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   famous person
         n 1: a widely known person; "he was a baseball celebrity" [syn:
               {celebrity}, {famous person}]

English Dictionary: Fangboot by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fan-shaped
adj
  1. shaped in the form of a fan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fanciful
adj
  1. indulging in or influenced by fancy; "a fanciful mind"; "all the notional vagaries of childhood"
    Synonym(s): fanciful, notional
  2. not based on fact; unreal; "the falsehood about some fanciful secret treaties"- F.D.Roosevelt; "a small child's imaginary friends"; "to create a notional world for oneself"
    Synonym(s): fanciful, imaginary, notional
  3. having a curiously intricate quality; "a fanciful pattern with intertwined vines and flowers"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fancifully
adv
  1. in a fanciful manner; "the Christmas tree was fancifully decorated"
    Synonym(s): fancifully, whimsically
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fancify
v
  1. make more beautiful [syn: fancify, beautify, embellish, prettify]
    Antonym(s): uglify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fancy up
v
  1. put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive; "She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera"; "The young girls were all fancied up for the party"
    Synonym(s): overdress, dress up, fig out, fig up, deck up, gussy up, fancy up, trick up, deck out, trick out, prink, attire, get up, rig out, tog up, tog out
    Antonym(s): dress down, underdress
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fancy-free
adj
  1. having no commitments or responsibilities; carefree; "a fancy-free bachelor"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Fenusa pusilla
n
  1. small black sawfly native to Europe but established in eastern United States; larvae mine the leaves of birches causing serious defoliation
    Synonym(s): birch leaf miner, Fenusa pusilla
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fine spray
n
  1. precipitation in very small drops
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
finespun
adj
  1. developed with extreme delicacy and subtlety; "the satire touches with finespun ridicule every kind of human pretense"
    Synonym(s): finespun, delicate
  2. developed in excessively fine detail; "finespun distinctions"
    Synonym(s): finespun, hairsplitting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
finish off
v
  1. finish a task completely; "I finally got through this homework assignment"
    Synonym(s): get through, wrap up, finish off, mop up, polish off, clear up, finish up
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
finish up
v
  1. finish a task completely; "I finally got through this homework assignment"
    Synonym(s): get through, wrap up, finish off, mop up, polish off, clear up, finish up
  2. finally be or do something; "He ended up marrying his high school sweetheart"; "he wound up being unemployed and living at home again"
    Synonym(s): finish up, land up, fetch up, end up, wind up, finish
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fungibility
n
  1. the quality of being capable of exchange or interchange
    Synonym(s): exchangeability, interchangeability, interchangeableness, fungibility
    Antonym(s): unexchangeability
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
fungible
adj
  1. of goods or commodities; freely exchangeable for or replaceable by another of like nature or kind in the satisfaction of an obligation
n
  1. a commodity that is freely interchangeable with another in satisfying an obligation
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fanciful \Fan"ci*ful\, a.
      1. Full of fancy; guided by fancy, rather than by reason and
            experience; whimsical; as, a fanciful man forms visionary
            projects.
  
      2. Conceived in the fancy; not consistent with facts or
            reason; abounding in ideal qualities or figures; as, a
            fanciful scheme; a fanciful theory.
  
      3. Curiously shaped or constructed; as, she wore a fanciful
            headdress.
  
                     Gather up all fancifullest shells.      --Keats.
  
      Syn: Imaginative; ideal; visionary; capricious; chimerical;
               whimsical; fantastical; wild.
  
      Usage: {Fanciful}, {Fantastical}, {Visionary}. We speak of
                  that as fanciful which is irregular in taste and
                  judgment; we speak of it as fantastical when it
                  becomes grotesque and extravagant as well as
                  irregular; we speak of it as visionary when it is
                  wholly unfounded in the nature of things. Fanciful
                  notions are the product of a heated fancy, without any
                  tems are made up of oddly assorted fancies, aften of
                  the most whimsical kind; visionary expectations are
                  those which can never be realized in fact. --
                  {Fan"ci*ful*ly}, adv. -{Fan"ci*ful*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fanciful \Fan"ci*ful\, a.
      1. Full of fancy; guided by fancy, rather than by reason and
            experience; whimsical; as, a fanciful man forms visionary
            projects.
  
