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   Canaanite
         n 1: a member of an ancient Semitic people who occupied Canaan
               before it was conquered by the Israelites
         2: the extinct language of the Semitic people who occupied
            Canaan before the Israelite conquest

English Dictionary: Community's by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Canaanitic
n
  1. a group of Semitic languages [syn: Canaanitic, Canaanitic language]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Canaanitic language
n
  1. a group of Semitic languages [syn: Canaanitic, Canaanitic language]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Canandaigua Lake
n
  1. a glacial lake in central New York; one of the Finger Lakes
    Synonym(s): Canandaigua Lake, Lake Canandaigua
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
canine distemper
n
  1. a viral disease of young dogs characterized by high fever and respiratory inflammation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
canine tooth
n
  1. one of the four pointed conical teeth (two in each jaw) located between the incisors and the premolars
    Synonym(s): canine, canine tooth, eyetooth, eye tooth, dogtooth, cuspid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Canna indica
n
  1. canna grown especially for its edible rootstock from which arrowroot starch is obtained
    Synonym(s): achira, indian shot, arrowroot, Canna indica, Canna edulis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cannonade
n
  1. intense and continuous artillery fire [syn: cannonade, drumfire]
v
  1. attack with cannons or artillery
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
canyon treefrog
n
  1. a small chiefly ground dweller that stays within easy jumping distance of water; of United States southwest and northern Mexico
    Synonym(s): canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cement
n
  1. concrete pavement is sometimes referred to as cement; "they stood on the grey cement beside the pool"
  2. a building material that is a powder made of a mixture of calcined limestone and clay; used with water and sand or gravel to make concrete and mortar
  3. something that hardens to act as adhesive material
  4. any of various materials used by dentists to fill cavities in teeth
  5. a specialized bony substance covering the root of a tooth
    Synonym(s): cementum, cement
v
  1. make fast as if with cement; "We cemented our friendship"
  2. cover or coat with cement
  3. bind or join with or as if with cement
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cement mixer
n
  1. a machine with a large revolving drum in which cement is mixed with other materials to make concrete
    Synonym(s): concrete mixer, cement mixer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cementite
n
  1. a chemical compound that is a constituent of steel and cast iron; very hard and brittle
    Synonym(s): cementite, iron carbide
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cementitious
adj
  1. like or relevant to or having the properties of cement; "the adhesion of cementitious materials"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cementum
n
  1. a specialized bony substance covering the root of a tooth
    Synonym(s): cementum, cement
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
chemin de fer
n
  1. a card game played in casinos in which two or more punters gamble against the banker; the player wins who holds 2 or 3 cards that total closest to nine
    Synonym(s): baccarat, chemin de fer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Chionanthus
n
  1. deciduous trees or shrubs: fringe tree [syn: Chionanthus, genus Chionanthus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Chionanthus virginicus
n
  1. small bushy tree of southeastern United States having profuse clusters of white flowers
    Synonym(s): fringe bush, Chionanthus virginicus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cinematic
adj
  1. of or pertaining to or characteristic of the cinema
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cinematise
v
  1. make a film of or adopt so as to make into a film; "cinematize history"
    Synonym(s): cinematize, cinematise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cinematize
v
  1. make a film of or adopt so as to make into a film; "cinematize history"
    Synonym(s): cinematize, cinematise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cinematographer
n
  1. a photographer who operates a movie camera [syn: cameraman, camera operator, cinematographer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cinematography
n
  1. the act of making a film [syn: filming, cinematography, motion-picture photography]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus
n
  1. whiptails
    Synonym(s): Cnemidophorus, genus Cnemidophorus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus exsanguis
n
  1. having longitudinal stripes overlaid with light spots; upland lizard of United States southwest and Mexico
    Synonym(s): Chihuahuan spotted whiptail, Cnemidophorus exsanguis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus sexlineatus
n
  1. very swift lizard of eastern and central United States
    Synonym(s): racerunner, race runner, six-lined racerunner, Cnemidophorus sexlineatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus tesselatus
n
  1. markings are darker and more marked than in western whiptail; from southeastern Colorado to eastern Chihuahua
    Synonym(s): checkered whiptail, Cnemidophorus tesselatus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus tigris
n
  1. active lizard having a network of dusky dark markings; of semiarid areas from Oregon and Idaho to Baja California
    Synonym(s): western whiptail, Cnemidophorus tigris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Cnemidophorus velox
n
  1. having distinct longitudinal stripes: of Colorado Plateau from Arizona to western Colorado
    Synonym(s): plateau striped whiptail, Cnemidophorus velox
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cohune nut
n
  1. nut of the cohune palm having hard white shells like those of ivory nuts
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cohune-nut oil
n
  1. semisolid fat from nuts of the cohune palm; used in cooking and soap making
    Synonym(s): cohune-nut oil, cohune oil, cohune fat
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Comandra
n
  1. small genus of chiefly North American parasitic plants
    Synonym(s): Comandra, genus Comandra
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Comandra pallida
n
  1. woody creeping parasite of western North America having numerous thick powdery leaves and panicles of small dull- white flowers
    Synonym(s): bastard toadflax, Comandra pallida
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
come into
v
  1. obtain, especially accidentally [syn: come by, {come into}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
come into being
v
  1. be born or come into existence; "All these flowers come to life when the rains come"
    Synonym(s): come to life, come into being
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
COMINT
n
  1. technical and intelligence information derived from foreign communications by other than the intended recipients
    Synonym(s): communications intelligence, COMINT
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command
n
  1. an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
    Synonym(s): command, bid, bidding, dictation
  2. a military unit or region under the control of a single officer
  3. the power or authority to command; "an admiral in command"
  4. availability for use; "the materials at the command of the potters grew"
  5. a position of highest authority; "the corporation has just undergone a change in command"
  6. great skillfulness and knowledge of some subject or activity; "a good command of French"
    Synonym(s): command, control, mastery
  7. (computer science) a line of code written as part of a computer program
    Synonym(s): instruction, command, statement, program line
v
  1. be in command of; "The general commanded a huge army"
  2. make someone do something
    Synonym(s): command, require
  3. demand as one's due; "This speaker commands a high fee"; "The author commands a fair hearing from his readers"
  4. look down on; "The villa dominates the town"
    Synonym(s): dominate, command, overlook, overtop
  5. exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
    Synonym(s): control, command
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command guidance
n
  1. a method of controlling the flight of a missile by commands originating from the ground or from another missile
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command key
n
  1. (computer science) the key on a computer keyboard that is used (in combination with some other key) to type control characters
    Synonym(s): control key, command key
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command language
n
  1. a source language consisting of procedural operators that invoke functions to be executed
    Synonym(s): command language, query language, search language
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command line
n
  1. commands that a user types in order to run an application
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command line interface
n
  1. a user interface in which you type commands instead of choosing them from a menu or selecting an icon
    Synonym(s): command line interface, CLI
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command module
n
  1. a space module in which astronauts can live and control the spacecraft and communicate with earth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command overhead
n
  1. (computer science) the processing time required by a device prior to the execution of a command
    Synonym(s): command processing overhead time, command processing overhead, command overhead, overhead
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command post
n
  1. military headquarters from which a military commander controls and organizes the forces
    Synonym(s): command post, general headquarters, GHQ
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command processing overhead
n
  1. (computer science) the processing time required by a device prior to the execution of a command
    Synonym(s): command processing overhead time, command processing overhead, command overhead, overhead
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command processing overhead time
n
  1. (computer science) the processing time required by a device prior to the execution of a command
    Synonym(s): command processing overhead time, command processing overhead, command overhead, overhead
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command prompt
n
  1. (computer science) a symbol that appears on the computer screen to indicate that the computer is ready to receive a command
    Synonym(s): prompt, command prompt
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
command sergeant major
n
  1. a noncommissioned officer serving as chief administrative officer of a headquarters unit of the Army
    Synonym(s): sergeant major, command sergeant major
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commandant
n
  1. an officer in command of a military unit [syn: {commanding officer}, commandant, commander]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commandeer
v
  1. take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
    Synonym(s): commandeer, hijack, highjack, pirate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commander
n
  1. an officer in command of a military unit [syn: {commanding officer}, commandant, commander]
  2. someone in an official position of authority who can command or control others
  3. a commissioned naval officer who ranks above a lieutenant commander and below a captain
  4. an officer in the airforce
    Synonym(s): air force officer, commander
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commander in chief
n
  1. the officer who holds the supreme command; "in the U.S. the president is the commander in chief"
    Synonym(s): commander in chief, generalissimo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commandership
n
  1. the position or office of commander [syn: commandership, commandery]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commandery
n
  1. the position or office of commander [syn: commandership, commandery]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commanding
adj
  1. used of a height or viewpoint; "a commanding view of the ocean"; "looked up at the castle dominating the countryside"; "the balcony overlooking the ballroom"
    Synonym(s): commanding, dominating, overlooking
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commanding officer
n
  1. an officer in command of a military unit [syn: {commanding officer}, commandant, commander]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commandment
n
  1. something that is commanded
  2. a doctrine that is taught; "the teachings of religion"; "he believed all the Christian precepts"
    Synonym(s): teaching, precept, commandment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commando
n
  1. a member of a military unit trained as shock troops for hit-and-run raids
    Synonym(s): commando, ranger
  2. an amphibious military unit trained for raids into enemy territory
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commend
v
  1. express approval of
  2. present as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence; "His paintings commend him to the artistic world"
  3. give to in charge; "I commend my children to you"
  4. express a good opinion of
    Synonym(s): commend, recommend
  5. mention as by way of greeting or to indicate friendship; "Remember me to your wife"
    Synonym(s): commend, remember
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commendable
adv
  1. in an admirable manner; "the children's responses were admirably normal"
    Synonym(s): admirably, laudably, praiseworthily, commendable
adj
  1. worthy of high praise; "applaudable efforts to save the environment"; "a commendable sense of purpose"; "laudable motives of improving housing conditions"; "a significant and praiseworthy increase in computer intelligence"
    Synonym(s): applaudable, commendable, laudable, praiseworthy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commendation
n
  1. an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement
    Synonym(s): citation, commendation
  2. a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
    Synonym(s): approval, commendation
    Antonym(s): disapproval
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
comment
n
  1. a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
    Synonym(s): remark, comment, input
  2. a written explanation or criticism or illustration that is added to a book or other textual material; "he wrote an extended comment on the proposal"
    Synonym(s): comment, commentary
  3. a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people; "the divorce caused much gossip"
    Synonym(s): gossip, comment, scuttlebutt
v
  1. make or write a comment on; "he commented the paper of his colleague"
    Synonym(s): comment, notice, remark, point out
  2. explain or interpret something
  3. provide interlinear explanations for words or phrases; "He annotated on what his teacher had written"
    Synonym(s): gloss, comment, annotate
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commentary
n
  1. a written explanation or criticism or illustration that is added to a book or other textual material; "he wrote an extended comment on the proposal"
    Synonym(s): comment, commentary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commentate
v
  1. make a commentary on
  2. serve as a commentator, as in sportscasting
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commentator
n
  1. an expert who observes and comments on something [syn: observer, commentator]
  2. a writer who reports and analyzes events of the day
    Synonym(s): commentator, reviewer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
comminate
v
  1. curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment
    Synonym(s): accurse, execrate, anathemize, comminate, anathemise, anathematize, anathematise
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
commination
n
  1. prayers proclaiming God's anger against sinners; read in the Church of England on Ash Wednesday
  2. a threat of divine punishment or vengeance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
comminatory
adj
  1. containing warning of punishment [syn: comminatory, denunciative, denunciatory]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
comminute
v
  1. reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading; "grind the spices in a mortar"; "mash the garlic"
    Synonym(s): grind, mash, crunch, bray, comminute
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
comminuted fracture
n
  1. fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common daisy
n
  1. low-growing Eurasian plant with yellow central disc flowers and pinkish-white outer ray flowers
    Synonym(s): common daisy, English daisy, Bellis perennis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common dandelion
n
  1. Eurasian plant widely naturalized as a weed in North America; used as salad greens and to make wine
    Synonym(s): common dandelion, Taraxacum ruderalia, Taraxacum officinale
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common denominator
n
  1. an integer that is a common multiple of the denominators of two or more fractions
  2. an attribute that is common to all members of a category
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common devil's claw
n
  1. annual of southern United States to Mexico having large whitish or yellowish flowers mottled with purple and a long curving beak
    Synonym(s): common unicorn plant, devil's claw, common devil's claw, elephant-tusk, proboscis flower, ram's horn, Proboscidea louisianica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common divisor
n
  1. an integer that divides two (or more) other integers evenly
    Synonym(s): common divisor, common factor, common measure
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common dogbane
n
  1. North American perennial having pinkish flowers in loose cymes; used in folk medicine for pain or inflammation in joints
    Synonym(s): common dogbane, spreading dogbane, rheumatism weed, Apocynum androsaemifolium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common dolphin
n
  1. black-and-white dolphin that leaps high out of the water;
    Synonym(s): common dolphin, Delphinus delphis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common duckweed
n
  1. of temperate regions except eastern Asia and Australia
    Synonym(s): common duckweed, lesser duckweed, Lemna minor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common heath
n
  1. small erect shrub of Australia and Tasmania with fragrant ivory flowers
    Synonym(s): common heath, blunt-leaf heath, Epacris obtusifolia
  2. spindly upright shrub of southern Australia and Tasmania having white to rose or purple-red flowers
    Synonym(s): common heath, Epacris impressa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common madia
n
  1. California annual having red-brown spots near the base of its yellow flower rays
    Synonym(s): common madia, common tarweed, Madia elegans
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common maidenhair
n
  1. delicate maidenhair fern with slender shining black leaf stalks; cosmopolitan
    Synonym(s): common maidenhair, Venushair, Venus'-hair fern, southern maidenhair, Venus maidenhair, Adiantum capillus-veneris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common matrimony vine
n
  1. deciduous erect or spreading shrub with spiny branches and violet-purple flowers followed by orange-red berries; southeastern Europe to China
    Synonym(s): common matrimony vine, Duke of Argyll's tea tree, Lycium barbarum, Lycium halimifolium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common meter
n
  1. the usual (iambic) meter of a ballad [syn: {common measure}, common meter]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common mood
n
  1. a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
    Synonym(s): indicative mood, indicative, declarative mood, declarative, common mood, fact mood
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common newt
n
  1. small semiaquatic salamander [syn: common newt, {Triturus vulgaris}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common nutcracker
n
  1. Old World nutcracker [syn: common nutcracker, {Nucifraga caryocatactes}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common tarweed
n
  1. California annual having red-brown spots near the base of its yellow flower rays
    Synonym(s): common madia, common tarweed, Madia elegans
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common teasel
n
  1. teasel with lilac flowers native to Old World but naturalized in North America; dried flower heads used to raise a nap on woolen cloth
    Synonym(s): common teasel, Dipsacus fullonum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common thorn apple
n
  1. intensely poisonous tall coarse annual tropical weed having rank-smelling foliage, large white or violet trumpet-shaped flowers and prickly fruits
    Synonym(s): jimsonweed, jimson weed, Jamestown weed, common thorn apple, apple of Peru, Datura stramonium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common thyme
n
  1. common aromatic garden perennial native to the western Mediterranean; used in seasonings and formerly as medicine
    Synonym(s): common thyme, Thymus vulgaris
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common time
n
  1. a time signature indicating four beats to the bar [syn: common time, four-four time, quadruple time, common measure]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common tobacco
n
  1. tall erect South American herb with large ovate leaves and terminal clusters of tubular white or pink flowers; cultivated for its leaves
    Synonym(s): common tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common topaz
n
  1. a yellow quartz [syn: topaz, false topaz, {common topaz}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common touch
n
  1. the property of appealing to people in general (usually by appearing to have qualities in common with them)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common water snake
n
  1. in some classifications placed in the genus Nerodia; western United States snake that seldom ventures far from water
    Synonym(s): common water snake, banded water snake, Natrix sipedon, Nerodia sipedon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common watercress
n
  1. perennial Eurasian cress growing chiefly in springs or running water having fleshy pungent leaves used in salads or as a potherb or garnish; introduced in North America and elsewhere
    Synonym(s): common watercress, Rorippa nasturtium- aquaticum, Nasturtium officinale
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common wheat
n
  1. widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important grain
    Synonym(s): common wheat, Triticum aestivum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common white dogwood
n
  1. deciduous tree; celebrated for its large white or pink bracts and stunning autumn color that is followed by red berries
    Synonym(s): common white dogwood, eastern flowering dogwood, Cornus florida
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
common wood sorrel
n
  1. Eurasian plant with heart-shaped trifoliate leaves and white purple-veined flowers
    Synonym(s): common wood sorrel, cuckoo bread, shamrock, Oxalis acetosella
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community
n
  1. a group of people living in a particular local area; "the team is drawn from all parts of the community"
  2. common ownership; "they shared a community of possessions"
  3. a group of nations having common interests; "they hoped to join the NATO community"
  4. agreement as to goals; "the preachers and the bootleggers found they had a community of interests"
    Synonym(s): community, community of interests
  5. a district where people live; occupied primarily by private residences
    Synonym(s): residential district, residential area, community
  6. (ecology) a group of interdependent organisms inhabiting the same region and interacting with each other
    Synonym(s): community, biotic community
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community center
n
  1. a center where the members of a community can gather for social or cultural activities
    Synonym(s): community center, civic center
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community chest
n
  1. a charity supported by individual subscriptions; defrays the demands on a community for social welfare
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community college
n
  1. a nonresidential junior college offering a curriculum fitted to the needs of the community
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community of interests
n
  1. agreement as to goals; "the preachers and the bootleggers found they had a community of interests"
    Synonym(s): community, community of interests
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community of scholars
n
  1. the body of individuals holding advanced academic degrees
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community property
n
  1. property and income belonging jointly to a married couple
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
community service
n
  1. a service that is performed for the benefit of the public or its institutions
    Synonym(s): community service, public service
  2. an unpaid service for the benefit of the public that is performed by lawbreakers as part (or all) of their sentence
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Conan Doyle
n
  1. British author who created Sherlock Holmes (1859-1930)
    Synonym(s): Conan Doyle, A. Conan Doyle, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
conundrum
n
  1. a difficult problem [syn: riddle, conundrum, enigma, brain-teaser]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
coonhound
n
  1. any of several breeds of hound developed for hunting raccoons
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cyanamid
n
  1. a weak soluble dibasic acid (the parent acid of cyanamide salts)
    Synonym(s): cyanamide, cyanamid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cyanamide
n
  1. a weak soluble dibasic acid (the parent acid of cyanamide salts)
    Synonym(s): cyanamide, cyanamid
  2. a compound used as a fertilizer and as a source of nitrogen compounds
    Synonym(s): calcium-cyanamide, cyanamide
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
cyanine dye
n
  1. any of a class of dyes containing a -CH= group linking two heterocyclic rings containing nitrogen; used as sensitizers in photography
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Money bill} (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue.
  
