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   E region
         n 1: a region of the ionosphere (from 50 to 90 miles up) that
               reflects radio waves of medium length [syn: {Heaviside
               layer}, {Kennelly-Heaviside layer}, {E layer}, {E region}]

English Dictionary: Erkundungsstollen by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ear canal
n
  1. either of the passages in the outer ear from the auricle to the tympanic membrane
    Synonym(s): auditory meatus, acoustic meatus, ear canal, auditory canal, external auditory canal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erasmian
adj
  1. of or relating to or in the manner of Erasmus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erasmus
n
  1. Dutch humanist and theologian who was the leading Renaissance scholar of northern Europe; although his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church led to the Reformation, he opposed violence and condemned Martin Luther (1466-1536)
    Synonym(s): Erasmus, Desiderius Erasmus, Gerhard Gerhards, Geert Geerts
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ergometer
n
  1. measuring instrument designed to measure power [syn: dynamometer, ergometer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ergonomic
adj
  1. of or relating to ergonomics
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ergonomics
n
  1. the branch of engineering science in which biological science is used to study the relation between workers and their environments
    Synonym(s): biotechnology, bioengineering, ergonomics
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ergonovine
n
  1. an alkaloid derived from ergot (trade name Ergotrate Maleate) that is less toxic than ergot; induces muscular contraction of the uterus and is administered after childbirth or abortion
    Synonym(s): ergonovine, Ergotrate Maleate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Ergun He
n
  1. a river in eastern Asia that arises in China and flows northeast along the border between China and Russia to become a tributary of the Amur River
    Synonym(s): Argun, Argun River, Ergun He
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erich Mendelsohn
n
  1. German architect who migrated to Palestine in 1937 (1887-1953)
    Synonym(s): Mendelsohn, Erich Mendelsohn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erie Canal
n
  1. an artificial waterway connecting the Hudson river at Albany with Lake Erie at Buffalo; built in the 19th century; now part of the New York State Barge Canal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erignathus
n
  1. bearded seals
    Synonym(s): Erignathus, genus Erignathus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erignathus barbatus
n
  1. medium-sized greyish to yellow seal with bristles each side of muzzle; of the Arctic Ocean
    Synonym(s): bearded seal, squareflipper square flipper, Erignathus barbatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erigonum fasciculatum
n
  1. low-growing shrub with spreading branches and flowers in loose heads; desert regions of western United States (California to Utah)
    Synonym(s): wild buckwheat, California buckwheat, Erigonum fasciculatum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
eriogonum
n
  1. any plant of the genus Eriogonum with small clustered flowers
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eriogonum allenii
n
  1. late blooming perennial plant of shale barrens of Virginia having flowers in flat-topped clusters
    Synonym(s): umbrella plant, Eriogonum allenii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eriosoma
n
  1. woolly aphids
    Synonym(s): Eriosoma, genus Eriosoma
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eriosoma lanigerum
n
  1. primarily a bark feeder on aerial parts and roots of apple and other trees
    Synonym(s): woolly apple aphid, American blight, Eriosoma lanigerum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
erogenous
adj
  1. sensitive to sexual stimulation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
erogenous zone
n
  1. any area of the body especially sensitive to sexual stimulation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
erosion
n
  1. (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
    Synonym(s): erosion, eroding, eating away, wearing, wearing away
  2. condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind
  3. a gradual decline of something; "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"
  4. erosion by chemical action
    Synonym(s): corrosion, corroding, erosion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erskine Caldwell
n
  1. United States author remembered for novels about poverty and degeneration (1903-1987)
    Synonym(s): Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erskine Preston Caldwell
n
  1. United States author remembered for novels about poverty and degeneration (1903-1987)
    Synonym(s): Caldwell, Erskine Caldwell, Erskine Preston Caldwell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum
n
  1. large genus of annual or perennial herbs some grown for their flowers and some for their attractive evergreen leaves; Old World and North America
    Synonym(s): Erysimum, genus Erysimum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum allionii
n
  1. showy erect biennial or short-lived perennial cultivated for its terminal racemes of orange-yellow flowers; sometimes placed in genus Cheiranthus
    Synonym(s): Siberian wall flower, Erysimum allionii, Cheiranthus allionii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum arkansanum
n
  1. biennial or short-lived perennial prairie rocket having orange-yellow flowers; western North America to Minnesota and Kansas; sometimes placed in genus Cheiranthus
    Synonym(s): western wall flower, Erysimum asperum, Cheiranthus asperus, Erysimum arkansanum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum asperum
n
  1. biennial or short-lived perennial prairie rocket having orange-yellow flowers; western North America to Minnesota and Kansas; sometimes placed in genus Cheiranthus
    Synonym(s): western wall flower, Erysimum asperum, Cheiranthus asperus, Erysimum arkansanum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum cheiranthoides
n
  1. slender yellow-flowered European mustard often troublesome as a weed; formerly used as an anthelmintic
    Synonym(s): wormseed mustard, Erysimum cheiranthoides
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Erysimum cheiri
n
  1. perennial of southern Europe having clusters of fragrant flowers of all colors especially yellow and orange; often naturalized on old walls or cliffs; sometimes placed in genus Erysimum
    Synonym(s): wallflower, Cheiranthus cheiri, Erysimum cheiri
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian
adj
  1. relating to, or coming from, Europe and Asia; "His mother was Eurasian, and his father Chinese"; "the Eurasian landmass is the largest in the world"
    Synonym(s): Eurasian, Eurasiatic
n
  1. a person of mixed European and Asian descent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian badger
n
  1. a variety of badger native to Europe and Asia [syn: Eurasian badger, Meles meles]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian green toad
n
  1. Eurasian toad with variable chiefly green coloring [syn: Eurasian green toad, Bufo viridis]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian hamster
n
  1. a variety of hamster common to Europe and Asia [syn: Eurasian hamster, Cricetus cricetus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian kingfisher
n
  1. small kingfisher with greenish-blue and orange plumage
    Synonym(s): Eurasian kingfisher, Alcedo atthis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian otter
n
  1. otter found in Europe and Asia [syn: Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurasian woodcock
n
  1. short-legged long-billed migratory Old World woodcock [syn: Eurasian woodcock, Scolopax rusticola]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurocentric
adj
  1. focussed on Europe and the Europeans [syn: Eurocentric, Europocentric]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Eurocentrism
n
  1. belief in the preeminence of Europe and the Europeans
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ear \Ear\, n. [AS. e[a0]re; akin to OFries. [a0]re, [a0]r, OS.
      [?]ra, D. oor, OHG. [?]ra, G. ohr, Icel. eyra, Sw. [94]ra,
      Dan. [94]re, Goth. auso, L. auris, Lith. ausis, Russ. ukho,
      Gr. [?]; cf. L. audire to hear, Gr. [?], Skr. av to favor,
      protect. Cf. {Auricle}, {Orillon}.]
      1. The organ of hearing; the external ear.
  
