}.] (Bot.)
      A shrubby plant of the genus {Jasminum}, bearing flowers of a
      peculiarly fragrant odor. The {J. officinale}, common in the
      south of Europe, bears white flowers. The Arabian jasmine is
      {J. Sambac}, and, with {J. angustifolia}, comes from the East
      Indies. The yellow false jasmine in the {Gelseminum
      sempervirens} (see {Gelsemium}). Several other plants are
      called jasmine in the West Indies, as species of {Calotropis}
      and {Faramea}. [Written also {jessamine}.]
  
      {Cape jasmine}, or {Cape jessamine}, the {Gardenia florida},
            a shrub with fragrant white flowers, a native of China,
            and hardy in the Southern United States.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Crocin \Cro"cin\ (kr?"s?n), n. [Gr. [?][?][?][?] saffron.]
      (Chem.)
      (a) The coloring matter of Chinese yellow pods, the fruit of
            {Gardenia grandiflora}. --Watts.
      (b) A red powder (called also {polychroite}), which is made
            from the saffron ({Crocus sativus}). See {Polychroite}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garden \Gar"den\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gardened}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Gardening}.]
      To lay out or cultivate a garden; to labor in a garden; to
      practice horticulture.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardening \Gar"den*ing\, n.
      The art of occupation of laying out and cultivating gardens;
      horticulture.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardenless \Gar"den*less\, a.
      Destitute of a garden. --Shelley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardenly \Gar"den*ly\, a.
      Like a garden. [R.] --W. Marshall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardenship \Gar"den*ship\, n.
      Horticulture. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gun \Gun\, n. [OE. gonne, gunne; of uncertain origin; cf. Ir.,
      {Gael}.) A LL. gunna, W. gum; possibly (like cannon) fr. L.
      canna reed, tube; or abbreviated fr. OF. mangonnel, E.
      mangonel, a machine for hurling stones.]
      1. A weapon which throws or propels a missile to a distance;
            any firearm or instrument for throwing projectiles by the
            explosion of gunpowder, consisting of a tube or barrel
            closed at one end, in which the projectile is placed, with
            an explosive charge behind, which is ignited by various
            means. Muskets, rifles, carbines, and fowling pieces are
            smaller guns, for hand use, and are called {small arms}.
            Larger guns are called {cannon}, {ordnance},
            {fieldpieces}, {carronades}, {howitzers}, etc. See these
            terms in the Vocabulary.
  
                     As swift as a pellet out of a gunne When fire is in
                     the powder runne.                              --Chaucer.
  
                     The word gun was in use in England for an engine to
                     cast a thing from a man long before there was any
                     gunpowder found out.                           --Selden.
  
      2. (Mil.) A piece of heavy ordnance; in a restricted sense, a
            cannon.
  
      3. pl. (Naut.) Violent blasts of wind.
  
      Note: Guns are classified, according to their construction or
               manner of loading as {rifled} or {smoothbore},
               {breech-loading} or {muzzle-loading}, {cast} or
               {built-up guns}; or according to their use, as {field},
               {mountain}, {prairie}, {seacoast}, and {siege guns}.
  
      {Armstrong gun}, a wrought iron breech-loading cannon named
            after its English inventor, Sir William Armstrong.
  
      {Great gun}, a piece of heavy ordnance; hence (Fig.), a
            person superior in any way.
  
      {Gun barrel}, the barrel or tube of a gun.
  
      {Gun carriage}, the carriage on which a gun is mounted or
            moved.
  
      {Gun cotton} (Chem.), a general name for a series of
            explosive nitric ethers of cellulose, obtained by steeping
            cotton in nitric and sulphuric acids. Although there are
            formed substances containing nitric acid radicals, yet the
            results exactly resemble ordinary cotton in appearance. It
            burns without ash, with explosion if confined, but quietly
            and harmlessly if free and open, and in small quantity.
            Specifically, the lower nitrates of cellulose which are
            insoluble in ether and alcohol in distinction from the
            highest (pyroxylin) which is soluble. See {Pyroxylin}, and
            cf. {Xyloidin}. The gun cottons are used for blasting and
            somewhat in gunnery: for making celluloid when compounded
            with camphor; and the soluble variety (pyroxylin) for
            making collodion. See {Celluloid}, and {Collodion}. Gun
            cotton is frequenty but improperly called nitrocellulose.
            It is not a nitro compound, but an ethereal salt of nitric
            acid.
  
      {Gun deck}. See under {Deck}.
  
      {Gun fire}, the time at which the morning or the evening gun
            is fired.
  
      {Gun metal}, a bronze, ordinarily composed of nine parts of
            copper and one of tin, used for cannon, etc. The name is
            also given to certain strong mixtures of cast iron.
  
      {Gun port} (Naut.), an opening in a ship through which a
            cannon's muzzle is run out for firing.
  
      {Gun tackle} (Naut.), the blocks and pulleys affixed to the
            side of a ship, by which a gun carriage is run to and from
            the gun port.
  
      {Gun tackle purchase} (Naut.), a tackle composed of two
            single blocks and a fall. --Totten.
  
      {Krupp gun}, a wrought steel breech-loading cannon, named
            after its German inventor, Herr Krupp.
  
      {Machine gun}, a breech-loading gun or a group of such guns,
            mounted on a carriage or other holder, and having a
            reservoir containing cartridges which are loaded into the
            gun or guns and fired in rapid succession, sometimes in
            volleys, by machinery operated by turning a crank. Several
            hundred shots can be fired in a minute with accurate aim.
            The {Gatling gun}, {Gardner gun}, {Hotchkiss gun}, and
            {Nordenfelt gun}, named for their inventors, and the
            French {mitrailleuse}, are machine guns.
  
