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   figure of eight
         n 1: a knot having the shape of the numeral 8; tied in a rope
               that has been passed through a hole or pulley and that
               prevents the rope from coming loose [syn: {figure eight},
               {figure of eight}]

English Dictionary: Faserbeton by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
figure of merit
n
  1. a numerical expression representing the efficiency of a given system, material, or procedure
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
figure of speech
n
  1. language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense [syn: trope, figure of speech, figure, image]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fissure of Rolando
n
  1. a brain fissure extending upward on the lateral surface of both hemispheres; separates the frontal and parietal lobes
    Synonym(s): fissure of Rolando, Rolando's fissure, central sulcus, sulcus centralis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fissure of Sylvius
n
  1. the deepest and most prominent of the cortical fissures; separates the frontal lobes and temporal lobes in both hemispheres
    Synonym(s): fissure of Sylvius, Sylvian fissure, lateral cerebral sulcus, sulcus lateralis cerebri
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fixer-upper
n
  1. a house or other dwelling in need of repair (usually offered for sale at a low price)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fox grape
n
  1. native grape of northeastern United States; origin of many cultivated varieties e.g. Concord grapes
    Synonym(s): fox grape, Vitis labrusca
  2. purplish-black wild grape of the eastern United States with tough skins that slip easily from the flesh; cultivated in many varieties
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Fox River
n
  1. a river in Wisconsin that flows into Lake Michigan
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Figurability \Fig`ur*a*bil"i*ty\, n. [Cf. F. figurabilit[82].]
      The quality of being figurable. --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Figurable \Fig`ur*a*ble\, a. [L. figurare to form, shape, fr.
      figura figure: cf. F. figurable. See {Figure}.]
      Capable of being brought to a fixed form or shape.
  
               Lead is figurable, but water is not.      --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   2/22/42/8 4/22/44/8 3/23/43/8 6/46/46/8
  
      {Academy figure}, {Canceled figures}, {Lay figure}, etc. See
            under {Academy}, {Cancel}, {Lay}, etc.
  
      {Figure caster}, [or] {Figure flinger}, an astrologer.
            [bd]This figure caster.[b8] --Milton.
  
      {Figure flinging}, the practice of astrology.
  
      {Figure-of-eight knot}, a knot shaped like the figure 8. See
            Illust. under {Knot}.
  
      {Figure painting}, a picture of the human figure, or the act
            or art of depicting the human figure.
  
      {Figure stone} (Min.), agalmatolite.
  
      {Figure weaving}, the art or process of weaving figured
            fabrics.
  
      {To cut a figure}, to make a display. [Colloq.] --Sir W.
            Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   2/22/42/8 4/22/44/8 3/23/43/8 6/46/46/8
  
      {Academy figure}, {Canceled figures}, {Lay figure}, etc. See
            under {Academy}, {Cancel}, {Lay}, etc.
  
      {Figure caster}, [or] {Figure flinger}, an astrologer.
            [bd]This figure caster.[b8] --Milton.
  
      {Figure flinging}, the practice of astrology.
  
      {Figure-of-eight knot}, a knot shaped like the figure 8. See
            Illust. under {Knot}.
  
      {Figure painting}, a picture of the human figure, or the act
            or art of depicting the human figure.
  
      {Figure stone} (Min.), agalmatolite.
  
      {Figure weaving}, the art or process of weaving figured
            fabrics.
  
      {To cut a figure}, to make a display. [Colloq.] --Sir W.
            Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   2/22/42/8 4/22/44/8 3/23/43/8 6/46/46/8
  
      {Academy figure}, {Canceled figures}, {Lay figure}, etc. See
            under {Academy}, {Cancel}, {Lay}, etc.
  
      {Figure caster}, [or] {Figure flinger}, an astrologer.
            [bd]This figure caster.[b8] --Milton.
  
      {Figure flinging}, the practice of astrology.
  
      {Figure-of-eight knot}, a knot shaped like the figure 8. See
            Illust. under {Knot}.
  
      {Figure painting}, a picture of the human figure, or the act
            or art of depicting the human figure.
  
      {Figure stone} (Min.), agalmatolite.
  
      {Figure weaving}, the art or process of weaving figured
            fabrics.
  
      {To cut a figure}, to make a display. [Colloq.] --Sir W.
            Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   2/22/42/8 4/22/44/8 3/23/43/8 6/46/46/8
  
      {Academy figure}, {Canceled figures}, {Lay figure}, etc. See
            under {Academy}, {Cancel}, {Lay}, etc.
  
      {Figure caster}, [or] {Figure flinger}, an astrologer.
            [bd]This figure caster.[b8] --Milton.
  
      {Figure flinging}, the practice of astrology.
  
