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   Dacninae
         n 1: the honeycreepers [syn: {Coerebidae}, {family Coerebidae},
               {Dacninae}, {family Dacninae}]

English Dictionary: Documenter's by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
de Kooning
n
  1. United States painter (born in the Netherlands) who was a leading American exponent of abstract expressionism (1904-1997)
    Synonym(s): de Kooning, Willem de Kooning
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
deccan hemp
n
  1. fiber from an East Indian plant Hibiscus cannabinus [syn: kenaf, deccan hemp]
  2. valuable fiber plant of East Indies now widespread in cultivation
    Synonym(s): kenaf, kanaf, deccan hemp, bimli, bimli hemp, Indian hemp, Bombay hemp, Hibiscus cannabinus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
decennium
n
  1. a period of 10 years [syn: decade, decennary, decennium]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Des Moines
n
  1. the capital and largest city in Iowa [syn: Des Moines, capital of Iowa]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
deskman
n
  1. the police sergeant on duty in a police station [syn: {desk sergeant}, deskman, station keeper]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Desmanthus
n
  1. genus of American herbs or shrubs with sensitive pinnate leaves and small whitish flowers
    Synonym(s): Desmanthus, genus Desmanthus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Desmanthus ilinoensis
n
  1. perennial herb of North American prairies having dense heads of small white flowers
    Synonym(s): prairie mimosa, prickle-weed, Desmanthus ilinoensis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Desmond Tutu
n
  1. South African prelate and leader of the antiapartheid struggle (born in 1931)
    Synonym(s): Tutu, Desmond Tutu
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
diazonium
n
  1. the univalent cation R-N:N- (where R is an aromatic hydrocarbon); found in salts that are used in manufacturing azo dyes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dicksonia antarctica
n
  1. of Australia and Tasmania; often cultivated; hardy in cool climates
    Synonym(s): soft tree fern, Dicksonia antarctica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Discina macrospora
n
  1. a discina with a flat or saucer-shaped fertile body that is brown on the upper surface; has a short stalk; not recommended for eating
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismantle
v
  1. tear down so as to make flat with the ground; "The building was levelled"
    Synonym(s): level, raze, rase, dismantle, tear down, take down, pull down
    Antonym(s): erect, put up, raise, rear, set up
  2. take apart into its constituent pieces
    Synonym(s): disassemble, dismantle, take apart, break up, break apart
    Antonym(s): assemble, piece, put together, set up, tack, tack together
  3. take off or remove; "strip a wall of its wallpaper"
    Synonym(s): strip, dismantle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismantled
adj
  1. torn down and broken up [syn: demolished, dismantled, razed]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismantlement
n
  1. the act of taking something apart (as a piece of machinery); "Russia and the United States discussed the dismantling of their nuclear weapons"
    Synonym(s): dismantling, dismantlement, disassembly
    Antonym(s): assemblage, assembly, fabrication, gathering
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismantling
n
  1. the act of taking something apart (as a piece of machinery); "Russia and the United States discussed the dismantling of their nuclear weapons"
    Synonym(s): dismantling, dismantlement, disassembly
    Antonym(s): assemblage, assembly, fabrication, gathering
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismaying
adj
  1. causing consternation; "appalling conditions" [syn: appalling, dismaying]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismember
v
  1. separate the limbs from the body; "the tiger dismembered the tourist"
  2. divide into pieces; "our department was dismembered when our funding dried up"; "The Empire was discerped after the war"
    Synonym(s): dismember, take apart, discerp
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismemberment
n
  1. the removal of limbs; being cut to pieces [syn: dismemberment, taking apart]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dismount
n
  1. the act of dismounting (a horse or bike etc.)
v
  1. alight from (a horse) [syn: unhorse, dismount, light, get off, get down]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disowning
n
  1. refusal to acknowledge as one's own [syn: disownment, disowning]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disownment
n
  1. refusal to acknowledge as one's own [syn: disownment, disowning]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminate
v
  1. cause to become widely known; "spread information"; "circulate a rumor"; "broadcast the news"
    Synonym(s): circulate, circularize, circularise, distribute, disseminate, propagate, broadcast, spread, diffuse, disperse, pass around
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminated lupus erythematosus
n
  1. an inflammatory disease of connective tissue with variable features including fever and weakness and fatigability and joint pains and skin lesions on the face or neck or arms
    Synonym(s): systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE, disseminated lupus erythematosus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminated multiple sclerosis
n
  1. a chronic progressive nervous disorder involving loss of myelin sheath around certain nerve fibers
    Synonym(s): multiple sclerosis, MS, disseminated sclerosis, disseminated multiple sclerosis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminated sclerosis
n
  1. a chronic progressive nervous disorder involving loss of myelin sheath around certain nerve fibers
    Synonym(s): multiple sclerosis, MS, disseminated sclerosis, disseminated multiple sclerosis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dissemination
n
  1. the opening of a subject to widespread discussion and debate
    Synonym(s): dissemination, airing, public exposure, spreading
  2. the property of being diffused or dispersed
    Synonym(s): dissemination, diffusion
  3. the act of dispersing or diffusing something; "the dispersion of the troops"; "the diffusion of knowledge"
    Synonym(s): dispersion, dispersal, dissemination, diffusion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminative
adj
  1. spreading by diffusion [syn: diffusing(a), diffusive, dispersive, disseminative]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disseminator
n
  1. someone who spreads the news [syn: propagator, disseminator]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dissonance
n
  1. a conflict of people's opinions or actions or characters
    Synonym(s): disagreement, dissension, dissonance
    Antonym(s): accord, agreement
  2. the auditory experience of sound that lacks musical quality; sound that is a disagreeable auditory experience; "modern music is just noise to me"
    Synonym(s): noise, dissonance, racket
  3. disagreeable sounds
    Antonym(s): harmony
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dissonant
adj
  1. characterized by musical dissonance; harmonically unresolved
    Synonym(s): unresolved, dissonant
  2. lacking in harmony
    Synonym(s): discordant, disharmonious, dissonant, inharmonic
  3. not in accord; "desires at variance with his duty"; "widely discrepant statements"
    Synonym(s): at variance(p), discrepant, dissonant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
disunion
n
  1. the termination or destruction of union [ant: conjugation, jointure, unification, union, uniting]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
document
n
  1. writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)
    Synonym(s): document, written document, papers
  2. anything serving as a representation of a person's thinking by means of symbolic marks
  3. a written account of ownership or obligation
  4. (computer science) a computer file that contains text (and possibly formatting instructions) using seven-bit ASCII characters
    Synonym(s): text file, document
v
  1. record in detail; "The parents documented every step of their child's development"
  2. support or supply with references; "Can you document your claims?"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
documental
adj
  1. relating to or consisting of or derived from documents
    Synonym(s): documentary, documental
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
documentary
adj
  1. relating to or consisting of or derived from documents
    Synonym(s): documentary, documental
  2. emphasizing or expressing things as perceived without distortion of personal feelings, insertion of fictional matter, or interpretation; "objective art"
    Synonym(s): objective, documentary
n
  1. a film or TV program presenting the facts about a person or event
    Synonym(s): documentary, docudrama, documentary film, infotainment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
documentary film
n
  1. a film or TV program presenting the facts about a person or event
    Synonym(s): documentary, docudrama, documentary film, infotainment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
documentation
n
  1. confirmation that some fact or statement is true through the use of documentary evidence
    Synonym(s): documentation, certification, corroboration
  2. program listings or technical manuals describing the operation and use of programs
    Synonym(s): software documentation, documentation
  3. documentary validation; "his documentation of the results was excellent"; "the strongest support for this view is the work of Jones"
    Synonym(s): documentation, support
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
documented
adj
  1. furnished with or supported by documents; "the first documented case of shark attack in those waters"
    Antonym(s): undocumented
  2. established as genuine
    Synonym(s): attested, authenticated, documented
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dysmenorrhea
n
  1. painful menstruation
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d1conomical \[d1]`co*nom"ic*al\, a.
      See {Economical}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d1conomics \[d1]`co*nom"ics\, n.
      See {Economics}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d1conomy \[d1]*con"o*my\, n.
      See {Economy}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d1cumenical \[d1]c`u*men"ic*al\, a.
      See {Ecumenical}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Agnomen \[d8]Ag*no"men\ ([acr]g*n[omac]"m[ecr]n), n. [L.; ad +
      nomen name.]
      1. An additional or fourth name given by the Romans, on
            account of some remarkable exploit or event; as, Publius
            Caius Scipio Africanus.
  
