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   Balder
         n 1: (Norse mythology) god of light and peace and noted for his
               beauty and sweet nature; son of Odin and Frigg and husband
               of Nanna; killed by Hoth [syn: {Balder}, {Baldr}]

English Dictionary: Bilderbuchillustratoren by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
balderdash
n
  1. trivial nonsense [syn: balderdash, fiddle-faddle, piffle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Baldr
n
  1. (Norse mythology) god of light and peace and noted for his beauty and sweet nature; son of Odin and Frigg and husband of Nanna; killed by Hoth
    Synonym(s): Balder, Baldr
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
baldric
n
  1. a wide (ornamented) belt worn over the right shoulder to support a sword or bugle by the left hip
    Synonym(s): baldric, baldrick
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
baldrick
n
  1. a wide (ornamented) belt worn over the right shoulder to support a sword or bugle by the left hip
    Synonym(s): baldric, baldrick
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
balladeer
n
  1. a singer of popular ballads
    Synonym(s): crooner, balladeer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
balldress
n
  1. a suit or dress for formal occasions
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
beholder
n
  1. a person who becomes aware (of things or events) through the senses
    Synonym(s): perceiver, percipient, observer, beholder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bell heather
n
  1. dwarf European shrub with rose-colored flowers [syn: cross-leaved heath, bell heather, Erica tetralix]
  2. common low European shrub with purple-red flowers
    Synonym(s): bell heather, heather bell, fine-leaved heath, Erica cinerea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bell tower
n
  1. a tower that supports or shelters a bell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
belletristic
adj
  1. written and regarded for aesthetic value rather than content
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bellwether
n
  1. someone who assumes leadership of a movement or activity
  2. sheep that leads the herd often wearing a bell
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bewilder
v
  1. be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me-- I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me"
    Synonym(s): perplex, vex, stick, get, puzzle, mystify, baffle, beat, pose, bewilder, flummox, stupefy, nonplus, gravel, amaze, dumbfound
  2. cause to be confused emotionally
    Synonym(s): bewilder, bemuse, discombobulate, throw
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bewildered
adj
  1. perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment; "obviously bemused by his questions"; "bewildered and confused"; "a cloudy and confounded philosopher"; "just a mixed-up kid"; "she felt lost on the first day of school"
    Synonym(s): baffled, befuddled, bemused, bewildered, confounded, confused, lost, mazed, mixed-up, at sea
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bewilderedly
adv
  1. in a bewildered manner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bewilderingly
adv
  1. in a bewildering and confusing manner; "her situation was bewilderingly unclear"
    Synonym(s): bewilderingly, confusingly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bewilderment
n
  1. confusion resulting from failure to understand [syn: bewilderment, obfuscation, puzzlement, befuddlement, mystification, bafflement, bemusement]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilateral
adj
  1. having identical parts on each side of an axis [syn: bilateral, isobilateral, bilaterally symmetrical, bilaterally symmetric]
  2. affecting or undertaken by two parties; "a bilateral agreement between the United States and Japan"
  3. having two sides or parts
    Synonym(s): bilateral, two-sided
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilateral contract
n
  1. a contract involving mutual promises (each party is both promisor and promisee)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilateral descent
n
  1. line of descent traced through both the maternal and paternal sides of the family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilateral symmetry
n
  1. the property of being symmetrical about a vertical plane
    Synonym(s): bilaterality, bilateralism, bilateral symmetry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilateralism
n
  1. the property of being symmetrical about a vertical plane
    Synonym(s): bilaterality, bilateralism, bilateral symmetry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilaterality
n
  1. the property of being symmetrical about a vertical plane
    Synonym(s): bilaterality, bilateralism, bilateral symmetry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilaterally
adv
  1. with the involvement of two parties or governments; "they worked out an agreement bilaterally"
  2. so as to involve two sides or parts
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilaterally symmetric
adj
  1. having identical parts on each side of an axis [syn: bilateral, isobilateral, bilaterally symmetrical, bilaterally symmetric]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bilaterally symmetrical
adj
  1. capable of division into symmetrical halves by only one longitudinal plane passing through the axis
    Synonym(s): zygomorphic, bilaterally symmetrical, zygomorphous
    Antonym(s): actinomorphic, actinomorphous
  2. having identical parts on each side of an axis
    Synonym(s): bilateral, isobilateral, bilaterally symmetrical, bilaterally symmetric
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder
n
  1. a distensible membranous sac (usually containing liquid or gas)
    Synonym(s): bladder, vesica
  2. a bag that fills with air
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder campion
n
  1. perennial of Arctic Europe having large white flowers with inflated calyx
    Synonym(s): bladder campion, Silene uniflora, Silene vulgaris
  2. bluish-green herb having sticky stems and clusters of large evening-opening white flowers with much-inflated calyx; sometimes placed in genus Lychnis
    Synonym(s): white campion, evening lychnis, white cockle, bladder campion, Silene latifolia, Lychnis alba
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder cherry
n
  1. Old World perennial cultivated for its ornamental inflated papery orange-red calyx
    Synonym(s): Chinese lantern plant, winter cherry, bladder cherry, Physalis alkekengi
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder disorder
n
  1. a disorder of the urinary bladder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder fern
n
  1. any fern of the genus Cystopteris characterized by a hooded indusium or bladderlike membrane covering the sori
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder fucus
n
  1. a common rockweed used in preparing kelp and as manure
    Synonym(s): bladderwrack, black rockweed, bladder fucus, tang, Fucus vesiculosus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder ketmia
n
  1. annual weedy herb with ephemeral yellow purple-eyed flowers; Old World tropics; naturalized as a weed in North America
    Synonym(s): flower-of-an-hour, flowers-of-an-hour, bladder ketmia, black-eyed Susan, Hibiscus trionum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder senna
n
  1. yellow-flowered European shrub cultivated for its succession of yellow flowers and very inflated bladdery pods and as a source of wildlife food
    Synonym(s): bladder senna, Colutea arborescens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder sphincter
n
  1. the sphincter muscle of the urinary bladder; made up of a thickened muscular layer of bladder around the urethral opening
    Synonym(s): bladder sphincter, musculus sphincter vesicae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder stone
n
  1. a calculus formed in the bladder [syn: bladder stone, cystolith]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladder worm
n
  1. encysted saclike larva of the tapeworm
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladderlike
adj
  1. resembling a bladder
    Synonym(s): bladdery, bladderlike
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladdernose
n
  1. medium-sized blackish-grey seal with large inflatable sac on the head; of Arctic and northern Atlantic waters
    Synonym(s): hooded seal, bladdernose, Cystophora cristata
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladdernut family
n
  1. a family of dicotyledonous plants of order Sapindales found mostly in the north temperate zone
    Synonym(s): Staphylaceae, family Staphylaceae, bladdernut family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladderpod
n
  1. North American wild lobelia having small blue flowers and inflated capsules formerly used as an antispasmodic
    Synonym(s): Indian tobacco, bladderpod, Lobelia inflata
  2. annual or perennial herbs with inflated seed pods; some placed in genus Lesquerella
  3. any of several plants of the genus Physaria having racemose yellow flowers and inflated pods
  4. any of several hairy North American herbs having yellow racemose flowers and inflated pods
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladderwort
n
  1. any of numerous aquatic carnivorous plants of the genus Utricularia some of whose leaves are modified as small urn- shaped bladders that trap minute aquatic animals
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladderwort family
n
  1. carnivorous aquatic or bog plants: genera Utricularia, Pinguicula, and Genlisea
    Synonym(s): Lentibulariaceae, family Lentibulariaceae, bladderwort family
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladderwrack
n
  1. similar to and found with black rockweed [syn: bladderwrack, Ascophyllum nodosum]
  2. a common rockweed used in preparing kelp and as manure
    Synonym(s): bladderwrack, black rockweed, bladder fucus, tang, Fucus vesiculosus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bladdery
adj
  1. resembling a bladder
    Synonym(s): bladdery, bladderlike
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blade roast
n
  1. a roast cut from the blade
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blather
n
  1. foolish gibberish
    Synonym(s): blather, blatherskite
v
  1. to talk foolishly; "The two women babbled and crooned at the baby"
    Synonym(s): babble, blather, smatter, blether, blither
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blatherskite
n
  1. foolish gibberish
    Synonym(s): blather, blatherskite
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Blatta orientalis
n
  1. dark brown cockroach originally from orient now nearly cosmopolitan in distribution
    Synonym(s): oriental cockroach, oriental roach, Asiatic cockroach, blackbeetle, Blatta orientalis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Blattaria
n
  1. cockroaches; in some classifications considered an order
    Synonym(s): Blattodea, suborder Blattodea, Blattaria, suborder Blattaria
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bleeder
n
  1. someone who has hemophilia and is subject to uncontrollable bleeding
    Synonym(s): hemophiliac, haemophiliac, bleeder, hemophile, haemophile
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bleeder's disease
n
  1. congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleeding; usually affects males and is transmitted from mother to son
    Synonym(s): hemophilia, haemophilia, bleeder's disease
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blether
n
  1. idle or foolish and irrelevant talk [syn: prate, prattle, idle talk, blether, chin music]
v
  1. to talk foolishly; "The two women babbled and crooned at the baby"
    Synonym(s): babble, blather, smatter, blether, blither
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blither
v
  1. to talk foolishly; "The two women babbled and crooned at the baby"
    Synonym(s): babble, blather, smatter, blether, blither
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloater
n
  1. large fatty herring lightly salted and briefly smoked
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blood relation
n
  1. one related by blood or origin; especially on sharing an ancestor with another
    Synonym(s): blood relation, blood relative, cognate, sib
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blood relative
n
  1. one related by blood or origin; especially on sharing an ancestor with another
    Synonym(s): blood relation, blood relative, cognate, sib
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blood transfusion
n
  1. the introduction of blood or blood plasma into a vein or artery
    Synonym(s): transfusion, blood transfusion
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blood-red
adj
  1. of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies
    Synonym(s): red, reddish, ruddy, blood-red, carmine, cerise, cherry, cherry-red, crimson, ruby, ruby-red, scarlet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blood-related
adj
  1. related by blood [syn: akin(p), blood-related, cognate, consanguine, consanguineous, consanguineal, kin(p)]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodroot
n
  1. perennial woodland native of North America having a red root and red sap and bearing a solitary lobed leaf and white flower in early spring and having acrid emetic properties; rootstock used as a stimulant and expectorant
    Synonym(s): bloodroot, puccoon, redroot, tetterwort, Sanguinaria canadensis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodthirstiness
n
  1. a disposition to shed blood [syn: bloodiness, bloodthirstiness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodthirsty
adj
  1. marked by eagerness to resort to violence and bloodshed; "bloody-minded tyrants"; "bloodthirsty yells"; "went after the collaborators with a sanguinary fury that drenched the land with blood"-G.W.Johnson
    Synonym(s): bloodthirsty, bloody-minded, sanguinary
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodworm
n
  1. a segmented marine worm with bright red body; often used for bait
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodwort
n
  1. any of various plants of the family Haemodoraceae; roots contain a deep red coloring matter
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bloodwort family
n
  1. some genera placed in family Liliaceae [syn: Haemodoraceae, family Haemodoraceae, bloodwort family]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blotter
n
  1. absorbent paper used to dry ink [syn: blotting paper, blotter]
  2. the daily written record of events (as arrests) in a police station
    Synonym(s): blotter, day book, police blotter, rap sheet, charge sheet
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blow drier
n
  1. a hand-held electric blower that can blow warm air onto the hair; used for styling hair
    Synonym(s): hand blower, blow dryer, blow drier, hair dryer, hair drier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blow dryer
n
  1. a hand-held electric blower that can blow warm air onto the hair; used for styling hair
    Synonym(s): hand blower, blow dryer, blow drier, hair dryer, hair drier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blow-dry
v
  1. dry hair with a hair dryer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blowtorch
n
  1. a burner that mixes air and gas to produce a very hot flame
    Synonym(s): blowtorch, torch, blowlamp
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
blue darter
n
  1. bluish-grey North American hawk having a darting flight
    Synonym(s): Cooper's hawk, blue darter, Accipiter cooperii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bluethroat
n
  1. songbird of northern Europe and Asia [syn: bluethroat, Erithacus svecicus]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bluethroat pikeblenny
n
  1. found from Florida to Cuba [syn: bluethroat pikeblenny, Chaenopsis ocellata]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
boulder
n
  1. a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin
    Synonym(s): boulder, bowlder
  2. a town in north central Colorado; Rocky Mountains resort center and university town
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
boulder clay
n
  1. unstratified soil deposited by a glacier; consists of sand and clay and gravel and boulders mixed together
    Synonym(s): till, boulder clay
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
boulder fern
n
  1. fern of eastern North America with pale green fronds and an aroma like hay
    Synonym(s): hay-scented, hay-scented fern, scented fern, boulder fern, Dennstaedtia punctilobula
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bouldered
adj
  1. abounding in rocks or stones; "rocky fields"; "stony ground"; "bouldery beaches"
    Synonym(s): rocky, bouldery, bouldered, stony
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bouldery
adj
  1. abounding in rocks or stones; "rocky fields"; "stony ground"; "bouldery beaches"
    Synonym(s): rocky, bouldery, bouldered, stony
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bowlder
n
  1. a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin
    Synonym(s): boulder, bowlder
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
builder
n
  1. a substance added to soaps or detergents to increase their cleansing action
    Synonym(s): builder, detergent builder
  2. a person who creates a business or who organizes and develops a country; "empire builder"
  3. someone who contracts for and supervises construction (as of a building)
    Synonym(s): builder, constructor
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bull terrier
n
  1. a powerful short-haired terrier originated in England by crossing the bulldog with terriers
    Synonym(s): bullterrier, bull terrier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bull through
v
  1. push or force; "He bulled through his demands" [syn: bull, bull through]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bullet train
n
  1. a high-speed passenger train [syn: bullet train, bullet]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bullterrier
n
  1. a powerful short-haired terrier originated in England by crossing the bulldog with terriers
    Synonym(s): bullterrier, bull terrier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bully tree
n
  1. a tropical hardwood tree yielding balata gum and heavy red timber
    Synonym(s): balata, balata tree, beefwood, bully tree, Manilkara bidentata
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balder \Bal"der\, n. [Icel. Baldr, akin to E. bold.] (Scan.
      Myth.)
      The most beautiful and beloved of the gods; the god of peace;
      the son of Odin and Freya. [Written also {Baldur}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balderdash \Bal"der*dash\, n. [Of uncertain origin: cf. Dan.
      balder noise, clatter, and E. dash; hence, perhaps, unmeaning
      noise, then hodgepodge, mixture; or W. baldorduss a
      prattling, baldordd, baldorddi, to prattle.]
      1. A worthless mixture, especially of liquors.
  