      2. Conceived in the fancy; not consistent with facts or
            reason; abounding in ideal qualities or figures; as, a
            fanciful scheme; a fanciful theory.
  
      3. Curiously shaped or constructed; as, she wore a fanciful
            headdress.
  
                     Gather up all fancifullest shells.      --Keats.
  
      Syn: Imaginative; ideal; visionary; capricious; chimerical;
               whimsical; fantastical; wild.
  
      Usage: {Fanciful}, {Fantastical}, {Visionary}. We speak of
                  that as fanciful which is irregular in taste and
                  judgment; we speak of it as fantastical when it
                  becomes grotesque and extravagant as well as
                  irregular; we speak of it as visionary when it is
                  wholly unfounded in the nature of things. Fanciful
                  notions are the product of a heated fancy, without any
                  tems are made up of oddly assorted fancies, aften of
                  the most whimsical kind; visionary expectations are
                  those which can never be realized in fact. --
                  {Fan"ci*ful*ly}, adv. -{Fan"ci*ful*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fanciful \Fan"ci*ful\, a.
      1. Full of fancy; guided by fancy, rather than by reason and
            experience; whimsical; as, a fanciful man forms visionary
            projects.
  
      2. Conceived in the fancy; not consistent with facts or
            reason; abounding in ideal qualities or figures; as, a
            fanciful scheme; a fanciful theory.
  
      3. Curiously shaped or constructed; as, she wore a fanciful
            headdress.
  
                     Gather up all fancifullest shells.      --Keats.
  
      Syn: Imaginative; ideal; visionary; capricious; chimerical;
               whimsical; fantastical; wild.
  
      Usage: {Fanciful}, {Fantastical}, {Visionary}. We speak of
                  that as fanciful which is irregular in taste and
                  judgment; we speak of it as fantastical when it
                  becomes grotesque and extravagant as well as
                  irregular; we speak of it as visionary when it is
                  wholly unfounded in the nature of things. Fanciful
                  notions are the product of a heated fancy, without any
                  tems are made up of oddly assorted fancies, aften of
                  the most whimsical kind; visionary expectations are
                  those which can never be realized in fact. --
                  {Fan"ci*ful*ly}, adv. -{Fan"ci*ful*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fancy \Fan"cy\, a.
      1. Adapted to please the fancy or taste; ornamental; as,
            fancy goods.
  
      2. Extravagant; above real value.
  
                     This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania,
                     like that which led his [Frederick the Great's]
                     father to pay fancy prices for giants. --Macaulay.
  
      {Fancy ball}, a ball in which porsons appear in fanciful
            dresses in imitation of the costumes of different persons
            and nations.
  
      {Fancy fair}, a fair at which articles of fancy and ornament
            are sold, generally for some charitable purpose.
  
      {Fancy goods}, fabrics of various colors, patterns, etc., as
            ribbons, silks, laces, etc., in distinction from those of
            a simple or plain color or make.
  
      {Fancy line} (Naut.), a line rove through a block at the jaws
            of a gaff; -- used to haul it down.
  
      {Fancy roller} (Carding Machine), a clothed cylinder (usually
            having straight teeth) in front of the doffer.
  
      {Fancy stocks}, a species of stocks which afford great
            opportunity for stock gambling, since they have no
            intrinsic value, and the fluctuations in their prices are
            artificial.
  
      {Fancy store}, one where articles of fancy and ornament are
            sold.
  
      {Fancy woods}, the more rare and expensive furniture woods,
            as mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fancy \Fan"cy\, a.
      1. Adapted to please the fancy or taste; ornamental; as,
            fancy goods.
  
      2. Extravagant; above real value.
  
                     This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania,
                     like that which led his [Frederick the Great's]
                     father to pay fancy prices for giants. --Macaulay.
  