      2. An additional name, or an epithet appended to a name; as,
            Aristides the Just.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Auchenium \[d8]Au*che"ni*um\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?], fr. [?]
      the neck.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The part of the neck nearest the back.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Camembert \[d8]Ca`mem`bert"\, n., or Camembert cheese
   \Camembert cheese\
      A kind of soft, unpressed cream cheese made in the vicinity
      of Camembert, near Argentan, France; also, any cheese of the
      same type, wherever made.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Camonflet \[d8]Ca*mon"flet\, n. [F.] (Mil.)
      A small mine, sometimes formed in the wall or side of an
      enemy's gallery, to blow in the earth and cut off the retreat
      of the miners. --Farrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Chenomorph91 \[d8]Che`no*mor"ph[91]\, n. pl. [NL., from Gr.
      [?] the wild goose + [?] form.] (Zo[94]l.)
      An order of birds, including the swans, ducks, geese,
      flamingoes and screamers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Chunam \[d8]Chu*nam"\, n. [Hind. ch[d4]n[be], from Skr.
      c[d4]r[c9]a powder, dust; or a Dravidian word.]
      Quicklime; also, plaster or mortar. [India] --Whitworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Conium \[d8]Co*ni"um\ (? [or] [?]), n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?]
      hemlock.]
      1. (Bot.) A genus of biennial, poisonous, white-flowered,
            umbelliferous plants, bearing ribbed fruit ([bd]seeds[b8])
            and decompound leaves.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Cynanche \[d8]Cy*nan"che\ (s?-n?n"k?), n. [L., fr. Gr.
      [?][?][?][?][?] a dog's collar, a bad kind of sore throat.
      Cf. {Quinsy}.] (Med.)
      Any disease of the tonsils, throat, or windpipe, attended
      with inflammation, swelling, and difficulty of breathing and
      swallowing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Decennium \[d8]De*cen"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Decenniums}, L.
      {Decennia}. [L.]
      A period of ten years. [bd]The present decennium.[b8]
      --Hallam. [bd]The last decennium of Chaucer's life.[b8] --A.
      W. Ward.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Desmomyaria \[d8]Des`mo*my*a"ri*a\, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. [?]
      bond + [?] muscle.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The division of Tunicata which includes the Salp[91]. See
      {Salpa}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Dies non \[d8]Di"es non"\ [L. dies non juridicus.] (Law)
      A day on which courts are not held, as Sunday or any legal
      holiday.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Dysmenorrhea \[d8]Dys*men`or*rhe"a\, n. [Gr. [?] ill, hard +
      [?] month + [?] to flow.] (Med.)
      Difficult and painful menstruation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gamin \[d8]Gam"in\, n. [F.]
      A neglected and untrained city boy; a young street Arab.
  
               In Japan, the gamins run after you, and say, 'Look at
               the Chinaman.'                                       --L. Oliphant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gemini \[d8]Gem"i*ni\, n. pl. [L., twins, pl. of geminus; cf.
      Skr. j[?]mi related as brother or sister.] (Astron.)
      A constellation of the zodiac, containing the two bright
      stars Castor and Pollux; also, the third sign of the zodiac,
      which the sun enters about May 20th.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Go89min \[d8]Go`[89]`min"\, n. [F. go[89]mon seaweed.]
      A complex mixture of several substances extracted from Irish
      moss.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gonangium \[d8]Go`nan*gi"um\, n.; pl. L. {Gonangia}, E.
      {Gonangiums}. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] offspring + [?] vessel.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      See {Gonotheca}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gonimia \[d8]Go*nim"i*a\, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] productive,
      fr. [?] that which generates.] (Bot.)
      Bluish green granules which occur in certain lichens, as
      {Collema}, {Peltigera}, etc., and which replace the more
      usual gonidia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Guenon \[d8]Guenon"\, n. [F.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of several long-tailed Oriental monkeys, of the genus
      {Cercocebus}, as the green monkey and grivet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gymnonoti \[d8]Gym"no*no`ti\, n. pl. [NL. fr. Gr. gymno`s
      naked + [?] the back.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The order of fishes which includes the Gymnotus or electrical
      eel. The dorsal fin is wanting.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Gynandria \[d8]Gy*nan"dri*a\, n. pl. [NL. See {Gynandrian}.]
      (Bot.)
      A class of plants in the Linnaean system, whose stamens grow
      out of, or are united with, the pistil.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Ichneumonides \[d8]Ich`neu*mon"i*des\, n. pl. [NL. See
      {Ichneumon}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The ichneumon flies.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Isonandra \[d8]I`so*nan"dra\, n. [Iso- + Gr. [?], [?], a man,
      male.] (Bot.)
      A genus of sapotaceous trees of India. {Isonandra Gutta} is
      the principal source of gutta-percha.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8O94gonium \[d8]O`[94]*go"ni*um\, n.; pl. L. {O[94]gonia}, E.
      {O[94]goniums}. [NL., fr. Gr. w,'o`n an egg + [?] offspring.]
      (Bot.)
      A special cell in certain cryptogamous plants containing
      o[94]spheres, as in the rockweeds ({Fucus}), and the orders
      {Vaucherie[91]} and {Peronospore[91]}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Semen \[d8]Se"men\, n.; pl. {Semina}. [L., from the root of
      serere, satum, to sow. See {Sow} to scatter seed.]
      1. (Bot.) The seed of plants.
  