      {To blow great guns} (Naut.), to blow a gale. See {Gun}, n.,
            3.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gardon \Gar"don\, n. [F] (Zo[94]l.)
      A European cyprinoid fish; the id.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garreting \Gar"ret*ing\, n.
      Small splinters of stone inserted into the joints of coarse
      masonry. --Weale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Garrote \Gar*rote"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Garroted}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Garroting}.]
      To strangle with the garrote; hence, to seize by the throat,
      from behind, with a view to strangle and rob.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gird \Gird\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Girt}or {Girded}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Girding}.] [OE. girden, gurden, AS. gyrdan; akin to OS.
      gurdian, D. gorden, OHG. gurten, G. g[81]rten, Icel. gyr[?]a,
      Sw. gjorda, Dan. giorde, Goth. biga[a1]rdan to begird, and
      prob. to E. yard an inclosure. Cf. {Girth}, n. & v., {Girt},
      v. t.]
      1. To encircle or bind with any flexible band.
  
      2. To make fast, as clothing, by binding with a cord, girdle,
            bandage, etc.
  
      3. To surround; to encircle, or encompass.
  
                     That Nyseian isle, Girt with the River Triton.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      4. To clothe; to swathe; to invest.
  
                     I girded thee about with fine linen.   --Ezek. xvi.
                                                                              10.
  
                     The Son . . . appeared Girt with omnipotence.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      5. To prepare; to make ready; to equip; as, to gird one's
            self for a contest.
  
                     Thou hast girded me with strength.      --Ps. xviii.
                                                                              39.
  
      {To gird on}, to put on; to fasten around or to one securely,
            like a girdle; as, to gird on armor or a sword.
  
                     Let not him that girdeth on his harness boast
                     himself as he that putteth it off.      --1 Kings xx.
                                                                              11.
  
      {To gird up}, to bind tightly with a girdle; to support and
            strengthen, as with a girdle.
  
                     He girded up his loins, and ran before Ahab. --1
                                                                              Kings xviii.
                                                                              46.
  
                     Gird up the loins of your mind.         --1 Pet. i.
                                                                              13.
  
      {Girt up}; prepared or equipped, as for a journey or for
            work, in allusion to the ancient custom of gathering the
            long flowing garments into the girdle and tightening it
            before any exertion; hence, adjectively, eagerly or
            constantly active; strenuous; striving. [bd]A severer,
            more girt-up way of living.[b8] --J. C. Shairp.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Girding \Gird"ing\, n.
      That with which one is girded; a girdle.
  
               Instead of a stomacher, a girding of sackcloth. --Is.
                                                                              iii. 24.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Girt \Girt\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Girted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Girting}.] [From {Girt}, n., cf. {Girth}, v.]
      To gird; to encircle; to invest by means of a girdle; to
      measure the girth of; as, to girt a tree.
  
               We here create thee the first duke of Suffolk, And girt
               thee with the sword.                              --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gordian \Gor"di*an\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the Gordiacea.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gordian \Gor"di*an\, a.
      1. Pertaining to Gordius, king of Phrygia, or to a knot tied
            by him; hence, intricate; complicated; inextricable.
  
      {Gordian knot}, an intricate knot tied by Gordius in the
            thong which connected the pole of the chariot with the
            yoke. An oracle having declared that he who should untie
            it should be master of Asia, Alexander the Great averted
            the ill omen of his inability to loosen it by cutting it
            with his sword. Hence, a Gordian knot is an inextricable
            difficulty; and to cut the Gordian knot is to remove a
            difficulty by bold and energetic measures.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Pertaining to the Gordiacea.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gordian \Gor"di*an\, a.
      1. Pertaining to Gordius, king of Phrygia, or to a knot tied
            by him; hence, intricate; complicated; inextricable.
  
      {Gordian knot}, an intricate knot tied by Gordius in the
            thong which connected the pole of the chariot with the
            yoke. An oracle having declared that he who should untie
            it should be master of Asia, Alexander the Great averted
            the ill omen of his inability to loosen it by cutting it
            with his sword. Hence, a Gordian knot is an inextricable
            difficulty; and to cut the Gordian knot is to remove a
            difficulty by bold and energetic measures.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Pertaining to the Gordiacea.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodwood \Blood"wood\, n. (Bot.)
      A tree having the wood or the sap of the color of blood.
  
      Note: Norfolk Island bloodwood is a euphorbiaceous tree
               ({Baloghia lucida}), from which the sap is collected
               for use as a plant. Various other trees have the name,
               chiefly on account of the color of the wood, as
               {Gordonia H[91]matoxylon} of Jamaica, and several
               species of Australian {Eucalyptus}; also the true
               logwood ({ H[91]matoxylon campechianum}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stalk \Stalk\, n. [OE. stalke, fr. AS. st[91]l, stel, a stalk.
      See {Stale} a handle, {Stall}.]
      1. (Bot.)
            (a) The stem or main axis of a plant; as, a stalk of
                  wheat, rye, or oats; the stalks of maize or hemp.
            (b) The petiole, pedicel, or peduncle, of a plant.
  
      2. That which resembes the stalk of a plant, as the stem of a
            quill. --Grew.
  
      3. (Arch.) An ornament in the Corinthian capital resembling
            the stalk of a plant, from which the volutes and helices
            spring.
  
      4. One of the two upright pieces of a ladder. [Obs.]
  
                     To climd by the rungs and the stalks. --Chaucer.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) A stem or peduncle, as of certain barnacles and
                  crinoids.
            (b) The narrow basal portion of the abdomen of a
                  hymenopterous insect.
            (c) The peduncle of the eyes of decapod crustaceans.
  
      6. (Founding) An iron bar with projections inserted in a core
            to strengthen it; a core arbor.
  
      {Stalk borer} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of a noctuid moth
            ({Gortyna nitela}), which bores in the stalks of the
            raspberry, strawberry, tomato, asters, and many other
            garden plants, often doing much injury.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gourdiness \Gourd"i*ness\, n. [From {Gourdy}.] (Far.)
      The state of being gourdy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gradient \Gra"di*ent\, a. [L. gradiens, p. pr. of gradi to step,
      to go. See {Grade}.]
      1. Moving by steps; walking; as, gradient automata.
            --Wilkins.
  
      2. Rising or descending by regular degrees of inclination;
            as, the gradient line of a railroad.
  
      3. Adapted for walking, as the feet of certain birds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gradient \Gra"di*ent\, n.
      1. The rate of regular or graded ascent or descent in a road;
            grade.
  