      Note: In man and the higher vertebrates, the organ of hearing
               is very complicated, and is divisible into three parts:
               the external ear, which includes the pinna or auricle
               and meatus or external opening; the middle ear, drum,
               or tympanum; and the internal ear, or labyrinth. The
               middle ear is a cavity connected by the Eustachian tube
               with the pharynx, separated from the opening of the
               external ear by the tympanic membrane, and containing a
               chain of three small bones, or ossicles, named malleus,
               incus, and stapes, which connect this membrane with the
               internal ear. The essential part of the internal ear
               where the fibers of the auditory nerve terminate, is
               the membranous labyrinth, a complicated system of sacs
               and tubes filled with a fluid (the endolymph), and
               lodged in a cavity, called the bony labyrinth, in the
               periotic bone. The membranous labyrinth does not
               completely fill the bony labyrinth, but is partially
               suspended in it in a fluid (the perilymph). The bony
               labyrinth consists of a central cavity, the vestibule,
               into which three semicircular canals and the canal of
               the cochlea (spirally coiled in mammals) open. The
               vestibular portion of the membranous labyrinth consists
               of two sacs, the utriculus and sacculus, connected by a
               narrow tube, into the former of which three membranous
               semicircular canals open, while the latter is connected
               with a membranous tube in the cochlea containing the
               organ of Corti. By the help of the external ear the
               sonorous vibrations of the air are concentrated upon
               the tympanic membrane and set it vibrating, the chain
               of bones in the middle ear transmits these vibrations
               to the internal ear, where they cause certain delicate
               structures in the organ of Corti, and other parts of
               the membranous labyrinth, to stimulate the fibers of
               the auditory nerve to transmit sonorous impulses to the
               brain.
  
