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   damaged
         adj 1: harmed or injured or spoiled; "I won't buy damaged
                  goods"; "the storm left a wake of badly damaged
                  buildings" [ant: {undamaged}]
         2: being unjustly brought into disrepute; "a discredited
            politician"; "her damaged reputation" [syn: {discredited},
            {damaged}]

English Dictionary: D'Ansit by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Damask steel
n
  1. a hard resilient steel often decorated and used for sword blades
    Synonym(s): Damascus steel, Damask steel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
n
  1. prolific English writer of detective stories (1890-1976)
    Synonym(s): Christie, Agatha Christie, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
danse du ventre
n
  1. a Middle Eastern dance in which the dancer makes sensuous movements of the hips and abdomen
    Synonym(s): belly dance, belly dancing, danse du ventre
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dean Gooderham Acheson
n
  1. United States statesman who promoted the Marshall Plan and helped establish NATO (1893-1971)
    Synonym(s): Acheson, Dean Acheson, Dean Gooderham Acheson
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Deems Taylor
n
  1. United States composer and music critic (1885-1966) [syn: Taylor, Deems Taylor, Joseph Deems Taylor]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dehong Dai
n
  1. a branch of the Tai languages [syn: Tai Nuea, {Chinese Shan}, Dehong Dai]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
demigod
n
  1. a person with great powers and abilities [syn: demigod, superman, Ubermensch]
  2. a person who is part mortal and part god
    Synonym(s): daemon, demigod
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
demist
v
  1. free from mist; "demist the car windows" [syn: demist, defog]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
demister
n
  1. heater that removes mist from the windshield of a car
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Demosthenes
n
  1. Athenian statesman and orator (circa 385-322 BC)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Demosthenic
adj
  1. of or relating to Demosthenes or his oratory
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
demystify
v
  1. make less mysterious or remove the mystery from; "let's demystify the event by explaining what it is all about"
    Antonym(s): mystify
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Denis Diderot
n
  1. French philosopher who was a leading figure of the Enlightenment in France; principal editor of an encyclopedia that disseminated the scientific and philosophical knowledge of the time (1713-1784)
    Synonym(s): Diderot, Denis Diderot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dennstaedtia
n
  1. chiefly terrestrial ferns; in some classification systems placed in family Polypodiaceae
    Synonym(s): Dennstaedtia, genus Dennstaedtia
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dennstaedtia punctilobula
n
  1. fern of eastern North America with pale green fronds and an aroma like hay
    Synonym(s): hay-scented, hay-scented fern, scented fern, boulder fern, Dennstaedtia punctilobula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Dennstaedtiaceae
n
  1. one of a number of families into which Polypodiaceae has been subdivided in some classification systems
    Synonym(s): Dennstaedtiaceae, family Dennstaedtiaceae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
densitometer
n
  1. a measuring instrument for determining optical or photographic density
  2. a measuring instrument for determining density or specific gravity
    Synonym(s): densimeter, densitometer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
densitometry
n
  1. measuring the optical density of a substance by shining light on it and measuring its transmission
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
density
n
  1. the amount per unit size
    Synonym(s): density, denseness
  2. the spatial property of being crowded together
    Synonym(s): concentration, density, denseness, tightness, compactness
    Antonym(s): dispersion, distribution
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
ding-dong
n
  1. the noise made by a bell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dingdong
adv
  1. heartily or earnestly; "They fell to work dingdong"
v
  1. go `ding dong', like a bell [syn: ding, dong, dingdong]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Domesday Book
n
  1. record of a British census and land survey in 1085-1086 ordered by William the Conqueror
    Synonym(s): Domesday Book, Doomsday Book
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic
adj
  1. of concern to or concerning the internal affairs of a nation; "domestic issues such as tax rate and highway construction"
    Antonym(s): foreign
  2. of or relating to the home; "domestic servant"; "domestic science"
  3. of or involving the home or family; "domestic worries"; "domestic happiness"; "they share the domestic chores"; "everything sounded very peaceful and domestic"; "an author of blood-and-thunder novels yet quite domestic in his taste"
    Antonym(s): undomestic
  4. converted or adapted to domestic use; "domestic animals"; "domesticated plants like maize"
    Synonym(s): domestic, domesticated
  5. produced in a particular country; "domestic wine"; "domestic oil"
n
  1. a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
    Synonym(s): domestic, domestic help, house servant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic animal
n
  1. any of various animals that have been tamed and made fit for a human environment
    Synonym(s): domestic animal, domesticated animal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic ass
n
  1. domestic beast of burden descended from the African wild ass; patient but stubborn
    Synonym(s): domestic ass, donkey, Equus asinus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic carp
n
  1. large Old World freshwater bottom-feeding fish introduced into Europe from Asia; inhabits ponds and sluggish streams and often raised for food; introduced into United States where it has become a pest
    Synonym(s): domestic carp, Cyprinus carpio
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic cat
n
  1. any domesticated member of the genus Felis [syn: {domestic cat}, house cat, Felis domesticus, Felis catus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic dog
n
  1. a member of the genus Canis (probably descended from the common wolf) that has been domesticated by man since prehistoric times; occurs in many breeds; "the dog barked all night"
    Synonym(s): dog, domestic dog, Canis familiaris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic flight
n
  1. a flight that begins and ends in the same country [ant: international flight]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic fowl
n
  1. a domesticated gallinaceous bird thought to be descended from the red jungle fowl
    Synonym(s): domestic fowl, fowl, poultry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic goat
n
  1. any of various breeds of goat raised for milk or meat or wool
    Synonym(s): domestic goat, Capra hircus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic help
n
  1. a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
    Synonym(s): domestic, domestic help, house servant
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic llama
n
  1. used in the Andes as a beast of burden and source of wool; considered a domesticated variety of the guanaco
    Synonym(s): domestic llama, Lama peruana
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic partner
n
  1. a person (not necessarily a spouse) with whom you cohabit and share a long-term sexual relationship
    Synonym(s): domestic partner, significant other, spousal equivalent, spouse equivalent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic pigeon
n
  1. domesticated pigeon raised for sport or food
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic prelate
n
  1. (Roman Catholic Church) a priest who is an honorary member of the papal household
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic relations court
n