      {Fancy ball}, a ball in which porsons appear in fanciful
            dresses in imitation of the costumes of different persons
            and nations.
  
      {Fancy fair}, a fair at which articles of fancy and ornament
            are sold, generally for some charitable purpose.
  
      {Fancy goods}, fabrics of various colors, patterns, etc., as
            ribbons, silks, laces, etc., in distinction from those of
            a simple or plain color or make.
  
      {Fancy line} (Naut.), a line rove through a block at the jaws
            of a gaff; -- used to haul it down.
  
      {Fancy roller} (Carding Machine), a clothed cylinder (usually
            having straight teeth) in front of the doffer.
  
      {Fancy stocks}, a species of stocks which afford great
            opportunity for stock gambling, since they have no
            intrinsic value, and the fluctuations in their prices are
            artificial.
  
      {Fancy store}, one where articles of fancy and ornament are
            sold.
  
      {Fancy woods}, the more rare and expensive furniture woods,
            as mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fancy-free \Fan"cy-free`\, a.
      Free from the power of love. [bd]In maiden meditation,
      fancy-free.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Feme \[d8]Feme\ (? [or] ?), n. [OF. feme, F. femme.] (Old Law)
      A woman. --Burrill.
  
      {Feme covert} (Law), a married woman. See {Covert}, a., 3.
  
      {Feme sole} (Law), a single or unmarried woman; a woman who
            has never been married, or who has been divorced, or whose
            husband is dead.
  
      {Feme sole} {trader [or] merchant} (Eng. Law), a married
            woman, who, by the custom of London, engages in business
            on her own account, inpendently of her husband.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fenceful \Fence"ful\, a.
      Affording defense; defensive. [Obs.] --Congreve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fenci-ble \Fen"ci-ble\, a.
      Capable of being defended, or of making or affording defense.
      [Obs.]
  
               No fort so fencible, nor walls so strong. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fencible \Fen"ci*ble\, n. (Mil.)
      A soldier enlisted for home service only; -- usually in the
      pl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fenci-ble \Fen"ci-ble\, a.
      Capable of being defended, or of making or affording defense.
      [Obs.]
  
               No fort so fencible, nor walls so strong. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fencible \Fen"ci*ble\, n. (Mil.)
      A soldier enlisted for home service only; -- usually in the
      pl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fensi-ble \Fen"si-ble\, a.
      Fencible. [Obs.] --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Finch \Finch\, n.; pl. {Fishes}. [AS. finc; akin to D. vink,
      OHG. fincho, G. fink; cf. W. pinc a finch; also E. spink.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A small singing bird of many genera and species, belonging to
      the family {Fringillid[91]}.
  
      Note: The word is often used in composition, as in chaffinch,
               goldfinch, grassfinch, pinefinch, etc.
  
      {Bramble finch}. See {Brambling}.
  
      {Canary finch}, the canary bird.
  
      {Copper finch}. See {Chaffinch}.
  
      {Diamond finch}. See under {Diamond}.
  
      {Finch falcon} (Zo[94]l.), one of several very small East
            Indian falcons of the genus {Hierax}.
  
      {To pull a finch}, to swindle an ignorant or unsuspecting
            person. [Obs.] [bd]Privily a finch eke could he pull.[b8]
            --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Finchbacked \Finch"backed`\, a.
      Streaked or spotted on the back; -- said of cattle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Finespun \Fine"spun`\, a.
      Spun so as to be fine; drawn to a fine thread; attenuated;
      hence, unsubstantial; visionary; as, finespun theories.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fungibles \Fun"gi*bles\, n. pl. [LL. (res) fungibiles, probably
      fr. L. fungi to discharge. [bd]A barbarous term, supposed to
      have originated in the use of the words functionem recipere
      in the Digeste.[b8] Bouvier. [bd]Called fungibiles, quia una
      alterius vice fungitur.[b8] John Taylor (1755). Cf.
      {Function}.]
      1. (Civ. Law) Things which may be furnished or restored in
            kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called
            also {fungible things}. --Burrill.
  