      {Money broker}, a broker who deals in different kinds of
            money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called
            also {money changer}.
  
      {Money cowrie} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            {Cypr[91]a} (esp. {C. moneta}) formerly much used as money
            by savage tribes. See {Cowrie}.
  
      {Money of account}, a denomination of value used in keeping
            accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an
            equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in
            the United States, but not a coin.
  
      {Money order}, an order for the payment of money;
            specifically, a government order for the payment of money,
            issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called
            also {postal money order}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cowrie \Cow"rie\ Cowry \Cow"ry\(kou"r[ycr]), n.; pl. {Cowries}
      (-r[icr]z). [Hind. kaur[imac].] (Zo[94]l.)
      A marine shell of the genus {Cypr[91]a}.
  
      Note: There are numerous species, many of them ornamental.
               Formerly {C. moneta} and several other species were
               largely used as money in Africa and some other
               countries, and they are still so used to some extent.
               The value is always trifling, and varies at different
               places.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Muntjac \Munt"jac\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      Any one of several species of small Asiatic deer of the genus
      {Cervulus}, esp. {C. muntjac}, which occurs both in India and
      on the East Indian Islands. [Written also {muntjak}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Canaanite \Ca"naan*ite\, n.
      1. A descendant of Canaan, the son of Ham, and grandson of
            Noah.
  
      2. A Native or inhabitant of the land of Canaan, esp. a
            member of any of the tribes who inhabited Canaan at the
            time of the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Canaanite \Ca"naan*ite\, n. [From an Aramaic word signifying
      [bd]zeal.[b8]]
      A zealot. [bd]Simon the Canaanite.[b8] --Matt. x. 4.
  
      Note: This was the [bd]Simon called Zelotes[b8] (--Luke vi.
               15), i.e., Simon the zealot. --Kitto.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Canaanitish \Ca"naan*i`tish\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Canaan or the Canaanites.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Canine \Ca*nine"\, a. [L. caninus, fr. canis dog: cf. F. canin.
      See {Hound}.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the family {Canid[91]}, or dogs and
            wolves; having the nature or qualities of a dog; like that
            or those of a dog.
  
      2. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pointed tooth on each side
            the incisors.
  
      {Canine appetite}, a morbidly voracious appetite; bulimia.
  
      {Canine letter}, the letter r. See {R}.
  
      {Canine madness}, hydrophobia.
  
      {Canine tooth}, a tooth situated between the incisor and
            bicuspid teeth, so called because well developed in dogs;
            usually, the third tooth from the front on each side of
            each jaw; an eyetooth, or the corresponding tooth in the
            lower jaw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannon \Can"non\, n.; pl. {Cannons}, collectively {Cannon}. [F.
      cannon, fr. L. canna reed, pipe, tube. See {Cane}.]
      1. A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm
            for discharging heavy shot with great force.
  
      Note: Cannons are made of various materials, as iron, brass,
               bronze, and steel, and of various sizes and shapes with
               respect to the special service for which they are
               intended, as intended, as siege, seacoast, naval,
               field, or mountain, guns. They always aproach more or
               less nearly to a cylindrical from, being usually
               thicker toward the breech than at the muzzle. Formerly
               they were cast hollow, afterwards they were cast,
               solid, and bored out. The cannon now most in use for
               the armament of war vessels and for seacoast defense
               consists of a forged steel tube reinforced with massive
               steel rings shrunk upon it. Howitzers and mortars are
               sometimes called cannon. See {Gun}.
  
      2. (Mech.) A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving
            shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently.
  
      3. (Printing.) A kind of type. See {Canon}.
  
      {Cannon ball}, strictly, a round solid missile of stone or
            iron made to be fired from a cannon, but now often applied
            to a missile of any shape, whether solid or hollow, made
            for cannon. Elongated and cylindrical missiles are
            sometimes called bolts; hollow ones charged with
            explosives are properly called shells.
  
      {Cannon bullet}, a cannon ball. [Obs.]
  
      {Cannon cracker}, a fire cracker of large size.
  
      {Cannon lock}, a device for firing a cannon by a percussion
            primer.
  
      {Cannon metal}. See {Gun Metal}.
  