      2. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; the power
            of discriminating between different tones; as, a nice ear
            for music; -- in the singular only.
  
                     Songs . . . not all ungrateful to thine ear.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      3. That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an
            animal; any prominence or projection on an object, --
            usually one for support or attachment; a lug; a handle;
            as, the ears of a tub, a skillet, or dish. The ears of a
            boat are outside kneepieces near the bow. See Illust. of
            {Bell}.
  
      4. (Arch.)
            (a) Same as {Acroterium}.
            (b) Same as {Crossette}.
  
      5. Privilege of being kindly heard; favor; attention.
  
                     Dionysius . . . would give no ear to his suit.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
                     Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {About the ears}, in close proximity to; near at hand.
  
      {By the ears}, in close contest; as, to set by the ears; to
            fall together by the ears; to be by the ears.
  
      {Button ear} (in dogs), an ear which falls forward and
            completely hides the inside.
  
      {Ear finger}, the little finger.
  
      {Ear of Dionysius}, a kind of ear trumpet with a flexible
            tube; -- named from the Sicilian tyrant, who constructed a
            device to overhear the prisoners in his dungeons.
  
      {Ear sand} (Anat.), otoliths. See {Otolith}.
  
      {Ear snail} (Zo[94]l.), any snail of the genus {Auricula} and
            allied genera.
  
      {Ear stones} (Anat.), otoliths. See {Otolith}.
  
      {Ear trumpet}, an instrument to aid in hearing. It consists
            of a tube broad at the outer end, and narrowing to a
            slender extremity which enters the ear, thus collecting
            and intensifying sounds so as to assist the hearing of a
            partially deaf person.
  
      {Ear vesicle} (Zo[94]l.), a simple auditory organ, occurring
            in many worms, mollusks, etc. It consists of a small sac
            containing a fluid and one or more solid concretions or
            otocysts.
  
      {Rose ear} (in dogs), an ear which folds backward and shows
            part of the inside.
  
      {To give ear to}, to listen to; to heed, as advice or one
            advising. [bd]Give ear unto my song.[b8] --Goldsmith.
  
      {To have one's ear}, to be listened to with favor.
  
      {Up to the ears}, deeply submerged; almost overwhelmed; as,
            to be in trouble up to one's ears. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Snail \Snail\ (sn[amac]l), n. [OE. snaile, AS. sn[ae]gel,
      snegel, sn[ae]gl; akin to G. schnecke, OHG. snecko, Dan.
      snegl, Icel. snigill.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial
                  air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix
                  and many allied genera of the family {Helicid[91]}.
                  They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world
                  except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on
                  vegetation; a land snail.
            (b) Any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true
                  snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See
                  {Pond snail}, under {Pond}, and {Sea snail}.
  
      2. Hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing.
  
      3. (Mech.) A spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally
            curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the
            position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a
            striking clock.
  
      4. A tortoise; in ancient warfare, a movable roof or shed to
            protect besiegers; a testudo. [Obs.]
  
                     They had also all manner of gynes [engines] . . .
                     that needful is [in] taking or sieging of castle or
                     of city, as snails, that was naught else but hollow
                     pavises and targets, under the which men, when they
                     fought, were heled [protected], . . . as the snail
                     is in his house; therefore they cleped them snails.
                                                                              --Vegetius
                                                                              (Trans.).
  
      5. (Bot.) The pod of the sanil clover.
  
      {Ear snail}, {Edible snail}, {Pond snail}, etc. See under
            {Ear}, {Edible}, etc.
  