      2. A part of a road which slopes upward or downward; a
            portion of a way not level; a grade.
  
      3. The rate of increase or decrease of a variable magnitude,
            or the curve which represents it; as, a thermometric
            gradient.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Gradient post}, a post or stake indicating by its height or
            by marks on it the grade of a railroad, highway, or
            embankment, etc., at that spot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gradin \[d8]Gra"din\, Gradine \Gra*dine"\,n. [F. gradin, dim.
      of grade. See {Grade}.] (Arch.)
      Any member like a step, as the raised back of an altar or the
      like; a set raised over another. [bd]The gradines of the
      amphitheeater.[b8] --Layard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gradine \Gra*dine"\, n. [F. gradine.]
      A toothed chised by sculptors.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grade \Grade\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Graded}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Grading}.]
      1. To arrange in order, steps, or degrees, according to size,
            quality, rank, etc.
  
      2. To reduce to a level, or to an evenly progressive ascent,
            as the line of a canal or road.
  
      3. (Stock Breeding) To cross with some better breed; to
            improve the blood of.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grading \Grad"ing\, n.
      The act or method of arranging in or by grade, or of
      bringing, as the surface of land or a road, to the desired
      level or grade.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gradino \[d8]Gra*di"no\, n.; pl. {Gradinos}. [It.] (Arch.)
      A step or raised shelf, as above a sideboard or altar. Cf.
      {Superaltar}, and {Gradin}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gratinate \Grat"i*nate\, v. t. [F. gratiner, v.i., to form a
      crust.] (Cookery)
      To cook, as macaroni, in a savory juice or sauce until juice
      is absorbed and a crisp surface forms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grating \Grat"ing\, n. (Optics)
      A system of close equidistant parallel lines or bars, esp.
      lines ruled on a polished surface, used for producing spectra
      by diffraction. Gratings have been made with over 40,000 such
      lines to the inch, but those with a somewhat smaller number
      give the best definition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grate \Grate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Grated}; p. pr. &. vb. n.
      {Grating}.]
      To furnish with grates; to protect with a grating or
      crossbars; as, to grate a window.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grating \Grat"ing\, n. [See 2d Grate.]
      1. A partition, covering, or frame of parallel or cross bars;
            a latticework resembling a window grate; as, the grating
            of a prison or convent.
  
      2. (Optics) A system of close equidistant and parallel lines
            lines or bars, especially lines ruled on a polished
            surface, used for producing spectra by diffraction; --
            called also {diffraction grating}.
  
      3. pl. (Naut.) The strong wooden lattice used to cover a
            hatch, admitting light and air; also, a movable Lattice
            used for the flooring of boats. [1913 Webster]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grating \Grat"ing\, a. [See {Grate} to rub harshy.]
      That grates; making a harsh sound; harsh. -- {Grat"ing*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grating \Grat"ing\, n.
      A harsh sound caused by attrition.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grating \Grat"ing\, a. [See {Grate} to rub harshy.]
      That grates; making a harsh sound; harsh. -- {Grat"ing*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      4. Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short;
            as, after a small space. --Shak.
  
      5. Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud. [bd]A still,
            small voice.[b8] --1 Kings xix. 12.
  
      {Great and small},of all ranks or degrees; -- used especially
            of persons. [bd]His quests, great and small.[b8]
            --Chaucer.
  
      {Small arms}, muskets, rifles, pistols, etc., in distinction
            from cannon.
  
      {Small beer}. See under {Beer}.
  
      {Small coal}.
            (a) Little coals of wood formerly used to light fires.
                  --Gay.
            (b) Coal about the size of a hazelnut, separated from the
                  coarser parts by screening.
  
      {Small craft} (Naut.), a vessel, or vessels in general, of a
            small size.
  
      {Small fruits}. See under {Fruit}.
  
      {Small hand}, a certain size of paper. See under {Paper}.
  
      {Small hours}. See under {Hour}.
  
      {Small letter}. (Print.), a lower-case letter. See
            {Lower-case}, and {Capital letter}, under {Capital}, a.
  
      {Small piece}, a Scotch coin worth about 2[frac14]d.
            sterling, or about 4[frac12]cents.
  
      {Small register}. See the Note under 1st {Register}, 7.
  
      {Small stuff} (Naut.), spun yarn, marline, and the smallest
            kinds of rope. --R. H. Dana, Jr.
  
      {Small talk}, light or trifling conversation; chitchat.
  
      {Small wares} (Com.), various small textile articles, as
            tapes, braid, tringe, and the like. --M[bf]Culloch.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dane \Dane\, n. [LL. Dani: cf. AS. Dene.]
      A native, or a naturalized inhabitant, of Denmark.
  
      {Great Dane}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Danish dog}, under {Danish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Danish \Dan"ish\, a. [See {Dane}.]
      Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country. --
      n. The language of the Danes.
  
      {Danish dog} (Zo[94]l.), one of a large and powerful breed of
            dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also {great Dane}. See
            Illustration in Appendix.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dane \Dane\, n. [LL. Dani: cf. AS. Dene.]
      A native, or a naturalized inhabitant, of Denmark.
  
      {Great Dane}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Danish dog}, under {Danish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Danish \Dan"ish\, a. [See {Dane}.]
      Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country. --
      n. The language of the Danes.
  
      {Danish dog} (Zo[94]l.), one of a large and powerful breed of
            dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also {great Dane}. See
            Illustration in Appendix.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bird of paradise \Bird" of par"a*dise\ (Zo[94]l.)
      The name of several very beautiful birds of the genus
      {Paradisea} and allied genera, inhabiting New Guinea and the
      adjacent islands. The males have brilliant colors, elegant
      plumes, and often remarkable tail feathers.
  