      2. (Physiol.) The seed or fecundating fluid of male animals;
            sperm. It is a white or whitish viscid fluid secreted by
            the testes, characterized by the presence of spermatozoids
            to which it owes its generative power.
  
      {Semen contra}, [or] {Semen cin[91] or cyn[91]}, a strong
            aromatic, bitter drug, imported from Aleppo and Barbary,
            said to consist of the leaves, peduncles, and unexpanded
            flowers of various species of {Artemisia}; wormseed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Semuncia \[d8]Se*mun"ci*a\, n. [L., fr. semi half + uncia
      ounce.] (Rom. Antiq.)
      A Roman coin equivalent to one twenty-fourth part of a Roman
      pound.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Siamang \[d8]Si"a*mang`\, n. [Malay si[be]mang.] (Zool.)
      A gibbon ({Hylobates syndactylus}), native of Sumatra. It has
      the second and third toes partially united by a web.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Summum bonum \[d8]Sum"mum bo"num\ [L.] (Philos.)
      The supreme or highest good, -- referring to the object of
      human life.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Synangium \[d8]Syn*an"gi*um\, n.; pl. {Synangia}. [NL., fr.
      Gr. [?] + [?] a hollow vessel.] (Anat.)
      The divided part beyond the pylangium in the aortic trunk of
      the amphibian heart. -- {Syn*an"gi*al}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Synanthesis \[d8]Syn`an*the"sis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. sy`n with +
      Gr. [?] bloom.] (Bot.)
      The simultaneous maturity of the anthers and stigmas of a
      blossom. --Gray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Synentognathi \[d8]Syn`en*tog"na*thi\, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr.
      sy`n with + 'ento`s within + gna`qos jaw.] (Zo[94]l.)
      An order of fishes, resembling the Physoclisti, without
      spines in the dorsal, anal, and ventral fins. It includes the
      true flying fishes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Synonyma \[d8]Syn*on"y*ma\ (s[icr]n*[ocr]n"[icr]*m[adot]), n.
      pl. [L.]
      Synonyms. [Obs.] --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Synonymicon \[d8]Syn`o*nym"i*con\, n. [NL.]
      A dictionary of synonyms. --C. J. Smith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tegmen \[d8]Teg"men\, n.; pl. {Tegmina}. [L., fr. tegere,
      tectum, to cover.]
      1. A tegument or covering.
  
      2. (Bot.) The inner layer of the coating of a seed, usually
            thin and delicate; the endopleura.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) One of the elytra of an insect, especially of
            certain Orthoptera.
  
      4. pl. (Zo[94]l.) Same as {Tectrices}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tegmentum \[d8]Teg*men"tum\, n.; pl. {Tegmenta}. [L., a
      covering.] (Anat.)
      A covering; -- applied especially to the bundles of
      longitudinal fibers in the upper part of the crura of the
      cerebrum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Xenium \[d8]Xe"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Xenia}. [L., from Gr. xe`nion
      gift to a guest, fr. xe`nos guest.] (Class. Antiq.)
      A present given to a guest or stranger, or to a foreign
      ambassador.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Xenomi \[d8]Xen"o*mi\, n. pl. [NL., from Gr. xe`nos strange.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A suborder of soft-rayed fresh-water fishes of which the
      blackfish of Alaska ({Dallia pectoralis}) is the type.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Zamang \[d8]Za*mang"\, n. (Bot.)
      An immense leguminous tree ({Pithecolobium Saman}) of
      Venezuela. Its branches form a hemispherical mass, often one
      hundred and eighty feet across. The sweet pulpy pods are used
      commonly for feeding cattle. Also called {rain tree}. --J.
      Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Zemindary \Zem"in*da*ry\, d8Zemindari \[d8]Zem"in*da*ri\, n.
      Same as {Zamindary}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Zenana \[d8]Ze*na"na\, n. [Hind. zen[be]na, zan[be]na, fr.
      Per. zan[be]na, fr. zan woman; akin to E. queen.]
      The part of a dwelling appropriated to women. [India]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desman \Des"man\ (d[ecr]s"m[ait]n), n. [Cf. Sw. desman musk.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      An amphibious, insectivorous mammal found in Russia ({Myogale
      moschata}). It is allied to the moles, but is called
      {muskrat} by some English writers. [Written also
      {d[91]sman}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Daysman \Days"man\ (d[amac]z"m[acr]n), n. [From day in the sense
      of day fixed for trial.]
      An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.
  