                     Indeed beer, by a mixture of wine, hath lost both
                     name and nature, and is called balderdash. --Taylor
                                                                              (Drink and
                                                                              Welcome).
  
      2. Senseless jargon; ribaldry; nonsense; trash.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balderdash \Bal"der*dash\, v. t.
      To mix or adulterate, as liquors.
  
               The wine merchants of Nice brew and balderdash, and
               even mix it with pigeon's dung and quicklime.
                                                                              --Smollett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Baldrib \Bald"rib`\, n.
      A piece of pork cut lower down than the sparerib, and
      destitute of fat. [Eng.] --Southey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Baldric \Bal"dric\, n. [OE. baudric, bawdrik, through OF. (cf.
      F. baudrier and LL. baldringus, baldrellus), from OHG.
      balderich, cf. balz, palz, akin to E. belt. See {Belt}, n.]
      A broad belt, sometimes richly ornamented, worn over one
      shoulder, across the breast, and under the opposite arm; less
      properly, any belt. [Also spelt {bawdrick}.]
  
               A radiant baldric o'er his shoulder tied Sustained the
               sword that glittered at his side.            --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balder \Bal"der\, n. [Icel. Baldr, akin to E. bold.] (Scan.
      Myth.)
      The most beautiful and beloved of the gods; the god of peace;
      the son of Odin and Freya. [Written also {Baldur}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ballader \Bal"lad*er\, n.
      A writer of ballads.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balladry \Bal"lad*ry\, n. [From {Ballad}, n. ]
      Ballad poems; the subject or style of ballads. [bd]Base
      balladry is so beloved.[b8] --Drayton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ballatry \Bal"la*try\, n.
      See {Balladry}. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balloter \Bal"lot*er\, n.
      One who votes by ballot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Balter \Bal"ter\, v. t. [Etymol. uncertain. Cf.
      {Bloodboltered}.]
      To stick together. [Obs.] --Holland.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Beholder \Be*hold"er\, n.
      One who beholds; a spectator.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bell \Bell\, n. [AS. belle, fr. bellan to bellow. See {Bellow}.]
      1. A hollow metallic vessel, usually shaped somewhat like a
            cup with a flaring mouth, containing a clapper or tongue,
            and giving forth a ringing sound on being struck.
  
      Note: Bells have been made of various metals, but the best
               have always been, as now, of an alloy of copper and
               tin.
  
      {The Liberty Bell}, the famous bell of the Philadelphia State
            House, which rang when the Continental Congress declared
            the Independence of the United States, in 1776. It had
            been cast in 1753, and upon it were the words [bd]Proclaim
            liberty throughout all the land, to all the inhabitants
            thereof.[b8]
  
      2. A hollow perforated sphere of metal containing a loose
            ball which causes it to sound when moved.
  
      3. Anything in the form of a bell, as the cup or corol of a
            flower. [bd]In a cowslip's bell I lie.[b8] --Shak.
  
      4. (Arch.) That part of the capital of a column included
            between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the
            naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist
            within the leafage of a capital.
  
      5. pl. (Naut.) The strikes of the bell which mark the time;
            or the time so designated.
  
      Note: On shipboard, time is marked by a bell, which is struck
               eight times at 4, 8, and 12 o'clock. Half an hour after
               it has struck [bd]eight bells[b8] it is struck once,
               and at every succeeding half hour the number of strokes
               is increased by one, till at the end of the four hours,
               which constitute a watch, it is struck eight times.
  
      {To bear away the bell}, to win the prize at a race where the
            prize was a bell; hence, to be superior in something.
            --Fuller.
  
      {To bear the bell}, to be the first or leader; -- in allusion
            to the bellwether or a flock, or the leading animal of a
            team or drove, when wearing a bell.
  
      {To curse by bell}, {book}, {and candle}, a solemn form of
            excommunication used in the Roman Catholic church, the
            bell being tolled, the book of offices for the purpose
            being used, and three candles being extinguished with
            certain ceremonies. --Nares.
  
      {To lose the bell}, to be worsted in a contest. [bd]In single
            fight he lost the bell.[b8] --Fairfax.
  
      {To shake the bells}, to move, give notice, or alarm. --Shak.
  
      Note: Bell is much used adjectively or in combinations; as,
               bell clapper; bell foundry; bell hanger; bell-mouthed;
               bell tower, etc., which, for the most part, are
               self-explaining.
  
      {Bell arch} (Arch.), an arch of unusual form, following the
            curve of an ogee.
  
      {Bell cage}, or {Bell carriage} (Arch.), a timber frame
            constructed to carry one or more large bells.
  
      {Bell cot} (Arch.), a small or subsidiary construction,
            frequently corbeled out from the walls of a structure, and
            used to contain and support one or more bells.
  
      {Bell deck} (Arch.), the floor of a belfry made to serve as a
            roof to the rooms below.
  
      {Bell founder}, one whose occupation it is to found or cast
            bells.
  
      {Bell foundry}, or {Bell foundery}, a place where bells are
            founded or cast.
  
      {Bell gable} (Arch.), a small gable-shaped construction,
            pierced with one or more openings, and used to contain
            bells.
  
      {Bell glass}. See {Bell jar}.
  
      {Bell hanger}, a man who hangs or puts up bells.
  
      {Bell pull}, a cord, handle, or knob, connecting with a bell
            or bell wire, and which will ring the bell when pulled.
            --Aytoun.
  
      {Bell punch}, a kind of conductor's punch which rings a bell
            when used.
  
      {Bell ringer}, one who rings a bell or bells, esp. one whose
            business it is to ring a church bell or chime, or a set of
            musical bells for public entertainment.
  
      {Bell roof} (Arch.), a roof shaped according to the general
            lines of a bell.
  
      {Bell rope}, a rope by which a church or other bell is rung.
           
  
      {Bell tent}, a circular conical-topped tent.
  
      {Bell trap}, a kind of bell shaped stench trap.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Belletristic \Bel`le*tris"tic\, Belletristical
   \Bel`le*tris"tic*al\, a.
      Occupied with, or pertaining to, belles-lettres. [bd]An
      unlearned, belletristic trifler.[b8] --M. Arnold.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Belletristic \Bel`le*tris"tic\, Belletristical
   \Bel`le*tris"tic*al\, a.
      Occupied with, or pertaining to, belles-lettres. [bd]An
      unlearned, belletristic trifler.[b8] --M. Arnold.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bellwether \Bell"weth`er\, n.
      1. A wether, or sheep, which leads the flock, with a bell on
            his neck.
  
      2. Hence: A leader. [Contemptuous] --Swift.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Three-mile \Three"-mile`\, a.
      Of or pertaining to three miles; as, the three-mile limit, or
      the limit of the marine belt (the
  
      {three-mile} {belt [or] zone}) of three miles included in
            territorial waters (which see) of a state.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewilder \Be*wil"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bewildered}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Bewildering}.] [Pref. be- + wilder.]
      To lead into perplexity or confusion, as for want of a plain
      path; to perplex with mazes; or in general, to perplex or
      confuse greatly.
  
               Lost and bewildered in the fruitless search. --Addison.
  
      Syn: To perplex; puzzle; entangle; confuse; confound;
               mystify; embarrass; lead astray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewilder \Be*wil"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bewildered}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Bewildering}.] [Pref. be- + wilder.]
      To lead into perplexity or confusion, as for want of a plain
      path; to perplex with mazes; or in general, to perplex or
      confuse greatly.
  
               Lost and bewildered in the fruitless search. --Addison.
  
      Syn: To perplex; puzzle; entangle; confuse; confound;
               mystify; embarrass; lead astray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewildered \Be*wil"dered\, a.
      Greatly perplexed; as, a bewildered mind.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewilderedness \Be*wil"dered*ness\, n.
      The state of being bewildered; bewilderment. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewildering \Be*wil"der*ing\, a.
      Causing bewilderment or great perplexity; as, bewildering
      difficulties. -- {Be*wil"der*ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewilder \Be*wil"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bewildered}; p. pr.
      & vb. n. {Bewildering}.] [Pref. be- + wilder.]
      To lead into perplexity or confusion, as for want of a plain
      path; to perplex with mazes; or in general, to perplex or
      confuse greatly.
  
               Lost and bewildered in the fruitless search. --Addison.
  
      Syn: To perplex; puzzle; entangle; confuse; confound;
               mystify; embarrass; lead astray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewildering \Be*wil"der*ing\, a.
      Causing bewilderment or great perplexity; as, bewildering
      difficulties. -- {Be*wil"der*ing*ly}, adv.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bewilderment \Be*wil"der*ment\, n.
      1. The state of being bewildered.
  
      2. A bewildering tangle or confusion.
  
                     He . . . soon lost all traces of it amid
                     bewilderment of tree trunks and underbrush.
                                                                              --Hawthorne.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bilateral \Bi*lat"er*al\, a. [Pref. bi- + lateral: cf. F.
      bilat[82]ral.]
      1. Having two sides; arranged upon two sides; affecting two
            sides or two parties.
  
      2. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to the two sides of a central
            area or organ, or of a central axis; as, bilateral
            symmetry in animals, where there is a similarity of parts
            on the right and left sides of the body.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bilaterality \Bi*lat`er*al"i*ty\, n.
      State of being bilateral.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Biliteral \Bi*lit"er*al\, a. [L. bis twice + littera letter.]
      Consisting of two letters; as, a biliteral root of a Sanskrit
      verb. --Sir W. Jones. -- n. A word, syllable, or root,
      consisting of two letters.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Biliteralism \Bi*lit"er*al*ism\, n.
      The property or state of being biliteral.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bladdered}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Bladdering}.]
      1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.]
            --G. Fletcher.
  
      2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Campion \Cam"pi*on\, n. [Prob. fr. L. campus field.] (Bot.)
      A plant of the Pink family ({Cucubalus bacciferus}), bearing
      berries regarded as poisonous.
  