      {Cannon pinion}, the pinion on the minute hand arbor of a
            watch or clock, which drives the hand but permits it to be
            moved in setting.
  
      {Cannon proof}, impenetrable by cannon balls.
  
      {Cannon shot}.
            (a) A cannon ball.
            (b) The range of a cannon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannonade \Can`non*ade"\, n. [F. Canonnade; cf. It. cannanata.]
      1. The act of discharging cannon and throwing ball, shell,
            etc., for the purpose of destroying an army, or battering
            a town, ship, or fort; -- usually, an attack of some
            continuance.
  
                     A furious cannonade was kept up from the whole
                     circle of batteries on the devoted towm. --Prescott.
  
      2. Fig.; A loud noise like a cannonade; a booming.
  
                     Blue Walden rolls its cannonade.         --Ewerson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannonade \Can`non*ade"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cannonade}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Cannonading}.]
      To attack with heavy artillery; to batter with cannon shot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannonade \Can`non*ade"\, v. i.
      To discharge cannon; as, the army cannonaded all day.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannonade \Can`non*ade"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cannonade}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Cannonading}.]
      To attack with heavy artillery; to batter with cannon shot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cannoned \Can"noned\, a.
      Furnished with cannon. [Poetic] [bd]Gilbralter's cannoned
      steep.[b8] --M. Arnold.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\ (s[ecr]*m[ecr]nt" or s[ecr]m"[ecr]nt), n. [OF.
      cement, ciment, F. ciment, fr. L. caementum a rough, unhewn
      stone, pieces or chips of marble, from which mortar was made,
      contr. fr. caedimentum, fr. caedere to cut, prob. akin to
      scindere to cleave, and to E. shed, v. t.]
      1. Any substance used for making bodies adhere to each other,
            as mortar, glue, etc.
  
      2. A kind of calcined limestone, or a calcined mixture of
            clay and lime, for making mortar which will harden under
            water.
  
      3. The powder used in cementation. See {Cementation}, n., 2.
  
      4. Bond of union; that which unites firmly, as persons in
            friendship, or men in society. [bd]The cement of our
            love.[b8]
  
      5. (Anat.) The layer of bone investing the root and neck of a
            tooth; -- called also {cementum}.
  
      {Hydraulic cement}. See under {Hydraulic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cemented}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Cementing}.] [Cf. F. cimenter. See {Cement}, n.]
      1. To unite or cause to adhere by means of a cement. --Bp.
            Burnet.
  
      2. To unite firmly or closely. --Shak.
  
      3. To overlay or coat with cement; as, to cement a cellar
            bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\, v. i.
      To become cemented or firmly united; to cohere. --S. Sharp.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement steel \Ce*ment" steel\
      Steel produced by cementation; blister steel.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cemental \Ce*ment"al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to cement, as of a tooth; as, cemental
      tubes. --R. Owen.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cementation \Cem`en*ta"tion\, n.
      1. The act or process of cementing.
  
      2. (Chem.) A process which consists in surrounding a solid
            body with the powder of other substances, and heating the
            whole to a degree not sufficient to cause fusion, the
            physical properties of the body being changed by chemical
            combination with powder; thus iron becomes steel by
            cementation with charcoal, and green glass becomes
            porcelain by cementation with sand.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cementatory \Ce*ment"a*to*ry\, a.
      Having the quality of cementing or uniting firmly.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cemented}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Cementing}.] [Cf. F. cimenter. See {Cement}, n.]
      1. To unite or cause to adhere by means of a cement. --Bp.
            Burnet.
  
      2. To unite firmly or closely. --Shak.
  
      3. To overlay or coat with cement; as, to cement a cellar
            bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cementer \Ce*ment"er\, n.
      A person or thing that cements.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cemented}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Cementing}.] [Cf. F. cimenter. See {Cement}, n.]
      1. To unite or cause to adhere by means of a cement. --Bp.
            Burnet.
  
      2. To unite firmly or closely. --Shak.
  
      3. To overlay or coat with cement; as, to cement a cellar
            bottom.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cementitious \Cem`en*ti"tious\, a. [L. caementitius pertaining
      to quarry stones. See {Cement}, n. ]
      Of the nature of cement. [R.] --Forsyth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cement \Ce*ment"\ (s[ecr]*m[ecr]nt" or s[ecr]m"[ecr]nt), n. [OF.
      cement, ciment, F. ciment, fr. L. caementum a rough, unhewn
      stone, pieces or chips of marble, from which mortar was made,
      contr. fr. caedimentum, fr. caedere to cut, prob. akin to
      scindere to cleave, and to E. shed, v. t.]
      1. Any substance used for making bodies adhere to each other,
            as mortar, glue, etc.
  
      2. A kind of calcined limestone, or a calcined mixture of
            clay and lime, for making mortar which will harden under
            water.
  
      3. The powder used in cementation. See {Cementation}, n., 2.
  
      4. Bond of union; that which unites firmly, as persons in
            friendship, or men in society. [bd]The cement of our
            love.[b8]
  
      5. (Anat.) The layer of bone investing the root and neck of a
            tooth; -- called also {cementum}.
  
      {Hydraulic cement}. See under {Hydraulic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cenanthy \Ce*nan"thy\, n. [Gr. [?] empty + [?] a flower.] (Bot.)
      The absence or suppression of the essential organs (stamens
      and pistil) in a flower.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fringe tree \Fringe tree\
      A small oleaceous tree ({Chionanthus virginica}), of the
      southern United States, having clusters of white flowers with
      slender petals. It is often cultivated.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fringe \Fringe\, n. [OF, fringe, F. frange, prob. fr. L. fimbria
      fiber, thread, fringe, cf. fibra fiber, E. fiber, fimbriate.]
      1. An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff,
            originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting
            beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate
            and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends,
            twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose
            threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of
            leather, or the like.
  
      2. Something resembling in any respect a fringe; a line of
            objects along a border or edge; a border; an edging; a
            margin; a confine.
  
                     The confines of grace and the fringes of repentance.
                                                                              --Jer. Taylor.
  
      3. (Opt.) One of a number of light or dark bands, produced by
            the interference of light; a diffraction band; -- called
            also interference fringe.
  
      4. (Bot.) The peristome or fringelike appendage of the
            capsules of most mosses. See {Peristome}.
  
      {Fringe tree} (Bot.), a small tree ({Chionanthus Virginica}),
            growing in the Southern United States, and having
            snow-white flowers, with long pendulous petals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fringe tree \Fringe tree\
      A small oleaceous tree ({Chionanthus virginica}), of the
      southern United States, having clusters of white flowers with
      slender petals. It is often cultivated.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fringe \Fringe\, n. [OF, fringe, F. frange, prob. fr. L. fimbria
      fiber, thread, fringe, cf. fibra fiber, E. fiber, fimbriate.]
      1. An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff,
            originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting
            beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate
            and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends,
            twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose
            threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of
            leather, or the like.
  
      2. Something resembling in any respect a fringe; a line of
            objects along a border or edge; a border; an edging; a
            margin; a confine.
  
                     The confines of grace and the fringes of repentance.
                                                                              --Jer. Taylor.
  
      3. (Opt.) One of a number of light or dark bands, produced by
            the interference of light; a diffraction band; -- called
            also interference fringe.
  
      4. (Bot.) The peristome or fringelike appendage of the
            capsules of most mosses. See {Peristome}.
  
      {Fringe tree} (Bot.), a small tree ({Chionanthus Virginica}),
            growing in the Southern United States, and having
            snow-white flowers, with long pendulous petals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematic \Cin`e*mat"ic\, Cinematical \Cin`e*mat"ic*al\, a.
      See {Kinematic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematic \Cin`e*mat"ic\, Cinematical \Cin`e*mat"ic*al\, a.
      See {Kinematic}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematics \Cin`e*mat"ics\, n. sing.
      See {Kinematics}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematograph \Cin`e*mat"o*graph\, n. [Gr. [?], [?], motion +
      -graph.]
      1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope
            features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures,
            moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently
            before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of
            vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture
            machine; also, any of several other machines or devices
            producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for
            the cinematograph are {animatograph}, {biograph},
            {bioscope}, {electrograph}, {electroscope},
            {kinematograph}, {kinetoscope}, {veriscope}, {vitagraph},
            {vitascope}, {zo[94]gyroscope}, {zo[94]praxiscope}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematographer \Cin`e*ma*tog"ra*pher\, n.
      One who exhibits moving pictures or who takes
      chronophotographs by the cinematograph. --
      {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic}, a. -- {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic*al*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematographer \Cin`e*ma*tog"ra*pher\, n.
      One who exhibits moving pictures or who takes
      chronophotographs by the cinematograph. --
      {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic}, a. -- {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic*al*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cinematographer \Cin`e*ma*tog"ra*pher\, n.
      One who exhibits moving pictures or who takes
      chronophotographs by the cinematograph. --
      {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic}, a. -- {Cin`e*mat`o*graph"ic*al*ly},
      adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Command \Com*mand"\ (?; 61), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commanded}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commanding}.] [OE. comaunden, commanden, OF.
      comander, F. commander, fr. L. com- + mandare to commit to,
      to command. Cf. {Commend}, {Mandate}.]
      1. To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to
            direct; to bid; to charge.
  
                     We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you
                     never read that we are commanded to forgive our
                     friends.                                             --Bacon.
  
                     Go to your mistress: Say, I command her come to me.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to
            have at one's disposal; to lead.
  
                     Monmouth commanded the English auxiliaries.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
                     Such aid as I can spare you shall command. --Shak.
  
      3. To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or
            vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.
  
                     Bridges commanded by a fortified house. --Motley.
  
                     Up to the eastern tower, Whose height commands as
                     subject all the vale.                        --Shak.
  
                     One side commands a view of the finest garden.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      4. To have power or influence of the nature of authority
            over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to
            challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and
            affections of the people; the best goods command the best
            price.
  
                     'Tis not in mortals to command success. --Addison.
  
      5. To direct to come; to bestow. [Obs.]
  
                     I will command my blessing upon you.   --Lev. xxv.
                                                                              21.
  
      Syn: To bid; order; direct; dictate; charge; govern; rule;
               overlook.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Command \Com*mand"\, v. i.
      1. To have or to exercise direct authority; to govern; to
            sway; to influence; to give an order or orders.
  
                     And reigned, commanding in his monarchy. --Shak.
  
                     For the king had so commanded concerning [Haman].
                                                                              --Esth. iii.
                                                                              2.
  
      2. To have a view, as from a superior position.
  
                     Far and wide his eye commands.            --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Command \Com*mand"\, n.
      1. An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an
            injunction.
  
                     Awaiting what command their mighty chief Had to
                     impose.                                             --Milton.
  
      2. The possession or exercise of authority.
  
                     Command and force may often create, but can never
                     cure, an aversion.                              --Locke.
  
      3. Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the
            forces under his command.
  
      4. Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of
            position; scope of vision; survey.
  
                     The steepy stand Which overlooks the vale with wide
                     command.                                             --Dryden.
  
      5. Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to
            have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has
            command of the bridge.
  
                     He assumed an absolute command over his readers.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
      6. A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post,
            or the whole territory under the authority or control of a
            particular officer.
  
      {Word of command} (Mil.), a word or phrase of definite and
            established meaning, used in directing the movements of
            soldiers; as, {aim}; {fire}; {shoulder arms}, etc.
  