               Neither is there any daysman betwixt us. --Job ix. 33.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Decennium \[d8]De*cen"ni*um\, n.; pl. {Decenniums}, L.
      {Decennia}. [L.]
      A period of ten years. [bd]The present decennium.[b8]
      --Hallam. [bd]The last decennium of Chaucer's life.[b8] --A.
      W. Ward.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Decoy-man \De*coy"-man`\, n.; pl. {Decoy-men}.
      A man employed in decoying wild fowl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Decoy-man \De*coy"-man`\, n.; pl. {Decoy-men}.
      A man employed in decoying wild fowl.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Decuman \Dec"u*man\, a. [L. decumanus of the tenth, and by
      metonymy, large, fr. decem ten.]
      Large; chief; -- applied to an extraordinary billow, supposed
      by some to be every tenth in order. [R.] Also used
      substantively. [bd]Such decuman billows.[b8] --Gauden.
      [bd]The baffled decuman.[b8] --Lowell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Degum \De*gum"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Degummed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Degumming}.]
      To deprive of, or free from, gum; as, to degum ramie.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Deign \Deign\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deigned}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Deigning}.] [OE. deinen, deignen, OF. degner, deigner,
      daigner, F. daigner, fr. L. dignari to deem worthy, deign,
      fr. dignus worthy; akin to decere to be fitting. See
      {Decent}, and cf. {Dainty}, {Dignity}, {Condign}, {Disdain}.]
      1. To esteem worthy; to consider worth notice; -- opposed to
            disdain. [Obs.]
  
                     I fear my Julia would not deign my lines. --Shak.
  
      2. To condescend to give or bestow; to stoop to furnish; to
            vouchsafe; to allow; to grant.
  
                     Nor would we deign him burial of his men. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desinence \Des"i*nence\, n. [Cf. F. d[82]sinence.]
      Termination; ending. --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desinent \Des"i*nent\, a. [L. desinens, p. pr. of desinere,
      desitum, to leave off, cease; de- + sinere to let, allow.]
      Ending; forming an end; lowermost. [Obs.] [bd]Their desinent
      parts, fish.[b8] --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desinential \Des`i*nen"tial\, a. [Cf. F. d[82]sinentiel.]
      Terminal.
  
               Furthermore, b, as a desinential element, has a dynamic
               function.                                                --Fitzed.
                                                                              Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desman \Des"man\ (d[ecr]s"m[ait]n), n. [Cf. Sw. desman musk.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      An amphibious, insectivorous mammal found in Russia ({Myogale
      moschata}). It is allied to the moles, but is called
      {muskrat} by some English writers. [Written also
      {d[91]sman}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Vine \Vine\, n. [F. vigne, L. vinea a vineyard, vine from vineus
      of or belonging to wine, vinum wine, grapes. See {Wine}, and
      cf. {Vignette}.] (Bot.)
            (a) Any woody climbing plant which bears grapes.
            (b) Hence, a climbing or trailing plant; the long, slender
                  stem of any plant that trails on the ground, or climbs
                  by winding round a fixed object, or by seizing
                  anything with its tendrils, or claspers; a creeper;
                  as, the hop vine; the bean vine; the vines of melons,
                  squashes, pumpkins, and other cucurbitaceous plants.
  
                           There shall be no grapes on the vine. --Jer.
                                                                              viii. 13.
  
                           And one went out into the field to gather herbs,
                           and found a wild vine, and gathered thereof wild
                           gourds.                                       --2 Kings iv.
                                                                              89.
  
      {Vine apple} (Bot.), a small kind of squash. --Roger
            Williams.
  
      {Vine beetle} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            beetles which are injurious to the leaves or branches of
            the grapevine. Among the more important species are the
            grapevine fidia (see {Fidia}), the spotted {Pelidnota}
            (see {Rutilian}), the vine fleabeetle ({Graptodera
            chalybea}), the rose beetle (see under {Rose}), the vine
            weevil, and several species of {Colaspis} and {Anomala}.
           
  
      {Vine borer}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) Any one of several species of beetles whose larv[91]
                  bore in the wood or pith of the grapevine, especially
                  {Sinoxylon basilare}, a small species the larva of
                  which bores in the stems, and {Ampeloglypter
                  sesostris}, a small reddish brown weevil (called also
                  {vine weevil}), which produces knotlike galls on the
                  branches.
            (b) A clearwing moth ({[92]geria polistiformis}), whose
                  larva bores in the roots of the grapevine and is often
                  destructive.
  
      {Vine dragon}, an old and fruitless branch of a vine. [Obs.]
            --Holland.
  
      {Vine forester} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            moths belonging to {Alypia} and allied genera, whose
            larv[91] feed on the leaves of the grapevine.
  
      {Vine fretter} (Zo[94]l.), a plant louse, esp. the phylloxera
            that injuries the grapevine.
  
      {Vine grub} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of insect
            larv[91] that are injurious to the grapevine.
  
      {Vine hopper} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of leaf
            hoppers which suck the sap of the grapevine, especially
            {Erythroneura vitis}. See Illust. of {Grape hopper}, under
            {Grape}.
  
      {Vine inchworm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            geometrid moths which feed on the leaves of the grapevine,
            especially {Cidaria diversilineata}.
  
      {Vine-leaf rooer} (Zo[94]l.), a small moth ({Desmia
            maculalis}) whose larva makes a nest by rolling up the
            leaves of the grapevine. The moth is brownish black,
            spotted with white.
  
      {Vine louse} (Zo[94]l.), the phylloxera.
  
      {Vine mildew} (Bot.), a fungous growth which forms a white,
            delicate, cottony layer upon the leaves, young shoots, and
            fruit of the vine, causing brown spots upon the green
            parts, and finally a hardening and destruction of the
            vitality of the surface. The plant has been called {Oidium
            Tuckeri}, but is now thought to be the conidia-producing
            stage of an {Erysiphe}.
  
      {Vine of Sodom} (Bot.), a plant named in the Bible (--Deut.
            xxxii. 32), now thought to be identical with the apple of
            Sodom. See {Apple of Sodom}, under {Apple}.
  
      {Vine sawfly} (Zo[94]l.), a small black sawfiy ({Selandria
            vitis}) whose larva feeds upon the leaves of the
            grapevine. The larv[91] stand side by side in clusters
            while feeding.
  
      {Vine slug} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of the vine sawfly.
  
      {Vine sorrel} (Bot.), a climbing plant ({Cissus acida})
            related to the grapevine, and having acid leaves. It is
            found in Florida and the West Indies.
  
      {Vine sphinx} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of hawk
            moths. The larv[91] feed on grapevine leaves.
  