  1. a court in some states in the United States that has jurisdiction over family disputes (especially those involving children)
    Synonym(s): family court, domestic relations court, court of domestic relations
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic science
n
  1. theory and practice of homemaking [syn: home economics, home ec, domestic science, household arts]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic sheep
n
  1. any of various breeds raised for wool or edible meat or skin
    Synonym(s): domestic sheep, Ovis aries
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic silkworm moth
n
  1. stocky creamy-white Asiatic moth found almost entirely under human care; the source of most of the silk commerce
    Synonym(s): domestic silkworm moth, domesticated silkworm moth, Bombyx mori
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic terrorism
n
  1. terrorism practiced in your own country against your own people; "the 1995 bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City was an instance of domestic terrorism"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestic violence
n
  1. violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partner; usually violence by men against women
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestically
adv
  1. with respect to the internal affairs of a government; "domestically, the president proposes a more moderate economic policy"
  2. with respect to home or family; "the housewife bored us with her domestically limited conversation"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticate
v
  1. adapt (a wild plant or unclaimed land) to the environment; "domesticate oats"; "tame the soil"
    Synonym(s): domesticate, cultivate, naturalize, naturalise, tame
  2. overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable; "He tames lions for the circus"; "reclaim falcons"
    Synonym(s): domesticate, domesticize, domesticise, reclaim, tame
  3. make fit for cultivation, domestic life, and service to humans; "The horse was domesticated a long time ago"; "The wolf was tamed and evolved into the house dog"
    Synonym(s): domesticate, tame
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticated
adj
  1. converted or adapted to domestic use; "domestic animals"; "domesticated plants like maize"
    Synonym(s): domestic, domesticated
  2. accustomed to home life; "some men think it unmanly to be domesticated; others find gratification in it"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticated animal
n
  1. any of various animals that have been tamed and made fit for a human environment
    Synonym(s): domestic animal, domesticated animal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticated silkworm moth
n
  1. stocky creamy-white Asiatic moth found almost entirely under human care; the source of most of the silk commerce
    Synonym(s): domestic silkworm moth, domesticated silkworm moth, Bombyx mori
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domestication
n
  1. adaptation to intimate association with human beings
  2. the attribute of having been domesticated
    Synonym(s): tameness, domestication
    Antonym(s): wildness
  3. accommodation to domestic life; "her explorer husband resisted all her attempts at domestication"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticise
v
  1. overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable; "He tames lions for the circus"; "reclaim falcons"
    Synonym(s): domesticate, domesticize, domesticise, reclaim, tame
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticity
n
  1. the quality of being domestic or domesticated; "a royal family living in unpretentious domesticity"
  2. domestic activities or life; "making a hobby of domesticity"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
domesticize
v
  1. overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable; "He tames lions for the circus"; "reclaim falcons"
    Synonym(s): domesticate, domesticize, domesticise, reclaim, tame
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Donizetti
n
  1. Italian composer of operas (1797-1848) [syn: Donizetti, Gaetano Donizetti]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Doomsday
n
  1. (New Testament) day at the end of time following Armageddon when God will decree the fates of all individual humans according to the good and evil of their earthly lives
    Synonym(s): Judgment Day, Judgement Day, Day of Judgment, Day of Judgement, Doomsday, Last Judgment, Last Judgement, Last Day, eschaton, day of reckoning, doomsday, crack of doom, end of the world
  2. an unpleasant or disastrous destiny; "everyone was aware of the approaching doom but was helpless to avoid it"; "that's unfortunate but it isn't the end of the world"
    Synonym(s): doom, doomsday, day of reckoning, end of the world
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Doomsday Book
n
  1. record of a British census and land survey in 1085-1086 ordered by William the Conqueror
    Synonym(s): Domesday Book, Doomsday Book
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Down Easter
n
  1. a native or resident of Maine [syn: Mainer, {Down Easter}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downside
n
  1. a negative aspect of something that is generally positive; "there is a downside even to motherhood"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downstage
adv
  1. at or toward the front of the stage; "the actors moved further and further downstage"
    Antonym(s): upstage
adj
  1. of the front half of a stage
    Antonym(s): upstage
n
  1. the front half of the stage (as seen from the audience)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downstair
adj
  1. on or of lower floors of a building; "the downstairs (or downstair) phone"
    Synonym(s): downstairs, downstair
    Antonym(s): upstair, upstairs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downstairs
adv
  1. on a floor below; "the tenants live downstairs" [syn: downstairs, down the stairs, on a lower floor, below]
    Antonym(s): on a higher floor, up the stairs, upstairs
adj
  1. on or of lower floors of a building; "the downstairs (or downstair) phone"
    Synonym(s): downstairs, downstair
    Antonym(s): upstair, upstairs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downstream
adv
  1. away from the source or with the current [syn: downriver, downstream]
    Antonym(s): upriver, upstream
adj
  1. in the direction of a stream's current
    Antonym(s): upstream
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downstroke
n
  1. a stroke normally made in a downward direction
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
downy cheat
n
  1. annual or winter annual grass with softly hairy leaves of the Mediterranean
    Synonym(s): downy brome, downy bromegrass, downy cheat, downy chess, cheatgrass, drooping brome, Bromus tectorum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dummy whist
n
  1. a form of whist with three players; four hands are dealt with the hand opposite the dealer being face up
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dunk shot
n
  1. a basketball shot in which the basketball is propelled downward into the basket
    Synonym(s): dunk, dunk shot, stuff shot
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Duns Scotus
n
  1. Scottish theologian who was very influential in the Middle Ages (1265-1308)
    Synonym(s): Duns Scotus, John Duns Scotus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dynast
n
  1. a hereditary ruler
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dynastic
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of a dynasty
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
dynasty
n
  1. a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Amassette \[d8]A`mas`sette"\, n. [F. See {Amass}.]
      An instrument of horn used for collecting painters' colors on
      the stone in the process of grinding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Amusette \[d8]Am`u*sette"\, n. [F.]
      A light field cannon, or stocked gun mounted on a swivel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Amygdala \[d8]A*myg"da*la\ ([adot]*m[icr]g"d[adot]*l[adot]),
      n.; pl. {-l[ae]} (-l[emac]). [L., an almond, fr. Gr.
      'amygda`lh. See {Almond}.]
      1. An almond.
  