      Syn: Control; sway; power; authority; rule; dominion;
               sovereignty; mandate; order; injunction; charge; behest.
               See {Direction}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandable \Com*mand"a*ble\, a.
      Capable of being commanded.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandant \Com`man*dant"\, n. [F., orig. p. pr. of commander.]
      A commander; the commanding officer of a place, or of a body
      of men; as, the commandant of a navy-yard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandatory \Com*mand"a*to*ry\, a.
      Mandatory; as, commandatory authority. [Obs.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Command \Com*mand"\ (?; 61), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commanded}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commanding}.] [OE. comaunden, commanden, OF.
      comander, F. commander, fr. L. com- + mandare to commit to,
      to command. Cf. {Commend}, {Mandate}.]
      1. To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to
            direct; to bid; to charge.
  
                     We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you
                     never read that we are commanded to forgive our
                     friends.                                             --Bacon.
  
                     Go to your mistress: Say, I command her come to me.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to
            have at one's disposal; to lead.
  
                     Monmouth commanded the English auxiliaries.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
                     Such aid as I can spare you shall command. --Shak.
  
      3. To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or
            vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.
  
                     Bridges commanded by a fortified house. --Motley.
  
                     Up to the eastern tower, Whose height commands as
                     subject all the vale.                        --Shak.
  
                     One side commands a view of the finest garden.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      4. To have power or influence of the nature of authority
            over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to
            challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and
            affections of the people; the best goods command the best
            price.
  
                     'Tis not in mortals to command success. --Addison.
  
      5. To direct to come; to bestow. [Obs.]
  
                     I will command my blessing upon you.   --Lev. xxv.
                                                                              21.
  
      Syn: To bid; order; direct; dictate; charge; govern; rule;
               overlook.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandeer \Com`man*deer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commandeered};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Commandeering}.] [D. kommandeeren to
      command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to
      command. See {Command}.]
      1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for
            military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers.
  
      2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandeer \Com`man*deer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commandeered};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Commandeering}.] [D. kommandeeren to
      command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to
      command. See {Command}.]
      1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for
            military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers.
  
      2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandeer \Com`man*deer"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commandeered};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Commandeering}.] [D. kommandeeren to
      command, in South Africa to commandeer, fr. F. commander to
      command. See {Command}.]
      1. (Mil.) To compel to perform military service; to seize for
            military purposes; -- orig. used of the Boers.
  
      2. To take arbitrary or forcible possession of. [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commander \Com*mand"er\, n. [Cf. F. commandeur. Cf. {Commodore},
      {Commender}.]
      1. A chief; one who has supreme authority; a leader; the
            chief officer of an army, or of any division of it.
  
                     A leader and commander to the people. --Is. lv. 4.
  
      2. (Navy) An officer who ranks next below a captain, --
            ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army.
  
      3. The chief officer of a commandery.
  
      4. A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail
            lofts, etc.
  
      {Commander in chief}, the military title of the officer who
            has supreme command of the land or naval forces or the
            united forces of a nation or state; a generalissimo. The
            President is commander in chief of the army and navy of
            the United States.
  
      Syn: See {Chief}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commander \Com*mand"er\, n. [Cf. F. commandeur. Cf. {Commodore},
      {Commender}.]
      1. A chief; one who has supreme authority; a leader; the
            chief officer of an army, or of any division of it.
  
                     A leader and commander to the people. --Is. lv. 4.
  
      2. (Navy) An officer who ranks next below a captain, --
            ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army.
  
      3. The chief officer of a commandery.
  
      4. A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail
            lofts, etc.
  
      {Commander in chief}, the military title of the officer who
            has supreme command of the land or naval forces or the
            united forces of a nation or state; a generalissimo. The
            President is commander in chief of the army and navy of
            the United States.
  
      Syn: See {Chief}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandery \Com*mand"er*y\, n.; pl. {Commanderies}. [F.
      commanderie.]
      1. The office or rank of a commander. [Obs.]
  
      2. A district or a manor with lands and tenements
            appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an
            order of knights who was called a commander; -- called
            also a {preceptory}.
  
      3. An assembly or lodge of Knights Templars (so called) among
            the Freemasons. [U. S.]
  
      4. A district under the administration of a military
            commander or governor. [R.] --Brougham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandership \Com*mand"er*ship\, n.
      The office of a commander.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandery \Com*mand"er*y\, n.; pl. {Commanderies}. [F.
      commanderie.]
      1. The office or rank of a commander. [Obs.]
  
      2. A district or a manor with lands and tenements
            appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an
            order of knights who was called a commander; -- called
            also a {preceptory}.
  
      3. An assembly or lodge of Knights Templars (so called) among
            the Freemasons. [U. S.]
  
      4. A district under the administration of a military
            commander or governor. [R.] --Brougham.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Command \Com*mand"\ (?; 61), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commanded}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commanding}.] [OE. comaunden, commanden, OF.
      comander, F. commander, fr. L. com- + mandare to commit to,
      to command. Cf. {Commend}, {Mandate}.]
      1. To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to
            direct; to bid; to charge.
  
                     We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you
                     never read that we are commanded to forgive our
                     friends.                                             --Bacon.
  
                     Go to your mistress: Say, I command her come to me.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      2. To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to
            have at one's disposal; to lead.
  
                     Monmouth commanded the English auxiliaries.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
                     Such aid as I can spare you shall command. --Shak.
  
      3. To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or
            vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.
  
                     Bridges commanded by a fortified house. --Motley.
  
                     Up to the eastern tower, Whose height commands as
                     subject all the vale.                        --Shak.
  
                     One side commands a view of the finest garden.
                                                                              --Addison.
  
      4. To have power or influence of the nature of authority
            over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to
            challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and
            affections of the people; the best goods command the best
            price.
  
                     'Tis not in mortals to command success. --Addison.
  
      5. To direct to come; to bestow. [Obs.]
  
                     I will command my blessing upon you.   --Lev. xxv.
                                                                              21.
  
      Syn: To bid; order; direct; dictate; charge; govern; rule;
               overlook.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commanding \Com*mand"ing\, a.
      1. Exercising authority; actually in command; as, a
            commanding officer.
  
      2. Fitted to impress or control; as, a commanding look or
            presence.
  
      3. Exalted; overlooking; having superior strategic
            advantages; as, a commanding position.
  
      Syn: Authoritative; imperative; imperious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandingly \Com*mand"ing*ly\, adv.
      In a commanding manner.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandment \Com*mand"ment\, n. [OF. commandement, F.
      commandement.]
      1. An order or injunction given by authority; a command; a
            charge; a precept; a mandate.
  
                     A new commandment I give unto you, that ye love one
                     another.                                             --John xiii.
                                                                              34.
  
      2. (Script.) One of the ten laws or precepts given by God to
            the Israelites at Mount Sinai.
  
      3. The act of commanding; exercise of authority.
  
                     And therefore put I on the countenance Of stern
                     commandment.                                       --Shak.
  
      4. (Law) The offense of commanding or inducing another to
            violate the law.
  
      {The Commandments}, {The Ten Commandments}, the Decalogue, or
            summary of God's commands, given to Moses at Mount Sinai.
            (--Ex. xx.)

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commando \Com*man"do\, n. [D. See {Command}, v. t.]
      In South Africa, a military body or command; also, sometimes,
      an expedition or raid; as, a commando of a hundred Boers.
  
               The war bands, called commandos, have played a great
               part in the . . . military history of the country.
                                                                              --James Bryce.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandress \Com*mand"ress\, n.
      A woman invested with authority to command. --Hooker.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commandry \Com*mand"ry\, n.
      See {Commandery}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commend \Com*mend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commended}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Commending}.] [L. commendare; com- + mandare to
      intrust to one's charge, enjoin, command. Cf. {Command},
      {Mandate}.]
      1. To commit, intrust, or give in charge for care or
            preservation.
  
                     His eye commends the leading to his hand. --Shak.
  
                     Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit. --Luke
                                                                              xxiii. 46.
  
      2. To recommend as worthy of confidence or regard; to present
            as worthy of notice or favorable attention.
  
                     Among the objects of knowledge, two especially
                     commend themselves to our contemplation. --Sir M.
                                                                              Hale.
  
                     I commend unto you Phebe our sister.   --Rom. xvi. 1.
  
      3. To mention with approbation; to praise; as, to commend a
            person or an act.
  
                     Historians commend Alexander for weeping when he
                     read the actions of Achilles.            --Dryden.
  
      4. To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and
            good will. [Archaic]
  
                     Commend me to my brother.                  --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commend \Com*mend"\, n.
      1. Commendation; praise. [Obs.]
  
                     Speak in his just commend.                  --Shak.
  
      2. pl. Compliments; greetings. [Obs.]
  
                     Hearty commends and much endeared love to you.
                                                                              --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendable \Com*mend"a*ble\, a.
  
      Note: (Formerly accented on the first syllable.) [L.
               commendabilis.]
      Worthy of being commended or praised; laudable; praiseworthy.
  
               Order and decent ceremonies in the church are not only
               comely but commendable.                           --Bacon.
      -- {Com*mend"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Com*mend"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendable \Com*mend"a*ble\, a.
  
      Note: (Formerly accented on the first syllable.) [L.
               commendabilis.]
      Worthy of being commended or praised; laudable; praiseworthy.
  
               Order and decent ceremonies in the church are not only
               comely but commendable.                           --Bacon.
      -- {Com*mend"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Com*mend"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendable \Com*mend"a*ble\, a.
  
      Note: (Formerly accented on the first syllable.) [L.
               commendabilis.]
      Worthy of being commended or praised; laudable; praiseworthy.
  
               Order and decent ceremonies in the church are not only
               comely but commendable.                           --Bacon.
      -- {Com*mend"a*ble*ness}, n. -- {Com*mend"a*bly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendam \Com*men"dam\, n. [LL. dare in commendam to give into
      trust.] (Eng. Eccl. Law)
      A vacant living or benefice commended to a cleric (usually a
      bishop) who enjoyed the revenue until a pastor was provided.
      A living so held was said to be held in commendam. The
      practice was abolished by law in 1836.
  
               There was [formerly] some sense for commendams.
                                                                              --Selden.
  
      {Partnership in commendam}. See under {Partnership}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendatary \Com*mend"a*ta*ry\, n. [Cf. F. commendataire, LL.
      commendatarius.]
      One who holds a living in commendam.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendation \Com`men*da"tion\, n. [L. commendatio.]
      1. The act of commending; praise; favorable representation in
            words; recommendation.
  
                     Need we . . . epistles of commendation? --2 Cor.
                                                                              iii. 1.
  
                     By the commendation of the great officers. --Bacon.
  
      2. That which is the ground of approbation or praise.
  
                     Good nature is the most godlike commendation of a
                     man.                                                   --Dryden.
  
      3. pl. A message of affection or respect; compliments;
            greeting. [Obs.]
  
                     Hark you, Margaret; No princely commendations to my
                     king?                                                --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendator \Com*mend"a*tor\ (? [or] ?), n. [LL.]
      One who holds a benefice in commendam; a commendatary.
      --Chalmers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendatory \Com*mend"a*to*ry\, n.
      A commendation; eulogy. [R.] [bd]Commendatories to our
      affection.[b8] --Sharp.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendatory \Com*mend"a*to*ry\, a. [L. commendatorius.]
      1. Serving to commend; containing praise or commendation;
            commending; praising. [bd]Commendatory verses.[b8] --Pope.
  
      2. Holding a benefice in commendam; as, a commendatory
            bishop. --Burke.
  
      {Commendatory prayer} (Book of Common Prayer), a prayer read
            over the dying. [bd]The commendatory prayer was said for
            him, and, as it ended, he [William III.] died.[b8] --Bp.
            Burnet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commendatory \Com*mend"a*to*ry\, a. [L. commendatorius.]
      1. Serving to commend; containing praise or commendation;
            commending; praising. [bd]Commendatory verses.[b8] --Pope.
  