      {Snail borer} (Zo[94]l.), a boring univalve mollusk; a drill.
           
  
      {Snail clover} (Bot.), a cloverlike plant ({Medicago
            scuttellata}, also, {M. Helix}); -- so named from its
            pods, which resemble the shells of snails; -- called also
            {snail trefoil}, {snail medic}, and {beehive}.
  
      {Snail flower} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Phaseolus
            Caracalla}) having the keel of the carolla spirally coiled
            like a snail shell.
  
      {Snail shell} (Zo[94]l.), the shell of snail.
  
      {Snail trefoil}. (Bot.) See {Snail clover}, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ear \Ear\, n. [AS. e[a0]re; akin to OFries. [a0]re, [a0]r, OS.
      [?]ra, D. oor, OHG. [?]ra, G. ohr, Icel. eyra, Sw. [94]ra,
      Dan. [94]re, Goth. auso, L. auris, Lith. ausis, Russ. ukho,
      Gr. [?]; cf. L. audire to hear, Gr. [?], Skr. av to favor,
      protect. Cf. {Auricle}, {Orillon}.]
      1. The organ of hearing; the external ear.
  
      Note: In man and the higher vertebrates, the organ of hearing
               is very complicated, and is divisible into three parts:
               the external ear, which includes the pinna or auricle
               and meatus or external opening; the middle ear, drum,
               or tympanum; and the internal ear, or labyrinth. The
               middle ear is a cavity connected by the Eustachian tube
               with the pharynx, separated from the opening of the
               external ear by the tympanic membrane, and containing a
               chain of three small bones, or ossicles, named malleus,
               incus, and stapes, which connect this membrane with the
               internal ear. The essential part of the internal ear
               where the fibers of the auditory nerve terminate, is
               the membranous labyrinth, a complicated system of sacs
               and tubes filled with a fluid (the endolymph), and
               lodged in a cavity, called the bony labyrinth, in the
               periotic bone. The membranous labyrinth does not
               completely fill the bony labyrinth, but is partially
               suspended in it in a fluid (the perilymph). The bony
               labyrinth consists of a central cavity, the vestibule,
               into which three semicircular canals and the canal of
               the cochlea (spirally coiled in mammals) open. The
               vestibular portion of the membranous labyrinth consists
               of two sacs, the utriculus and sacculus, connected by a
               narrow tube, into the former of which three membranous
               semicircular canals open, while the latter is connected
               with a membranous tube in the cochlea containing the
               organ of Corti. By the help of the external ear the
               sonorous vibrations of the air are concentrated upon
               the tympanic membrane and set it vibrating, the chain
               of bones in the middle ear transmits these vibrations
               to the internal ear, where they cause certain delicate
               structures in the organ of Corti, and other parts of
               the membranous labyrinth, to stimulate the fibers of
               the auditory nerve to transmit sonorous impulses to the
               brain.
  
      2. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; the power
            of discriminating between different tones; as, a nice ear
            for music; -- in the singular only.
  
                     Songs . . . not all ungrateful to thine ear.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      3. That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an
            animal; any prominence or projection on an object, --
            usually one for support or attachment; a lug; a handle;
            as, the ears of a tub, a skillet, or dish. The ears of a
            boat are outside kneepieces near the bow. See Illust. of
            {Bell}.
  
      4. (Arch.)
            (a) Same as {Acroterium}.
            (b) Same as {Crossette}.
  
      5. Privilege of being kindly heard; favor; attention.
  
                     Dionysius . . . would give no ear to his suit.
                                                                              --Bacon.
  
                     Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      {About the ears}, in close proximity to; near at hand.
  
      {By the ears}, in close contest; as, to set by the ears; to
            fall together by the ears; to be by the ears.
  
      {Button ear} (in dogs), an ear which falls forward and
            completely hides the inside.
  
      {Ear finger}, the little finger.
  
      {Ear of Dionysius}, a kind of ear trumpet with a flexible
            tube; -- named from the Sicilian tyrant, who constructed a
            device to overhear the prisoners in his dungeons.
  
      {Ear sand} (Anat.), otoliths. See {Otolith}.
  