      2. (Anat.)
            (a) One of the tonsils of the pharynx.
            (b) One of the rounded prominences of the lower surface of
                  the lateral hemispheres of the cerebellum, each side
                  of the vallecula.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8An91sthesia \[d8]An`[91]s*the"si*a\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?]; 'an
      priv. + [?] feeling, [?] to feel: cf. F. anesth[82]sie. See
      {[92]sthetics}.] (Med.)
      Entire or partial loss or absence of feeling or sensation; a
      state of general or local insensibility produced by disease
      or by the inhalation or application of an an[91]sthetic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8An91sthesis \[d8]An`[91]s*the"sis\, n.
      See {An[91]sthesia}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anacd2nosis \[d8]An`a*c[d2]*no"sis\, n. [Gr. [?], fr. [?], to
      communicate; [?] up + [?] to make common, [?] common.]
      (Rhet.)
      A figure by which a speaker appeals to his hearers or
      opponents for their opinion on the point in debate. --Walker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anastomosis \[d8]A*nas`to*mo"sis\, n.; pl. {Anastomoses}.
      [NL., fr. Gr. [?] opening, fr. [?] to furnish with a mouth or
      opening, to open; [?] + sto`ma mouth: cf. F. anastomose.]
      (Anat. & Bot.)
      The inosculation of vessels, or intercommunication between
      two or more vessels or nerves, as the cross communication
      between arteries or veins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anastrophe \[d8]A*nas"tro*phe\, n. [Gr. [?], fr. [?] to turn
      up or back; [?] + [?] to turn.] (Rhet. & Gram.)
      An inversion of the natural order of words; as, echoed the
      hills, for, the hills echoed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anesthesia \[d8]An`es*the"si*a\, n., Anesthetic
   \An`es*thet"ic\, a.
      Same as {An[91]sthesia}, {An[91]sthetic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anicut \[d8]An"i*cut\, d8Annicut \[d8]An"ni*cut\, n. [Tamil
      anai kattu dam building.]
      A dam or mole made in the course of a stream for the purpose
      of regulating the flow of a system of irrigation. [India]
      --Brande & C.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anisette \[d8]An`i*sette"\, n. [F.]
      A French cordial or liqueur flavored with anise seeds. --De
      Colange.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anisodactyla \[d8]An`i*so*dac"ty*la\, Anisodactyls
   \An`i*so*dac"tyls\, n. pl. [NL. anisodactyla, fr. Gr. 'a`nisos
      unequal ('an priv. + 'i`sos equal) + da`ktylos finger.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A group of herbivorous mammals characterized by having
            the hoofs in a single series around the foot, as the
            elephant, rhinoceros, etc.
      (b) A group of perching birds which are anisodactylous.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Anicut \[d8]An"i*cut\, d8Annicut \[d8]An"ni*cut\, n. [Tamil
      anai kattu dam building.]
      A dam or mole made in the course of a stream for the purpose
      of regulating the flow of a system of irrigation. [India]
      --Brande & C.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Dinichthys \[d8]Di*nich"thys\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] terrible +
      [?] fish.] (Paleon.)
      A genus of large extinct Devonian ganoid fishes. In some
      parts of Ohio remains of the Dinichthys are abundant,
      indicating animals twenty feet in length.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Dynasta \[d8]Dy*nas"ta\, n. [NL. See {Dynast}.]
      A tyrant. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Enchodus \[d8]En"cho*dus\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] a spear + [?],
      [?], a tooth.] (Paleon.)
      A genus of extinct Cretaceous fishes; -- so named from their
      spear-shaped teeth. They were allied to the pike ({Esox}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8H91mocytolysis \[d8]H[91]m`o*cy*tol"y*sis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr.
      a"i^ma blood + [?] hollow vessel + [?] to loosen, dissolve.]
      (Physiol.)
      See {H[91]mocytotrypsis}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8H91mocytotrypsis \[d8]H[91]m`o*cy`to*tryp"sis\, n. [NL., fr.
      Gr. a"i^ma blood + [?] hollow vessel+[?] to rub, grind.]
      (Physiol.)
      A breaking up of the blood corpuscles, as by pressure, in
      distinction from solution of the corpuscles, or
      h[91]mcytolysis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8In situ \[d8]In` si"tu\ [L.]
      In its natural position or place; -- said of a rock or
      fossil, when found in the situation in which it was
      originally formed or deposited.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8In situ \[d8]In si"tu\ [L.]
      In its natural or original position or place; in position; --
      said specif., in geology, of a rock, soil, or fossil, when in
      the situation in which it was originally formed or deposited.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Instanter \[d8]In*stan"ter\, adv. [L., vehemently, earnestly.
      See {Instant}, n. & a.]
      Immediately; instantly; at once; as, he left instanter.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mac82doine \[d8]Ma`c[82]`doine"\, n. [F., apparently the same
      word as Mac[82]doine Macedonia.]
      A kind of mixed dish, as of cooked vegetables with white
      sauce, sweet jelly with whole fruit, etc. Also, fig., a
      medley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Machete \[d8]Ma*che"te\, n. [Sp.]
      A large heavy knife resembling a broadsword, often two or
      three feet in length, -- used by the inhabitants of Spanish
      America as a hatchet to cut their way through thickets, and
      for various other purposes. --J. Stevens.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mactra \[d8]Mac"tra\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] kneading trough,
      fr. [?] to knead.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any marine bivalve shell of the genus {Mactra}, and allied
      genera. Many species are known. Some of them are used as
      food, as {Mactra stultorum}, of Europe. See {Surf clam},
      under {Surf}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Maestoso \[d8]Ma`es*to"so\, a. & adv. [It.] (Mus.)
      Majestic or majestically; -- a direction to perform a passage
      or piece of music in a dignified manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Maestro \[d8]Ma*es"tro\, n. [It., fr. L. magister. See
      {Master}.]
      A master in any art, especially in music; a composer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mastax \[d8]Mas"tax\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] mouth, jaws.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The pharynx of a rotifer. It usually contains four horny
            pieces. The two central ones form the incus, against
            which the mallei, or lateral ones, work so as to crush
            the food.
      (b) The lore of a bird.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mastigopoda \[d8]Mas`ti*gop"o*da\, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. [?],
      [?], a whip + [?], [?], foot.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The Infusoria.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mastitis \[d8]Mas*ti"tis\, n. [Gr. [?] breast + -itis.] (Med.)
      Inflammation of the breast.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mastodonsaurus \[d8]Mas`to*don*sau"rus\, n. [NL., fr. E.
      Mastodon + Gr. [?] a lizard.] (Paleon.)
      A large extinct genus of labyrinthodonts, found in the
      European Triassic rocks.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mastodynia \[d8]Mas`to*dyn"i*a\, Mastodyny \Mas*tod"y*ny\, n.
      [NL. mastodynia, fr. Gr. [?] the breast + [?] pain.] (Med.)
      Pain occuring in the mamma or female breast, -- a form of
      neuralgia.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mecate \[d8]Me*ca"te\, n. [Sp.]
      A rope of hair or of maguey fiber, for tying horses, etc.
      [Southwestern U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Megathere \Meg"a*there\, d8Megatherium \[d8]Meg`a*the"ri*um\, n.
      [NL. megatherium, fr. Gr. me`gas great + thyri`on beast.]
      (Paleon.)
      An extinct gigantic quaternary mammal, allied to the
      ant-eaters and sloths. Its remains are found in South
      America.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Meistersinger \[d8]Meis"ter*sing`er\, n. [G.]
      See {Mastersinger}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mesdames \[d8]Mes`dames"\ (F. ?, E. ?), n.,
      pl. of {Madame} and {Madam}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mesotheca \[d8]Mes`o*the"ca\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. me`sos middle +
      [?] box.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The middle layer of the gonophore in the Hydrozoa.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mesothelium \[d8]Mes`o*the"li*um\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. me`sos
      middle + E. epithelium.] (Biol.)
      Epithelial mesoderm; a layer of cuboidal epithelium cells,
      formed from a portion of the mesoderm during the
      differetiation of the germ layers. It constitutes the
      boundary of the c[oe]lum.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mesothorium \[d8]Mes`o*tho"ri*um\, n. [NL.; meso- + thorium.]
      (Chem.)
      A radioactive product intermediate between thorium and
      radiothorium, with a period of 5.5 years.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Messidor \[d8]Mes`si`dor"\ (F. ?; E. ?), n. [F., fr. L. messis
      harvest.]
      The tenth month of the French republican calendar dating from
      September 22, 1792. It began June 19, and ended July 18. See
      {Vend[90]miaire}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mezquita \[d8]Mez*qui"ta\, n. [Sp.]
      A mosque.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mistigris \[d8]Mis`ti`gris"\, d8Mistigri \[d8]Mis`ti`gri"\, n.
      [F. mistigri.]
      A variety of the game of poker in which the joker is used,
      and called mistigris or mistigri.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mistigris \[d8]Mis`ti`gris"\, d8Mistigri \[d8]Mis`ti`gri"\, n.
      [F. mistigri.]
      A variety of the game of poker in which the joker is used,
      and called mistigris or mistigri.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mistonusk \[d8]Mis"to*nusk\, n. [From the Indian name.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      The American badger.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mistura \[d8]Mis*tu"ra\, n. [L. See {Mixture}.] (Med.)
      (a) A mingled compound in which different ingredients are
            contained in a liquid state; a mixture. See {Mixture},
            n., 4.
      (b) Sometimes, a liquid medicine containing very active
            substances, and which can only be administered by drops.
            --Dunglison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Moquette \[d8]Mo*quette"\, n. [F.]
      A kind of carpet having a short velvety pile.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mostra \[d8]Mos"tra\, n. [It.] (Mus.)
      See {Direct}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mousquetaire \[d8]Mous`que*taire"\, n. [F.]
      1. A musketeer, esp. one of the French royal musketeers of
            the 17th and 18th centuries, conspicuous both for their
            daring and their fine dress.
  