      2. Holding a benefice in commendam; as, a commendatory
            bishop. --Burke.
  
      {Commendatory prayer} (Book of Common Prayer), a prayer read
            over the dying. [bd]The commendatory prayer was said for
            him, and, as it ended, he [William III.] died.[b8] --Bp.
            Burnet.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commend \Com*mend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commended}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Commending}.] [L. commendare; com- + mandare to
      intrust to one's charge, enjoin, command. Cf. {Command},
      {Mandate}.]
      1. To commit, intrust, or give in charge for care or
            preservation.
  
                     His eye commends the leading to his hand. --Shak.
  
                     Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit. --Luke
                                                                              xxiii. 46.
  
      2. To recommend as worthy of confidence or regard; to present
            as worthy of notice or favorable attention.
  
                     Among the objects of knowledge, two especially
                     commend themselves to our contemplation. --Sir M.
                                                                              Hale.
  
                     I commend unto you Phebe our sister.   --Rom. xvi. 1.
  
      3. To mention with approbation; to praise; as, to commend a
            person or an act.
  
                     Historians commend Alexander for weeping when he
                     read the actions of Achilles.            --Dryden.
  
      4. To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and
            good will. [Archaic]
  
                     Commend me to my brother.                  --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commender \Com*mend"er\, n.
      One who commends or praises.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commend \Com*mend"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Commended}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Commending}.] [L. commendare; com- + mandare to
      intrust to one's charge, enjoin, command. Cf. {Command},
      {Mandate}.]
      1. To commit, intrust, or give in charge for care or
            preservation.
  
                     His eye commends the leading to his hand. --Shak.
  
                     Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit. --Luke
                                                                              xxiii. 46.
  
      2. To recommend as worthy of confidence or regard; to present
            as worthy of notice or favorable attention.
  
                     Among the objects of knowledge, two especially
                     commend themselves to our contemplation. --Sir M.
                                                                              Hale.
  
                     I commend unto you Phebe our sister.   --Rom. xvi. 1.
  
      3. To mention with approbation; to praise; as, to commend a
            person or an act.
  
                     Historians commend Alexander for weeping when he
                     read the actions of Achilles.            --Dryden.
  
      4. To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and
            good will. [Archaic]
  
                     Commend me to my brother.                  --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comment \Com"ment\, v. t.
      To comment on. [Archaic.] --Fuller.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comment \Com"ment\, n. [Cf. OF. comment.]
      1. A remark, observation, or criticism; gossip; discourse;
            talk.
  
                     Their lavish comment when her name was named.
                                                                              --Tennyson.
  
      2. A note or observation intended to explain, illustrate, or
            criticise the meaning of a writing, book, etc.;
            explanation; annotation; exposition.
  
                     All the volumes of philosophy, With all their
                     comments.                                          --Prior.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comment \Com"ment\ (?; 277), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Commented}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commenting}.] [F. commenter, L. commentari to
      meditate upon, explain, v. intens. of comminisci, commentus,
      to reflect upon, invent; com- + the root of meminisse to
      remember, mens mind. See {Mind}.]
      To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to
      write notes on the works of an author, with a view to
      illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to
      write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon.
  
               A physician to comment on your malady.   --Shak.
  
               Critics . . . proceed to comment on him. --Dryden.
  
               I must translate and comment.                  --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentary \Com"men*ta*ry\, n.; pl. {Commentaries}. [L.
      commentarius, commentarium, note book, commentary: cf. F.
      commentaire. See {Comment}, v. i.]
      1. A series of comments or annotations; esp., a book of
            explanations or expositions on the whole or a part of the
            Scriptures or of some other work.
  
                     This letter . . . was published by him with a severe
                     commentary.                                       --Hallam.
  
      2. A brief account of transactions or events written hastily,
            as if for a memorandum; -- usually in the plural; as,
            Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentary \Com"men*ta*ry\, n.; pl. {Commentaries}. [L.
      commentarius, commentarium, note book, commentary: cf. F.
      commentaire. See {Comment}, v. i.]
      1. A series of comments or annotations; esp., a book of
            explanations or expositions on the whole or a part of the
            Scriptures or of some other work.
  
                     This letter . . . was published by him with a severe
                     commentary.                                       --Hallam.
  
      2. A brief account of transactions or events written hastily,
            as if for a memorandum; -- usually in the plural; as,
            Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentate \Com"men*tate\, v. t. & i. [L. commentatus, p. p. of
      commentari to meditate.]
      To write comments or notes upon; to make comments. [R.]
  
               Commentate upon it, and return it enriched. --Lamb.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentation \Com`men*ta"tion\, n.
      1. The act or process of commenting or criticising;
            exposition. [R.]
  
                     The spirit of commentation.               --Whewell.
  
      2. The result of the labors of a commentator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentator \Com"men*ta`tor\, n. [L. commentator: cf. F.
      commentateur.]
      One who writes a commentary or comments; an expositor; an
      annotator.
  
               The commentator's professed object is to explain, to
               enforce, to illustrate doctrines claimed as true.
                                                                              --Whewell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentatorial \Com`men*ta*to"ri*al\ (? [or] ?), a.
      Pertaining to the making of commentaries. --Whewell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentatorship \Com"men*ta`tor*ship\, n.
      The office or occupation of a commentator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comment \Com"ment\ (?; 277), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Commented}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commenting}.] [F. commenter, L. commentari to
      meditate upon, explain, v. intens. of comminisci, commentus,
      to reflect upon, invent; com- + the root of meminisse to
      remember, mens mind. See {Mind}.]
      To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to
      write notes on the works of an author, with a view to
      illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to
      write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon.
  
               A physician to comment on your malady.   --Shak.
  
               Critics . . . proceed to comment on him. --Dryden.
  
               I must translate and comment.                  --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commenter \Com"ment`er\, n.
      One who makes or writes comments; a commentator; an
      annotator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comment \Com"ment\ (?; 277), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Commented}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Commenting}.] [F. commenter, L. commentari to
      meditate upon, explain, v. intens. of comminisci, commentus,
      to reflect upon, invent; com- + the root of meminisse to
      remember, mens mind. See {Mind}.]
      To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to
      write notes on the works of an author, with a view to
      illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to
      write annotations; -- often followed by on or upon.
  
               A physician to comment on your malady.   --Shak.
  
               Critics . . . proceed to comment on him. --Dryden.
  
               I must translate and comment.                  --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commentitious \Com`men*ti"tious\, a. [L. commentitius.]
      Fictitious or imaginary; unreal; as, a commentitious system
      of religion. [Obs.] --Warburton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commination \Com`mi*na"tion\, n. [L. comminatio, from comminari
      to threaten; com- + minari to threaten: cf. F. commination.]
      1. A threat or threatening; a denunciation of punishment or
            vengeance.
  
                     With terrible comminations to all them that did
                     resist.                                             --Foxe.
  
                     Those thunders of commination.            --I. Taylor.
  
      2. An office in the liturgy of the Church of England, used on
            Ash Wednesday, containing a recital of God's anger and
            judgments against sinners.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminatory \Com*min"a*to"ry\, a. [Cf. F. comminatoire.]
      Threatening or denouncing punishment; as, comminatory terms.
      --B. Jonson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminute \Com"mi*nute\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Comminuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Comminuting}.] [L. comminutus, p. p. of
      comminuere to comminute; com- + minuere to lessen. See
      {Minute}.]
      To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to
      pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or
      bones; to comminute food with the teeth. --Pennant.
  
      {Comminuted fracture}. See under {Fracture}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminute \Com"mi*nute\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Comminuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Comminuting}.] [L. comminutus, p. p. of
      comminuere to comminute; com- + minuere to lessen. See
      {Minute}.]
      To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to
      pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or
      bones; to comminute food with the teeth. --Pennant.
  
      {Comminuted fracture}. See under {Fracture}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Fracture \Frac"ture\ (?; 135), n. [L. fractura, fr. frangere,
      fractum, to break: cf. F. fracture. See {Fraction}.]
      1. The act of breaking or snapping asunder; rupture; breach.
  
      2. (Surg.) The breaking of a bone.
  
      3. (Min.) The texture of a freshly broken surface; as, a
            compact fracture; an even, hackly, or conchoidal fracture.
  
      {Comminuted fracture} (Surg.), a fracture in which the bone
            is broken into several parts.
  
      {Complicated fracture} (Surg.), a fracture of the bone
            combined with the lesion of some artery, nervous trunk, or
            joint.
  
      {Compound fracture} (Surg.), a fracture in which there is an
            open wound from the surface down to the fracture.
  
      {Simple fracture} (Surg.), a fracture in which the bone only
            is ruptured. It does not communicate with the surface by
            an open wound.
  
      Syn: {Fracture}, {Rupture}.
  
      Usage: These words denote different kinds of breaking,
                  according to the objects to which they are applied.
                  Fracture is applied to hard substances; as, the
                  fracture of a bone. Rupture is oftener applied to soft
                  substances; as, the rupture of a blood vessel. It is
                  also used figuratively. [bd]To be an enemy and once to
                  have been a friend, does it not embitter the
                  rupture?[b8] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminute \Com"mi*nute\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Comminuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Comminuting}.] [L. comminutus, p. p. of
      comminuere to comminute; com- + minuere to lessen. See
      {Minute}.]
      To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to
      pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or
      bones; to comminute food with the teeth. --Pennant.
  
      {Comminuted fracture}. See under {Fracture}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminute \Com"mi*nute\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Comminuted}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Comminuting}.] [L. comminutus, p. p. of
      comminuere to comminute; com- + minuere to lessen. See
      {Minute}.]
      To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to
      pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or
      bones; to comminute food with the teeth. --Pennant.
  
      {Comminuted fracture}. See under {Fracture}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Comminution \Com`mi*nu"tion\, n.
      1. The act of reducing to a fine powder or to small
            particles; pulverization; the state of being comminuted.
            --Bentley.
  
      2. (Surg.) Fracture (of a bone) into a number of pieces.
            --Dunglison.
  
      3. Gradual diminution by the removal of small particles at a
            time; a lessening; a wearing away.
  
                     Natural and necessary comminution of our lives.
                                                                              --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Large \Large\, a. [Compar. {Larger}; superl. {Largest}.] [F.,
      fr. L. largus. Cf. {Largo}.]
      1. Exceeding most other things of like kind in bulk,
            capacity, quantity, superficial dimensions, or number of
            constituent units; big; great; capacious; extensive; --
            opposed to {small}; as, a large horse; a large house or
            room; a large lake or pool; a large jug or spoon; a large
            vineyard; a large army; a large city.
  
      Note: For linear dimensions, and mere extent, great, and not
               large, is used as a qualifying word; as, great length,
               breadth, depth; a great distance; a great height.
  
      2. Abundant; ample; as, a large supply of provisions.
  
                     We hare yet large day.                        --Milton.
  
      3. Full in statement; diffuse; full; profuse.
  
                     I might be very large upon the importance and
                     advantages of education.                     -- Felton.
  
      4. Having more than usual power or capacity; having broad
            sympathies and generous impulses; comprehensive; -- said
            of the mind and heart.
  
      5. Free; unembarrassed. [Obs.]
  
                     Of burdens all he set the Paynims large. --Fairfax.
  
      6. Unrestrained by decorum; -- said of language. [Obs.]
            [bd]Some large jests he will make.[b8] --Shak.
  
      7. Prodigal in expending; lavish. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      8. (Naut.) Crossing the line of a ship's course in a
            favorable direction; -- said of the wind when it is abeam,
            or between the beam and the quarter.
  