      Note: The {Great emerald} ({Paradisea apoda}) and the {Lesser
               emerald} ({P. minor}) furnish many of the plumes used
               as ornaments by ladies; the Red is {P. rubra [or]
               sanguinea}; the Golden is {Parotia aurea [or]
               sexsetacea}; the King is {Cincinnurus regius}. The name
               is also applied to the longer-billed birds of another
               related group ({Epimachin[91]}) from the same region.
               The Twelve-wired ({Seleucides alba}) is one of these.
               See {Paradise bird}, and Note under {Apod}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Great \Great\, a. [Compar. {Greater}; superl. {Greatest}.] [OE.
      gret, great, AS. gre[aacute]t; akin to OS. & LG. gr[omac]t,
      D. groot, OHG. gr[omac]z, G. gross. Cf. {Groat} the coin.]
      1. Large in space; of much size; big; immense; enormous;
            expanded; -- opposed to small and little; as, a great
            house, ship, farm, plain, distance, length.
  
      2. Large in number; numerous; as, a great company, multitude,
            series, etc.
  
      3. Long continued; lengthened in duration; prolonged in time;
            as, a great while; a great interval.
  
      4. Superior; admirable; commanding; -- applied to thoughts,
            actions, and feelings.
  
      5. Endowed with extraordinary powers; uncommonly gifted; able
            to accomplish vast results; strong; powerful; mighty;
            noble; as, a great hero, scholar, genius, philosopher,
            etc.
  
      6. Holding a chief position; elevated: lofty: eminent;
            distingushed; foremost; principal; as, great men; the
            great seal; the great marshal, etc.
  
                     He doth object I am too great of birth. --Shak.
  
      7. Entitled to earnest consideration; weighty; important; as,
            a great argument, truth, or principle.
  
      8. Pregnant; big (with young).
  
                     The ewes great with young.                  --Ps. lxxviii.
                                                                              71.
  
      9. More than ordinary in degree; very considerable in degree;
            as, to use great caution; to be in great pain.
  
                     We have all Great cause to give great thanks.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      10. (Genealogy) Older, younger, or more remote, by single
            generation; -- often used before grand to indicate one
            degree more remote in the direct line of descent; as,
            great-grandfather (a grandfather's or a grandmother's
            father), great-grandson, etc.
  
      {Great bear} (Astron.), the constellation Ursa Major.
  
      {Great cattle} (Law), all manner of cattle except sheep and
            yearlings. --Wharton.
  
      {Great charter} (Eng. Hist.), Magna Charta.
  
      {Great circle of a sphere}, a circle the plane of which
            passes through the center of the sphere.
  
      {Great circle sailing}, the process or art of conducting a
            ship on a great circle of the globe or on the shortest arc
            between two places.
  
      {Great go}, the final examination for a degree at the
            University of Oxford, England; -- called also {greats}.
            --T. Hughes.
  
      {Great guns}. (Naut.) See under Gun.
  
      {The Great Lakes} the large fresh-water lakes (Lakes
            Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario) which lie on
            the northern borders of the United States.
  
      {Great master}. Same as {Grand master}, under {Grand}.
  
      {Great organ} (Mus.), the largest and loudest of the three
            parts of a grand organ (the others being the choir organ
            and the swell, and sometimes the pedal organ or foot
            keys), It is played upon by a separate keyboard, which has
            the middle position.
  
      {The great powers} (of Europe), in modern diplomacy, Great
            Britain, France, Germany, Austria, Russia, and Italy.
  
      {Great primer}. See under {Type}.
  
      {Great scale} (Mus.), the complete scale; -- employed to
            designate the entire series of musical sounds from lowest
            to highest.
  
      {Great sea}, the Mediterranean sea. In Chaucer both the Black
            and the Mediterranean seas are so called.
  
      {Great seal}.
            (a) The principal seal of a kingdom or state.
            (b) In Great Britain, the lord chancellor (who is
                  custodian of this seal); also, his office.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mind \Mind\, n. [AS. mynd, gemynd; akin to OHG. minna memory,
      love, G. minne love, Dan. minde mind, memory, remembrance,
      consent, vote, Sw. minne memory, Icel. minni, Goth. gamunds,
      L. mens, mentis, mind, Gr. [?], Skr. manas mind, man to
      think. [?][?][?][?], [?][?][?]. Cf. {Comment}, {Man}, {Mean},
      v., 3d {Mental}, {Mignonette}, {Minion}, {Mnemonic},
      {Money}.]
      1. The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the
            understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives,
            judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the
            soul; -- often in distinction from the body.
  
                     By the mind of man we understand that in him which
                     thinks, remembers, reasons, wills.      --Reid.
  
                     What we mean by mind is simply that which perceives,
                     thinks, feels, wills, and desires.      --Sir W.
                                                                              Hamilton.
  
                     Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.
                                                                              --Rom. xiv. 5.
  
                     The mind shall banquet, though the body pine.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. The state, at any given time, of the faculties of
            thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical
            activity or state; as:
            (a) Opinion; judgment; belief.
  
                           A fool uttereth all his mind.      --Prov. xxix.
                                                                              11.
  
                           Being so hard to me that brought your mind, I
                           fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling her
                           mind.                                          --Shak.
            (b) Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.
  
                           If it be your minds, then let none go forth. --2
                                                                              Kings ix. 15.
            (c) Courage; spirit. --Chapman.
  
      3. Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in
            mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc.
  
      {To have a mind} [or] {great mind}, to be inclined or
            strongly inclined in purpose; -- used with an infinitive.
            [bd]Sir Roger de Coverly . . . told me that he had a great
            mind to see the new tragedy with me.[b8] --Addison.
  
      {To lose one's mind}, to become insane, or imbecile.
  
      {To make up one's mind}, to come to an opinion or decision;
            to determine.
  
      {To put in mind}, to remind. [bd]Regard us simply as putting
            you in mind of what you already know to be good
            policy.[b8] --Jowett (Thucyd. ).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Morel \Mor"el\, n. [See {Morelle}.] (Bot.)
      1. Nightshade; -- so called from its blackish purple berries.
            [Written also {morelle}.]
  
      2. A kind of cherry. See {Morello}.
  
      {Great morel}, the deadly nightshade.
  