      2. A mosquetaire cuff or glove, or other article of dress
            fancied to resemble those worn by the French mosquetaires.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mycetes \[d8]My*ce"tes\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. mykhth`s a bellower,
      fr. myka^sqai to bellow.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A genus of South American monkeys, including the howlers. See
      {Howler}, 2, and Illust.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mycetozoa \[d8]My*ce`to*zo"a\, n. pl. [NL.; Gr. [?], [?],
      fungus + [?] pl. of [?] an animal.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The Myxomycetes; -- so called by those who regard them as a
      class of animals. -- {My*ce`to*zo"an}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mycoderma \[d8]My`co*der"ma\, n. [NL., from Gr. my`khs a
      fungus + de`rma skin.]
      1. (Biol.) One of the forms in which bacteria group
            themselves; a more or less thick layer of motionless but
            living bacteria, formed by the bacteria uniting on the
            surface of the fluid in which they are developed. This
            production differs from the zo[94]l[d2]a stage of bacteria
            by not having the intermediary mucous substance.
  
      2. A genus of micro[94]rganisms of which the acetic ferment
            ({Mycoderma aceti}), which converts alcoholic fluids into
            vinegar, is a representative. Cf. {Mother}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Mycothrix \[d8]Myc"o*thrix\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. (spurious) [?]
      mucus (L. mucus) + [?], [?], hair.] (Biol.)
      The chain of micrococci formed by the division of the
      micrococci in multiplication.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Myositis \[d8]My`o*si"tis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?], [?], muscle
      + -itis.] (Med.)
      Inflammation of the muscles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Myosotis \[d8]My`o*so"tis\, n. [NL.; Gr. [?], lit., mouse
      ear.] (Bot.)
      A genus of plants. See {Mouse-ear}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Myxd2dema \[d8]Myx`[d2]*de"ma\, n. [NL. fr. Gr. [?] mucus +
      [d2]dema.] (Med.)
      A disease producing a peculiar cretinoid appearance of the
      face, slow speech, and dullness of intellect, and due to
      failure of the functions of the thyroid gland. --
      {Myx`[d2]*dem"a*tous}, a., {Myx`[d2]*dem"ic}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Ne exeat \[d8]Ne` ex"e*at\ [L. ne exeat regno let him not go
      out of the kingdom.] (Law)
      A writ to restrain a person from leaving the country, or the
      jurisdiction of the court. The writ was originally applicable
      to purposes of state, but is now an ordinary process of
      courts of equity, resorted to for the purpose of obtaining
      bail, or security to abide a decree. --Kent.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nectocalyx \[d8]Nec`to*ca"lyx\, n.; pl. {Nectocalyces}. [NL.,
      fr. gr. [?] swimming + [?] a calyx.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The swimming bell or umbrella of a jellyfish of medusa.
      (b) One of the zooids of certain Siphonophora, having
            somewhat the form, and the essential structure, of the
            bell of a jellyfish, and acting as a swimming organ.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Neishout \[d8]Neis"hout\, n. [From D. niezen to sneeze + hout
      wood.] (Bot.)
      The mahogany-like wood of the South African tree Pteroxylon
      utile, the sawdust of which causes violent sneezing (whence
      the name). Also called sneezewood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nicotiana \[d8]Ni*co`ti*a"na\, n. [NL. See {Nicotian}.] (Bot.)
      A genus of American and Asiatic solanaceous herbs, with
      viscid foliage and funnel-shaped blossoms. Several species
      yield tobacco. See {Tobacco}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Noctiluca \[d8]Noc`ti*lu"ca\, n.; pl. {Noctiluc[92]}. [L.
      noctiluca something that shines by night, fr. nox, noctis,
      night + lucere to shine, lux light.]
      1. (Old Chem.) That which shines at night; -- a fanciful name
            for phosphorus.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A genus of marine flagellate Infusoria,
            remarkable for their unusually large size and complex
            structure, as well as for their phosphorescence. The
            brilliant diffuse phosphorescence of the sea is often due
            to myriads of Noctiluc[91].

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nougat \[d8]Nou`gat"\, n. [F.]
      A cake, sweetmeat, or confecti[a2]n made with almonds or
      other nuts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nyctalopia \[d8]Nyc`ta*lo"pi*a\, n. [L. nyctalopia, fr.
      nyctalops a nyctalops, Gr. [?]. Gr. [?] meant, a person
      affected either with day blindness or with night blindness,
      and in the former case was derived fr. [?], [?], night + [?],
      [?], the eye; in the latter, fr. [?] + [?] blind + [?].]
      (Med.)
      (a) A disease of the eye, in consequence of which the patient
            can see well in a faint light or at twilight, but is
            unable to see during the day or in a strong light; day
            blindness.
      (b) See {Moonblink}.
  