      {At large}.
            (a) Without restraint or confinement; as, to go at large;
                  to be left at large.
            (b) Diffusely; fully; in the full extent; as, to discourse
                  on a subject at large.
  
      {Common at large}. See under {Common}, n.
  
      {Electors at large}, {Representative at large}, electors, or
            a representative, as in Congress, chosen to represent the
            whole of a State, in distinction from those chosen to
            represent particular districts in a State. [U. S.]
  
      {To give, go, run, [or] sail large} (Naut.), to have the wind
            crossing the direction of a vessel's course in such a way
            that the sails feel its full force, and the vessel gains
            its highest speed. See {Large}, a., 8.
  
      Syn: Big; bulky; huge; capacious; comprehensive; ample;
               abundant; plentiful; populous; copious; diffusive;
               liberal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Divisor \Di*vi"sor\, n. [L., fr. dividere. See {Divide}.]
      (Math.)
      The number by which the dividend is divided.
  
      {Common divisor}. (Math.) See under {Common}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Common \Com"mon\, a. [Compar. {Commoner}; superl. {Commonest}.]
      [OE. commun, comon, OF. comun, F. commun, fr. L. communis;
      com- + munis ready to be of service; cf. Skr. mi to make
      fast, set up, build, Goth. gamains common, G. gemein, and E.
      mean low, common. Cf. {Immunity}, {Commune}, n. & v.]
      1. Belonging or relating equally, or similarly, to more than
            one; as, you and I have a common interest in the property.
  
                     Though life and sense be common to men and brutes.
                                                                              --Sir M. Hale.
  
      2. Belonging to or shared by, affecting or serving, all the
            members of a class, considered together; general; public;
            as, properties common to all plants; the common schools;
            the Book of Common Prayer.
  
                     Such actions as the common good requireth. --Hooker.
  
                     The common enemy of man.                     --Shak.
  
      3. Often met with; usual; frequent; customary.
  
                     Grief more than common grief.            --Shak.
  
      4. Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary;
            plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense.
  
                     The honest, heart-felt enjoyment of common life.
                                                                              --W. Irving.
  
                     This fact was infamous And ill beseeming any common
                     man, Much more a knight, a captain and a leader.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     Above the vulgar flight of common souls. --A.
                                                                              Murphy.
  
      5. Profane; polluted. [Obs.]
  
                     What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common.
                                                                              --Acts x. 15.
  
      6. Given to habits of lewdness; prostitute.
  
                     A dame who herself was common.            --L'Estrange.
  
      {Common bar} (Law) Same as {Blank bar}, under {Blank}.
  
      {Common barrator} (Law), one who makes a business of
            instigating litigation.
  
      {Common Bench}, a name sometimes given to the English Court
            of Common Pleas.
  
      {Common brawler} (Law), one addicted to public brawling and
            quarreling. See {Brawler}.
  
      {Common carrier} (Law), one who undertakes the office of
            carrying (goods or persons) for hire. Such a carrier is
            bound to carry in all cases when he has accommodation, and
            when his fixed price is tendered, and he is liable for all
            losses and injuries to the goods, except those which
            happen in consequence of the act of God, or of the enemies
            of the country, or of the owner of the property himself.
           
  
      {Common chord} (Mus.), a chord consisting of the fundamental
            tone, with its third and fifth.
  
      {Common council}, the representative (legislative) body, or
            the lower branch of the representative body, of a city or
            other municipal corporation.
  
      {Common crier}, the crier of a town or city.
  
      {Common divisor} (Math.), a number or quantity that divides
            two or more numbers or quantities without a remainder; a
            common measure.
  
      {Common gender} (Gram.), the gender comprising words that may
            be of either the masculine or the feminine gender.
  
      {Common law}, a system of jurisprudence developing under the
            guidance of the courts so as to apply a consistent and
            reasonable rule to each litigated case. It may be
            superseded by statute, but unless superseded it controls.
            --Wharton.
  
      Note: It is by others defined as the unwritten law
               (especially of England), the law that receives its
               binding force from immemorial usage and universal
               reception, as ascertained and expressed in the
               judgments of the courts. This term is often used in
               contradistinction from {statute law}. Many use it to
               designate a law common to the whole country. It is also
               used to designate the whole body of English (or other)
               law, as distinguished from its subdivisions, local,
               civil, admiralty, equity, etc. See {Law}.
  
      {Common lawyer}, one versed in common law.
  
      {Common lewdness} (Law), the habitual performance of lewd
            acts in public.
  
      {Common multiple} (Arith.) See under {Multiple}.
  
      {Common noun} (Gram.), the name of any one of a class of
            objects, as distinguished from a proper noun (the name of
            a particular person or thing).
  
      {Common nuisance} (Law), that which is deleterious to the
            health or comfort or sense of decency of the community at
            large.
  
      {Common pleas}, one of the three superior courts of common
            law at Westminster, presided over by a chief justice and
            four puisne judges. Its jurisdiction is confined to civil
            matters. Courts bearing this title exist in several of the
            United States, having, however, in some cases, both civil
            and criminal jurisdiction extending over the whole State.
            In other States the jurisdiction of the common pleas is
            limited to a county, and it is sometimes called a {county
            court}. Its powers are generally defined by statute.
  
      {Common prayer}, the liturgy of the Church of England, or of
            the Protestant Episcopal church of the United States,
            which all its clergy are enjoined to use. It is contained
            in the Book of Common Prayer.
  
      {Common school}, a school maintained at the public expense,
            and open to all.
  
      {Common scold} (Law), a woman addicted to scolding
            indiscriminately, in public.
  
      {Common seal}, a seal adopted and used by a corporation.
  
      {Common sense}.
            (a) A supposed sense which was held to be the common bond
                  of all the others. [Obs.] --Trench.
            (b) Sound judgment. See under {Sense}.
  
      {Common time} (Mus.), that variety of time in which the
            measure consists of two or of four equal portions.
  
      {In common}, equally with another, or with others; owned,
            shared, or used, in community with others; affecting or
            affected equally.
  
      {Out of the common}, uncommon; extraordinary.
  
      {Tenant in common}, one holding real or personal property in
            common with others, having distinct but undivided
            interests. See {Joint tenant}, under {Joint}.
  
      {To make common cause with}, to join or ally one's self with.
  
      Syn: General; public; popular; national; universal; frequent;
               ordinary; customary; usual; familiar; habitual; vulgar;
               mean; trite; stale; threadbare; commonplace. See
               {Mutual}, {Ordinary}, {General}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Meter \Me"ter\, Metre \Me"tre\, n. [OE. metre, F. m[8a]tre, L.
      metrum, fr. Gr. [?]; akin to Skr. m[be] to measure. See
      {Mete} to measure.]
      1. Rhythmical arrangement of syllables or words into verses,
            stanzas, strophes, etc.; poetical measure, depending on
            number, quantity, and accent of syllables; rhythm;
            measure; verse; also, any specific rhythmical
            arrangements; as, the Horatian meters; a dactylic meter.
  
                     The only strict antithesis to prose is meter.
                                                                              --Wordsworth.
  
      2. A poem. [Obs.] --Robynson (More's Utopia).
  
      3. A measure of length, equal to 39.37 English inches, the
            standard of linear measure in the metric system of weights
            and measures. It was intended to be, and is very nearly,
            the ten millionth part of the distance from the equator to
            the north pole, as ascertained by actual measurement of an
            arc of a meridian. See {Metric system}, under {Metric}.
  
      {Common meter} (Hymnol.), four iambic verses, or lines,
            making a stanza, the first and third having each four
            feet, and the second and fourth each three feet; --
            usually indicated by the initials C.M.
  
      {Long meter} (Hymnol.), iambic verses or lines of four feet
            each, four verses usually making a stanza; -- commonly
            indicated by the initials L. M.
  
      {Short meter} (Hymnol.), iambic verses or lines, the first,
            second, and fourth having each three feet, and the third
            four feet. The stanza usually consists of four lines, but
            is sometimes doubled. Short meter is indicated by the
            initials S. M.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Thrift \Thrift\, n. [Icel. [thorn]rift. See {Thrive}.]
      1. A thriving state; good husbandry; economical management in
            regard to property; frugality.
  
                     The rest, . . . willing to fall to thrift, prove
                     very good husbands.                           --Spenser.
  
      2. Success and advance in the acquisition of property;
            increase of worldly goods; gain; prosperity. [bd]Your
            thrift is gone full clean.[b8] --Chaucer.
  
                     I have a mind presages me such thrift. --Shak.
  
      3. Vigorous growth, as of a plant.
  
      4. (Bot.) One of several species of flowering plants of the
            genera {Statice} and {Armeria}.
  
      {Common thrift} (Bot.), {Armeria vulgaris}; -- also called
            {sea pink}.
  
      Syn: Frugality; economy; prosperity; gain; profit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Time \Time\, n.; pl. {Times}. [OE. time, AS. t[c6]ma, akin to
      t[c6]d time, and to Icel. t[c6]mi, Dan. time an hour, Sw.
      timme. [fb]58. See {Tide}, n.]
      1. Duration, considered independently of any system of
            measurement or any employment of terms which designate
            limited portions thereof.
  
                     The time wasteth [i. e. passes away] night and day.
                                                                              --Chaucer.
  
                     I know of no ideas . . . that have a better claim to
                     be accounted simple and original than those of space
                     and time.                                          --Reid.
  
      2. A particular period or part of duration, whether past,
            present, or future; a point or portion of duration; as,
            the time was, or has been; the time is, or will be.
  
                     God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake
                     in time past unto the fathers by the prophets.
                                                                              --Heb. i. 1.
  
      3. The period at which any definite event occurred, or person
            lived; age; period; era; as, the Spanish Armada was
            destroyed in the time of Queen Elizabeth; -- often in the
            plural; as, ancient times; modern times.
  
      4. The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a
            person has at his disposal.
  
                     Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to
                     God, to religion, to mankind.            --Buckminster.
  
      5. A proper time; a season; an opportunity.
  
                     There is . . . a time to every purpose. --Eccl. iii.
                                                                              1.
  
                     The time of figs was not yet.            --Mark xi. 13.
  
      6. Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition.
  
                     She was within one month of her time. --Clarendon.
  
      7. Performance or occurrence of an action or event,
            considered with reference to repetition; addition of a
            number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four
            times; four times four, or sixteen.
  
                     Summers three times eight save one.   --Milton.
  
      8. The present life; existence in this world as contrasted
            with immortal life; definite, as contrasted with infinite,
            duration.
  
                     Till time and sin together cease.      --Keble.
  
      9. (Gram.) Tense.
  
      10. (Mus.) The measured duration of sounds; measure; tempo;
            rate of movement; rhythmical division; as, common or
            triple time; the musician keeps good time.
  
                     Some few lines set unto a solemn time. --Beau. &
                                                                              Fl.
  
      Note: Time is often used in the formation of compounds,
               mostly self-explaining; as, time-battered,
               time-beguiling, time-consecrated, time-consuming,
               time-enduring, time-killing, time-sanctioned,
               time-scorner, time-wasting, time-worn, etc.
  
      {Absolute time}, time irrespective of local standards or
            epochs; as, all spectators see a lunar eclipse at the same
            instant of absolute time.
  
      {Apparent time}, the time of day reckoned by the sun, or so
            that 12 o'clock at the place is the instant of the transit
            of the sun's center over the meridian.
  