      {Vine weevil}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Vine borer}
            (a) above, and {Wound gall}, under {Wound}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stilbite \Stil"bite\, n. [Gr. [?] to glitter, shine: cf. F.
      stilbite.] (Min.)
      A common mineral of the zeolite family, a hydrous silicate of
      alumina and lime, usually occurring in sheaflike aggregations
      of crystals, also in radiated masses. It is of a white or
      yellowish color, with pearly luster on the cleavage surface.
      Called also {desmine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desmine \Des"mine\, n. [Gr. de`smh, desmo`s, bundle, fr. dei^n
      to bind.] (Min.)
      Same as {Stilbite}. It commonly occurs in bundles or tufts of
      crystals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Stilbite \Stil"bite\, n. [Gr. [?] to glitter, shine: cf. F.
      stilbite.] (Min.)
      A common mineral of the zeolite family, a hydrous silicate of
      alumina and lime, usually occurring in sheaflike aggregations
      of crystals, also in radiated masses. It is of a white or
      yellowish color, with pearly luster on the cleavage surface.
      Called also {desmine}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desmine \Des"mine\, n. [Gr. de`smh, desmo`s, bundle, fr. dei^n
      to bind.] (Min.)
      Same as {Stilbite}. It commonly occurs in bundles or tufts of
      crystals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desynonymization \De`syn*on`y*mi*za"tion\, n.
      The act of desynonymizing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Desynonymize \De`syn*on"y*mize\, v. t.
      To deprive of synonymous character; to discriminate in use;
      -- applied to words which have been employed as synonyms.
      --Coleridge. Trench.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Grand cross}.
            (a) The highest rank of knighthood in the Order of the
                  Bath.
            (b) A knight grand cross.
  
      {Grand cordon}, the cordon or broad ribbon, identified with
            the highest grade in certain honorary orders; hence, a
            person who holds that grade.
  
      {Grand days} (Eng. Law), certain days in the terms which are
            observed as holidays in the inns of court and chancery
            (Candlemas, Ascension, St. John Baptist's, and All Saints'
            Days); called also {Dies non juridici}.
  
      {Grand duchess}.
            (a) The wife or widow of a grand duke.
            (b) A lady having the sovereignty of a duchy in her own
                  right.
            (c) In Russia, a daughter of the Czar.
  
      {Grand duke}.
            (a) A sovereign duke, inferior in rank to a king; as, the
                  Grand Duke of Tuscany.
            (b) In Russia, a son of the Czar.
            (c) (Zo[94]l.) The European great horned owl or eagle owl
                  ({Bubo maximas}).
  
      {Grand-guard}, [or] {Grandegarde}, a piece of plate armor
            used in tournaments as an extra protection for the left
            shoulder and breast.
  
      {Grand juror}, a member of a grand jury.
  
      {Grand jury} (Law), a jury of not less than twelve men, and
            not more than twenty-three, whose duty it is, in private
            session, to examine into accusations against persons
            charged with crime, and if they see just cause, then to
            find bills of indictment against them, to be presented to
            the court; -- called also {grand inquest}.
  
      {Grand juryman}, a grand juror.
  
      {Grand larceny}. (Law) See under {Larceny}.
  
      {Grand lodge}, the chief lodge, or governing body, among
            Freemasons and other secret orders.
  
      {Grand master}.
            (a) The head of one of the military orders of knighthood,
                  as the Templars, Hospitallers, etc.
            (b) The head of the order of Freemasons or of Good
                  Templars, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Digynian \Di*gyn"i*an\, Digynous \Dig"y*nous\, a. [Cf. F.
      digyne.] (Bot.)
      Of or pertaining to the Digynia; having two styles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disanimate \Dis*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disanimated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Disanimating}.]
      1. To deprive of life. [R.] --Cudworth.
  
      2. To deprive of spirit; to dishearten. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disanimate \Dis*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disanimated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Disanimating}.]
      1. To deprive of life. [R.] --Cudworth.
  
      2. To deprive of spirit; to dishearten. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disanimate \Dis*an"i*mate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disanimated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Disanimating}.]
      1. To deprive of life. [R.] --Cudworth.
  
      2. To deprive of spirit; to dishearten. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disanimation \Dis*an`i*ma"tion\, n.
      1. Privation of life. [R.] --Sir T. Browne.
  
      2. The state of being disanimated or discouraged; depression
            of spirits.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disanoint \Dis`a*noint"\, v. t.
      To invalidate the consecration of; as, to disanoint a king.
      [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommend \Dis`com*mend"\, v. t.
      1. To mention with disapprobation; to blame; to disapprove.
            [R.] --Spenser.
  
                     By commending something in him that is good, and
                     discommending the same fault in others. --Jer.
                                                                              Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommendable \Dis`com*mend"a*ble\, a.
      Deserving, disapprobation or blame. --
      {Dis`com*mend"a*ble*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommendable \Dis`com*mend"a*ble\, a.
      Deserving, disapprobation or blame. --
      {Dis`com*mend"a*ble*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommendation \Dis*com`men*da"tion\, n.
      Blame; censure; reproach. [R.] --Ayliffe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommender \Dis`com*mend"er\, n.
      One who discommends; a dispraiser. --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommon \Dis*com"mon\, v. t.
      1. To deprive of the right of common. [R.] --Bp. Hall.
  
      2. To deprive of privileges. [R.] --T. Warton.
  
      3. (Law) To deprive of commonable quality, as lands, by
            inclosing or appropriating. --Burrill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Discommunity \Dis`com*mu"ni*ty\, n.
      A lack of common possessions, properties, or relationship.
  
               Community of embryonic structure reveals community of
               descent; but dissimilarity of embryonic development
               does not prove discommunity of descent.   --Darwin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disenamor \Dis`en*am"or\, v. t.
      To free from the captivity of love. --Shelton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disinhume \Dis`in*hume"\, v. t.
      To disinter. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disjoin \Dis*join"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disjoined}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Disjoining}.] [OF. desjoindre, F. disjoindre,
      d[82]joindre, fr. L. disjungere; dis- + jungere to join. See
      {Join}, and cf. {Disjoint}, {Disjunct}.]
      To part; to disunite; to separate; to sunder.
  
               That marriage, therefore, God himself disjoins.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
               Never let us lay down our arms against France, till we
               have utterly disjoined her from the Spanish monarchy.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
               Windmill Street consisted of disjoined houses.
                                                                              --Pennant.
  