      {Petty morel}, the black nightshade. See {Nightshade}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wanderoo \Wan`der*oo"\, n. [Cingalese wanderu a monkey.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A large monkey ({Macacus silenus}) native of Malabar. It is
      black, or nearly so, but has a long white or gray beard
      encircling the face. Called also {maha}, {silenus},
      {neelbhunder}, {lion-tailed baboon}, and {great wanderoo}.
      [Written also {ouanderoo}.]
  
      Note: The name is sometimes applied also to other allied
               species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greaten \Great"en\, v. t.
      To make great; to aggrandize; to cause to increase in size;
      to expand. [R.]
  
               A minister's [business] is to greaten and exalt [his
               king].                                                   --Ken.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greaten \Great"en\, v. i.
      To become large; to dilate. [R.]
  
               My blue eyes greatening in the looking-glass. --Mrs.
                                                                              Browning.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greatness \Great"ness\, n. [AS. gre[a0]tnes.]
      1. The state, condition, or quality of being great; as,
            greatness of size, greatness of mind, power, etc.
  
      2. Pride; haughtiness. [Obs.]
  
                     It is not of pride or greatness that he cometh not
                     aboard your ships.                              --Bacon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greediness \Greed"i*ness\, n. [AS gr[aemac]dignes.]
      The quality of being greedy; vehement and selfish desire.
  
               Fox in stealth, wolf in greediness.         --Shak.
  
      Syn: Ravenousness; voracity; eagerness; avidity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greet \Greet\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Greeted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Greeting}.] [OE. greten, AS. gr[emac]tan to address,
      approach; akin to OS. gr[omac]tian, LG. gr[94]ten, D.
      groeten, OHG. gruozzen, G. gr[81]ssen. [root]50.]
      1. To address with salutations or expressions of kind wishes;
            to salute; to hail; to welcome; to accost with friendship;
            to pay respects or compliments to, either personally or
            through the intervention of another, or by writing or
            token.
  
                     My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To come upon, or meet, as with something that makes the
            heart glad.
  
                     In vain the spring my senses greets.   --Addison.
  
      3. To accost; to address. --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Greeting \Greet"ing\, n.
      Expression of kindness or joy; salutation at meeting; a
      compliment from one absent.
  
               Write to him . . . gentle adieus and greetings. --Shak.
  
      Syn: Salutation; salute; compliment.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gride \Gride\, e. i. [imp. & p. p. {Grided}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Griding}.] [For gird, properly, to strike with a rod. See
      {Yard} a measure, and cf. {Grid} to strike, sneer.]
      To cut with a grating sound; to cut; to penetrate or pierce
      harshly; as, the griding sword. --Milton.
  
               That through his thigh the mortal steel did gride.
                                                                              --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grittiness \Grit"ti*ness\ (-t[icr]*n[ecr]s), n.
      The quality of being gritty.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grit \Grit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gritted}; p. pr. &, vb. n.
      {Gritting}.]
      To grind; to rub harshly together; to grate; as, to grit the
      teeth. [Collog.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grout \Grout\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Grouted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Grouting}.]
      To fill up or finish with grout, as the joints between
      stones.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grouting \Grout"ing\, n.
      The process of filling in or finishing with grout; also, the
      grout thus filled in. --Gwilt.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Groutnol \Grout"nol\, n. [See {Groat}, and {Noll}, n.] [Obs.]
      Same as {Growthead.} --Beau. & Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardant \Guard"ant\, a. [OF. guardant, p. pr. of guard[?]. See
      {Guard}, v. t.]
      1. Acting as guardian. [Obs.] --Shak.
  
      2. (Her.) Same as {Gardant}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardant \Guard"ant\, n.
      A guardian. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardenage \Guard"en*age\, n.
      Guardianship. [Obs. & R.] [bd] His tuition and
      guardenage.[b8] --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, n. [OF. guardain, gardien, F. gardien,
      LL. guardianus. See {Guard}, v. t., and cf. {Wasden}.]
      1. One who guards, preserves, or secures; one to whom any
            person or thing is committed for protection, security, or
            preservation from injury; a warden.
  
      2. (Law) One who has, or is entitled to, the custody of the
            person or property of an infant, a minor without living
            parents, or a person incapable of managing his own
            affairs.
  
                     Of the several species of guardians, the first are
                     guardians by nature. -- viz., the father and (in
                     some cases) the mother of the child.   --Blockstone.
  
      {Guardian ad litem}(Law), a guardian appointed by a court of
            justice to conduct a particular suit.
  
      {Guardians of the poor}, the members of a board appointed or
            elected to care for the relief of the poor within a
            township, or district.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, a.
      Performing, or appropriate to, the office of a protector; as,
      a guardian care.
  
      {Feast of Guardian Angels} (R. C. Ch.) a church festival
            instituted by Pope Paul V., and celebrated on October 2d.
           
  
      {Guardian angel}.
      (a) The particular spiritual being believed in some branches
            of the Christian church to have guardianship and
            protection of each human being from birth.
      (b) Hence, a protector or defender in general. --O. W.
            Holmes.
  
      {Guardian spirit}, in the belief of many pagan nations, a
            spirit, often of a deceased relative or friend, that
            presides over the interests of a household, a city, or a
            region.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, n. [OF. guardain, gardien, F. gardien,
      LL. guardianus. See {Guard}, v. t., and cf. {Wasden}.]
      1. One who guards, preserves, or secures; one to whom any
            person or thing is committed for protection, security, or
            preservation from injury; a warden.
  
      2. (Law) One who has, or is entitled to, the custody of the
            person or property of an infant, a minor without living
            parents, or a person incapable of managing his own
            affairs.
  
                     Of the several species of guardians, the first are
                     guardians by nature. -- viz., the father and (in
                     some cases) the mother of the child.   --Blockstone.
  
      {Guardian ad litem}(Law), a guardian appointed by a court of
            justice to conduct a particular suit.
  
      {Guardians of the poor}, the members of a board appointed or
            elected to care for the relief of the poor within a
            township, or district.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, a.
      Performing, or appropriate to, the office of a protector; as,
      a guardian care.
  