      {Astronomical time}, mean solar time reckoned by counting the
            hours continuously up to twenty-four from one noon to the
            next.
  
      {At times}, at distinct intervals of duration; now and then;
            as, at times he reads, at other times he rides.
  
      {Civil time}, time as reckoned for the purposes of common
            life in distinct periods, as years, months, days, hours,
            etc., the latter, among most modern nations, being divided
            into two series of twelve each, and reckoned, the first
            series from midnight to noon, the second, from noon to
            midnight.
  
      {Common time} (Mil.), the ordinary time of marching, in which
            ninety steps, each twenty-eight inches in length, are
            taken in one minute.
  
      {Equation of time}. See under {Equation}, n.
  
      {In time}.
            (a) In good season; sufficiently early; as, he arrived in
                  time to see the exhibition.
            (b) After a considerable space of duration; eventually;
                  finally; as, you will in time recover your health and
                  strength.
  
      {Mean time}. See under 4th {Mean}.
  
      {Quick time} (Mil.), time of marching, in which one hundred
            and twenty steps, each thirty inches in length, are taken
            in one minute.
  
      {Sidereal time}. See under {Sidereal}.
  
      {Standard time}, the civil time that has been established by
            law or by general usage over a region or country. In
            England the standard time is Greenwich mean solar time. In
            the United States and Canada four kinds of standard time
            have been adopted by the railroads and accepted by the
            people, viz., Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific
            time, corresponding severally to the mean local times of
            the 75th, 90th, 105th, and 120th meridians west from
            Greenwich, and being therefore five, six, seven, and eight
            hours slower than Greenwich time.
  
      {Time ball}, a ball arranged to drop from the summit of a
            pole, to indicate true midday time, as at Greenwich
            Observatory, England. --Nichol.
  
      {Time bargain} (Com.), a contract made for the sale or
            purchase of merchandise, or of stock in the public funds,
            at a certain time in the future.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Common \Com"mon\, a. [Compar. {Commoner}; superl. {Commonest}.]
      [OE. commun, comon, OF. comun, F. commun, fr. L. communis;
      com- + munis ready to be of service; cf. Skr. mi to make
      fast, set up, build, Goth. gamains common, G. gemein, and E.
      mean low, common. Cf. {Immunity}, {Commune}, n. & v.]
      1. Belonging or relating equally, or similarly, to more than
            one; as, you and I have a common interest in the property.
  
                     Though life and sense be common to men and brutes.
                                                                              --Sir M. Hale.
  
      2. Belonging to or shared by, affecting or serving, all the
            members of a class, considered together; general; public;
            as, properties common to all plants; the common schools;
            the Book of Common Prayer.
  
                     Such actions as the common good requireth. --Hooker.
  
                     The common enemy of man.                     --Shak.
  
      3. Often met with; usual; frequent; customary.
  
                     Grief more than common grief.            --Shak.
  
      4. Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary;
            plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense.
  
                     The honest, heart-felt enjoyment of common life.
                                                                              --W. Irving.
  
                     This fact was infamous And ill beseeming any common
                     man, Much more a knight, a captain and a leader.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     Above the vulgar flight of common souls. --A.
                                                                              Murphy.
  
      5. Profane; polluted. [Obs.]
  
                     What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common.
                                                                              --Acts x. 15.
  
      6. Given to habits of lewdness; prostitute.
  
                     A dame who herself was common.            --L'Estrange.
  
      {Common bar} (Law) Same as {Blank bar}, under {Blank}.
  
      {Common barrator} (Law), one who makes a business of
            instigating litigation.
  
      {Common Bench}, a name sometimes given to the English Court
            of Common Pleas.
  
      {Common brawler} (Law), one addicted to public brawling and
            quarreling. See {Brawler}.
  
      {Common carrier} (Law), one who undertakes the office of
            carrying (goods or persons) for hire. Such a carrier is
            bound to carry in all cases when he has accommodation, and
            when his fixed price is tendered, and he is liable for all
            losses and injuries to the goods, except those which
            happen in consequence of the act of God, or of the enemies
            of the country, or of the owner of the property himself.
           
  
      {Common chord} (Mus.), a chord consisting of the fundamental
            tone, with its third and fifth.
  
      {Common council}, the representative (legislative) body, or
            the lower branch of the representative body, of a city or
            other municipal corporation.
  
      {Common crier}, the crier of a town or city.
  
      {Common divisor} (Math.), a number or quantity that divides
            two or more numbers or quantities without a remainder; a
            common measure.
  
      {Common gender} (Gram.), the gender comprising words that may
            be of either the masculine or the feminine gender.
  
      {Common law}, a system of jurisprudence developing under the
            guidance of the courts so as to apply a consistent and
            reasonable rule to each litigated case. It may be
            superseded by statute, but unless superseded it controls.
            --Wharton.
  
      Note: It is by others defined as the unwritten law
               (especially of England), the law that receives its
               binding force from immemorial usage and universal
               reception, as ascertained and expressed in the
               judgments of the courts. This term is often used in
               contradistinction from {statute law}. Many use it to
               designate a law common to the whole country. It is also
               used to designate the whole body of English (or other)
               law, as distinguished from its subdivisions, local,
               civil, admiralty, equity, etc. See {Law}.
  
      {Common lawyer}, one versed in common law.
  
      {Common lewdness} (Law), the habitual performance of lewd
            acts in public.
  
      {Common multiple} (Arith.) See under {Multiple}.
  
      {Common noun} (Gram.), the name of any one of a class of
            objects, as distinguished from a proper noun (the name of
            a particular person or thing).
  
      {Common nuisance} (Law), that which is deleterious to the
            health or comfort or sense of decency of the community at
            large.
  
      {Common pleas}, one of the three superior courts of common
            law at Westminster, presided over by a chief justice and
            four puisne judges. Its jurisdiction is confined to civil
            matters. Courts bearing this title exist in several of the
            United States, having, however, in some cases, both civil
            and criminal jurisdiction extending over the whole State.
            In other States the jurisdiction of the common pleas is
            limited to a county, and it is sometimes called a {county
            court}. Its powers are generally defined by statute.
  
      {Common prayer}, the liturgy of the Church of England, or of
            the Protestant Episcopal church of the United States,
            which all its clergy are enjoined to use. It is contained
            in the Book of Common Prayer.
  
      {Common school}, a school maintained at the public expense,
            and open to all.
  
      {Common scold} (Law), a woman addicted to scolding
            indiscriminately, in public.
  
      {Common seal}, a seal adopted and used by a corporation.
  
      {Common sense}.
            (a) A supposed sense which was held to be the common bond
                  of all the others. [Obs.] --Trench.
            (b) Sound judgment. See under {Sense}.
  
      {Common time} (Mus.), that variety of time in which the
            measure consists of two or of four equal portions.
  
      {In common}, equally with another, or with others; owned,
            shared, or used, in community with others; affecting or
            affected equally.
  
      {Out of the common}, uncommon; extraordinary.
  
      {Tenant in common}, one holding real or personal property in
            common with others, having distinct but undivided
            interests. See {Joint tenant}, under {Joint}.
  
      {To make common cause with}, to join or ally one's self with.
  
      Syn: General; public; popular; national; universal; frequent;
               ordinary; customary; usual; familiar; habitual; vulgar;
               mean; trite; stale; threadbare; commonplace. See
               {Mutual}, {Ordinary}, {General}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commonition \Com`mo*ni"tion\, n. [L. commonitio. See
      {Monition}.]
      Advice; warning; instruction. [Obs.] --Bailey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commonitive \Com*mon"i*tive\, a.
      Monitory. [Obs.]
  
               Only commemorative and commonitive.         --Bp. Hall.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commonitory \Com*mon"i*to*ry\, a. [L. commonitorius.]
      Calling to mind; giving admonition. [Obs.] --Foxe.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commonty \Com"mon*ty\, n. (Scots Law)
      A common; a piece of land in which two or more persons have a
      common right. --Bell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Commune \Com*mune"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Communed}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Communing}.] [OF. communier, fr. L. communicare to
      communicate, fr. communis common. See {Common}, and cf.
      {Communicate}.]
      1. To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to
            interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.
  
                     I would commune with you of such things That want no
                     ear but yours.                                    --Shak.
  
      2. To receive the communion; to partake of the eucharist or
            Lord's supper.
  
                     To commune under both kinds.               --Bp. Burnet.
  
      {To commune with one's self} [or] {one's heart}, to think; to
            reflect; to meditate.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Community \Com*mu"ni*ty\, n.; pl. {Communities}. [L. communitas:
      cf. OF. communit[82]. Cf. {Commonalty}, and see {Common}.]
      1. Common possession or enjoyment; participation; as, a
            community of goods.
  
                     The original community of all things. --Locke.
  
                     An unreserved community of thought and feeling. --W.
                                                                              Irving.
  
      2. A body of people having common rights, privileges, or
            interests, or living in the same place under the same laws
            and regulations; as, a community of monks. Hence a number
            of animals living in a common home or with some apparent
            association of interests.
  
                     Creatures that in communities exist.   --Wordsworth.
  
      3. Society at large; a commonwealth or state; a body politic;
            the public, or people in general.
  
                     Burdens upon the poorer classes of the community.
                                                                              --Hallam.
  
      Note: In this sense, the term should be used with the
               definite article; as, the interests of the community.
  
      4. Common character; likeness. [R.]
  
                     The essential community of nature between organic
                     growth and inorganic growth.               --H. Spencer.
  
      5. Commonness; frequency. [Obs.]
  
                     Eyes . . . sick and blunted with community. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Community \Com*mu"ni*ty\, n.; pl. {Communities}. [L. communitas:
      cf. OF. communit[82]. Cf. {Commonalty}, and see {Common}.]
      1. Common possession or enjoyment; participation; as, a
            community of goods.
  
                     The original community of all things. --Locke.
  
                     An unreserved community of thought and feeling. --W.
                                                                              Irving.
  
      2. A body of people having common rights, privileges, or
            interests, or living in the same place under the same laws
            and regulations; as, a community of monks. Hence a number
            of animals living in a common home or with some apparent
            association of interests.
  
                     Creatures that in communities exist.   --Wordsworth.
  
      3. Society at large; a commonwealth or state; a body politic;
            the public, or people in general.
  
                     Burdens upon the poorer classes of the community.
                                                                              --Hallam.
  
      Note: In this sense, the term should be used with the
               definite article; as, the interests of the community.
  
      4. Common character; likeness. [R.]
  
                     The essential community of nature between organic
                     growth and inorganic growth.               --H. Spencer.
  
      5. Commonness; frequency. [Obs.]
  
                     Eyes . . . sick and blunted with community. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Conundrum \Co*nun"drum\, n. [Origin unknown.]
      1. A kind of riddle based upon some fanciful or fantastic
            resemblance between things quite unlike; a puzzling
            question, of which the answer is or involves a pun.
  
                     Or pun ambiguous, or conundrum quaint. --J. Philips.
  
      2. A question to which only a conjectural answer can be made.
  
                     Do you think life is long enough to let me speculate
                     on conundrums like that?                     --W. Black.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cyanometer \Cy`a*nom"e*ter\ (s?`?-n?m"?-t?r), n. [Gr. ky`anos a
      dark blue substance + -meter: cf. F. cyanom[8a]tre.]
      An instrument for measuring degress of blueness.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cymometer \Cy*mom"e*ter\, n. [Gr. [?] wave -meter.]
      An instrument for exhibiting and measuring wave motion;
      specif. (Elec.), an instrument for determining the frequency
      of electic wave oscillations, esp. in connection with
      wireless telegraphy.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cynanthropy \Cy*nan"thro*py\ (s?-n?n"thr?-p?), n. [Gr.
      [?][?][?][?][?] of a dog-man; [?][?][?][?], [?][?][?], dog +
      [?][?][?][?][?] man: cf. F. cynanthropie.] (Med.)
      A kind of madness in which men fancy themselves changed into
      dogs, and imitate the voice and habits of that animal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Sylph \Sylph\, n. [F. sylphe, m., fr. Gr. [?] a kind of grub,
      beetle, or moth; -- so called by Paracelsus.]
      1. An imaginary being inhabiting the air; a fairy.
  