      {Bladder campion}, a plant of the Pink family ({Cucubalus
            Behen} or {Silene inflata}), having a much inflated calyx.
            See {Behen}.
  
      {Rose campion}, a garden plant ({Lychnis coronaria}) with
            handsome crimson flowers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Senna \Sen"na\, n. [Cf. It. & Sp. sena, Pg. sene, F. s[82]n[82];
      all fr. Ar. san[be].]
      1. (Med.) The leaves of several leguminous plants of the
            genus Cassia. ({C. acutifolia}, {C. angustifolia}, etc.).
            They constitute a valuable but nauseous cathartic
            medicine.
  
      2. (Bot.) The plants themselves, native to the East, but now
            cultivated largely in the south of Europe and in the West
            Indies.
  
      {Bladder senna}. (Bot.) See under {Bladder}.
  
      {Wild senna} (Bot.), the {Cassia Marilandica}, growing in the
            United States, the leaves of which are used medicinally,
            like those of the officinal senna.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cysticerce \Cys"ti*cerce\ (s?s"t?-s?rs), Cysticercus
   \Cys`ti*cer"cus\ (-s?r"k?s), n. [NL. cysticercus, fr. Gr.
      [?][?][?][?] bladder + [?][?][?][?] tail: cf. F.
      cysticerque.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a
      tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; --
      called also {bladder worm}, {hydatid}, and {measle} (as, pork
      measle).
  
      Note: These larvae live in the tissues of various living
               animals, and, when swallowed by a suitable carnivorous
               animal, develop into adult tapeworms in the intestine.
               See {Measles}, 4, {Tapeworm}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cysticerce \Cys"ti*cerce\ (s?s"t?-s?rs), Cysticercus
   \Cys`ti*cer"cus\ (-s?r"k?s), n. [NL. cysticercus, fr. Gr.
      [?][?][?][?] bladder + [?][?][?][?] tail: cf. F.
      cysticerque.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The larval form of a tapeworm, having the head and neck of a
      tapeworm attached to a saclike body filled with fluid; --
      called also {bladder worm}, {hydatid}, and {measle} (as, pork
      measle).
  
      Note: These larvae live in the tissues of various living
               animals, and, when swallowed by a suitable carnivorous
               animal, develop into adult tapeworms in the intestine.
               See {Measles}, 4, {Tapeworm}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      2. (Veter. Med.) A disease of cattle and swine in which the
            flesh is filled with the embryos of different varieties of
            the tapeworm.
  
      3. A disease of trees. [Obs.]
  
      4. pl. (Zo[94]l.) The larv[91] of any tapeworm ({T[91]nia})
            in the cysticerus stage, when contained in meat. Called
            also {bladder worms}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bladdered}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Bladdering}.]
      1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.]
            --G. Fletcher.
  
      2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bladdered}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Bladdering}.]
      1. To swell out like a bladder with air; to inflate. [Obs.]
            --G. Fletcher.
  
      2. To put up in bladders; as, bladdered lard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladderwort \Blad"der*wort`\, n. (Bot.)
      A genus ({Utricularia}) of aquatic or marshy plants, which
      usually bear numerous vesicles in the divisions of the
      leaves. These serve as traps for minute animals. See
      {Ascidium}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladdery \Blad"der*y\, a.
      Having bladders; also, resembling a bladder.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bladder \Blad"der\, n. [OE. bladder, bleddre, AS. bl[?]dre,
      bl[?]ddre; akin to Icel. bla[?]ra, SW. bl[84]ddra, Dan.
      bl[91]re, D. blaar, OHG. bl[be]tara the bladder in the body
      of animals, G. blatter blister, bustule; all fr. the same
      root as AS. bl[be]wan, E. blow, to puff. See {Blow} to puff.]
      1. (Anat.) A bag or sac in animals, which serves as the
            receptacle of some fluid; as, the urinary bladder; the
            gall bladder; -- applied especially to the urinary
            bladder, either within the animal, or when taken out and
            inflated with air.
  
      2. Any vesicle or blister, especially if filled with air, or
            a thin, watery fluid.
  
      3. (Bot.) A distended, membranaceous pericarp.
  
      4. Anything inflated, empty, or unsound. [bd]To swim with
            bladders of philosophy.[b8] --Rochester.
  
      {Bladder nut}, [or] {Bladder tree} (Bot.), a genus of plants
            ({Staphylea}) with bladderlike seed pods.
  
      {Bladder pod} (Bot.), a genus of low herbs ({Vesicaria}) with
            inflated seed pods.
  
      {Bladdor senna} (Bot.), a genus of shrubs ({Colutea}), with
            membranaceous, inflated pods.
  
      {Bladder worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of any species of
            tapeworm ({T[91]nia}), found in the flesh or other parts
            of animals. See {Measle}, {Cysticercus}.
  
      {Bladder wrack} (Bot.), the common black rock weed of the
            seacoast ({Fucus nodosus} and {F. vesiculosus}) -- called
            also {bladder tangle}. See {Wrack}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\ (bl[acr][th]"[etil]r), v. i. & t. [imp. & p.
      p. {Blathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blathering}.] [Written also
      {blether}.] [Icel. bla[edh]ra. Cf. {Blatherskite}.]
      To talk foolishly, or nonsensically. --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\, n. [Written also {blether}.]
      Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.
      --Hall Caine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\ (bl[acr][th]"[etil]r), v. i. & t. [imp. & p.
      p. {Blathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blathering}.] [Written also
      {blether}.] [Icel. bla[edh]ra. Cf. {Blatherskite}.]
      To talk foolishly, or nonsensically. --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\ (bl[acr][th]"[etil]r), v. i. & t. [imp. & p.
      p. {Blathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blathering}.] [Written also
      {blether}.] [Icel. bla[edh]ra. Cf. {Blatherskite}.]
      To talk foolishly, or nonsensically. --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatherskite \Blath"er*skite\, n.
      A blustering, talkative fellow. [Local slang, U. S.]
      --Barllett.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Beetle \Bee"tle\, n. [OE. bityl, bittle, AS. b[imac]tel, fr.
      b[imac]tan to bite. See {Bite}, v. t.]
      Any insect of the order Coleoptera, having four wings, the
      outer pair being stiff cases for covering the others when
      they are folded up. See {Coleoptera}.
  
      {Beetle mite} (Zo[94]l.), one of many species of mites, of
            the family {Oribatid[91]}, parasitic on beetles.
  
      {Black beetle}, the common large black cockroach ({Blatta
            orientalis}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Black \Black\, a. [OE. blak, AS. bl[91]c; akin to Icel. blakkr
      dark, swarthy, Sw. bl[84]ck ink, Dan. bl[91]k, OHG. blach,
      LG. & D. blaken to burn with a black smoke. Not akin to AS.
      bl[be]c, E. bleak pallid. [?]98.]
      1. Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the
            color of soot or coal; of the darkest or a very dark
            color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a
            color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes.
  
                     O night, with hue so black!               --Shak.
  
      2. In a less literal sense: Enveloped or shrouded in
            darkness; very dark or gloomy; as, a black night; the
            heavens black with clouds.
  
                     I spy a black, suspicious, threatening cloud.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. Fig.: Dismal, gloomy, or forbidding, like darkness;
            destitute of moral light or goodness; atrociously wicked;
            cruel; mournful; calamitous; horrible. [bd]This day's
            black fate.[b8] [bd]Black villainy.[b8] [bd]Arise, black
            vengeance.[b8] [bd]Black day.[b8] [bd]Black despair.[b8]
            --Shak.
  
      4. Expressing menace, or discontent; threatening; sullen;
            foreboding; as, to regard one with black looks.
  
      Note: Black is often used in self-explaining compound words;
               as, black-eyed, black-faced, black-haired,
               black-visaged.
  
      {Black act}, the English statute 9 George I, which makes it a
            felony to appear armed in any park or warren, etc., or to
            hunt or steal deer, etc., with the face blackened or
            disguised. Subsequent acts inflicting heavy penalties for
            malicious injuries to cattle and machinery have been
            called black acts.
  
      {Black angel} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the West Indies and
            Florida ({Holacanthus tricolor}), with the head and tail
            yellow, and the middle of the body black.
  
      {Black antimony} (Chem.), the black sulphide of antimony,
            {Sb2S3}, used in pyrotechnics, etc.
  
      {Black bear} (Zo[94]l.), the common American bear ({Ursus
            Americanus}).
  
      {Black beast}. See {B[88]te noire}.
  
      {Black beetle} (Zo[94]l.), the common large cockroach
            ({Blatta orientalis}).
  
      {Black and blue}, the dark color of a bruise in the flesh,
            which is accompanied with a mixture of blue. [bd]To pinch
            the slatterns black and blue.[b8] --Hudibras.
  
      {Black bonnet} (Zo[94]l.), the black-headed bunting ({Embriza
            Sch[d2]niclus}) of Europe.
  
      {Black canker}, a disease in turnips and other crops,
            produced by a species of caterpillar.
  
      {Black cat} (Zo[94]l.), the fisher, a quadruped of North
            America allied to the sable, but larger. See {Fisher}.
  
      {Black cattle}, any bovine cattle reared for slaughter, in
            distinction from dairy cattle. [Eng.]
  
      {Black cherry}. See under {Cherry}.
  
      {Black cockatoo} (Zo[94]l.), the palm cockatoo. See
            {Cockatoo}.
  
      {Black copper}. Same as {Melaconite}.
  
      {Black currant}. (Bot.) See {Currant}.
  
      {Black diamond}. (Min.) See {Carbonado}.
  
      {Black draught} (Med.), a cathartic medicine, composed of
            senna and magnesia.
  
      {Black drop} (Med.), vinegar of opium; a narcotic preparation
            consisting essentially of a solution of opium in vinegar.
           
  
      {Black earth}, mold; earth of a dark color. --Woodward.
  
      {Black flag}, the flag of a pirate, often bearing in white a
            skull and crossbones; a signal of defiance.
  
      {Black flea} (Zo[94]l.), a flea beetle ({Haltica nemorum})
            injurious to turnips.
  
      {Black flux}, a mixture of carbonate of potash and charcoal,
            obtained by deflagrating tartar with half its weight of
            niter. --Brande & C.
  
      {Black fly}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) In the United States, a small, venomous, two-winged
                  fly of the genus {Simulium} of several species,
                  exceedingly abundant and troublesome in the northern
                  forests. The larv[91] are aquatic.
            (b) A black plant louse, as the bean aphis ({A. fab[91]}).
                 
  
      {Black Forest} [a translation of G. Schwarzwald], a forest in
            Baden and W[81]rtemburg, in Germany; a part of the ancient
            Hercynian forest.
  
      {Black game}, or {Black grouse}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Blackcock},
            {Grouse}, and {Heath grouse}.
  
      {Black grass} (Bot.), a grasslike rush of the species {Juncus
            Gerardi}, growing on salt marshes, and making good hay.
  
      {Black gum} (Bot.), an American tree, the tupelo or
            pepperidge. See {Tupelo}.
  
      {Black Hamburg (grape)} (Bot.), a sweet and juicy variety of
            dark purple or [bd]black[b8] grape.
  
      {Black horse} (Zo[94]l.), a fish of the Mississippi valley
            ({Cycleptus elongatus}), of the sucker family; the
            Missouri sucker.
  
      {Black lemur} (Zo[94]l.), the {Lemurniger} of Madagascar; the
            {acoumbo} of the natives.
  
      {Black list}, a list of persons who are for some reason
            thought deserving of censure or punishment; -- esp. a list
            of persons stigmatized as insolvent or untrustworthy, made
            for the protection of tradesmen or employers. See
            {Blacklist}, v. t.
  
      {Black manganese} (Chem.), the black oxide of manganese,
            {MnO2}.
  
      {Black Maria}, the close wagon in which prisoners are carried
            to or from jail.
  
      {Black martin} (Zo[94]l.), the chimney swift. See {Swift}.
  
      {Black moss} (Bot.), the common so-called long moss of the
            southern United States. See {Tillandsia}.
  
      {Black oak}. See under {Oak}.
  
      {Black ocher}. See {Wad}.
  
      {Black pigment}, a very fine, light carbonaceous substance,
            or lampblack, prepared chiefly for the manufacture of
            printers' ink. It is obtained by burning common coal tar.
           
  
      {Black plate}, sheet iron before it is tinned. --Knight.
  