      {Ear snail} (Zo[94]l.), any snail of the genus {Auricula} and
            allied genera.
  
      {Ear stones} (Anat.), otoliths. See {Otolith}.
  
      {Ear trumpet}, an instrument to aid in hearing. It consists
            of a tube broad at the outer end, and narrowing to a
            slender extremity which enters the ear, thus collecting
            and intensifying sounds so as to assist the hearing of a
            partially deaf person.
  
      {Ear vesicle} (Zo[94]l.), a simple auditory organ, occurring
            in many worms, mollusks, etc. It consists of a small sac
            containing a fluid and one or more solid concretions or
            otocysts.
  
      {Rose ear} (in dogs), an ear which folds backward and shows
            part of the inside.
  
      {To give ear to}, to listen to; to heed, as advice or one
            advising. [bd]Give ear unto my song.[b8] --Goldsmith.
  
      {To have one's ear}, to be listened to with favor.
  
      {Up to the ears}, deeply submerged; almost overwhelmed; as,
            to be in trouble up to one's ears. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Earwig \Ear"wig`\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Earwigged}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Earwigging}.]
      To influence, or attempt to influence, by whispered
      insinuations or private talk. [bd]No longer was he earwigged
      by the Lord Cravens.[b8] --Lord Campbell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eerisome \Ee"ri*some\, a.
      Causing fear; eerie. [Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Erasement \E*rase"ment\, n.
      The act of erasing; a rubbing out; expunction; obliteration.
      --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Erase \E*rase"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Erased}; p. pr. & vb. n..
      {Erasing}.] [L. erasus, p. p. of eradere to erase; e out +
      radere to scrape, scratch, shave. See {Rase}.]
      1. To rub or scrape out, as letters or characters written,
            engraved, or painted; to efface; to expunge; to cross out;
            as, to erase a word or a name.
  
      2. Fig.: To obliterate; to expunge; to blot out; -- used of
            ideas in the mind or memory. --Burke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Erasion \E*ra"sion\, n.
      The act of erasing; a rubbing out; obliteration.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ergmeter \Erg"me`ter\, n. [Erg + -meter.] (Physics)
      An instrument for measuring energy in ergs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ergometer \Er*gom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] work + -meter.] (Physics)
      A device for measuring, or an instrument for indicating,
      energy expended or work done; a dynamometer. --
      {Er`go*met"ric}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ergometer \Er*gom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] work + -meter.] (Physics)
      A device for measuring, or an instrument for indicating,
      energy expended or work done; a dynamometer. --
      {Er`go*met"ric}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ergon \Er"gon\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] work.] (Physics)
      (a) Work, measured in terms of the quantity of heat to which
            it is equivalent.
      (b) = {Erg}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ericinol \E*ric"i*nol\, n. [NL. ericaceae the Heath family + L.
      oleum oil.] (Chem.)
      A colorless oil (quickly becoming brown), with a pleasant
      odor, obtained by the decomposition of ericolin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Seal \Seal\ (s[emac]l), n. [OE. sele, AS. seolh; akin to OHG.
      selah, Dan. s[91]l, Sw. sj[84]l, Icel. selr.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families {Phocid[91]}
      and {Otariid[91]}.
  
      Note: Seals inhabit seacoasts, and are found principally in
               the higher latitudes of both hemispheres. There are
               numerous species, bearing such popular names as {sea
               lion}, {sea leopard}, {sea bear}, or {ursine seal},
               {fur seal}, and {sea elephant}. The bearded seal
               ({Erignathus barbatus}), the hooded seal ({Cystophora
               crustata}), and the ringed seal ({Phoca f[d2]tida}),
               are northern species. See also {Eared seal}, {Harp
               seal}, and {Fur seal}, under {Eared}, {Harp}, {Monk},
               and {Fur}. Seals are much hunted for their skins and
               fur, and also for their oil, which in some species is
               very abundant.
  