      Syn: To disunite; separate; detach; sever; dissever; sunder;
               disconnect.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disman \Dis*man"\, v. t.
      To unman. [Obs.] --Feltham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismantle \Dis*man"tle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismantled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismantling}.] [F. d[82]manteler, OF.
      desmanteler; pref: des- (L. dis-) + manteler to cover with a
      cloak, defend, fr. mantel, F. manteau, cloak. See {Mantle}.]
      1. To strip or deprive of dress; to divest.
  
      2. To strip of furniture and equipments, guns, etc.; to
            unrig; to strip of walls or outworks; to break down; as,
            to dismantle a fort, a town, or a ship.
  
                     A dismantled house, without windows or shutters to
                     keep out the rain.                              --Macaulay.
  
      3. To disable; to render useless. --Comber.
  
      Syn: To demo[?]sh; raze. See {Demol[?]sh}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismantle \Dis*man"tle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismantled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismantling}.] [F. d[82]manteler, OF.
      desmanteler; pref: des- (L. dis-) + manteler to cover with a
      cloak, defend, fr. mantel, F. manteau, cloak. See {Mantle}.]
      1. To strip or deprive of dress; to divest.
  
      2. To strip of furniture and equipments, guns, etc.; to
            unrig; to strip of walls or outworks; to break down; as,
            to dismantle a fort, a town, or a ship.
  
                     A dismantled house, without windows or shutters to
                     keep out the rain.                              --Macaulay.
  
      3. To disable; to render useless. --Comber.
  
      Syn: To demo[?]sh; raze. See {Demol[?]sh}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismantle \Dis*man"tle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismantled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismantling}.] [F. d[82]manteler, OF.
      desmanteler; pref: des- (L. dis-) + manteler to cover with a
      cloak, defend, fr. mantel, F. manteau, cloak. See {Mantle}.]
      1. To strip or deprive of dress; to divest.
  
      2. To strip of furniture and equipments, guns, etc.; to
            unrig; to strip of walls or outworks; to break down; as,
            to dismantle a fort, a town, or a ship.
  
                     A dismantled house, without windows or shutters to
                     keep out the rain.                              --Macaulay.
  
      3. To disable; to render useless. --Comber.
  
      Syn: To demo[?]sh; raze. See {Demol[?]sh}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismay \Dis*may"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismayed}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Dismaying}.] [OE. desmaien, dismaien, OF. esmaier; pref.
      es- (L. ex) + OHG. magan to be strong or able; akin to E.
      may. In English the pref. es- was changed to dis- (L. dis-).
      See {May}, v. i.]
      1. To disable with alarm or apprehensions; to depress the
            spirits or courage of; to deprive or firmness and energy
            through fear; to daunt; to appall; to terrify.
  
                     Be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed. --Josh. i.
                                                                              9.
  
                     What words be these? What fears do you dismay?
                                                                              --Fairfax.
  
      2. To render lifeless; to subdue; to disquiet. [Obs.]
  
                     Do not dismay yourself for this.         --Spenser.
  
      Syn: To terrify; fright; affright; frighten; appall; daunt;
               dishearthen; dispirit; discourage; deject; depress. --
               To {Dismay}, {Daunt}, {Appall}. Dismay denotes a state
               of deep and gloomy apprehension. To daunt supposes
               something more sudden and startling. To appall is the
               strongest term, implying a sense of terror which
               overwhelms the faculties.
  
                        So flies a herd of beeves, that hear, dismayed,
                        The lions roaring through the midnight shade.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
                        Jove got such heroes as my sire, whose soul No
                        fear could daunt, nor earth nor hell control.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
                        Now the last ruin the whole host appalls; Now
                        Greece has trembled in her wooden walls. --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismember \Dis*mem"ber\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismembered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismembering}.] [OF. desmembrer, F.
      d[82]membrer; pref. des- (L. dis) + OF. & F. membre limb. See
      {Member}.]
      1. To tear limb from limb; to dilacerate; to disjoin member
            from member; to tear or cut in pieces; to break up.
  
                     Fowls obscene dismembered his remains. --Pope.
  
                     A society lacerated and dismembered.   --Gladstone.
  
                     By whose hands the blow should be struck which would
                     dismember that once mighty empire.      --Buckle.
  
      2. To deprive of membership. [Obs.]
  
                     They were dismembered by vote of the house. --R.
                                                                              North.
  
      Syn: To disjoint; dislocate; dilacerate; mutilate; divide;
               sever.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismember \Dis*mem"ber\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismembered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismembering}.] [OF. desmembrer, F.
      d[82]membrer; pref. des- (L. dis) + OF. & F. membre limb. See
      {Member}.]
      1. To tear limb from limb; to dilacerate; to disjoin member
            from member; to tear or cut in pieces; to break up.
  
                     Fowls obscene dismembered his remains. --Pope.
  
                     A society lacerated and dismembered.   --Gladstone.
  
                     By whose hands the blow should be struck which would
                     dismember that once mighty empire.      --Buckle.
  
      2. To deprive of membership. [Obs.]
  
                     They were dismembered by vote of the house. --R.
                                                                              North.
  
      Syn: To disjoint; dislocate; dilacerate; mutilate; divide;
               sever.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismember \Dis*mem"ber\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismembered}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Dismembering}.] [OF. desmembrer, F.
      d[82]membrer; pref. des- (L. dis) + OF. & F. membre limb. See
      {Member}.]
      1. To tear limb from limb; to dilacerate; to disjoin member
            from member; to tear or cut in pieces; to break up.
  
                     Fowls obscene dismembered his remains. --Pope.
  
                     A society lacerated and dismembered.   --Gladstone.
  
                     By whose hands the blow should be struck which would
                     dismember that once mighty empire.      --Buckle.
  
      2. To deprive of membership. [Obs.]
  
                     They were dismembered by vote of the house. --R.
                                                                              North.
  
      Syn: To disjoint; dislocate; dilacerate; mutilate; divide;
               sever.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismemberment \Dis*mem"ber*ment\, n. [Cf. OF. desmembrement, F.
      d[82]membrement.]
      The act of dismembering, or the state of being dismembered;
      cutting in piece; m[?]tilation; division; separation.
  
               The Castilians would doubtless have resented the
               dismemberment of the unwieldy body of which they formed
               the head.                                                --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismount \Dis*mount"\, v. t.
      1. To throw or bring down from an elevation, place of honor
            and authority, or the like.
  
                     Dismounted from his authority.            --Barrow.
  