      Note: Some writers (as Quain) use the word in the opposite
               sense, night blindness. See {Hemeralopia}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Nystagmus \[d8]Nys*tag"mus\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] drowsiness,
      fr. [?] to nod in sleep, to slumber.] (Med.)
      A rapid involuntary oscillation of the eyeballs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Oncidium \[d8]On*cid"i*um\, n. [NL.] (Bot.)
      A genus of tropical orchidaceous plants, the flower of one
      species of which ({O. Papilio}) resembles a butterfly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tanystomata \[d8]Tan`y*stom"a*ta\, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. [?] to
      stretch + [?], [?], mouth.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A division of dipterous insects in which the proboscis is
      large and contains lancelike mandibles and maxill[91]. The
      horseflies and robber flies are examples.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tenositis \[d8]Ten`o*si"tis\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. te`nwn tendon +
      -itis.] (Med.)
      Inflammation of a tendon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Tunicata \[d8]Tu`ni*ca"ta\, n. pl. [NL. See {Tunicate}.]
      (Zo[94]l.)
      A grand division of the animal kingdom, intermediate, in some
      respects, between the invertebrates and vertebrates, and by
      some writers united with the latter. They were formerly
      classed with acephalous mollusks. The body is usually covered
      with a firm external tunic, consisting in part of cellulose,
      and having two openings, one for the entrance and one for the
      exit of water. The pharynx is usually dilated in the form of
      a sac, pierced by several series of ciliated slits, and
      serves as a gill.
  
      Note: Most of the species when mature are firmly attached to
               foreign substances, but have free-swimming larv[91]
               which are furnished with an elongated tail and somewhat
               resemble a tadpole. In this state the larva has a
               urochord and certain other structures resembling some
               embryonic vertebrates. See {Ascidian}, {Doliolum},
               {Salpa}, {Urochord}, and Illust. of {Social ascidian},
               under {Social}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Unciatim \[d8]Un`ci*a"tim\, adv. [L.]
      Ounce by ounce.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Damask \Dam"ask\, a.
      1. Pertaining to, or originating at, the city of Damascus;
            resembling the products or manufactures of Damascus.
  
      2. Having the color of the damask rose.
  
                     But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on
                     her damask cheek.                              --Shak.
  
      {Damask color}, a deep rose-color like that of the damask
            rose.
  
      {Damask plum}, a small dark-colored plum, generally called
            damson.
  
      {Damask rose} (Bot.), a large, pink, hardy, and very fragrant
            variety of rose ({Rosa damascena}) from Damascus.
            [bd]Damask roses have not been known in England above one
            hundred years.[b8] --Bacon.
  
      {Damask steel}, [or] {Damascus steel}, steel of the kind
            originally made at Damascus, famous for its hardness, and
            its beautiful texture, ornamented with waving lines;
            especially, that which is inlaid with damaskeening; --
            formerly much valued for sword blades, from its great
            flexibility and tenacity.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Damask \Dam"ask\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Damasked}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Damasking}.]
      To decorate in a way peculiar to Damascus or attributed to
      Damascus; particularly:
      (a) with flowers and rich designs, as silk;
      (b) with inlaid lines of gold, etc., or with a peculiar
            marking or [bd]water,[b8] as metal. See {Damaskeen}.
  
                     Mingled metal damasked o'er with gold. --Dryde[?].
  
                     On the soft, downy bank, damasked with flowers.
                                                                              --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fiddle \Fid"dle\, n. [OE. fidele, fithele, AS. fi[?]ele; akin to
      D. vedel, OHG. fidula, G. fiedel, Icel. fi[?]la, and perh. to
      E. viol. Cf. {Viol}.]
      1. (Mus.) A stringed instrument of music played with a bow; a
            violin; a kit.
  
      2. (Bot.) A kind of dock ({Rumex pulcher}) with fiddle-shaped
            leaves; -- called also {fiddle dock}.
  
      3. (Naut.) A rack or frame of bars connected by strings, to
            keep table furniture in place on the cabin table in bad
            weather. --Ham. Nav. Encyc.
  
      {Fiddle beetle} (Zo[94]l.), a Japanese carabid beetle
            ({Damaster blaptoides}); -- so called from the form of the
            body.
  
      {Fiddle block} (Naut.), a long tackle block having two
            sheaves of different diameters in the same plane, instead
            of side by side as in a common double block. --Knight.
  
      {Fiddle bow}, fiddlestick.
  
      {Fiddle fish} (Zo[94]l.), the angel fish.
  
      {Fiddle head}, an ornament on a ship's bow, curved like the
            volute or scroll at the head of a violin.
  
      {Fiddle pattern}, a form of the handles of spoons, forks,
            etc., somewhat like a violin.
  
      {Scotch fiddle}, the itch. (Low)
  
      {To play} {first, [or] second}, {fiddle}, to take a leading
            or a subordinate part. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dance \Dance\ (d[adot]ns), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Danced}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Dancing}.] [F. danser, fr. OHG. dans[omac]n to
      draw; akin to dinsan to draw, Goth. apinsan, and prob. from
      the same root (meaning to stretch) as E. thin. See {Thin}.]
      1. To move with measured steps, or to a musical
            accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company
            with others, with a regulated succession of movements,
            (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap
            rhythmically.
  
                     Jack shall pipe and Gill shall dance. --Wither.
  
                     Good shepherd, what fair swain is this Which dances
                     with your daughter?                           --Shak.
  
      2. To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion;
            to caper; to frisk; to skip about.
  
                     Then, 'tis time to dance off.            --Thackeray.
  
                     More dances my rapt heart Than when I first my
                     wedded mistress saw.                           --Shak.
  
                     Shadows in the glassy waters dance.   --Byron.
  
                     Where rivulets dance their wayward round.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      {To dance on a rope}, [or] {To dance on nothing}, to be
            hanged.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dancett82 \Dan`cet`t[82]"\, a. [Cf. F. danch[82] dancett[82],
      dent tooth.] (Her.)
      Deeply indented; having large teeth; thus, a fess dancett[82]
      has only three teeth in the whole width of the escutcheon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Danewort \Dane"wort`\, n. (Bot.)
      A fetid European species of elder ({Sambucus Ebulus}); dwarf
      elder; wallwort; elderwort; -- called also {Daneweed},
      {Dane's weed}, and {Dane's-blood}.
  
      Note: [Said to grow on spots where battles were fought
               against the Danes.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Danish \Dan"ish\, a. [See {Dane}.]
      Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country. --
      n. The language of the Danes.
  
      {Danish dog} (Zo[94]l.), one of a large and powerful breed of
            dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also {great Dane}. See
            Illustration in Appendix.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dean \Dean\, n. [OE. dene, deene, OF. deien, dien, F. doyen,
      eldest of a corporation, a dean, L. decanus the chief of ten,
      one set over ten persons, e. g., over soldiers or over monks,
      from decem ten. See {Ten}, and cf. {Decemvir}.]
      1. A dignitary or presiding officer in certain ecclesiastical
            and lay bodies; esp., an ecclesiastical dignitary,
            subordinate to a bishop.
  
      {Dean of cathedral church}, the chief officer of a chapter;
            he is an ecclesiastical magistrate next in degree to
            bishop, and has immediate charge of the cathedral and its
            estates.
  
      {Dean of peculiars}, a dean holding a preferment which has
            some peculiarity relative to spiritual superiors and the
            jurisdiction exercised in it. [Eng.]
  