      {Harbor seal} (Zo[94]l.), the common seal ({Phoca vitulina}).
            It inhabits both the North Atlantic and the North Pacific
            Ocean, and often ascends rivers; -- called also {marbled
            seal}, {native seal}, {river seal}, {bay seal}, {land
            seal}, {sea calf}, {sea cat}, {sea dog}, {dotard},
            {ranger}, {selchie}, {tangfish}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bunch grass \Bunch" grass`\ (Bot.)
      A grass growing in bunches and affording pasture. In
      California, {Atropis tenuifolia}, {Festuca scabrella}, and
      several kinds of {Stipa} are favorite bunch grasses. In Utah,
      {Eriocoma cuspidata} is a good bunch grass.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ruddy \Rud"dy\, a. [Compar. {Ruddier}; superl. {Ruddiest}.] [AS.
      rudig. See {Rud}, n.]
      1. Of a red color; red, or reddish; as, a ruddy sky; a ruddy
            flame. --Milton.
  
                     They were more ruddy in body than rubies. --Lam. iv.
                                                                              7.
  
      2. Of a lively flesh color, or the color of the human skin in
            high health; as, ruddy cheeks or lips. --Dryden.
  
      {Ruddy duck} (Zo[94]l.), an American duck ({Erismatura
            rubida}) having a broad bill and a wedge-shaped tail
            composed of stiff, sharp feathers. The adult male is rich
            brownish red on the back, sides, and neck, black on the
            top of the head, nape, wings, and tail, and white on the
            cheeks. The female and young male are dull brown mixed
            with blackish on the back; grayish below. Called also
            {dunbird}, {dundiver}, {ruddy diver}, {stifftail},
            {spinetail}, {hardhead}, {sleepy duck}, {fool duck},
            {spoonbill}, etc.
  
      {Ruddy plover} (Zo[94]l.) the sanderling.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Erosion \E*ro"sion\, n.
      The wearing away of the earth's surface by any natural
      process. The chief agent of erosion is running water; minor
      agents are glaciers, the wind, and waves breaking against the
      coast.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Erosion \E*ro"sion\, n. [L. erosio. See {Erode}.]
      1. The act or operation of eroding or eating away.
  
      2. The state of being eaten away; corrosion; canker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eruginous \E*ru"gi*nous\, a. [Cf. F. [82]rugineux. See
      {[92]ruginous}.]
      Partaking of the substance or nature of copper, or of the
      rust copper; resembling the trust of copper or verdigris;
      [91]ruginous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wallflower \Wall"flow`er\, n.
      1. (Bot.) A perennial, cruciferous plant ({Cheiranthus
            Cheiri}), with sweet-scented flowers varying in color from
            yellow to orange and deep red. In Europe it very common on
            old walls.
  
      Note: The name is sometimes extended to other species of
               {Cheiranthus} and of the related genus {Erysimum},
               especially the American {Western wallflower} ({Erysimum
               asperum}), a biennial herb with orange-yellow flowers.
  
      2. A lady at a ball, who, either from choice, or because not
            asked to dance, remains a spectator. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mustard \Mus"tard\, n. [OF. moustarde, F. moutarde, fr. L.
      mustum must, -- mustard was prepared for use by being mixed
      with must. See {Must}, n.]
      1. (Bot.) The name of several cruciferous plants of the genus
            {Brassica} (formerly {Sinapis}), as white mustard ({B.
            alba}), black mustard ({B. Nigra}), wild mustard or
            charlock ({B. Sinapistrum}).
  
      Note: There are also many herbs of the same family which are
               called mustard, and have more or less of the flavor of
               the true mustard; as, bowyer's mustard ({Lepidium
               ruderale}); hedge mustard ({Sisymbrium officinale});
               Mithridate mustard ({Thlaspi arvense}); tower mustard
               ({Arabis perfoliata}); treacle mustard ({Erysimum
               cheiranthoides}).
  
      2. A powder or a paste made from the seeds of black or white
            mustard, used as a condiment and a rubefacient. Taken
            internally it is stimulant and diuretic, and in large
            doses is emetic.
  
      {Mustard oil} (Chem.), a substance obtained from mustard, as
            a transparent, volatile and intensely pungent oil. The
            name is also extended to a number of analogous compounds
            produced either naturally or artificially.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Wormseed \Worm"seed`\, n. (Bot.)
      Any one of several plants, as {Artemisia santonica}, and
      {Chenopodium anthelminticum}, whose seeds have the property
      of expelling worms from the stomach and intestines.
  