      {Figure-of-eight knot}, a knot shaped like the figure 8. See
            Illust. under {Knot}.
  
      {Figure painting}, a picture of the human figure, or the act
            or art of depicting the human figure.
  
      {Figure stone} (Min.), agalmatolite.
  
      {Figure weaving}, the art or process of weaving figured
            fabrics.
  
      {To cut a figure}, to make a display. [Colloq.] --Sir W.
            Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   2/22/42/8 4/22/44/8 3/23/43/8 6/46/46/8
  
      {Academy figure}, {Canceled figures}, {Lay figure}, etc. See
            under {Academy}, {Cancel}, {Lay}, etc.
  
      {Figure caster}, [or] {Figure flinger}, an astrologer.
            [bd]This figure caster.[b8] --Milton.
  
      {Figure flinging}, the practice of astrology.
  
      {Figure-of-eight knot}, a knot shaped like the figure 8. See
            Illust. under {Knot}.
  
      {Figure painting}, a picture of the human figure, or the act
            or art of depicting the human figure.
  
      {Figure stone} (Min.), agalmatolite.
  
      {Figure weaving}, the art or process of weaving figured
            fabrics.
  
      {To cut a figure}, to make a display. [Colloq.] --Sir W.
            Scott.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fissure \Fis"sure\, n. [L. fissura, fr. findere, fissum, to
      cleave, split; akin to E. bite: cf. F. fissure.]
      A narrow opening, made by the parting of any substance; a
      cleft; as, the fissure of a rock.
  
      {Cerebral fissures} (Anat.), the furrows or clefts by which
            the surface of the cerebrum is divided; esp., the furrows
            first formed by the infolding of the whole wall of the
            cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure needle} (Surg.), a spiral needle for catching
            together the gaping lips of wounds. --Knight.
  
      {Fissure of rolando} (Anat.), the furrow separating the
            frontal from the parietal lobe in the cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure of Sylvius} (Anat.), a deep cerebral fissure
            separating the frontal from the temporal lobe. See Illust.
            under {Brain}.
  
      {Fissure vein} (Mining), a crack in the earth's surface
            filled with mineral matter. --Raymond.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fissure \Fis"sure\, n. [L. fissura, fr. findere, fissum, to
      cleave, split; akin to E. bite: cf. F. fissure.]
      A narrow opening, made by the parting of any substance; a
      cleft; as, the fissure of a rock.
  
      {Cerebral fissures} (Anat.), the furrows or clefts by which
            the surface of the cerebrum is divided; esp., the furrows
            first formed by the infolding of the whole wall of the
            cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure needle} (Surg.), a spiral needle for catching
            together the gaping lips of wounds. --Knight.
  
      {Fissure of rolando} (Anat.), the furrow separating the
            frontal from the parietal lobe in the cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure of Sylvius} (Anat.), a deep cerebral fissure
            separating the frontal from the temporal lobe. See Illust.
            under {Brain}.
  
      {Fissure vein} (Mining), a crack in the earth's surface
            filled with mineral matter. --Raymond.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fissure \Fis"sure\, n. [L. fissura, fr. findere, fissum, to
      cleave, split; akin to E. bite: cf. F. fissure.]
      A narrow opening, made by the parting of any substance; a
      cleft; as, the fissure of a rock.
  
      {Cerebral fissures} (Anat.), the furrows or clefts by which
            the surface of the cerebrum is divided; esp., the furrows
            first formed by the infolding of the whole wall of the
            cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure needle} (Surg.), a spiral needle for catching
            together the gaping lips of wounds. --Knight.
  
      {Fissure of rolando} (Anat.), the furrow separating the
            frontal from the parietal lobe in the cerebrum.
  
      {Fissure of Sylvius} (Anat.), a deep cerebral fissure
            separating the frontal from the temporal lobe. See Illust.
            under {Brain}.
  
      {Fissure vein} (Mining), a crack in the earth's surface
            filled with mineral matter. --Raymond.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fox \Fox\, n.; pl. {Foxes}. [AS. fox; akin to D. vos, G. fuchs,
      OHG. fuhs, foha, Goth. fa[a3]h[?], Icel. f[?]a fox, fox
      fraud; of unknown origin, cf. Skr. puccha tail. Cf. {Vixen}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) A carnivorous animal of the genus {Vulpes},
            family {Canid[91]}, of many species. The European fox ({V.
            vulgaris} or {V. vulpes}), the American red fox ({V.
            fulvus}), the American gray fox ({V. Virginianus}), and
            the arctic, white, or blue, fox ({V. lagopus}) are
            well-known species.
  