      {Feast of Guardian Angels} (R. C. Ch.) a church festival
            instituted by Pope Paul V., and celebrated on October 2d.
           
  
      {Guardian angel}.
      (a) The particular spiritual being believed in some branches
            of the Christian church to have guardianship and
            protection of each human being from birth.
      (b) Hence, a protector or defender in general. --O. W.
            Holmes.
  
      {Guardian spirit}, in the belief of many pagan nations, a
            spirit, often of a deceased relative or friend, that
            presides over the interests of a household, a city, or a
            region.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, a.
      Performing, or appropriate to, the office of a protector; as,
      a guardian care.
  
      {Feast of Guardian Angels} (R. C. Ch.) a church festival
            instituted by Pope Paul V., and celebrated on October 2d.
           
  
      {Guardian angel}.
      (a) The particular spiritual being believed in some branches
            of the Christian church to have guardianship and
            protection of each human being from birth.
      (b) Hence, a protector or defender in general. --O. W.
            Holmes.
  
      {Guardian spirit}, in the belief of many pagan nations, a
            spirit, often of a deceased relative or friend, that
            presides over the interests of a household, a city, or a
            region.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardianage \Guard"i*an*age\, n.
      Guardianship. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardiance \Guard"i*ance\, n.
      Guardianship. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardianess \Guard"i*an*ess\, n.
      A female guardian.
  
               I have placed a trusty, watchful guardianess. --Beau. &
                                                                              Fl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardianless \Guard"i*an*less\, a.
      Without a guardian. --Marston.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardian \Guard"i*an\, n. [OF. guardain, gardien, F. gardien,
      LL. guardianus. See {Guard}, v. t., and cf. {Wasden}.]
      1. One who guards, preserves, or secures; one to whom any
            person or thing is committed for protection, security, or
            preservation from injury; a warden.
  
      2. (Law) One who has, or is entitled to, the custody of the
            person or property of an infant, a minor without living
            parents, or a person incapable of managing his own
            affairs.
  
                     Of the several species of guardians, the first are
                     guardians by nature. -- viz., the father and (in
                     some cases) the mother of the child.   --Blockstone.
  
      {Guardian ad litem}(Law), a guardian appointed by a court of
            justice to conduct a particular suit.
  
      {Guardians of the poor}, the members of a board appointed or
            elected to care for the relief of the poor within a
            township, or district.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guardianship \Guard"i*an*ship\, n.
      The office, duty, or care, of a guardian; protection; care;
      watch.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guerdon \Guer"don\, n. [OF. guerdon, guerredon, LL. widerdonum
      (influenced by L. donum gift, cf. {Donation} ), fr. OHG.
      widarl[omac]n; widar again, against (G. wider wieder) +
      l[omac]n reward, G. lohn, akin to AS. le[a0]n Goth. laun. See
      {Withers}.]
      A reward; requital; recompense; -- used in both a good and a
      bad sense. --Macaulay.
  
               So young as to regard men's frown or smile As loss or
               guerdon of a glorious lot.                     --Byron.
  
               He shall, by thy revenging hand, at once receive the
               just guerdon of all his former villainies. --Knolles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guerdon \Guer"don\, v. t. [OF. guerdonner, guerredonner. See
      {Guerdon}, n.]
      To give guerdon to; to reward; to be a recompense for. [R.]
  
               Him we gave a costly bribe To guerdon silence.
                                                                              --Tennyson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guerdonable \Guer"don*a*ble\, a. [Cf. OF. guerredonable.]
      Worthy of reward. --Sir G. Buck.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guerdonless \Guer"don*less\, a.
      Without reward or guerdon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Guard \Guard\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Guarded}; p. pr. &, vb. n.
      {Gurding}.] [OF. guarder, garder, warder, F. garder, fr. OHG.
      wart[?]n to be on the watch, await, G. marten. See {Ward}, v.
      & n., and cf. {Guard}, n.]
      1. To protect from danger; to secure against surprise,
            attack, or injury; to keep in safety; to defend; to
            shelter; to shield from surprise or attack; to protect by
            attendance; to accompany for protection; to care for.
  
                     For Heaven still guards the right.      --Shak.
  
      2. To keep watch over, in order to prevent escape or restrain
            from acts of violence, or the like.
  
      3. To protect the edge of, esp. with an ornamental border;
            hence, to face or ornament with lists, laces, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gyrate \Gy"rate\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gyrated}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Gyrating}.] [L. gyratus, p. p. of gyrare to gyrate. See
      {Gyre}, n.]
      To revolve round a central point; to move spirally about an
      axis, as a tornado; to revolve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gyration \Gy*ra"tion\, n.
      1. The act of turning or whirling, as around a fixed center;
            a circular or spiral motion; motion about an axis;
            rotation; revolution.
  
                     The gyrations of an ascending balloon. --De Quincey.
  
                     If a burning coal be nimbly moved round in a circle,
                     with gyrations continually repeated, the whole
                     circle will appear like fire.            --Sir I.
                                                                              Newton.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) One of the whorls of a spiral univalve shell.
  
      {Center of gyration}. (Mech.) See under {Center}.
  
      {Radius of gyration} the distance between the axis of a
            rotating body and its center of gyration. --Rankine.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden, MI (village, FIPS 31380)
      Location: 45.77530 N, 86.55245 W
      Population (1990): 268 (138 housing units)
      Area: 2.2 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49835