      2. To throw or remove from a horse; to unhorse; as, the
            soldier dismounted his adversary.
  
      3. (Mech.) To take down, or apart, as a machine.
  
      4. To throw or remove from the carriage, or from that on
            which a thing is mounted; to break the carriage or wheels
            of, and render useless; to deprive of equipments or
            mountings; -- said esp. of artillery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismount \Dis*mount"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dismounted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Dismounting}.] [Pref. dis- + mount: cf. OF.
      desmonter, F. d[82]monter.]
      1. To come down; to descend. [Poetic]
  
                     But now the bright sun ginneth to dismount.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. To alight from a horse; to descend or get off, as a rider
            from his beast; as, the troops dismounted.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismount \Dis*mount"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dismounted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Dismounting}.] [Pref. dis- + mount: cf. OF.
      desmonter, F. d[82]monter.]
      1. To come down; to descend. [Poetic]
  
                     But now the bright sun ginneth to dismount.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. To alight from a horse; to descend or get off, as a rider
            from his beast; as, the troops dismounted.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dismount \Dis*mount"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dismounted}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Dismounting}.] [Pref. dis- + mount: cf. OF.
      desmonter, F. d[82]monter.]
      1. To come down; to descend. [Poetic]
  
                     But now the bright sun ginneth to dismount.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. To alight from a horse; to descend or get off, as a rider
            from his beast; as, the troops dismounted.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disown \Dis*own"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disowned}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Disowning}.]
      1. To refuse to own or acknowledge as belonging to one's
            self; to disavow or deny, as connected with one's self
            personally; as, a parent can hardly disown his child; an
            author will sometimes disown his writings.
  
      2. To refuse to acknowledge or allow; to deny.
  
                     Then they, who brother's better claim disown, Expel
                     their parents, and usurp the throne.   --Dryden.
  
      Syn: To disavow; disclaim; deny; abnegate; renounce;
               disallow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disownment \Dis*own"ment\, n.
      Act of disowning. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminate \Dis*sem"i*nate\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Disseminated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disseminating}.] [L.
      disseminatus, p. p. of disseminare to disseminate; dis- +
      seminare to sow, semen seed. See {Seminary}.]
      1. To sow broadcast or as seed; to scatter for growth and
            propagation, like seed; to spread abroad; to diffuse; as,
            principles, ideas, opinions, and errors are disseminated
            when they are spread abroad for propagation.
  
      2. To spread or extend by dispersion.
  
                     A nearly uniform and constant fire or heat
                     disseminated throughout the body of the earth.
                                                                              --Woodward.
  
      Syn: To spread; diffuse; propagate; circulate; disperse;
               scatter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminate \Dis*sem"i*nate\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Disseminated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disseminating}.] [L.
      disseminatus, p. p. of disseminare to disseminate; dis- +
      seminare to sow, semen seed. See {Seminary}.]
      1. To sow broadcast or as seed; to scatter for growth and
            propagation, like seed; to spread abroad; to diffuse; as,
            principles, ideas, opinions, and errors are disseminated
            when they are spread abroad for propagation.
  
      2. To spread or extend by dispersion.
  
                     A nearly uniform and constant fire or heat
                     disseminated throughout the body of the earth.
                                                                              --Woodward.
  
      Syn: To spread; diffuse; propagate; circulate; disperse;
               scatter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminated \Dis*sem"i*na`ted\, p. a. (Min.)
      Occurring in small portions scattered through some other
      substance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminate \Dis*sem"i*nate\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p.
      {Disseminated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disseminating}.] [L.
      disseminatus, p. p. of disseminare to disseminate; dis- +
      seminare to sow, semen seed. See {Seminary}.]
      1. To sow broadcast or as seed; to scatter for growth and
            propagation, like seed; to spread abroad; to diffuse; as,
            principles, ideas, opinions, and errors are disseminated
            when they are spread abroad for propagation.
  
      2. To spread or extend by dispersion.
  
                     A nearly uniform and constant fire or heat
                     disseminated throughout the body of the earth.
                                                                              --Woodward.
  
      Syn: To spread; diffuse; propagate; circulate; disperse;
               scatter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dissemination \Dis*sem`i*na"tion\, n. [L. disseminatio: cf. F.
      diss[82]mination.]
      The act of disseminating, or the state of being disseminated;
      diffusion for propagation and permanence; a scattering or
      spreading abroad, as of ideas, beliefs, etc.
  
               The universal dissemination of those writings.
                                                                              --Wayland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminative \Dis*sem"i*na*tive\, a.
      Tending to disseminate, or to become disseminated.
  
               The effect of heresy is, like the plague, infectious
               and disseminative.                                 --Jer. Taylor.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disseminator \Dis*sem"i*na`tor\, n. [L.]
      One who, or that which, disseminates, spreads, or propagates;
      as, disseminators of disease.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dissonance \Dis"so*nance\, n. [L. dissonantia: cf. F.
      dissonance.]
      1. A mingling of discordant sounds; an inharmonious
            combination of sounds; discord.
  
                     Filled the air with barbarous dissonance. --Milton.
  
      2. Want of agreement; incongruity. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dissonancy \Dis"so*nan*cy\, n.
      Discord; dissonance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dissonant \Dis"so*nant\, a. [L. dissonans, -antis, p. pr. of
      dissonare to disagree in sound, be discordant; dis- + sonare
      to sound: cf. F. dissonant. See {Sonant}.]
      1. Sounding harshly; discordant; unharmonious.
  
                     With clamor of voices dissonant and loud.
                                                                              --Longfellow.
  
      2. Disagreeing; incongruous; discrepant, -- with from or to.
            [bd]Anything dissonant to truth.[b8] --South.
  
                     What can be dissonant from reason and nature than
                     that a man, naturally inclined to clemency, should
                     show himself unkind and inhuman?         --Hakewill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disunion \Dis*un"ion\, n. [Pref. dis- + union: cf. F.
      d[82]sunion.]
      1. The termination of union; separation; disjunction; as, the
            disunion of the body and the soul.
  
      2. A breach of concord and its effect; alienation.
  
                     Such a disunion between the two houses as might much
                     clou[?] the happiness of this kingdom. --Clarendon.
  