      {Black quarter}, malignant anthrax with engorgement of a
            shoulder or quarter, etc., as of an ox.
  
      {Black rat} (Zo[94]l.), one of the species of rats ({Mus
            rattus}), commonly infesting houses.
  
      {Black rent}. See {Blackmail}, n., 3.
  
      {Black rust}, a disease of wheat, in which a black, moist
            matter is deposited in the fissures of the grain.
  
      {Black sheep}, one in a family or company who is unlike the
            rest, and makes trouble.
  
      {Black silver}. (Min.) See under {Silver}.
  
      {Black and tan}, black mixed or spotted with tan color or
            reddish brown; -- used in describing certain breeds of
            dogs.
  
      {Black tea}. See under {Tea}.
  
      {Black tin} (Mining), tin ore (cassiterite), when dressed,
            stamped and washed, ready for smelting. It is in the form
            of a black powder, like fine sand. --Knight.
  
      {Black walnut}. See under {Walnut}.
  
      {Black warrior} (Zo[94]l.), an American hawk ({Buteo
            Harlani}).
  
      Syn: Dark; murky; pitchy; inky; somber; dusky; gloomy; swart;
               Cimmerian; ebon; atrocious.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cockroach \Cock"roach\, n. [Sp. cucaracha.] (Zo[94]l.)
      An orthopterous insect of the genus {Blatta}, and allied
      genera.
  
      Note: The species are numerous, especially in hot countries.
               Those most commonly infesting houses in Europe and
               North America are {Blatta orientalis}, a large species
               often called {black beetle}, and the Croton bug
               ({Ectobia Germanica}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatter \Blat"ter\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Blattered}.] [L.
      blaterare to babble: cf. F. blat[82]rer to bleat.]
      To prate; to babble; to rail; to make a senseless noise; to
      patter. [Archaic] [bd]The rain blattered.[b8] --Jeffrey.
  
               They procured . . . preachers to blatter against me, .
               . . so that they had place and time to belie me
               shamefully.                                             --Latimer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatteration \Blat`ter*a"tion\, n. [L. blateratio a babbling.]
      Blattering.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatter \Blat"ter\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Blattered}.] [L.
      blaterare to babble: cf. F. blat[82]rer to bleat.]
      To prate; to babble; to rail; to make a senseless noise; to
      patter. [Archaic] [bd]The rain blattered.[b8] --Jeffrey.
  
               They procured . . . preachers to blatter against me, .
               . . so that they had place and time to belie me
               shamefully.                                             --Latimer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatterer \Blat"ter*er\, n.
      One who blatters; a babbler; a noisy, blustering boaster.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blattering \Blat"ter*ing\, n.
      Senseless babble or boasting.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blatteroon \Blat`ter*oon"\, n. [L. blatero, -onis.]
      A senseless babbler or boaster. [Obs.] [bd]I hate such
      blatteroons.[b8] --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bleater \Bleat"er\, n.
      One who bleats; a sheep.
  
               In cold, stiff soils the bleaters oft complain Of gouty
               ails.                                                      --Dyer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bleeder \Bleed"er\, n. (Med.)
            (a) One who, or that which, draws blood.
            (b) One in whom slight wounds give rise to profuse or
                  uncontrollable bleeding.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\ (bl[acr][th]"[etil]r), v. i. & t. [imp. & p.
      p. {Blathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blathering}.] [Written also
      {blether}.] [Icel. bla[edh]ra. Cf. {Blatherskite}.]
      To talk foolishly, or nonsensically. --G. Eliot.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blather \Blath"er\, n. [Written also {blether}.]
      Voluble, foolish, or nonsensical talk; -- often in the pl.
      --Hall Caine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloater \Bloat"er\ (-[etil]r), n. [See {Bloat}, {Blote}.]
      The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half
      dried; -- called also {bloat herring}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloater \Bloat"er\ (-[etil]r), n. [See {Bloat}, {Blote}.]
      The common herring, esp. when of large size, smoked, and half
      dried; -- called also {bloat herring}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blood \Blood\, n. [OE. blod, blood, AS. bl[?]d; akin to D.
      bloed, OHG. bluot, G. blut, Goth, bl[?][?], Sw. & Dan. blod;
      prob. fr. the same root as E. blow to bloom. See {Blow} to
      bloom.]
      1. The fluid which circulates in the principal vascular
            system of animals, carrying nourishment to all parts of
            the body, and bringing away waste products to be excreted.
            See under {Arterial}.
  
      Note: The blood consists of a liquid, the plasma, containing
               minute particles, the blood corpuscles. In the
               invertebrate animals it is usually nearly colorless,
               and contains only one kind of corpuscles; but in all
               vertebrates, except Amphioxus, it contains some
               colorless corpuscles, with many more which are red and
               give the blood its uniformly red color. See
               {Corpuscle}, {Plasma}.
  
      2. Relationship by descent from a common ancestor;
            consanguinity; kinship.
  
                     To share the blood of Saxon royalty.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     A friend of our own blood.                  --Waller.
  
      {Half blood} (Law), relationship through only one parent.
  
      {Whole blood}, relationship through both father and mother.
            In American Law, blood includes both half blood, and whole
            blood. --Bouvier. --Peters.
  
      3. Descent; lineage; especially, honorable birth; the highest
            royal lineage.
  
                     Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam. --Shak.
  
                     I am a gentleman of blood and breeding. --Shak.
  
      4. (Stock Breeding) Descent from parents of recognized breed;
            excellence or purity of breed.
  
      Note: In stock breeding half blood is descent showing one
               half only of pure breed. Blue blood, full blood, or
               warm blood, is the same as blood.
  
      5. The fleshy nature of man.
  
                     Nor gives it satisfaction to our blood. --Shak.
  
      6. The shedding of blood; the taking of life, murder;
            manslaughter; destruction.
  
                     So wills the fierce, avenging sprite, Till blood for
                     blood atones.                                    --Hood.
  
      7. A bloodthirsty or murderous disposition. [R.]
  
                     He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was
                     timed with dying cries.                     --Shak.
  
      8. Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as
            if the blood were the seat of emotions.
  
                     When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      Note: Often, in this sense, accompanied with bad, cold, warm,
               or other qualifying word. Thus, to commit an act in
               cold blood, is to do it deliberately, and without
               sudden passion; to do it in bad blood, is to do it in
               anger. Warm blood denotes a temper inflamed or
               irritated. To warm or heat the blood is to excite the
               passions. Qualified by up, excited feeling or passion
               is signified; as, my blood was up.
  
      9. A man of fire or spirit; a fiery spark; a gay, showy man;
            a rake.
  
                     Seest thou not . . . how giddily 'a turns about all
                     the hot bloods between fourteen and five and thirty?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     It was the morning costume of a dandy or blood.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      10. The juice of anything, especially if red.
  
                     He washed . . . his clothes in the blood of grapes.
                                                                              --Gen. xiix.
                                                                              11.
  
      Note: Blood is often used as an adjective, and as the first
               part of self-explaining compound words; as,
               blood-bespotted, blood-bought, blood-curdling,
               blood-dyed, blood-red, blood-spilling, blood-stained,
               blood-warm, blood-won.
  
      {Blood baptism} (Eccl. Hist.), the martyrdom of those who had
            not been baptized. They were considered as baptized in
            blood, and this was regarded as a full substitute for
            literal baptism.
  
      {Blood blister}, a blister or bleb containing blood or bloody
            serum, usually caused by an injury.
  
      {Blood brother}, brother by blood or birth.
  
      {Blood clam} (Zo[94]l.), a bivalve mollusk of the genus Arca
            and allied genera, esp. {Argina pexata} of the American
            coast. So named from the color of its flesh.
  
      {Blood corpuscle}. See {Corpuscle}.
  
      {Blood crystal} (Physiol.), one of the crystals formed by the
            separation in a crystalline form of the h[91]moglobin of
            the red blood corpuscles; h[91]matocrystallin. All blood
            does not yield blood crystals.
  
      {Blood heat}, heat equal to the temperature of human blood,
            or about 98[ab] [deg] Fahr.
  
      {Blood horse}, a horse whose blood or lineage is derived from
            the purest and most highly prized origin or stock.
  
      {Blood money}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blood orange}, an orange with dark red pulp.
  
      {Blood poisoning} (Med.), a morbid state of the blood caused
            by the introduction of poisonous or infective matters from
            without, or the absorption or retention of such as are
            produced in the body itself; tox[91]mia.
  
      {Blood pudding}, a pudding made of blood and other materials.
           
  
      {Blood relation}, one connected by blood or descent.
  
      {Blood spavin}. See under {Spavin}.
  
      {Blood vessel}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blue blood}, the blood of noble or aristocratic families,
            which, according to a Spanish prover, has in it a tinge of
            blue; -- hence, a member of an old and aristocratic
            family.
  
      {Flesh and blood}.
            (a) A blood relation, esp. a child.
            (b) Human nature.
  
      {In blood} (Hunting), in a state of perfect health and vigor.
            --Shak.
  
      {To let blood}. See under {Let}.
  
      {Prince of the blood}, the son of a sovereign, or the issue
            of a royal family. The sons, brothers, and uncles of the
            sovereign are styled princes of the blood royal; and the
            daughters, sisters, and aunts are princesses of the blood
            royal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      3. Mounted soldiery; cavalry; -- used without the plural
            termination; as, a regiment of horse; -- distinguished
            from foot.
  
                     The armies were appointed, consisting of twenty-five
                     thousand horse and foot.                     --Bacon.
  
      4. A frame with legs, used to support something; as, a
            clotheshorse, a sawhorse, etc.
  
      5. A frame of timber, shaped like a horse, on which soldiers
            were made to ride for punishment.
  
      6. Anything, actual or figurative, on which one rides as on a
            horse; a hobby.
  
      7. (Mining) A mass of earthy matter, or rock of the same
            character as the wall rock, occurring in the course of a
            vein, as of coal or ore; hence, to take horse -- said of a
            vein -- is to divide into branches for a distance.
  
      8. (Naut.)
            (a) See {Footrope}, a.
            (b) A breastband for a leadsman.
            (c) An iron bar for a sheet traveler to slide upon.
            (d) A jackstay. --W. C. Russell. --Totten.
  
      Note: Horse is much used adjectively and in composition to
               signify of, or having to do with, a horse or horses,
               like a horse, etc.; as, horse collar, horse dealer or
               horse[?]dealer, horsehoe, horse jockey; and hence,
               often in the sense of strong, loud, coarse, etc.; as,
               horselaugh, horse nettle or horse-nettle, horseplay,
               horse ant, etc.
  
      {Black horse}, {Blood horse}, etc. See under {Black}, etc.
  
      {Horse aloes}, caballine aloes.
  
      {Horse ant} (Zo[94]l.), a large ant ({Formica rufa}); --
            called also {horse emmet}.
  
      {Horse artillery}, that portion of the artillery in which the
            cannoneers are mounted, and which usually serves with the
            cavalry; flying artillery.
  
      {Horse balm} (Bot.), a strong-scented labiate plant
            ({Collinsonia Canadensis}), having large leaves and
            yellowish flowers.
  
      {Horse bean} (Bot.), a variety of the English or Windsor bean
            ({Faba vulgaris}), grown for feeding horses.
  
      {Horse boat}, a boat for conveying horses and cattle, or a
            boat propelled by horses.
  
      {Horse bot}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Botfly}, and {Bots}.
  
      {Horse box}, a railroad car for transporting valuable horses,
            as hunters. [Eng.]
  
      {Horse} {breaker [or] trainer}, one employed in subduing or
            training horses for use.
  
      {Horse car}.
            (a) A railroad car drawn by horses. See under {Car}.
            (b) A car fitted for transporting horses.
  
      {Horse cassia} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Cassia
            Javanica}), bearing long pods, which contain a black,
            catharic pulp, much used in the East Indies as a horse
            medicine.
  
      {Horse cloth}, a cloth to cover a horse.
  
      {Horse conch} (Zo[94]l.), a large, spiral, marine shell of
            the genus Triton. See {Triton}.
  
      {Horse courser}.
            (a) One that runs horses, or keeps horses for racing.
                  --Johnson.
            (b) A dealer in horses. [Obs.] --Wiseman.
  
      {Horse crab} (Zo[94]l.), the Limulus; -- called also
            {horsefoot}, {horsehoe crab}, and {king crab}.
  