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Acres, CA (CDP, FIPS 28182)
      Location: 37.96390 N, 121.22832 W
      Population (1990): 8547 (2816 housing units)
      Area: 6.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden City, AL (town, FIPS 29032)
      Location: 34.01478 N, 86.75008 W
      Population (1990): 578 (243 housing units)
      Area: 5.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Garden City, CO (town, FIPS 29185)
      Location: 40.39395 N, 104.68873 W
      Population (1990): 199 (88 housing units)
      Area: 0.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 80631
   Garden City, GA (city, FIPS 32048)
      Location: 32.10348 N, 81.16286 W
      Population (1990): 7410 (3129 housing units)
      Area: 13.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 31408
   Garden City, IA
      Zip code(s): 50102
   Garden City, ID (city, FIPS 29620)
      Location: 43.64847 N, 116.26701 W
      Population (1990): 6369 (2724 housing units)
      Area: 8.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 83714
   Garden City, KS (city, FIPS 25325)
      Location: 37.97711 N, 100.86284 W
      Population (1990): 24097 (8583 housing units)
      Area: 19.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67846
   Garden City, MI (city, FIPS 31420)
      Location: 42.32380 N, 83.34239 W
      Population (1990): 31846 (11374 housing units)
      Area: 15.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 48135
   Garden City, MN
      Zip code(s): 56034
   Garden City, MO (city, FIPS 26434)
      Location: 38.56082 N, 94.18837 W
      Population (1990): 1225 (516 housing units)
      Area: 3.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 64747
   Garden City, NY (village, FIPS 28178)
      Location: 40.72590 N, 73.64455 W
      Population (1990): 21686 (7716 housing units)
      Area: 13.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 11530
   Garden City, SC (CDP, FIPS 28455)
      Location: 33.59265 N, 79.00897 W
      Population (1990): 6305 (6821 housing units)
      Area: 13.8 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
   Garden City, SD (town, FIPS 23460)
      Location: 44.95791 N, 97.58071 W
      Population (1990): 93 (57 housing units)
      Area: 1.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 57236
   Garden City, TX
      Zip code(s): 79739
   Garden City, UT (town, FIPS 27930)
      Location: 41.93411 N, 111.40969 W
      Population (1990): 193 (415 housing units)
      Area: 10.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 84028

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden City Park, NY (CDP, FIPS 28189)
      Location: 40.74443 N, 73.66352 W
      Population (1990): 7437 (2533 housing units)
      Area: 2.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden City South, NY (CDP, FIPS 28200)
      Location: 40.71120 N, 73.66063 W
      Population (1990): 4073 (1437 housing units)
      Area: 1.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden County, NE (county, FIPS 69)
      Location: 41.62204 N, 102.34351 W
      Population (1990): 2460 (1343 housing units)
      Area: 4414.8 sq km (land), 68.9 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Grove, CA (city, FIPS 29000)
      Location: 33.77875 N, 117.95937 W
      Population (1990): 143050 (45984 housing units)
      Area: 46.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 92640, 92641, 92643, 92644, 92645
   Garden Grove, IA (city, FIPS 29775)
      Location: 40.82648 N, 93.60752 W
      Population (1990): 229 (120 housing units)
      Area: 1.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 50103

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Home, OR
      Zip code(s): 97223

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Home-Whitford, OR (CDP, FIPS 27825)
      Location: 45.46513 N, 122.75683 W
      Population (1990): 6652 (2717 housing units)
      Area: 5.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Plain, KS (city, FIPS 25375)
      Location: 37.66110 N, 97.68156 W
      Population (1990): 731 (251 housing units)
      Area: 1.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67050

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Prairie, IL
      Zip code(s): 61038

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Ridge, TX (city, FIPS 28248)
      Location: 29.63470 N, 98.29363 W
      Population (1990): 1450 (521 housing units)
      Area: 18.4 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 78266

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden Valley, CA
      Zip code(s): 95633
   Garden Valley, ID
      Zip code(s): 83622

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Garden View, PA (CDP, FIPS 28456)
      Location: 41.25650 N, 77.04870 W
      Population (1990): 2687 (1159 housing units)
      Area: 2.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardena, CA (city, FIPS 28168)
      Location: 33.89360 N, 118.30485 W
      Population (1990): 49847 (19037 housing units)
      Area: 13.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 90247, 90248, 90249
   Gardena, ND (city, FIPS 29180)
      Location: 48.70098 N, 100.49808 W
      Population (1990): 41 (28 housing units)
      Area: 0.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 58739

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardendale, AL (city, FIPS 29056)
      Location: 33.66522 N, 86.80056 W
      Population (1990): 9251 (3682 housing units)
      Area: 39.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 35071
   Gardendale, TX (CDP, FIPS 28200)
      Location: 32.02040 N, 102.36134 W
      Population (1990): 1103 (424 housing units)
      Area: 18.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 79758

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardiner, ME (city, FIPS 27085)
      Location: 44.19067 N, 69.78923 W
      Population (1990): 6746 (2705 housing units)
      Area: 40.6 sq km (land), 2.5 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 04345
   Gardiner, MT
      Zip code(s): 59030
   Gardiner, NY
      Zip code(s): 12525
   Gardiner, OR
      Zip code(s): 97441

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardner, IL (village, FIPS 28638)
      Location: 41.18773 N, 88.31216 W
      Population (1990): 1237 (537 housing units)
      Area: 2.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 60424
   Gardner, KS (city, FIPS 25425)
      Location: 38.81230 N, 94.92586 W
      Population (1990): 3191 (1251 housing units)
      Area: 7.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 66030
   Gardner, MA (city, FIPS 25485)
      Location: 42.58413 N, 71.98622 W
      Population (1990): 20125 (8654 housing units)
      Area: 57.5 sq km (land), 2.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 01440
   Gardner, ND (city, FIPS 29220)
      Location: 47.14340 N, 96.96883 W
      Population (1990): 85 (42 housing units)
      Area: 1.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 58036

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardners, PA
      Zip code(s): 17324

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardnertown, NY (CDP, FIPS 28310)
      Location: 41.53405 N, 74.05995 W
      Population (1990): 4209 (1565 housing units)
      Area: 12.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardnerville, NV (CDP, FIPS 26300)
      Location: 38.93929 N, 119.73585 W
      Population (1990): 2177 (1051 housing units)
      Area: 11.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 89410

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gardnerville Ranchos, NV (CDP, FIPS 26500)
      Location: 38.88822 N, 119.74018 W
      Population (1990): 7455 (2810 housing units)
      Area: 38.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gerton, NC
      Zip code(s): 28735