      2. Fig.: A slender, graceful woman.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any one of several species of very brilliant
            South American humming birds, having a very long and
            deeply-forked tail; as, the blue-tailed sylph ({Cynanthus
            cyanurus}).

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Canandaigua, NY (city, FIPS 12144)
      Location: 42.88900 N, 77.28068 W
      Population (1990): 10725 (4717 housing units)
      Area: 11.9 sq km (land), 0.6 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 14424, 14425

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Canyon Day, AZ (CDP, FIPS 10040)
      Location: 33.78142 N, 110.02618 W
      Population (1990): 857 (253 housing units)
      Area: 9.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Canyondam, CA
      Zip code(s): 95923

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Cement, OK (town, FIPS 13000)
      Location: 34.93631 N, 98.13624 W
      Population (1990): 642 (327 housing units)
      Area: 1.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 73017

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Cement City, MI (village, FIPS 14260)
      Location: 42.06840 N, 84.32732 W
      Population (1990): 493 (179 housing units)
      Area: 2.3 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 49233

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Chaumont, NY (village, FIPS 14036)
      Location: 44.06529 N, 76.13336 W
      Population (1990): 593 (289 housing units)
      Area: 1.7 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 13622

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Cheyenne Mtn Afb, CO
      Zip code(s): 80914

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Community, VA
      Zip code(s): 22306

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   command key n.   [Mac users] Syn. {feature key}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   comment out vt.   To surround a section of code with comment
   delimiters or to prefix every line in the section with a comment
   marker; this prevents it from being compiled or interpreted.   Often
   done when the code is redundant or obsolete, but is being left in
   the source to make the intent of the active code clearer; also when
   the code in that section is broken and you want to bypass it in
   order to debug some other part of the code.   Compare {condition
   out}, usually the preferred technique in languages (such as {C})
   that make it possible.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command
  
      A character string which tells a program to
      perform a specific action.   Most commands take {arguments}
      which either modify the action performed or supply it with
      input.   Commands may be typed by the user or read from a file
      by a {command interpreter}.   It is also common to refer to
      menu items as commands.
  
      (1997-06-21)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Command Control Processor
  
      (CCP) {CP/M}'s {command-line interpreter}.
  
      (2001-11-01)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command interpreter
  
      A program which reads textual commands from
      the user or from a file and executes them.   Some commands may
      be executed directly within the interpreter itself
      (e.g. setting variables or control constructs), others may
      cause it to load and execute other files.
  
      {Unix}'s command interpreters are known as {shell}s.
  
      When an {IBM PC} is {boot}ed {BIOS} loads and runs the
      {MS-DOS} command interpreter into memory from file COMMAND.COM
      found on a {floppy disk} or {hard disk} drive.   The commands
      that COMMAND.COM recognizes (e.g. COPY, DIR, PRN) are called
      internal commands, in contrast to external commands which are
      executable files.
  
      (1995-03-16)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command key
  
      {feature key}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command line interface
  
      A means of communication between a
      {program} and its {user}, based solely on textual input and
      output.   Commands are input with the help of a {keyboard} or
      similar device and are interpreted and executed by the
      program.   Results are output as text or graphics to the
      {terminal}.
  
      Command line interfaces usually provide greater flexibility
      than {graphical user interfaces}, at the cost of being harder
      for the novice to use.   Consequently, some {hackers} look down
      on GUIs as designed {For The Rest Of Them}.
  
      (1996-01-12)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command line option
  
      (Or "option", "flag", "switch", "option switch") An
      argument to a command that modifies its function rather than
      providing data.   Options generally start with "-" in {Unix} or
      "/" in {MS-DOS}.   This is usually followed by a single letter
      or occasionally a digit.
  
      Some commands require each option to be a separate argument,
      introduced by a new "-" or "/", others allow multiple option
      letters to be concatenated into a single argument with a
      single "-" or "/", e.g. "ls -al".   A few Unix commands
      (e.g. {ar}, {tar}) allow the "-" to be omitted.   Some options
      may or must be followed by a value, e.g. "cc prog.c -o prog",
      sometimes with and sometimes without an intervening space.
  
      {getopt} and {getopts} are commands for parsing command line
      options.   There is also a {C} library routine called getopt
      for the same purpose.
  
      (1996-12-11)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   command-line interpreter
  
      {command interpreter}
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   comment
  
      (Or "remark") Explanatory text embedded in
      program {source} (or less often data) intended to help human
      readers understand it.
  
      Code completely without comments is often hard to read, but
      too heavily commented code isn't much better, especially if
      the comments are not kept up-to-date with changes to the code.
      Too much commenting may mean that the code is
      over-complicated.   A good rule is to comment everything that
      needs it but write code that doesn't need much of it.
  
      A particularly irksome form of over-commenting explains
      exactly what each statement does, even when it is obvious to
      any reasonably competant programmer, e.g.
  
      /* Open the input file */
      infd = open(input_file, O_RDONLY);
  
      (1998-04-28)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   comment out
  
      To surround a section of code with {comment}
      {delimiters} or to prefix every line in the section with a
      comment marker.   This prevents it from being compiled or
      interpreted.   It is often done to temporarily disable the
      code, e.g. during {debugging} or when the code is redundant or
      obsolete, but is being left in the source to make the intent
      of the active code clearer.
  
      The word "comment" is sometimes replaced with whatever
      {syntax} is used to mark comments in the language in question,
      e.g. "hash out" ({shell script}, {Perl}), "REM out" ({BASIC}),
      etc.
  
      Compare {condition out}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1998-04-28)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Common Desktop Environment
  
      (CDE) A {desktop} manager from {COSE}.
  
      (1994-10-31)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Community of Massive Gaming Agency
  
      (CMGA) An online {gaming portal} introduced by the
      German Telekom.
  
      (2003-06-15)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Canaan, the language of
      mentioned in Isa. 19:18, denotes the language spoken by the Jews
      resident in Palestine. The language of the Canaanites and of the
      Hebrews was substantially the same. This is seen from the
      fragments of the Phoenician language which still survive, which
      show the closest analogy to the Hebrew. Yet the subject of the
      language of the "Canaanites" is very obscure. The cuneiform
      writing of Babylon, as well as the Babylonian language, was
      taught in the Canaanitish schools, and the clay tablets of
      Babylonian literature were stored in the Canaanitish libraries.
      Even the Babylonian divinities were borrowed by the Canaanites.
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Canaanite
      a name given to the apostle Simon (Matt. 10:4; Mark 3:18). The
      word here does not, however, mean a descendant of Canaan, but is
      a translation, or rather almost a transliteration, of the Syriac
      word Kanenyeh (R.V. rendered "Cananaen"), which designates the
      Jewish sect of the Zealots. Hence he is called elsewhere (Luke
      6:15) "Simon Zelotes;" i.e., Simon of the sect of the Zealots.
      (See {SIMON}.)
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Canaanites
      the descendants of Canaan, the son of Ham. Migrating from their
      original home, they seem to have reached the Persian Gulf, and
      to have there sojourned for some time. They thence "spread to
      the west, across the mountain chain of Lebanon to the very edge
      of the Mediterranean Sea, occupying all the land which later
      became Palestine, also to the north-west as far as the mountain
      chain of Taurus. This group was very numerous, and broken up
      into a great many peoples, as we can judge from the list of
      nations (Gen. 10), the 'sons of Canaan.'" Six different tribes
      are mentioned in Ex. 3:8, 17; 23:23; 33:2; 34:11. In Ex. 13:5
      the "Perizzites" are omitted. The "Girgashites" are mentioned in
      addition to the foregoing in Deut. 7:1; Josh. 3:10.
     
         The "Canaanites," as distinguished from the Amalekites, the
      Anakim, and the Rephaim, were "dwellers in the lowlands" (Num.
      13:29), the great plains and valleys, the richest and most
      important parts of Palestine. Tyre and Sidon, their famous
      cities, were the centres of great commercial activity; and hence
      the name "Canaanite" came to signify a "trader" or "merchant"
      (Job 41:6; Prov. 31:24, lit. "Canaanites;" comp. Zeph. 1:11;
      Ezek. 17:4). The name "Canaanite" is also sometimes used to
      designate the non-Israelite inhabitants of the land in general
      (Gen. 12:6; Num. 21:3; Judg. 1:10).
     
         The Israelites, when they were led to the Promised Land, were
      commanded utterly to destroy the descendants of Canaan then
      possessing it (Ex. 23:23; Num. 33:52, 53; Deut. 20:16, 17). This
      was to be done "by little and little," lest the beasts of the
      field should increase (Ex. 23:29; Deut. 7:22, 23). The history
      of these wars of conquest is given in the Book of Joshua. The
      extermination of these tribes, however, was never fully carried
      out. Jerusalem was not taken till the time of David (2 Sam. 5:6,
      7). In the days of Solomon bond-service was exacted from the
      fragments of the tribes still remaining in the land (1 Kings
      9:20, 21). Even after the return from captivity survivors of
      five of the Canaanitish tribes were still found in the land.
     
         In the Tell-el-Amarna tablets Canaan is found under the forms
      of Kinakhna and Kinakhkhi. Under the name of Kanana the
      Canaanites appear on Egyptian monuments, wearing a coat of mail
      and helmet, and distinguished by the use of spear and javelin
      and the battle-axe. They were called Phoenicians by the Greeks
      and Poeni by the Romans. By race the Canaanites were Semitic.
      They were famous as merchants and seamen, as well as for their
      artistic skill. The chief object of their worship was the
      sun-god, who was addressed by the general name of Baal, "lord."
      Each locality had its special Baal, and the various local Baals
      were summed up under the name of Baalim, "lords."
     

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Commandments, the Ten
      (Ex. 34:28; Deut. 10:4, marg. "ten words") i.e., the Decalogue
      (q.v.), is a summary of the immutable moral law. These
      commandments were first given in their written form to the
      people of Israel when they were encamped at Sinai, about fifty
      days after they came out of Egypt (Ex. 19:10-25). They were
      written by the finger of God on two tables of stone. The first
      tables were broken by Moses when he brought them down from the
      mount (32:19), being thrown by him on the ground. At the command
      of God he took up into the mount two other tables, and God wrote
      on them "the words that were on the first tables" (34:1). These
      tables were afterwards placed in the ark of the covenant (Deut.
      10:5; 1 Kings 8:9). Their subsequent history is unknown. They
      are as a whole called "the covenant" (Deut. 4:13), and "the
      tables of the covenant" (9:9, 11; Heb. 9:4), and "the
      testimony."
     
         They are obviously "ten" in number, but their division is not
      fixed, hence different methods of numbering them have been
      adopted. The Jews make the "Preface" one of the commandments,
      and then combine the first and second. The Roman Catholics and
      Lutherans combine the first and second and divide the tenth into
      two. The Jews and Josephus divide them equally. The Lutherans
      and Roman Catholics refer three commandments to the first table
      and seven to the second. The Greek and Reformed Churches refer
      four to the first and six to the second table. The Samaritans
      add to the second that Gerizim is the mount of worship. (See {LAW}.)
     
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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