      {Horse crevall[82]} (Zo[94]l.), the cavally.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Orange \Or"ange\, n. [F.; cf. It. arancia, arancio, LL. arangia,
      Sp. naranjia, Pg. laranja; all fr. Ar. n[be]ranj, Per.
      n[be]ranj, n[be]rang; cf. Skr. n[be]ranga orange tree. The o-
      in F. orange is due to confusion with or gold, L. aurum,
      because the orange resembles gold in color.]
      1. The fruit of a tree of the genus {Citrus} ({C.
            Aurantium}). It is usually round, and consists of pulpy
            carpels, commonly ten in number, inclosed in a leathery
            rind, which is easily separable, and is reddish yellow
            when ripe.
  
      Note: There are numerous varieties of oranges; as, the
               {bitter orange}, which is supposed to be the original
               stock; the {navel orange}, which has the rudiment of a
               second orange imbedded in the top of the fruit; the
               {blood orange}, with a reddish juice; and the {horned
               orange}, in which the carpels are partly separated.
  
      2. (Bot.) The tree that bears oranges; the orange tree.
  
      3. The color of an orange; reddish yellow.
  
      {Mandarin orange}. See {Mandarin}.
  
      {Mock orange} (Bot.), any species of shrubs of the genus
            {Philadelphus}, which have whitish and often fragrant
            blossoms.
  
      {Native orange}, or {Orange thorn} (Bot.), an Australian
            shrub ({Citriobatus parviflorus}); also, its edible yellow
            berries.
  
      {Orange bird} (Zo[94]l.), a tanager of Jamaica ({Tanagra
            zena}); -- so called from its bright orange breast.
  
      {Orange cowry} (Zo[94]l.), a large, handsome cowry
            ({Cypr[91]a aurantia}), highly valued by collectors of
            shells on account of its rarity.
  
      {Orange grass} (Bot.), an inconspicuous annual American plant
            ({Hypericum Sarothra}), having minute, deep yellow
            flowers.
  
      {Orange oil} (Chem.), an oily, terpenelike substance obtained
            from orange rind, and distinct from neroli oil, which is
            obtained from the flowers.
  
      {Orange pekoe}, a kind of black tea.
  
      {Orange pippin}, an orange-colored apple with acid flavor.
  
      {Quito orange}, the orangelike fruit of a shrubby species of
            nightshade ({Solanum Quitoense}), native in Quito.
  
      {Orange scale} (Zo[94]l.) any species of scale insects which
            infests orange trees; especially, the purple scale
            ({Mytilaspis citricola}), the long scale ({M. Gloveri}),
            and the red scale ({Aspidiotus Aurantii}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blood \Blood\, n. [OE. blod, blood, AS. bl[?]d; akin to D.
      bloed, OHG. bluot, G. blut, Goth, bl[?][?], Sw. & Dan. blod;
      prob. fr. the same root as E. blow to bloom. See {Blow} to
      bloom.]
      1. The fluid which circulates in the principal vascular
            system of animals, carrying nourishment to all parts of
            the body, and bringing away waste products to be excreted.
            See under {Arterial}.
  
      Note: The blood consists of a liquid, the plasma, containing
               minute particles, the blood corpuscles. In the
               invertebrate animals it is usually nearly colorless,
               and contains only one kind of corpuscles; but in all
               vertebrates, except Amphioxus, it contains some
               colorless corpuscles, with many more which are red and
               give the blood its uniformly red color. See
               {Corpuscle}, {Plasma}.
  
      2. Relationship by descent from a common ancestor;
            consanguinity; kinship.
  
                     To share the blood of Saxon royalty.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     A friend of our own blood.                  --Waller.
  
      {Half blood} (Law), relationship through only one parent.
  
      {Whole blood}, relationship through both father and mother.
            In American Law, blood includes both half blood, and whole
            blood. --Bouvier. --Peters.
  
      3. Descent; lineage; especially, honorable birth; the highest
            royal lineage.
  
                     Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam. --Shak.
  
                     I am a gentleman of blood and breeding. --Shak.
  
      4. (Stock Breeding) Descent from parents of recognized breed;
            excellence or purity of breed.
  
      Note: In stock breeding half blood is descent showing one
               half only of pure breed. Blue blood, full blood, or
               warm blood, is the same as blood.
  
      5. The fleshy nature of man.
  
                     Nor gives it satisfaction to our blood. --Shak.
  
      6. The shedding of blood; the taking of life, murder;
            manslaughter; destruction.
  
                     So wills the fierce, avenging sprite, Till blood for
                     blood atones.                                    --Hood.
  
      7. A bloodthirsty or murderous disposition. [R.]
  
                     He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was
                     timed with dying cries.                     --Shak.
  
      8. Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as
            if the blood were the seat of emotions.
  
                     When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      Note: Often, in this sense, accompanied with bad, cold, warm,
               or other qualifying word. Thus, to commit an act in
               cold blood, is to do it deliberately, and without
               sudden passion; to do it in bad blood, is to do it in
               anger. Warm blood denotes a temper inflamed or
               irritated. To warm or heat the blood is to excite the
               passions. Qualified by up, excited feeling or passion
               is signified; as, my blood was up.
  
      9. A man of fire or spirit; a fiery spark; a gay, showy man;
            a rake.
  
                     Seest thou not . . . how giddily 'a turns about all
                     the hot bloods between fourteen and five and thirty?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     It was the morning costume of a dandy or blood.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      10. The juice of anything, especially if red.
  
                     He washed . . . his clothes in the blood of grapes.
                                                                              --Gen. xiix.
                                                                              11.
  
      Note: Blood is often used as an adjective, and as the first
               part of self-explaining compound words; as,
               blood-bespotted, blood-bought, blood-curdling,
               blood-dyed, blood-red, blood-spilling, blood-stained,
               blood-warm, blood-won.
  
      {Blood baptism} (Eccl. Hist.), the martyrdom of those who had
            not been baptized. They were considered as baptized in
            blood, and this was regarded as a full substitute for
            literal baptism.
  
      {Blood blister}, a blister or bleb containing blood or bloody
            serum, usually caused by an injury.
  
      {Blood brother}, brother by blood or birth.
  
      {Blood clam} (Zo[94]l.), a bivalve mollusk of the genus Arca
            and allied genera, esp. {Argina pexata} of the American
            coast. So named from the color of its flesh.
  
      {Blood corpuscle}. See {Corpuscle}.
  
      {Blood crystal} (Physiol.), one of the crystals formed by the
            separation in a crystalline form of the h[91]moglobin of
            the red blood corpuscles; h[91]matocrystallin. All blood
            does not yield blood crystals.
  
      {Blood heat}, heat equal to the temperature of human blood,
            or about 98[ab] [deg] Fahr.
  
      {Blood horse}, a horse whose blood or lineage is derived from
            the purest and most highly prized origin or stock.
  
      {Blood money}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blood orange}, an orange with dark red pulp.
  
      {Blood poisoning} (Med.), a morbid state of the blood caused
            by the introduction of poisonous or infective matters from
            without, or the absorption or retention of such as are
            produced in the body itself; tox[91]mia.
  
      {Blood pudding}, a pudding made of blood and other materials.
           
  
      {Blood relation}, one connected by blood or descent.
  
      {Blood spavin}. See under {Spavin}.
  
      {Blood vessel}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blue blood}, the blood of noble or aristocratic families,
            which, according to a Spanish prover, has in it a tinge of
            blue; -- hence, a member of an old and aristocratic
            family.
  
      {Flesh and blood}.
            (a) A blood relation, esp. a child.
            (b) Human nature.
  
      {In blood} (Hunting), in a state of perfect health and vigor.
            --Shak.
  
      {To let blood}. See under {Let}.
  
      {Prince of the blood}, the son of a sovereign, or the issue
            of a royal family. The sons, brothers, and uncles of the
            sovereign are styled princes of the blood royal; and the
            daughters, sisters, and aunts are princesses of the blood
            royal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Orange \Or"ange\, n. [F.; cf. It. arancia, arancio, LL. arangia,
      Sp. naranjia, Pg. laranja; all fr. Ar. n[be]ranj, Per.
      n[be]ranj, n[be]rang; cf. Skr. n[be]ranga orange tree. The o-
      in F. orange is due to confusion with or gold, L. aurum,
      because the orange resembles gold in color.]
      1. The fruit of a tree of the genus {Citrus} ({C.
            Aurantium}). It is usually round, and consists of pulpy
            carpels, commonly ten in number, inclosed in a leathery
            rind, which is easily separable, and is reddish yellow
            when ripe.
  
      Note: There are numerous varieties of oranges; as, the
               {bitter orange}, which is supposed to be the original
               stock; the {navel orange}, which has the rudiment of a
               second orange imbedded in the top of the fruit; the
               {blood orange}, with a reddish juice; and the {horned
               orange}, in which the carpels are partly separated.
  
      2. (Bot.) The tree that bears oranges; the orange tree.
  
      3. The color of an orange; reddish yellow.
  
      {Mandarin orange}. See {Mandarin}.
  
      {Mock orange} (Bot.), any species of shrubs of the genus
            {Philadelphus}, which have whitish and often fragrant
            blossoms.
  
      {Native orange}, or {Orange thorn} (Bot.), an Australian
            shrub ({Citriobatus parviflorus}); also, its edible yellow
            berries.
  
      {Orange bird} (Zo[94]l.), a tanager of Jamaica ({Tanagra
            zena}); -- so called from its bright orange breast.
  
      {Orange cowry} (Zo[94]l.), a large, handsome cowry
            ({Cypr[91]a aurantia}), highly valued by collectors of
            shells on account of its rarity.
  
      {Orange grass} (Bot.), an inconspicuous annual American plant
            ({Hypericum Sarothra}), having minute, deep yellow
            flowers.
  
      {Orange oil} (Chem.), an oily, terpenelike substance obtained
            from orange rind, and distinct from neroli oil, which is
            obtained from the flowers.
  
      {Orange pekoe}, a kind of black tea.
  
      {Orange pippin}, an orange-colored apple with acid flavor.
  
      {Quito orange}, the orangelike fruit of a shrubby species of
            nightshade ({Solanum Quitoense}), native in Quito.
  
      {Orange scale} (Zo[94]l.) any species of scale insects which
            infests orange trees; especially, the purple scale
            ({Mytilaspis citricola}), the long scale ({M. Gloveri}),
            and the red scale ({Aspidiotus Aurantii}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blood \Blood\, n. [OE. blod, blood, AS. bl[?]d; akin to D.
      bloed, OHG. bluot, G. blut, Goth, bl[?][?], Sw. & Dan. blod;
      prob. fr. the same root as E. blow to bloom. See {Blow} to
      bloom.]
      1. The fluid which circulates in the principal vascular
            system of animals, carrying nourishment to all parts of
            the body, and bringing away waste products to be excreted.
            See under {Arterial}.
  
      Note: The blood consists of a liquid, the plasma, containing
               minute particles, the blood corpuscles. In the
               invertebrate animals it is usually nearly colorless,
               and contains only one kind of corpuscles; but in all
               vertebrates, except Amphioxus, it contains some
               colorless corpuscles, with many more which are red and
               give the blood its uniformly red color. See
               {Corpuscle}, {Plasma}.
  
      2. Relationship by descent from a common ancestor;
            consanguinity; kinship.
  
                     To share the blood of Saxon royalty.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     A friend of our own blood.                  --Waller.
  
      {Half blood} (Law), relationship through only one parent.
  
      {Whole blood}, relationship through both father and mother.
            In American Law, blood includes both half blood, and whole
            blood. --Bouvier. --Peters.
  
      3. Descent; lineage; especially, honorable birth; the highest
            royal lineage.
  
                     Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam. --Shak.
  
                     I am a gentleman of blood and breeding. --Shak.
  
      4. (Stock Breeding) Descent from parents of recognized breed;
            excellence or purity of breed.
  
      Note: In stock breeding half blood is descent showing one
               half only of pure breed. Blue blood, full blood, or
               warm blood, is the same as blood.
  
      5. The fleshy nature of man.
  
                     Nor gives it satisfaction to our blood. --Shak.
  
      6. The shedding of blood; the taking of life, murder;
            manslaughter; destruction.
  
                     So wills the fierce, avenging sprite, Till blood for
                     blood atones.                                    --Hood.
  