      {Rural dean}, one having, under the bishop, the especial care
            and inspection of the clergy within certain parishes or
            districts of the diocese.
  
      2. The collegiate officer in the universities of Oxford and
            Cambridge, England, who, besides other duties, has regard
            to the moral condition of the college. --Shipley.
  
      3. The head or presiding officer in the faculty of some
            colleges or universities.
  
      4. A registrar or secretary of the faculty in a department of
            a college, as in a medical, or theological, or scientific
            department. [U.S.]
  
      5. The chief or senior of a company on occasion of ceremony;
            as, the dean of the diplomatic corps; -- so called by
            courtesy.
  
      {Cardinal dean}, the senior cardinal bishop of the college of
            cardinals at Rome. --Shipley.
  
      {Dean and chapter}, the legal corporation and governing body
            of a cathedral. It consists of the dean, who is chief, and
            his canons or prebendaries.
  
      {Dean of arches}, the lay judge of the court of arches.
  
      {Dean of faculty}, the president of an incorporation or
            barristers; specifically, the president of the
            incorporation of advocates in Edinburgh.
  
      {Dean of guild}, a magistrate of Scotch burghs, formerly, and
            still, in some burghs, chosen by the Guildry, whose duty
            is to superintend the erection of new buildings and see
            that they conform to the law.
  
      {Dean of a monastery}, {Monastic dean}, a monastic superior
            over ten monks.
  
      {Dean's stall}. See {Decanal stall}, under {Decanal}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Deemster \Deem"ster\ (d[emac]m"st[etil]r), n. [Deem + -ster; i.
      e., doomster. Cf. {Dempster}.]
      A judge in the Isle of Man who decides controversies without
      process. --Cowell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dehonestate \De`ho*nes"tate\, v. t. [L. dehonestatus, p. p. of
      dehonestare to dishonor; de- + honestare to make honorable.
      Cf. {Dishonest}, and see {Honest}.]
      To disparage. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dehonestation \De*hon`es*ta"tion\, n. [L. dehonestatio.]
      A dishonoring; disgracing. [Obs.] --Gauden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demicadence \Dem"i*ca`dence\n. (Mus.)
      An imperfect or half cadence, falling on the dominant instead
      of on the key note.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demigod \Dem"i*god\, n.
      A half god, or an inferior deity; a fabulous hero, the
      offspring of a deity and a mortal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demigoddess \Dem"i*god`dess\, n.
      A female demigod.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demise \De*mise"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Demised}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Demising}.]
      1. To transfer or transmit by succession or inheritance; to
            grant or bestow by will; to bequeath. [bd]Power to demise
            my lands.[b8] --Swift.
  
                     What honor Canst thou demise to any child of mine?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To convey; to give. [R.]
  
                     His soul is at his conception demised to him.
                                                                              --Hammond.
  
      3. (Law) To convey, as an estate, by lease; to lease.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demisuit \Dem"i*suit`\, n. (Mil. Antiq.)
      A suit of light armor covering less than the whole body, as
      having no protection for the legs below the thighs, no vizor
      to the helmet, and the like.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Demosthenic \Dem`os*then"ic\, a. [L. Demosthenicus: cf. F.
      D[82]mosth[82]nique.]
      Pertaining to, or in the style of, Demosthenes, the Grecian
      orator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dempster \Demp"ster\ (?; 215), Demster \Dem"ster\, n. [See
      {Deemster}.]
      1. A deemster.
  
      2. (O. Scots Law) An officer whose duty it was to announce
            the doom or sentence pronounced by the court.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Denegate \Den"e*gate\, v. t. [L. denegatus, p. p. of denegare.
      See {Deny}.]
      To deny. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Denegation \Den`e*ga"tion\, n. [Cf. F. d[82]n[82]gation.]
      Denial. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Denization \Den`i*za"tion\, n.
      The act of making one a denizen or adopted citizen;
      naturalization. --Hallam.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Density \Den"si*ty\, n. [L. densitas; cf. F. densit[82].]
      1. The quality of being dense, close, or thick; compactness;
            -- opposed to rarity.
  
      2. (Physics) The ratio of mass, or quantity of matter, to
            bulk or volume, esp. as compared with the mass and volume
            of a portion of some substance used as a standard.
  
      Note: For gases the standard substance is hydrogen, at a
               temperature of 0[deg] Centigrade and a pressure of 760
               millimeters. For liquids and solids the standard is
               water at a temperature of 4[deg] Centigrade. The
               density of solids and liquids is usually called
               specific gravity, and the same is true of gases when
               referred to air as a standard.
  
      3. (Photog.) Depth of shade. --Abney.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Newt \Newt\, n. [OE. ewt, evete, AS. efete, with n prefixed, an
      ewt being understood as a newt. Cf. {Eft}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several species of small aquatic salamanders. The
      common British species are the crested newt ({Triton
      cristatus}) and the smooth newt ({Lophinus punctatus}). In
      America, {Diemictylus viridescens} is one of the most
      abundant species.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Triton \[d8]Tri"ton\, n. [L., fr. Gr.[?].] (Gr. Myth.)
      A fabled sea demigod, the son of Neptune and Amphitrite, and
      the trumpeter of Neptune. He is represented by poets and
      painters as having the upper part of his body like that of a
      man, and the lower part like that of a fish. He often has a
      trumpet made of a shell.
  
               Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea, Or hear old
               Triton blow his wreathed horn.               --Wordsworth.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of many species of marine gastropods
            belonging to {Triton} and allied genera, having a stout
            spiral shell, often handsomely colored and ornamented with
            prominent varices. Some of the species are among the
            largest of all gastropods. Called also {trumpet shell},
            and {sea trumpet}.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of numerous species of aquatic
            salamanders. The common European species are
            {Hemisalamandra cristata}, {Molge palmata}, and {M.
            alpestris}, a red-bellied species common in Switzerland.
            The most common species of the United States is
            {Diemyctylus viridescens}. See Illust. under {Salamander}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dimication \Dim`i*ca"tion\, n. [L. dimicatio, fr. dimicare to
      fight.]
      A fight; contest. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dim \Dim\, a. [Compar. {Dimmer}; superl. {Dimmest}.] [AS. dim;
      akin to OFries. dim, Icel. dimmr: cf. MHG. timmer, timber; of
      uncertain origin.]
      1. Not bright or distinct; wanting luminousness or clearness;
            obscure in luster or sound; dusky; darkish; obscure;
            indistinct; overcast; tarnished.
  
                     The dim magnificence of poetry.         --Whewell.
  
                     How is the gold become dim!               --Lam. iv. 1.
  
                     I never saw The heavens so dim by day. --Shak.
  
                     Three sleepless nights I passed in sounding on,
                     Through words and things, a dim and perilous way.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      2. Of obscure vision; not seeing clearly; hence, dull of
            apprehension; of weak perception; obtuse.
  
                     Mine eye also is dim by reason of sorrow. --Job
                                                                              xvii. 7.
  
                     The understanding is dim.                  --Rogers.
  