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gordon, AL (town, FIPS 30760)
      Location: 31.14564 N, 85.09435 W
      Population (1990): 493 (188 housing units)
      Area: 8.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 36343
   Gordon, GA (city, FIPS 33980)
      Location: 32.88570 N, 83.33547 W
      Population (1990): 2468 (966 housing units)
      Area: 14.0 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
   Gordon, NE (city, FIPS 19350)
      Location: 42.80633 N, 102.20363 W
      Population (1990): 1803 (905 housing units)
      Area: 2.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 69343
   Gordon, OH (village, FIPS 30912)
      Location: 39.92991 N, 84.50858 W
      Population (1990): 206 (73 housing units)
      Area: 0.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Gordon, PA (borough, FIPS 30128)
      Location: 40.75035 N, 76.34057 W
      Population (1990): 768 (337 housing units)
      Area: 1.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Gordon, TX (city, FIPS 30272)
      Location: 32.54585 N, 98.36580 W
      Population (1990): 465 (242 housing units)
      Area: 2.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 76453
   Gordon, WI
      Zip code(s): 54838
   Gordon, WV
      Zip code(s): 25093

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gordon County, GA (county, FIPS 129)
      Location: 34.50423 N, 84.87158 W
      Population (1990): 35072 (13777 housing units)
      Area: 919.8 sq km (land), 6.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gordonsville, TN (town, FIPS 30120)
      Location: 36.18306 N, 85.93263 W
      Population (1990): 891 (372 housing units)
      Area: 15.7 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 38563
   Gordonsville, VA (town, FIPS 31936)
      Location: 38.13662 N, 78.18811 W
      Population (1990): 1351 (552 housing units)
      Area: 1.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gordonville, MO (town, FIPS 27928)
      Location: 37.31038 N, 89.67304 W
      Population (1990): 345 (126 housing units)
      Area: 2.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Gordonville, PA
      Zip code(s): 17529
   Gordonville, TX
      Zip code(s): 76245

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Graettinger, IA (city, FIPS 31800)
      Location: 43.23639 N, 94.75097 W
      Population (1990): 813 (407 housing units)
      Area: 1.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 51342

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Graton, CA (CDP, FIPS 30812)
      Location: 38.43770 N, 122.86527 W
      Population (1990): 1409 (572 housing units)
      Area: 4.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 95444

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Meadows, NJ
      Zip code(s): 07838

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Meadows-Vienna, NJ (CDP, FIPS 27366)
      Location: 40.87075 N, 74.88981 W
      Population (1990): 1108 (384 housing units)
      Area: 10.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Mills, MD
      Zip code(s): 20634

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Neck, NY (village, FIPS 30169)
      Location: 40.80235 N, 73.73337 W
      Population (1990): 8745 (3450 housing units)
      Area: 3.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 11020, 11021, 11023

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Neck Estates, NY (village, FIPS 30191)
      Location: 40.78495 N, 73.73912 W
      Population (1990): 2790 (963 housing units)
      Area: 2.0 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Great Neck Plaza, NY (village, FIPS 30213)
      Location: 40.78687 N, 73.72647 W
      Population (1990): 5897 (3612 housing units)
      Area: 0.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gretna, FL (city, FIPS 27650)
      Location: 30.61411 N, 84.66216 W
      Population (1990): 1981 (531 housing units)
      Area: 4.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
   Gretna, LA (city, FIPS 31915)
      Location: 29.91397 N, 90.05250 W
      Population (1990): 17208 (7987 housing units)
      Area: 9.1 sq km (land), 0.9 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 70053
   Gretna, NE (city, FIPS 20260)
      Location: 41.14071 N, 96.24363 W
      Population (1990): 2249 (768 housing units)
      Area: 2.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 68028
   Gretna, VA (town, FIPS 33232)
      Location: 36.95305 N, 79.36305 W
      Population (1990): 1339 (595 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 24557

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Groton, CT (city, FIPS 34180)
      Location: 41.32733 N, 72.07167 W
      Population (1990): 9837 (4479 housing units)
      Area: 8.3 sq km (land), 9.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 06340, 06349
   Groton, MA (CDP, FIPS 27445)
      Location: 42.60641 N, 71.57150 W
      Population (1990): 1044 (394 housing units)
      Area: 4.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 01450
   Groton, NY (village, FIPS 30961)
      Location: 42.58685 N, 76.36525 W
      Population (1990): 2398 (911 housing units)
      Area: 4.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 13073
   Groton, SD (city, FIPS 26340)
      Location: 45.45206 N, 98.10011 W
      Population (1990): 1196 (537 housing units)
      Area: 3.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 57445
   Groton, VT
      Zip code(s): 05046

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Gurdon, AR (city, FIPS 29200)
      Location: 33.91643 N, 93.14814 W
      Population (1990): 2199 (985 housing units)
      Area: 4.7 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 71743

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Gartner Group
  
      One of the biggest IT industry research firms.
  
      Address: Connecticut, USA.
  
      [URL?]
  
      (1997-09-30)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Gardens
      mentioned in Scripture, of Eden (Gen. 2:8, 9); Ahab's garden of
      herbs (1 Kings 21:2); the royal garden (2 Kings 21:18); the
      royal garden at Susa (Esther 1:5); the garden of Joseph of
      Arimathea (John 19:41); of Gethsemane (John 18:1).
     
         The "king's garden" mentioned 2 Kings 25:4, Neh. 3:15, was
      near the Pool of Siloam.
     
         Gardens were surrounded by hedges of thorns (Isa. 5:5) or by
      walls of stone (Prov. 24:31). "Watch-towers" or "lodges" were
      also built in them (Isa. 1:8; Mark 12:1), in which their keepers
      sat. On account of their retirement they were frequently used as
      places for secret prayer and communion with God (Gen. 24:63;
      Matt. 26:30-36; John 1:48; 18:1, 2). The dead were sometimes
      buried in gardens (Gen. 23:19, 20; 2 Kings 21:18, 26; 1 Sam.
      25:1; Mark 15:46; John 19:41). (See {PARADISE}.)
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2020
Your feedback:
Ad partners


Sprachreisen.org