      7. A bloodthirsty or murderous disposition. [R.]
  
                     He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was
                     timed with dying cries.                     --Shak.
  
      8. Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as
            if the blood were the seat of emotions.
  
                     When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      Note: Often, in this sense, accompanied with bad, cold, warm,
               or other qualifying word. Thus, to commit an act in
               cold blood, is to do it deliberately, and without
               sudden passion; to do it in bad blood, is to do it in
               anger. Warm blood denotes a temper inflamed or
               irritated. To warm or heat the blood is to excite the
               passions. Qualified by up, excited feeling or passion
               is signified; as, my blood was up.
  
      9. A man of fire or spirit; a fiery spark; a gay, showy man;
            a rake.
  
                     Seest thou not . . . how giddily 'a turns about all
                     the hot bloods between fourteen and five and thirty?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     It was the morning costume of a dandy or blood.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      10. The juice of anything, especially if red.
  
                     He washed . . . his clothes in the blood of grapes.
                                                                              --Gen. xiix.
                                                                              11.
  
      Note: Blood is often used as an adjective, and as the first
               part of self-explaining compound words; as,
               blood-bespotted, blood-bought, blood-curdling,
               blood-dyed, blood-red, blood-spilling, blood-stained,
               blood-warm, blood-won.
  
      {Blood baptism} (Eccl. Hist.), the martyrdom of those who had
            not been baptized. They were considered as baptized in
            blood, and this was regarded as a full substitute for
            literal baptism.
  
      {Blood blister}, a blister or bleb containing blood or bloody
            serum, usually caused by an injury.
  
      {Blood brother}, brother by blood or birth.
  
      {Blood clam} (Zo[94]l.), a bivalve mollusk of the genus Arca
            and allied genera, esp. {Argina pexata} of the American
            coast. So named from the color of its flesh.
  
      {Blood corpuscle}. See {Corpuscle}.
  
      {Blood crystal} (Physiol.), one of the crystals formed by the
            separation in a crystalline form of the h[91]moglobin of
            the red blood corpuscles; h[91]matocrystallin. All blood
            does not yield blood crystals.
  
      {Blood heat}, heat equal to the temperature of human blood,
            or about 98[ab] [deg] Fahr.
  
      {Blood horse}, a horse whose blood or lineage is derived from
            the purest and most highly prized origin or stock.
  
      {Blood money}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blood orange}, an orange with dark red pulp.
  
      {Blood poisoning} (Med.), a morbid state of the blood caused
            by the introduction of poisonous or infective matters from
            without, or the absorption or retention of such as are
            produced in the body itself; tox[91]mia.
  
      {Blood pudding}, a pudding made of blood and other materials.
           
  
      {Blood relation}, one connected by blood or descent.
  
      {Blood spavin}. See under {Spavin}.
  
      {Blood vessel}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blue blood}, the blood of noble or aristocratic families,
            which, according to a Spanish prover, has in it a tinge of
            blue; -- hence, a member of an old and aristocratic
            family.
  
      {Flesh and blood}.
            (a) A blood relation, esp. a child.
            (b) Human nature.
  
      {In blood} (Hunting), in a state of perfect health and vigor.
            --Shak.
  
      {To let blood}. See under {Let}.
  
      {Prince of the blood}, the son of a sovereign, or the issue
            of a royal family. The sons, brothers, and uncles of the
            sovereign are styled princes of the blood royal; and the
            daughters, sisters, and aunts are princesses of the blood
            royal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blood \Blood\, n. [OE. blod, blood, AS. bl[?]d; akin to D.
      bloed, OHG. bluot, G. blut, Goth, bl[?][?], Sw. & Dan. blod;
      prob. fr. the same root as E. blow to bloom. See {Blow} to
      bloom.]
      1. The fluid which circulates in the principal vascular
            system of animals, carrying nourishment to all parts of
            the body, and bringing away waste products to be excreted.
            See under {Arterial}.
  
      Note: The blood consists of a liquid, the plasma, containing
               minute particles, the blood corpuscles. In the
               invertebrate animals it is usually nearly colorless,
               and contains only one kind of corpuscles; but in all
               vertebrates, except Amphioxus, it contains some
               colorless corpuscles, with many more which are red and
               give the blood its uniformly red color. See
               {Corpuscle}, {Plasma}.
  
      2. Relationship by descent from a common ancestor;
            consanguinity; kinship.
  
                     To share the blood of Saxon royalty.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     A friend of our own blood.                  --Waller.
  
      {Half blood} (Law), relationship through only one parent.
  
      {Whole blood}, relationship through both father and mother.
            In American Law, blood includes both half blood, and whole
            blood. --Bouvier. --Peters.
  
      3. Descent; lineage; especially, honorable birth; the highest
            royal lineage.
  
                     Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam. --Shak.
  
                     I am a gentleman of blood and breeding. --Shak.
  
      4. (Stock Breeding) Descent from parents of recognized breed;
            excellence or purity of breed.
  
      Note: In stock breeding half blood is descent showing one
               half only of pure breed. Blue blood, full blood, or
               warm blood, is the same as blood.
  
      5. The fleshy nature of man.
  
                     Nor gives it satisfaction to our blood. --Shak.
  
      6. The shedding of blood; the taking of life, murder;
            manslaughter; destruction.
  
                     So wills the fierce, avenging sprite, Till blood for
                     blood atones.                                    --Hood.
  
      7. A bloodthirsty or murderous disposition. [R.]
  
                     He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was
                     timed with dying cries.                     --Shak.
  
      8. Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as
            if the blood were the seat of emotions.
  
                     When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      Note: Often, in this sense, accompanied with bad, cold, warm,
               or other qualifying word. Thus, to commit an act in
               cold blood, is to do it deliberately, and without
               sudden passion; to do it in bad blood, is to do it in
               anger. Warm blood denotes a temper inflamed or
               irritated. To warm or heat the blood is to excite the
               passions. Qualified by up, excited feeling or passion
               is signified; as, my blood was up.
  
      9. A man of fire or spirit; a fiery spark; a gay, showy man;
            a rake.
  
                     Seest thou not . . . how giddily 'a turns about all
                     the hot bloods between fourteen and five and thirty?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     It was the morning costume of a dandy or blood.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      10. The juice of anything, especially if red.
  
                     He washed . . . his clothes in the blood of grapes.
                                                                              --Gen. xiix.
                                                                              11.
  
      Note: Blood is often used as an adjective, and as the first
               part of self-explaining compound words; as,
               blood-bespotted, blood-bought, blood-curdling,
               blood-dyed, blood-red, blood-spilling, blood-stained,
               blood-warm, blood-won.
  
      {Blood baptism} (Eccl. Hist.), the martyrdom of those who had
            not been baptized. They were considered as baptized in
            blood, and this was regarded as a full substitute for
            literal baptism.
  
      {Blood blister}, a blister or bleb containing blood or bloody
            serum, usually caused by an injury.
  
      {Blood brother}, brother by blood or birth.
  
      {Blood clam} (Zo[94]l.), a bivalve mollusk of the genus Arca
            and allied genera, esp. {Argina pexata} of the American
            coast. So named from the color of its flesh.
  
      {Blood corpuscle}. See {Corpuscle}.
  
      {Blood crystal} (Physiol.), one of the crystals formed by the
            separation in a crystalline form of the h[91]moglobin of
            the red blood corpuscles; h[91]matocrystallin. All blood
            does not yield blood crystals.
  
      {Blood heat}, heat equal to the temperature of human blood,
            or about 98[ab] [deg] Fahr.
  
      {Blood horse}, a horse whose blood or lineage is derived from
            the purest and most highly prized origin or stock.
  
      {Blood money}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blood orange}, an orange with dark red pulp.
  
      {Blood poisoning} (Med.), a morbid state of the blood caused
            by the introduction of poisonous or infective matters from
            without, or the absorption or retention of such as are
            produced in the body itself; tox[91]mia.
  
      {Blood pudding}, a pudding made of blood and other materials.
           
  
      {Blood relation}, one connected by blood or descent.
  
      {Blood spavin}. See under {Spavin}.
  
      {Blood vessel}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blue blood}, the blood of noble or aristocratic families,
            which, according to a Spanish prover, has in it a tinge of
            blue; -- hence, a member of an old and aristocratic
            family.
  
      {Flesh and blood}.
            (a) A blood relation, esp. a child.
            (b) Human nature.
  
      {In blood} (Hunting), in a state of perfect health and vigor.
            --Shak.
  
      {To let blood}. See under {Let}.
  
      {Prince of the blood}, the son of a sovereign, or the issue
            of a royal family. The sons, brothers, and uncles of the
            sovereign are styled princes of the blood royal; and the
            daughters, sisters, and aunts are princesses of the blood
            royal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodroot \Blood"root`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant ({Sanguinaria Canadensis}), with a red root and red
      sap, and bearing a pretty, white flower in early spring; --
      called also {puccoon}, {redroot}, {bloodwort}, {tetterwort},
      {turmeric}, and {Indian paint}. It has acrid emetic
      properties, and the rootstock is used as a stimulant
      expectorant. See {Sanguinaria}.
  
      Note: In England the name is given to the tormentil, once
               used as a remedy for dysentery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodthirsty \Blood"thirst`y\, a.
      Eager to shed blood; cruel; sanguinary; murderous. --
      {Blood"thirst`i*ness} ([?]), n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodthirsty \Blood"thirst`y\, a.
      Eager to shed blood; cruel; sanguinary; murderous. --
      {Blood"thirst`i*ness} ([?]), n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodroot \Blood"root`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant ({Sanguinaria Canadensis}), with a red root and red
      sap, and bearing a pretty, white flower in early spring; --
      called also {puccoon}, {redroot}, {bloodwort}, {tetterwort},
      {turmeric}, and {Indian paint}. It has acrid emetic
      properties, and the rootstock is used as a stimulant
      expectorant. See {Sanguinaria}.
  
      Note: In England the name is given to the tormentil, once
               used as a remedy for dysentery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodwort \Blood"wort`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant, {Rumex sanguineus}, or bloody-veined dock. The name
      is applied also to bloodroot ({Sanguinaria Canadensis}), and
      to an extensive order of plants ({H[91]modorace[91]}), the
      roots of many species of which contain a red coloring matter
      useful in dyeing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodroot \Blood"root`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant ({Sanguinaria Canadensis}), with a red root and red
      sap, and bearing a pretty, white flower in early spring; --
      called also {puccoon}, {redroot}, {bloodwort}, {tetterwort},
      {turmeric}, and {Indian paint}. It has acrid emetic
      properties, and the rootstock is used as a stimulant
      expectorant. See {Sanguinaria}.
  
      Note: In England the name is given to the tormentil, once
               used as a remedy for dysentery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bloodwort \Blood"wort`\, n. (Bot.)
      A plant, {Rumex sanguineus}, or bloody-veined dock. The name
      is applied also to bloodroot ({Sanguinaria Canadensis}), and
      to an extensive order of plants ({H[91]modorace[91]}), the
      roots of many species of which contain a red coloring matter
      useful in dyeing.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blotter \Blot"ter\ (bl[ocr]t"t[etil]r), n.
      1. One who, or that which, blots; esp. a device for absorbing
            superfluous ink.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Soldier \Sol"dier\, n. [OE. souldier, soudiour, souder, OF.
      soldier, soldoier, soldeier, sodoier, soudoier, soudier, fr.
      L. solidus a piece of money (hence applied to the pay of a
      soldier), fr. solidus solid. See {Solid}, and cf. {Sold}, n.]
      1. One who is engaged in military service as an officer or a
            private; one who serves in an army; one of an organized
            body of combatants.
  
                     I am a soldier and unapt to weep.      --Shak.
  
      2. Especially, a private in military service, as
            distinguished from an officer.
  
                     It were meet that any one, before he came to be a
                     captain, should have been a soldier.   --Spenser.
  
      3. A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill,
            or a man of distinguished valor; -- used by way of
            emphasis or distinction. --Shak.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) The red or cuckoo gurnard ({Trigla pini}.)
            [Prov. Eng.]
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) One of the asexual polymorphic forms of white
            ants, or termites, in which the head and jaws are very
            large and strong. The soldiers serve to defend the nest.
            See {Termite}.
  
      {Soldier beetle} (Zo[94]l.), an American carabid beetle
            ({Chauliognathus Americanus}) whose larva feeds upon other
            insects, such as the plum curculio.
  