      Note: Obvious compounds: dim-eyed; dim-sighted, etc.
  
      Syn: Obscure; dusky; dark; mysterious; imperfect; dull;
               sullied; tarnished.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dingdong \Ding"dong`\, n. [See {Ding}.]
      1. The sound of, or as of, repeated strokes on a metallic
            body, as a bell; a repeated and monotonous sound.
  
      2. (Horol.) An attachment to a clock by which the quarter
            hours are struck upon bells of different tones.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dingdong theory \Ding"dong` the"o*ry\ (Philol.)
      The theory which maintains that the primitive elements of
      language are reflex expressions induced by sensory
      impressions; that is, as stated by Max M[81]ller, the
      creative faculty gave to each general conception as it
      thrilled for the first time through the brain a phonetic
      expression; -- jocosely so called from the analogy of the
      sound of a bell induced by the stroke of the clapper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ding \Ding\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dinged}, {Dang} (Obs.), or
      {Dung} (Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dinging}.] [OE. dingen,
      dengen; akin to AS. dencgan to knock, Icel. dengja to beat,
      hammer, Sw. d[84]nga, G. dengeln.]
      1. To dash; to throw violently. [Obs.]
  
                     To ding the book a coit's distance from him.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. To cause to sound or ring.
  
      {To ding (anything) in one's ears}, to impress one by noisy
            repetition, as if by hammering.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dingthrift \Ding"thrift`\, n.
      A spendthrift. [Obs.]
  
               Wilt thou, therefore, a drunkard be, A dingthrift and a
               knave?                                                   --Drant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dinoxide \Din*ox"ide\, n. (Chem.)
      Same as {Dioxide}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesday \Domes"day`\, n.
      A day of judgment. See {Doomsday}. [Obs.]
  
      {Domesday Book}, the ancient record of the survey of most of
            the lands of England, made by order of William the
            Conqueror, about 1086. It consists of two volumes, a large
            folio and a quarto, and gives the proprietors' tenures,
            arable land, woodland, etc. [Written also {Doomsday
            Book}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesday \Domes"day`\, n.
      A day of judgment. See {Doomsday}. [Obs.]
  
      {Domesday Book}, the ancient record of the survey of most of
            the lands of England, made by order of William the
            Conqueror, about 1086. It consists of two volumes, a large
            folio and a quarto, and gives the proprietors' tenures,
            arable land, woodland, etc. [Written also {Doomsday
            Book}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestic \Do*mes"tic\, n.
      1. One who lives in the family of an other, as hired
            household assistant; a house servant.
  
                     The master labors and leads an anxious life, to
                     secure plenty and ease to the domestic. --V. Knox.
  
      2. pl. (Com.) Articles of home manufacture, especially cotton
            goods. [U. S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestic \Do*mes"tic\, a. [L. domesticus, fr. domus use: cf. F.
      domestique. See 1st {Dome}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to one's house or home, or one's
            household or family; relating to home life; as, domestic
            concerns, life, duties, cares, happiness, worship,
            servants.
  
                     His fortitude is the more extraordinary, because his
                     domestic feelings were unusually strong. --Macaulay.
  
      4. Of or pertaining to a nation considered as a family or
            home, or to one's own country; intestine; not foreign; as,
            foreign wars and domestic dissensions. --Shak.
  
      3. Remaining much at home; devoted to home duties or
            pleasures; as, a domestic man or woman.
  
      4. Living in or near the habitations of man; domesticated;
            tame as distinguished from wild; as, domestic animals.
  
      5. Made in one's own house, nation, or country; as, domestic
            manufactures, wines, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestical \Do*mes"tic*al\, a.
      Domestic. [Obs.]
  
               Our private and domestical matter.         --Sir. P.
                                                                              Sidney.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestical \Do*mes"tic*al\, n.
      A family; a household. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestically \Do*mes"tic*al*ly\, adv.
      In a domestic manner; privately; with reference to domestic
      affairs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticant \Do*mes"ti*cant\, a.
      Forming part of the same family. [Obs.] --Sir E. Dering.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticate \Do*mes"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Domesticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Domesticating.}] [LL.
      domesticatus, p. p. of domesticare to reside in, to tame. See
      {Domestic}, a.]
      1. To make domestic; to habituate to home life; as, to
            domesticate one's self.
  
      2. To cause to be, as it were, of one's family or country;
            as, to domesticate a foreign custom or word.
  
      3. To tame or reclaim from a wild state; as, to domesticate
            wild animals; to domesticate a plant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticate \Do*mes"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Domesticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Domesticating.}] [LL.
      domesticatus, p. p. of domesticare to reside in, to tame. See
      {Domestic}, a.]
      1. To make domestic; to habituate to home life; as, to
            domesticate one's self.
  
      2. To cause to be, as it were, of one's family or country;
            as, to domesticate a foreign custom or word.
  
      3. To tame or reclaim from a wild state; as, to domesticate
            wild animals; to domesticate a plant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticate \Do*mes"ti*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p.
      {Domesticated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Domesticating.}] [LL.
      domesticatus, p. p. of domesticare to reside in, to tame. See
      {Domestic}, a.]
      1. To make domestic; to habituate to home life; as, to
            domesticate one's self.
  
      2. To cause to be, as it were, of one's family or country;
            as, to domesticate a foreign custom or word.
  
      3. To tame or reclaim from a wild state; as, to domesticate
            wild animals; to domesticate a plant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domestication \Do*mes`ti*ca"tion\, n. [Cf. F. domestication.]
      The act of domesticating, or accustoming to home; the action
      of taming wild animals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticator \Do*mes"ti*ca`tor\, n.
      One who domesticates.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesticity \Do`mes*tic"i*ty\, n. [LL. domesticitas: cf. F.
      domesticit[82].]
      The state of being domestic; domestic character; household
      life.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domeykite \Do"mey*kite\, n. [Named after Domeyko, a mineralogist
      of Chili.] (Min.)
      A massive mineral of tin-white or steel-gray color, an
      arsenide of copper.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Do-naught \Do"-naught`\, n. [Do + naught.]
      A lazy, good-for-nothing fellow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Doomsday \Dooms"day`\, n. [AS. d[?]mes d[be]g. See {Doom}, and
      {Day}.]
      1. A day of sentence or condemnation; day of death. [bd]My
            body's doomsday.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. The day of the final judgment.
  
                     I could not tell till doomsday.         --Chaucer.
  
      {Doomsday Book}. See {Domesday Book}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Domesday \Domes"day`\, n.
      A day of judgment. See {Doomsday}. [Obs.]
  
      {Domesday Book}, the ancient record of the survey of most of
            the lands of England, made by order of William the
            Conqueror, about 1086. It consists of two volumes, a large
            folio and a quarto, and gives the proprietors' tenures,
            arable land, woodland, etc. [Written also {Doomsday
            Book}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Doomsday \Dooms"day`\, n. [AS. d[?]mes d[be]g. See {Doom}, and
      {Day}.]
      1. A day of sentence or condemnation; day of death. [bd]My
            body's doomsday.[b8] --Shak.
  