      3. The termination or disruption of the union of the States
            forming the United States.
  
                     I have not accustomed myself to hang over the
                     precipice of disunion.                        --D. Webster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Disunionist \Dis*un"ion*ist\, n.
      An advocate of disunion, specifically, of disunion of the
      United States.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dizen \Diz"en\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dizened}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Dizening}.] [Perh. orig., to dress in a foolish manner, and
      allied to dizzy: but cf. also OE. dysyn (Palsgrave) to put
      tow or flax on a distaff, i. e., to dress it. Cf. {Distaff}.]
      1. To dress; to attire. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl.
  
      2. To dress gaudily; to overdress; to bedizen; to deck out.
  
                     Like a tragedy queen, he has dizened her out.
                                                                              --Goldsmith.
  
                     To-morrow when the masks shall fall That dizen
                     Nature's carnival.                              --Emerson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Document \Doc"u*ment\, n. [LL. documentum, fr. docere to teach:
      cf. F. document. See {Docile}.]
      1. That which is taught or authoritatively set forth;
            precept; instruction; dogma. [Obs.]
  
                     Learners should not be too much crowded with a heap
                     or multitude of documents or ideas at one time. --
                                                                              I. Watts.
  
      2. An example for instruction or warning. [Obs.]
  
                     They were forth with stoned to death, as a document
                     to others.                                          -- Sir W.
                                                                              Raleigh.
  
      3. An original or official paper relied upon as the basis,
            proof, or support of anything else; -- in its most
            extended sense, including any writing, book, or other
            instrument conveying information in the case; any material
            substance on which the thoughts of men are represented by
            any species of conventional mark or symbol.
  
                     Saint Luke . . . collected them from such documents
                     and testimonies as he . . . judged to be authentic.
                                                                              --Paley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Document \Doc"u*ment\, v. t.
      1. To teach; to school. [Obs.]
  
                     I am finely documented by my own daughter. --
                                                                              Dryden.
  
      2. To furnish with documents or papers necessary to establish
            facts or give information; as, a a ship should be
            documented according to the directions of law.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Documental \Doc`u*men"tal\, a.
      1. Of or pertaining to instruction. [Obs.] --Dr. H. More.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to written evidence; documentary; as,
            documental testimony.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Documentary \Doc`u*men"ta*ry\, a.
      Pertaining to written evidence; contained or certified in
      writing. [bd]Documentary evidence.[b8] --Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dysnomy \Dys"no*my\, n. [Gr. [?]; [?] ill, bad + [?] law.]
      Bad legislation; the enactment of bad laws. --Cockeram.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Des Moines, IA (city, FIPS 21000)
      Location: 41.57674 N, 93.61741 W
      Population (1990): 193187 (83289 housing units)
      Area: 194.9 sq km (land), 3.8 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 50309, 50310, 50312, 50313, 50314, 50315, 50316, 50320, 50321
   Des Moines, NM (village, FIPS 20480)
      Location: 36.76134 N, 103.83329 W
      Population (1990): 168 (80 housing units)
      Area: 3.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 88418
   Des Moines, WA (city, FIPS 17635)
      Location: 47.39550 N, 122.30947 W
      Population (1990): 17283 (7438 housing units)
      Area: 8.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 98198

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Des Moines County, IA (county, FIPS 57)
      Location: 40.92086 N, 91.17492 W
      Population (1990): 42614 (18248 housing units)
      Area: 1077.9 sq km (land), 35.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dishman, WA (CDP, FIPS 17985)
      Location: 47.65895 N, 117.27545 W
      Population (1990): 9671 (4207 housing units)
      Area: 8.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dixmont, ME
      Zip code(s): 04932

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dousman, WI (village, FIPS 20550)
      Location: 43.01484 N, 88.47136 W
      Population (1990): 1277 (369 housing units)
      Area: 2.7 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 53118

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   documentation n.   The multiple kilograms of macerated,
   pounded, steamed, bleached, and pressed trees that accompany most
   modern software or hardware products (see also {tree-killer}).
   Hackers seldom read paper documentation and (too) often resist
   writing it; they prefer theirs to be terse and on-line.   A common
   comment on this predilection is "You can't {grep} dead trees".   See
   {drool-proof paper}, {verbiage}, {treeware}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   disman
  
      {Distributed Management}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   document
  
      1. Any specific type of {file} produced or
      edited by a specific {application}; usually capable of being
      printed.   E.g. "Word document", "Photoshop document", etc.
  
      2. A term used on some systems (e.g. {Intermedia})
      for a {hypertext} {node}.   It is sometimes used for a
      collection of nodes on related topics, possibly stored or
      distributed as one.
  
      3. To write {documentation} on a certain piece
      of code.
  
      (2003-10-25)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Document Examiner
  
      A high-performance {hypertext} system by
      {Symbolics} that provides on-line access to their user
      documentation.
  
      (1995-04-16)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Document Image Processing
  
      (DIP) Storage, management and retrieval of {image}s.
  
      (1994-11-11)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Document Object Model
  
      A {W3C} specification
      for {application program interfaces} for accessing the content
      of {HTML} and {XML} documents.
  
      {Home (http://www.w3.org/DOM/)}.
  
      (1999-12-14)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Document Style Semantics and Specification Language
  
      (DSSSL) An {ISO} {standard} under preparation, addressing the
      {semantics} of high-quality composition in a manner
      independent of particular formatting systems or processes.
      DSSSL is intended as a complementary standard to {SGML} for
      the specification of semantics.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Document Type Definition
  
      (DTD) The definition of a document type in
      {SGML} or {XML}, consisting of a set of {mark-up} tags and
      their interpretation.
  
      {Docbook DTD home (http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/)}.
  
      {XML DTD Tutorial (http://www.xml101.com/dtd)}.
  
      (2001-04-30)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   documentation
  
      The multiple kilograms of macerated, pounded,
      steamed, bleached, and pressed trees that accompany most
      modern software or hardware products (see also {tree-killer}).
      Hackers seldom read paper documentation and (too) often resist
      writing it; they prefer theirs to be terse and {on-line}.   A
      common comment on this predilection is "You can't {grep} dead
      trees".
  
      See {drool-proof paper}, {verbiage}, {treeware}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (2003-10-25)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Daysman
      an umpire or arbiter or judge (Job 9:33). This word is formed
      from the Latin diem dicere, i.e., to fix a day for hearing a
      cause. Such an one is empowered by mutual consent to decide the
      cause, and to "lay his hand", i.e., to impose his authority, on
      both, and enforce his sentence.
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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