      Note: The black or silver-gray fox is a variety of the
               American red fox, producing a fur of great value; the
               cross-gray and woods-gray foxes are other varieties of
               the same species, of less value. The common foxes of
               Europe and America are very similar; both are
               celebrated for their craftiness. They feed on wild
               birds, poultry, and various small animals.
  
                        Subtle as the fox for prey.            --Shak.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) The European dragonet.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also
            {sea fox}. See {Thrasher shark}, under {Shark}.
  
      4. A sly, cunning fellow. [Colloq.]
  
                     We call a crafty and cruel man a fox. --Beattie.
  
      5. (Naut.) Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar;
            -- used for seizings or mats.
  
      6. A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the
            blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox. [Obs.]
  
                     Thou diest on point of fox.               --Shak.
  
      7. pl. (Enthnol.) A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs,
            formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin;
            -- called also {Outagamies}.
  
      {Fox and geese}.
            (a) A boy's game, in which one boy tries to catch others
                  as they run one goal to another.
            (b) A game with sixteen checkers, or some substitute for
                  them, one of which is called the fox, and the rest the
                  geese; the fox, whose first position is in the middle
                  of the board, endeavors to break through the line of
                  the geese, and the geese to pen up the fox.
  
      {Fox bat} (Zo[94]l.), a large fruit bat of the genus
            {Pteropus}, of many species, inhabiting Asia, Africa, and
            the East Indies, esp. {P. medius} of India. Some of the
            species are more than four feet across the outspread
            wings. See {Fruit bat}.
  
      {Fox bolt}, a bolt having a split end to receive a fox wedge.
           
  
      {Fox brush} (Zo[94]l.), the tail of a fox.
  
      {Fox evil}, a disease in which the hair falls off; alopecy.
           
  
      {Fox grape} (Bot.), the name of two species of American
            grapes. The northern fox grape ({Vitis Labrusca}) is the
            origin of the varieties called {Isabella}, {Concord},
            {Hartford}, etc., and the southern fox grape ({Vitis
            vulpina}) has produced the {Scuppernong}, and probably the
            {Catawba}.
  
      {Fox hunter}.
            (a) One who pursues foxes with hounds.
            (b) A horse ridden in a fox chase.
  
      {Fox shark} (Zo[94]l.), the thrasher shark. See {Thrasher
            shark}, under {Thrasher}.
  
      {Fox sleep}, pretended sleep.
  
      {Fox sparrow} (Zo[94]l.), a large American sparrow
            ({Passerella iliaca}); -- so called on account of its
            reddish color.
  
      {Fox squirrel} (Zo[94]l.), a large North American squirrel
            ({Sciurus niger}, or {S. cinereus}). In the Southern
            States the black variety prevails; farther north the
            fulvous and gray variety, called the {cat squirrel}, is
            more common.
  
      {Fox terrier} (Zo[94]l.), one of a peculiar breed of
            terriers, used in hunting to drive foxes from their holes,
            and for other purposes. There are rough- and smooth-haired
            varieties.
  
      {Fox trot}, a pace like that which is adopted for a few
            steps, by a horse, when passing from a walk into a trot,
            or a trot into a walk.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Grapevine \Grape"vine`\, n. (Bot.)
      A vine or climbing shrub, of the genus {Vitis}, having small
      green flowers and lobed leaves, and bearing the fruit called
      {grapes}.
  
      Note: The common grapevine of the Old World is {Vitis
               vinifera}, and is a native of Central Asia. Another
               variety is that yielding small seedless grapes commonly
               called {Zante currants}. The northern {Fox grape} of
               the United States is the {V. Labrusca}, from which, by
               cultivation, has come the Isabella variety. The
               southern {Fox grape}, or {Muscadine}, is the {V.
               vulpina}. The {Frost grape} is {V. cordifolia}, which
               has very fragrant flowers, and ripens after the early
               frosts.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fisherville, KY
      Zip code(s): 40023

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fox River, AK (CDP, FIPS 26910)
      Location: 59.85832 N, 150.95823 W
      Population (1990): 382 (103 housing units)
      Area: 222.4 sq km (land), 11.9 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fox River Grove, IL (village, FIPS 27533)
      Location: 42.19700 N, 88.21896 W
      Population (1990): 3551 (1331 housing units)
      Area: 3.8 sq km (land), 0.3 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 60021

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fox River Valley Gardens, IL (village, FIPS 27572)
      Location: 42.24437 N, 88.19492 W
      Population (1990): 665 (259 housing units)
      Area: 2.4 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   fgrep
  
      A variant of the {Unix} {grep} command which searches
      for fixed (uninterpreted) strings rather than {regular
      expressions}.   Surprisingly, this is not always faster.
  
      (1996-10-27)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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