      2. The day of the final judgment.
  
                     I could not tell till doomsday.         --Chaucer.
  
      {Doomsday Book}. See {Domesday Book}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Doomster \Doom"ster\, n.
      Same as {Dempster}. [Scot.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Downsitting \Down"sit`ting\, n.
      The act of sitting down; repose; a resting.
  
               Thou knowest my downsitting and my uprising. --Ps.
                                                                              cxxxix. 2.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Downstairs \Down"stairs\, adv.
      Down the stairs; to a lower floor. -- a. Below stairs; as, a
      downstairs room.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Downsteepy \Down"steep`y\, a.
      Very steep. [Obs.] --Florio.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Downstream \Down"stream`\, adv.
      Down the stream; as, floating downstream.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Downstroke \Down"stroke`\, n. (Penmanship)
      A stroke made with a downward motion of the pen or pencil.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Duncedom \Dunce"dom\, n.
      The realm or domain of dunces. [Jocose] --Carlyle.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dung \Dung\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dunged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Dunging}.]
      1. To manure with dung. --Dryden.
  
      2. (Calico Print.) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath
            of hot water containing cow dung; -- done to remove the
            superfluous mordant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynactinometer \Dy*nac`ti*nom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] power + E.
      actinometer.]
      An instrument for measuring the intensity of the photogenic
      (light-producing) rays, and computing the power of object
      glasses.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynast \Dy"nast\, n. [L. dynastes, Gr. [?], fr. [?] to be able
      or strong: cf. F. dynaste. See {Dynamic}.]
      1. A ruler; a governor; a prince.
  
      2. A dynasty; a government. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynastic \Dy*nas"tic\, a. [Gr. [?] of a dynast, fr. [?]: cf. F.
      dunastique.]
      Of or relating to a dynasty or line of kings. --Motley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynastical \Dy*nas"tic*al\, a.
      Dynastic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynastidan \Dy*nas"ti*dan\, n. [Gr. [?], fem. of [?]. See
      {Dynast}. The name alludes to the immense size of some
      species.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of a group of gigantic, horned beetles, including
      {Dynastus Neptunus}, and the Hercules beetle ({D. Hercules})
      of tropical America, which grow to be six inches in length.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynasty \Dy"nas*ty\ (?; 277), n.; pl. {Dynasties}. [Gr. [?]
      lordship, fr. [?] to hold power or lordship, fr. [?]: cf. F.
      dynastie dynasty. See {Dynast}.]
      1. Sovereignty; lordship; dominion. --Johnson.
  
      2. A race or succession of kings, of the same line or family;
            the continued lordship of a race of rulers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynastidan \Dy*nas"ti*dan\, n. [Gr. [?], fem. of [?]. See
      {Dynast}. The name alludes to the immense size of some
      species.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of a group of gigantic, horned beetles, including
      {Dynastus Neptunus}, and the Hercules beetle ({D. Hercules})
      of tropical America, which grow to be six inches in length.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dynasty \Dy"nas*ty\ (?; 277), n.; pl. {Dynasties}. [Gr. [?]
      lordship, fr. [?] to hold power or lordship, fr. [?]: cf. F.
      dynastie dynasty. See {Dynast}.]
      1. Sovereignty; lordship; dominion. --Johnson.
  
      2. A race or succession of kings, of the same line or family;
            the continued lordship of a race of rulers.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Deemston, PA (borough, FIPS 18496)
      Location: 40.03210 N, 80.02673 W
      Population (1990): 770 (311 housing units)
      Area: 24.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Denniston, KY
      Zip code(s): 40316

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dunes City, OR (city, FIPS 21150)
      Location: 43.90810 N, 124.09506 W
      Population (1990): 1081 (559 housing units)
      Area: 6.9 sq km (land), 2.1 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dunnstown, PA (CDP, FIPS 20416)
      Location: 41.14686 N, 77.42115 W
      Population (1990): 1486 (611 housing units)
      Area: 2.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dunseith, ND (city, FIPS 21020)
      Location: 48.81256 N, 100.06129 W
      Population (1990): 723 (267 housing units)
      Area: 2.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Dunstable, MA
      Zip code(s): 01827

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   demigod n.   A hacker with years of experience, a world-wide
   reputation, and a major role in the development of at least one
   design, tool, or game used by or known to more than half of the
   hacker community.   To qualify as a genuine demigod, the person must
   recognizably identify with the hacker community and have helped
   shape it.   Major demigods include Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie
   (co-inventors of {{Unix}} and {C}), Richard M. Stallman (inventor of
   {EMACS}), Larry Wall (inventor of {Perl}), Linus Torvalds (inventor
   of Linux), and most recently James Gosling (inventor of Java).   In
   their hearts of hearts, most hackers dream of someday becoming
   demigods themselves, and more than one major software project has
   been driven to completion by the author's veiled hopes of
   apotheosis.   See also {net.god}, {true-hacker}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   demigod
  
      A hacker with years of experience, a national
      reputation, and a major role in the development of at least
      one design, tool, or game used by or known to more than half
      of the hacker community.   To qualify as a genuine demigod, the
      person must recognisably identify with the hacker community
      and have helped shape it.   Major demigods include {Ken
      Thompson} and {Dennis Ritchie} (co-inventors of {Unix} and
      {C}) and {Richard Stallman} (inventor of {Emacs}).   In their
      hearts of hearts, most hackers dream of someday becoming
      demigods themselves, and more than one major software project
      has been driven to completion by the author's veiled hopes of
      apotheosis.
  
      See also {net.god}, {true-hacker}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1994-10-27)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   DIM statement
  
      (From "dimension") A {keyword} in most versions
      of the {BASIC} programming language that declares the size of
      an {array}.   E.g.
  
      DIM A(100)
  
      declares a one-dimensional array with 101 numeric elements
      (including A(0)).
  
      {Visual Basic} uses the DIM (or "Dim") statement for any
      variable declaration, even {scalars}, e.g.
  
      Dim DepartmentNumber As Integer
  
      which declares a single (scalar) variable of type Integer.
  
      (1999-03-26)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   downstream
  
      {upstream}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Dynix Automated Library Systems
  
      The world's largest supplier of library automation
      systems with European offices in France, Germany, Ireland, the
      Netherlands and the UK.
  
      Dynix sell two library management systems - Horizon
      ({client/server}) and, Dynix ({host-based}).   Both have {GUI}
      or {terminal interface}s.   Dynix also sell other products and
      services for {database} enrichment, interconnectivity, and
      on-line and {CD-ROM} databases.
  
      {Home (http://www.uk.dynix.com/dynix.html)}.
  
      (1995-04-28)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Dung-gate
      (Neh. 2:13), a gate of ancient Jerusalem, on the south-west
      quarter. "The gate outside of which lay the piles of sweepings
      and offscourings of the streets," in the valley of Tophet.
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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