      {Wormseed mustard}, a slender, cruciferous plant ({Erysinum
            cheiranthoides}) having small lanceolate leaves.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eurasian \Eu*ra"sian\, n. [European + Asian.]
      1. A child of a European parent on the one side and an
            Asiatic on the other.
  
      2. One born of European parents in Asia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Eurasian \Eu*ra"sian\, a.
      Of European and Asiatic descent; of or pertaining to both
      Europe and Asia; as, the great Eurasian plain.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Ericson, NE (village, FIPS 16025)
      Location: 41.78054 N, 98.67761 W
      Population (1990): 111 (63 housing units)
      Area: 0.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 68637

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Erie County, NY (county, FIPS 29)
      Location: 42.75495 N, 78.78491 W
      Population (1990): 968532 (402131 housing units)
      Area: 2705.7 sq km (land), 472.2 sq km (water)
   Erie County, OH (county, FIPS 43)
      Location: 41.51273 N, 82.61410 W
      Population (1990): 76779 (32827 housing units)
      Area: 659.2 sq km (land), 961.6 sq km (water)
   Erie County, PA (county, FIPS 49)
      Location: 42.10335 N, 80.10415 W
      Population (1990): 275572 (108585 housing units)
      Area: 2077.2 sq km (land), 1959.3 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Erskine, MN (city, FIPS 19700)
      Location: 47.66361 N, 96.01374 W
      Population (1990): 422 (264 housing units)
      Area: 1.9 sq km (land), 0.7 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56535

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Eureka Mill, SC (CDP, FIPS 24020)
      Location: 34.71763 N, 81.19384 W
      Population (1990): 1738 (708 housing units)
      Area: 3.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   Eric Conspiracy n.   A shadowy group of mustachioed hackers
   named Eric first pinpointed as a sinister conspiracy by an infamous
   talk.bizarre posting ca. 1987; this was doubtless influenced by the
   numerous `Eric' jokes in the Monty Python oeuvre.   There do indeed
   seem to be considerably more mustachioed Erics in hackerdom than the
   frequency of these three traits can account for unless they are
   correlated in some arcane way.   Well-known examples include Eric
   Allman (he of the `Allman style' described under {indent style}) and
   Erik Fair (co-author of NNTP); your editor has heard from more than
   sixty others by email, and the organization line `Eric Conspiracy
   Secret Laboratories' now emanates regularly from more than one site.
   See the Eric Conspiracy Web Page at
   `http://www.ccil.org/~esr/ecsl/' for full details.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   ERCIM
  
      European Research Consortium on Informatics and Mathematics.
      An association of European research organisations promoting
      cooperative research on key issues in {Information
      Technology}.
  
      (2000-12-30)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   ergonomic
  
      Concerning {ergonomics} or exhibitting good ergonimics.
  
      (1995-04-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   ergonomics
  
      The study of the design and arrangement of equipment so that
      people will interact with the equipment in healthy,
      comfortable, and efficient manner.   As related to computer
      equipment, ergonomics is concerned with such factors as the
      physical design of the keyboard, screens, and related
      hardware, and the manner in which people interact with these
      hardware devices.
  
      (1995-04-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Eric Conspiracy
  
      A shadowy group of moustachioed hackers named
      Eric first pinpointed as a sinister conspiracy by an infamous
      talk.bizarre posting ca. 1986.   This was doubtless influenced
      by the numerous "Eric" jokes in the Monty Python oeuvre.
      There do indeed seem to be considerably more moustachioed
      Erics in hackerdom than the frequency of these three traits
      can account for unless they are correlated in some arcane way.
      Well-known examples include {Eric Allman} (of the "Allman
      style" described under {indent style}), {Erik Fair} (co-author
      of NNTP), {Eric S. Raymond} and about fifteen others.   The
      organisation line "Eric Conspiracy Secret Laboratories" now
      emanates regularly from more than one site.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1998-10-20)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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