      2. (Scots Law) Movable goods which may be valued by weight or
            measure, in contradistinction from those which must be
            judged of individually. --Jamieson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fungibles \Fun"gi*bles\, n. pl. [LL. (res) fungibiles, probably
      fr. L. fungi to discharge. [bd]A barbarous term, supposed to
      have originated in the use of the words functionem recipere
      in the Digeste.[b8] Bouvier. [bd]Called fungibiles, quia una
      alterius vice fungitur.[b8] John Taylor (1755). Cf.
      {Function}.]
      1. (Civ. Law) Things which may be furnished or restored in
            kind, as distinguished from specific things; -- called
            also {fungible things}. --Burrill.
  
      2. (Scots Law) Movable goods which may be valued by weight or
            measure, in contradistinction from those which must be
            judged of individually. --Jamieson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fungiform \Fun"gi*form\, a. [Eungus + -form: cf. F. fongiforme.]
      Shaped like a fungus or mushroom.
  
      {Fungiform papill[91]} (Anat.), numerous small, rounded
            eminences on the upper surface of the tongue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fungiform \Fun"gi*form\, a. [Eungus + -form: cf. F. fongiforme.]
      Shaped like a fungus or mushroom.
  
      {Fungiform papill[91]} (Anat.), numerous small, rounded
            eminences on the upper surface of the tongue.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fungivorous \Fun*giv"o*rous\, a. [L. fungus + vorare to eat
      freedily: cf. F. fangivore.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Eating fungi; -- said of certain insects and snails.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fancy Farm, KY
      Zip code(s): 42039

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Fancy Prairie, IL
      Zip code(s): 62613

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Finchville, KY
      Zip code(s): 40022

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   fencepost error n.   1. [common] A problem with the discrete
   equivalent of a boundary condition, often exhibited in programs by
   iterative loops.   From the following problem: "If you build a fence
   100 feet long with posts 10 feet apart, how many posts do you need?"
   (Either 9 or 11 is a better answer than the obvious 10.)   For
   example, suppose you have a long list or array of items, and want to
   process items m through n; how many items are there?   The obvious
   answer is n - m, but that is off by one; the right answer is n - m +
   1.   A program that used the `obvious' formula would have a fencepost
   error in it.   See also {zeroth} and {off-by-one error}, and note
   that not all off-by-one errors are fencepost errors.   The game of
   Musical Chairs involves a catastrophic off-by-one error where N
   people try to sit in N - 1 chairs, but it's not a fencepost error.
   Fencepost errors come from counting things rather than the spaces
   between them, or vice versa, or by neglecting to consider whether
   one should count one or both ends of a row.   2. [rare] An error
   induced by unexpected regularities in input values, which can (for
   instance) completely thwart a theoretically efficient binary tree or
   hash table implementation.   (The error here involves the difference
   between expected and worst case behaviors of an algorithm.)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   fencepost error
  
      1. (Rarely "lamp-post error") A problem with the discrete
      equivalent of a {boundary condition}, often exhibited in
      programs by iterative loops.   From the following problem: "If
      you build a fence 100 feet long with posts 10 feet apart, how
      many posts do you need?"   (Either 9 or 11 is a better answer
      than the obvious 10).
  
      For example, suppose you have a long list or array of items,
      and want to process items m through n; how many items are
      there?   The obvious answer is n - m, but that is off by one;
      the right answer is n - m + 1.   The "obvious" formula exhibits
      a fencepost error.
  
      See also {zeroth} and note that not all {off-by-one errors}
      are fencepost errors.   The game of Musical Chairs involves a
      catastrophic off-by-one error where N people try to sit in N -
      1 chairs, but it's not a fencepost error.   Fencepost errors
      come from counting things rather than the spaces between them,
      or vice versa, or by neglecting to consider whether one should
      count one or both ends of a row.
  
      2. (Rare) An error induced by unexpected regularities in input
      values, which can (for instance) completely thwart a
      theoretically efficient {binary tree} or {hash coding}
      implementation.   The error here involves the difference
      between expected and worst case behaviours of an {algorithm}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1994-12-01)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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