      {Soldier bug} (Zo[94]l.), any hemipterous insect of the genus
            {Podisus} and allied genera, as the spined soldier bug
            ({Podius spinosus}). These bugs suck the blood of other
            insects.
  
      {Soldier crab} (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The hermit crab.
            (b) The fiddler crab.
  
      {Soldier fish} (Zo[94]l.), a bright-colored etheostomoid fish
            ({Etheostoma c[d2]ruleum}) found in the Mississippi River;
            -- called also {blue darter}, and {rainbow darter}.
  
      {Soldier fly} (Zo[94]l.), any one of numerous species of
            small dipterous flies of the genus {Stratyomys} and allied
            genera. They are often bright green, with a metallic
            luster, and are ornamented on the sides of the back with
            markings of yellow, like epaulets or shoulder straps.
  
      {Soldier moth} (Zo[94]l.), a large geometrid moth ({Euschema
            militaris}), having the wings bright yellow with bluish
            black lines and spots.
  
      {Soldier orchis} (Bot.), a kind of orchis ({Orchis
            militaris}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blue \Blue\, a. [Compar. {Bluer}; superl. {Bluest}.] [OE. bla,
      blo, blew, blue, Sw. bl[?], D. blauw, OHG. bl[?]o, G. blau;
      but influenced in form by F. bleu, from OHG. bl[be]o.]
      1. Having the color of the clear sky, or a hue resembling it,
            whether lighter or darker; as, the deep, blue sea; as blue
            as a sapphire; blue violets. [bd]The blue firmament.[b8]
            --Milton.
  
      2. Pale, without redness or glare, -- said of a flame; hence,
            of the color of burning brimstone, betokening the presence
            of ghosts or devils; as, the candle burns blue; the air
            was blue with oaths.
  
      3. Low in spirits; melancholy; as, to feel blue.
  
      4. Suited to produce low spirits; gloomy in prospect; as,
            thongs looked blue. [Colloq.]
  
      5. Severe or over strict in morals; gloom; as, blue and sour
            religionists; suiting one who is over strict in morals;
            inculcating an impracticable, severe, or gloomy mortality;
            as, blue laws.
  
      6. Literary; -- applied to women; -- an abbreviation of
            bluestocking. [Colloq.]
  
                     The ladies were very blue and well informed.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      {Blue asbestus}. See {Crocidolite}.
  
      {Blue black}, of, or having, a very dark blue color, almost
            black.
  
      {Blue blood}. See under {Blood}.
  
      {Blue buck} (Zo[94]l.), a small South African antelope
            ({Cephalophus pygm[91]us}); also applied to a larger
            species ({[92]goceras leucoph[91]u}s); the blaubok.
  
      {Blue cod} (Zo[94]l.), the buffalo cod.
  
      {Blue crab} (Zo[94]l.), the common edible crab of the
            Atlantic coast of the United States ({Callinectes
            hastatus}).
  
      {Blue curls} (Bot.), a common plant ({Trichostema
            dichotomum}), resembling pennyroyal, and hence called also
            {bastard pennyroyal}.
  
      {Blue devils}, apparitions supposed to be seen by persons
            suffering with {delirium tremens}; hence, very low
            spirits. [bd]Can Gumbo shut the hall door upon blue
            devils, or lay them all in a red sea of claret?[b8]
            --Thackeray.
  
      {Blue gage}. See under {Gage}, a plum.
  
      {Blue gum}, an Australian myrtaceous tree ({Eucalyptus
            globulus}), of the loftiest proportions, now cultivated in
            tropical and warm temperate regions for its timber, and as
            a protection against malaria. The essential oil is
            beginning to be used in medicine. The timber is very
            useful. See {Eucalyptus}.
  
      {Blue jack}, {Blue stone}, blue vitriol; sulphate of copper.
           
  
      {Blue jacket}, a man-of war's man; a sailor wearing a naval
            uniform.
  
      {Blue jaundice}. See under {Jaundice}.
  
      {Blue laws}, a name first used in the eighteenth century to
            describe certain supposititious laws of extreme rigor
            reported to have been enacted in New Haven; hence, any
            puritanical laws. [U. S.]
  
      {Blue light}, a composition which burns with a brilliant blue
            flame; -- used in pyrotechnics and as a night signal at
            sea, and in military operations.
  
      {Blue mantle} (Her.), one of the four pursuivants of the
            English college of arms; -- so called from the color of
            his official robes.
  
      {Blue mass}, a preparation of mercury from which is formed
            the blue pill. --McElrath.
  
      {Blue mold}, or mould, the blue fungus ({Aspergillus
            glaucus}) which grows on cheese. --Brande & C.
  
      {Blue Monday}, a Monday following a Sunday of dissipation, or
            itself given to dissipation (as the Monday before Lent).
           
  
      {Blue ointment} (Med.), mercurial ointment.
  
      {Blue Peter} (British Marine), a blue flag with a white
            square in the center, used as a signal for sailing, to
            recall boats, etc. It is a corruption of blue repeater,
            one of the British signal flags.
  
      {Blue pill}. (Med.)
            (a) A pill of prepared mercury, used as an aperient, etc.
            (b) Blue mass.
  
      {Blue ribbon}.
            (a) The ribbon worn by members of the order of the Garter;
                  -- hence, a member of that order.
            (b) Anything the attainment of which is an object of great
                  ambition; a distinction; a prize. [bd]These
                  [scholarships] were the --blue ribbon of the
                  college.[b8] --Farrar.
            (c) The distinctive badge of certain temperance or total
                  abstinence organizations, as of the --Blue ribbon
                  Army.
  
      {Blue ruin}, utter ruin; also, gin. [Eng. Slang] --Carlyle.
  
      {Blue spar} (Min.), azure spar; lazulite. See {Lazulite}.
  
      {Blue thrush} (Zo[94]l.), a European and Asiatic thrush
            ({Petrocossyphus cyaneas}).
  
      {Blue verditer}. See {Verditer}.
  
      {Blue vitriol} (Chem.), sulphate of copper, a violet blue
            crystallized salt, used in electric batteries, calico
            printing, etc.
  
      {Blue water}, the open ocean.
  
      {To look blue}, to look disheartened or dejected.
  
      {True blue}, genuine and thorough; not modified, nor mixed;
            not spurious; specifically, of uncompromising
            Presbyterianism, blue being the color adopted by the
            Covenanters.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blue \Blue\, a. [Compar. {Bluer}; superl. {Bluest}.] [OE. bla,
      blo, blew, blue, Sw. bl[?], D. blauw, OHG. bl[?]o, G. blau;
      but influenced in form by F. bleu, from OHG. bl[be]o.]
      1. Having the color of the clear sky, or a hue resembling it,
            whether lighter or darker; as, the deep, blue sea; as blue
            as a sapphire; blue violets. [bd]The blue firmament.[b8]
            --Milton.
  
      2. Pale, without redness or glare, -- said of a flame; hence,
            of the color of burning brimstone, betokening the presence
            of ghosts or devils; as, the candle burns blue; the air
            was blue with oaths.
  
      3. Low in spirits; melancholy; as, to feel blue.
  
      4. Suited to produce low spirits; gloomy in prospect; as,
            thongs looked blue. [Colloq.]
  
      5. Severe or over strict in morals; gloom; as, blue and sour
            religionists; suiting one who is over strict in morals;
            inculcating an impracticable, severe, or gloomy mortality;
            as, blue laws.
  
      6. Literary; -- applied to women; -- an abbreviation of
            bluestocking. [Colloq.]
  
                     The ladies were very blue and well informed.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      {Blue asbestus}. See {Crocidolite}.
  
      {Blue black}, of, or having, a very dark blue color, almost
            black.
  
      {Blue blood}. See under {Blood}.
  
      {Blue buck} (Zo[94]l.), a small South African antelope
            ({Cephalophus pygm[91]us}); also applied to a larger
            species ({[92]goceras leucoph[91]u}s); the blaubok.
  
      {Blue cod} (Zo[94]l.), the buffalo cod.
  
      {Blue crab} (Zo[94]l.), the common edible crab of the
            Atlantic coast of the United States ({Callinectes
            hastatus}).
  
      {Blue curls} (Bot.), a common plant ({Trichostema
            dichotomum}), resembling pennyroyal, and hence called also
            {bastard pennyroyal}.
  
      {Blue devils}, apparitions supposed to be seen by persons
            suffering with {delirium tremens}; hence, very low
            spirits. [bd]Can Gumbo shut the hall door upon blue
            devils, or lay them all in a red sea of claret?[b8]
            --Thackeray.
  
      {Blue gage}. See under {Gage}, a plum.
  
      {Blue gum}, an Australian myrtaceous tree ({Eucalyptus
            globulus}), of the loftiest proportions, now cultivated in
            tropical and warm temperate regions for its timber, and as
            a protection against malaria. The essential oil is
            beginning to be used in medicine. The timber is very
            useful. See {Eucalyptus}.
  
      {Blue jack}, {Blue stone}, blue vitriol; sulphate of copper.
           
  
      {Blue jacket}, a man-of war's man; a sailor wearing a naval
            uniform.
  
      {Blue jaundice}. See under {Jaundice}.
  
      {Blue laws}, a name first used in the eighteenth century to
            describe certain supposititious laws of extreme rigor
            reported to have been enacted in New Haven; hence, any
            puritanical laws. [U. S.]
  
      {Blue light}, a composition which burns with a brilliant blue
            flame; -- used in pyrotechnics and as a night signal at
            sea, and in military operations.
  
      {Blue mantle} (Her.), one of the four pursuivants of the
            English college of arms; -- so called from the color of
            his official robes.
  
      {Blue mass}, a preparation of mercury from which is formed
            the blue pill. --McElrath.
  
      {Blue mold}, or mould, the blue fungus ({Aspergillus
            glaucus}) which grows on cheese. --Brande & C.
  
      {Blue Monday}, a Monday following a Sunday of dissipation, or
            itself given to dissipation (as the Monday before Lent).
           
  
      {Blue ointment} (Med.), mercurial ointment.
  
      {Blue Peter} (British Marine), a blue flag with a white
            square in the center, used as a signal for sailing, to
            recall boats, etc. It is a corruption of blue repeater,
            one of the British signal flags.
  
      {Blue pill}. (Med.)
            (a) A pill of prepared mercury, used as an aperient, etc.
            (b) Blue mass.
  
      {Blue ribbon}.
            (a) The ribbon worn by members of the order of the Garter;
                  -- hence, a member of that order.
            (b) Anything the attainment of which is an object of great
                  ambition; a distinction; a prize. [bd]These
                  [scholarships] were the --blue ribbon of the
                  college.[b8] --Farrar.
            (c) The distinctive badge of certain temperance or total
                  abstinence organizations, as of the --Blue ribbon
                  Army.
  
      {Blue ruin}, utter ruin; also, gin. [Eng. Slang] --Carlyle.
  
      {Blue spar} (Min.), azure spar; lazulite. See {Lazulite}.
  
      {Blue thrush} (Zo[94]l.), a European and Asiatic thrush
            ({Petrocossyphus cyaneas}).
  
      {Blue verditer}. See {Verditer}.
  
      {Blue vitriol} (Chem.), sulphate of copper, a violet blue
            crystallized salt, used in electric batteries, calico
            printing, etc.
  
      {Blue water}, the open ocean.
  
      {To look blue}, to look disheartened or dejected.
  
      {True blue}, genuine and thorough; not modified, nor mixed;
            not spurious; specifically, of uncompromising
            Presbyterianism, blue being the color adopted by the
            Covenanters.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bluethroat \Blue"throat`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singing bird of northern Europe and Asia ({Cyanecula
      Suecica}), related to the nightingales; -- called also
      {blue-throated robin} and {blue-throated warbler}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Robin \Rob"in\, n. [Properly a pet name for Robert, originally
      meaning, famebright; F., fron OHG. Roudperht; ruod (in comp.;
      akin to AS. hr[?][?] glory, fame, Goth. hr[?]peigs victorius)
      + beraht bright. See {Bright}, {Hob} a clown.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A small European singing bird ({Erythacus rubecula}),
            having a reddish breast; -- called also {robin
            redbreast}, {robinet}, and {ruddock}.
      (b) An American singing bird ({Merula migratoria}), having
            the breast chestnut, or dull red. The upper parts are
            olive-gray, the head and tail blackish. Called also
            {robin redbreast}, and {migratory thrush}.
      (c) Any one of several species of Australian warblers of the
            genera {Petroica}, {Melanadrays}, and allied genera; as,
            the scarlet-breasted robin ({Petroica mullticolor}).
      (d) Any one of several Asiatic birds; as, the Indian robins.
            See {Indian robin}, below.
  
      {Beach robin} (Zo[94]l.), the robin snipe, or knot. See
            {Knot}.
  
      {Blue-throated robin}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Bluethroat}.
  
      {Canada robin} (Zo[94]l.), the cedar bird.
  
      {Golden robin} (Zo[94]l.), the Baltimore oriole.
  
      {Ground robin} (Zo[94]l.), the chewink.
  
      {Indian robin} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Asiatic saxoline birds of the genera {Thamnobia} and
            {Pratincola}. They are mostly black, usually with some
            white on the wings.
  
      {Magrie robin} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic singing bird ({Corsycus
            saularis}), having the back, head, neck, and breast black
            glossed with blue, the wings black, and the belly white.
           
  
      {Ragged robin}. (Bot.) See under {Ragged}.
  
      {Robin accentor} (Zo[94]l.), a small Asiatic singing bird
            ({Accentor rubeculoides}), somewhat resembling the
            European robin.
  
      {Robin redbreast}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European robin.
      (b) The American robin.
      (c) The American bluebird.
  
      {Robin snipe}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The red-breasted snipe, or dowitcher.
      (b) The red-breasted sandpiper, or knot.
  
      {Robin's plantain}. (Bot.) See under {Plantain}.
  
      {Sea robin}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) Any one of several species of American gurnards of the
            genus {Prionotus}. They are excellent food fishes. Called
            also {wingfish}. The name is also applied to a European
            gurnard.
      (b) The red-breasted merganser, or sheldrake. [Local, U.S.]
           
  
      {Water robin} (Zo[94]l.), a redstart ({Ruticulla
            fuliginosa}), native of India.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bluethroat \Blue"throat`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singing bird of northern Europe and Asia ({Cyanecula
      Suecica}), related to the nightingales; -- called also
      {blue-throated robin} and {blue-throated warbler}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Robin \Rob"in\, n. [Properly a pet name for Robert, originally
      meaning, famebright; F., fron OHG. Roudperht; ruod (in comp.;
      akin to AS. hr[?][?] glory, fame, Goth. hr[?]peigs victorius)
      + beraht bright. See {Bright}, {Hob} a clown.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) A small European singing bird ({Erythacus rubecula}),
            having a reddish breast; -- called also {robin
            redbreast}, {robinet}, and {ruddock}.
      (b) An American singing bird ({Merula migratoria}), having
            the breast chestnut, or dull red. The upper parts are
            olive-gray, the head and tail blackish. Called also
            {robin redbreast}, and {migratory thrush}.
      (c) Any one of several species of Australian warblers of the
            genera {Petroica}, {Melanadrays}, and allied genera; as,
            the scarlet-breasted robin ({Petroica mullticolor}).
      (d) Any one of several Asiatic birds; as, the Indian robins.
            See {Indian robin}, below.
  
      {Beach robin} (Zo[94]l.), the robin snipe, or knot. See
            {Knot}.
  
      {Blue-throated robin}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Bluethroat}.
  
      {Canada robin} (Zo[94]l.), the cedar bird.
  
      {Golden robin} (Zo[94]l.), the Baltimore oriole.
  
      {Ground robin} (Zo[94]l.), the chewink.
  
      {Indian robin} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            Asiatic saxoline birds of the genera {Thamnobia} and
            {Pratincola}. They are mostly black, usually with some
            white on the wings.
  
      {Magrie robin} (Zo[94]l.), an Asiatic singing bird ({Corsycus
            saularis}), having the back, head, neck, and breast black
            glossed with blue, the wings black, and the belly white.
           
  
      {Ragged robin}. (Bot.) See under {Ragged}.
  
      {Robin accentor} (Zo[94]l.), a small Asiatic singing bird
            ({Accentor rubeculoides}), somewhat resembling the
            European robin.
  
      {Robin redbreast}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The European robin.
      (b) The American robin.
      (c) The American bluebird.
  
      {Robin snipe}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) The red-breasted snipe, or dowitcher.
      (b) The red-breasted sandpiper, or knot.
  
      {Robin's plantain}. (Bot.) See under {Plantain}.
  
      {Sea robin}. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) Any one of several species of American gurnards of the
            genus {Prionotus}. They are excellent food fishes. Called
            also {wingfish}. The name is also applied to a European
            gurnard.
      (b) The red-breasted merganser, or sheldrake. [Local, U.S.]
           
  
      {Water robin} (Zo[94]l.), a redstart ({Ruticulla
            fuliginosa}), native of India.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bluethroat \Blue"throat`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singing bird of northern Europe and Asia ({Cyanecula
      Suecica}), related to the nightingales; -- called also
      {blue-throated robin} and {blue-throated warbler}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bluethroat \Blue"throat`\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A singing bird of northern Europe and Asia ({Cyanecula
      Suecica}), related to the nightingales; -- called also
      {blue-throated robin} and {blue-throated warbler}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bolter \Bolt"er\, n.
      A kind of fishing line. See {Boulter}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bolter \Bolt"er\, n.
      One who bolts; esp.:
      (a) A horse which starts suddenly aside.
      (b) A man who breaks away from his party.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bolter \Bolt"er\, n.
      1. One who sifts flour or meal.
  
      2. An instrument or machine for separating bran from flour,
            or the coarser part of meal from the finer; a sieve.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Boltrope \Bolt"rope`\, n. (Naut.)
      A rope stitched to the edges of a sail to strengthen the
      sail.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowlder \Bowl"der\, Boulder \Boul"der\, n. [Cf. Sw. bullra to
      roar, rattle, Dan. buldre, dial. Sw. bullersteen larger kind
      of pebbles; perh. akin to E. bellow.]
      1. A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of
            water; a large pebble.
  
      2. (Geol.) A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that
            has been transported by natural agencies from its native
            bed. See {Drift}.
  
      {Bowlder clay}, the unstratified clay deposit of the Glacial
            or Drift epoch, often containing large numbers of
            bowlders.
  
      {Bowlder wall}, a wall constructed of large stones or
            bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Boulder \Boul"der\ (b[omac]l"d[etil]r), n.
      Same as {Bowlder}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bouldery \Boul"der*y\, a.
      Characterized by bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Boulter \Boul"ter\, n. [Etymol. uncertain.]
      A long, stout fishing line to which many hooks are attached.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowlder \Bowl"der\, Boulder \Boul"der\, n. [Cf. Sw. bullra to
      roar, rattle, Dan. buldre, dial. Sw. bullersteen larger kind
      of pebbles; perh. akin to E. bellow.]
      1. A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of
            water; a large pebble.
  
      2. (Geol.) A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that
            has been transported by natural agencies from its native
            bed. See {Drift}.
  
      {Bowlder clay}, the unstratified clay deposit of the Glacial
            or Drift epoch, often containing large numbers of
            bowlders.
  
      {Bowlder wall}, a wall constructed of large stones or
            bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowlder \Bowl"der\, Boulder \Boul"der\, n. [Cf. Sw. bullra to
      roar, rattle, Dan. buldre, dial. Sw. bullersteen larger kind
      of pebbles; perh. akin to E. bellow.]
      1. A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of
            water; a large pebble.
  
      2. (Geol.) A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that
            has been transported by natural agencies from its native
            bed. See {Drift}.
  
      {Bowlder clay}, the unstratified clay deposit of the Glacial
            or Drift epoch, often containing large numbers of
            bowlders.
  
      {Bowlder wall}, a wall constructed of large stones or
            bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Clay \Clay\ (kl[amac]), n. [AS. cl[d6]g; akin to LG. klei, D.
      klei, and perh. to AS. cl[be]m clay, L. glus, gluten glue,
      Gr. gloio`s glutinous substance, E. glue. Cf. {Clog}.]
      1. A soft earth, which is plastic, or may be molded with the
            hands, consisting of hydrous silicate of aluminium. It is
            the result of the wearing down and decomposition, in part,
            of rocks containing aluminous minerals, as granite. Lime,
            magnesia, oxide of iron, and other ingredients, are often
            present as impurities.
  
      2. (Poetry & Script.) Earth in general, as representing the
            elementary particles of the human body; hence, the human
            body as formed from such particles.
  
                     I also am formed out of the clay.      --Job xxxiii.
                                                                              6.
  
                     The earth is covered thick with other clay, Which
                     her own clay shall cover.                  --Byron.
  
      {Bowlder clay}. See under {Bowlder}.
  
      {Brick clay}, the common clay, containing some iron, and
            therefore turning red when burned.
  
      {Clay cold}, cold as clay or earth; lifeless; inanimate.
  
      {Clay ironstone}, an ore of iron consisting of the oxide or
            carbonate of iron mixed with clay or sand.
  
      {Clay marl}, a whitish, smooth, chalky clay.
  
      {Clay mill}, a mill for mixing and tempering clay; a pug
            mill.
  
      {Clay pit}, a pit where clay is dug.
  
      {Clay slate} (Min.), argillaceous schist; argillite.
  
      {Fatty clays}, clays having a greasy feel; they are chemical
            compounds of water, silica, and aluminia, as {halloysite},
            {bole}, etc.
  
      {Fire clay}, a variety of clay, entirely free from lime,
            iron, or an alkali, and therefore infusible, and used for
            fire brick.
  
      {Porcelain clay}, a very pure variety, formed directly from
            the decomposition of feldspar, and often called {kaolin}.
           
  
      {Potter's clay}, a tolerably pure kind, free from iron.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowlder \Bowl"der\, Boulder \Boul"der\, n. [Cf. Sw. bullra to
      roar, rattle, Dan. buldre, dial. Sw. bullersteen larger kind
      of pebbles; perh. akin to E. bellow.]
      1. A large stone, worn smooth or rounded by the action of
            water; a large pebble.
  
      2. (Geol.) A mass of any rock, whether rounded or not, that
            has been transported by natural agencies from its native
            bed. See {Drift}.
  
      {Bowlder clay}, the unstratified clay deposit of the Glacial
            or Drift epoch, often containing large numbers of
            bowlders.
  
      {Bowlder wall}, a wall constructed of large stones or
            bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowldery \Bowl"der*y\, a.
      Characterized by bowlders.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Builder \Build"er\, n.
      One who builds; one whose occupation is to build, as a
      carpenter, a shipwright, or a mason.
  
               In the practice of civil architecture, the builder
               comes between the architect who designs the work and
               the artisans who execute it.                  --Eng. Cyc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bull terrier \Bull" ter"ri*er\ (Zo[94]l.)
      A breed of dogs obtained by crossing the bulldog and the
      terrier.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Malma \Mal"ma\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A spotted trout ({Salvelinus malma}), inhabiting Northern
      America, west of the Rocky Mountains; -- called also {Dolly
      Varden trout}, {bull trout}, {red-spotted trout}, and
      {golet}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dolly Varden \Dol"ly Var"den\
      1. A character in Dickens's novel [bd]Barnaby Rudge,[b8] a
            beautiful, lively, and coquettish girl who wore a
            cherry-colored mantle and cherry-colored ribbons.
  
      2. A style of light, bright-figured dress goods for women;
            also, a style of dress.
  
      {Dolly Varden trout} (Zo[94]l.), a trout of northwest
            America; -- called also {bull trout}, {malma}, and
            {red-spotted trout}. See {Malma}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bull trout \Bull" trout`\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) In England, a large salmon trout of several species, as
            {Salmo trutta} and {S. Cambricus}, which ascend rivers;
            -- called also {sea trout}.
      (b) {Salvelinus malma} of California and Oregon; -- called
            also {Dolly Varden trout} and {red-spotted trout}.
      (c) The huso or salmon of the Danube.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Huch \[d8]Huch\, d8Huchen \[d8]Hu"chen\, n. [G.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A large salmon ({Salmo, [or] Salvelinus, hucho}) inhabiting
      the Danube; -- called also {huso}, and {bull trout}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Malma \Mal"ma\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A spotted trout ({Salvelinus malma}), inhabiting Northern
      America, west of the Rocky Mountains; -- called also {Dolly
      Varden trout}, {bull trout}, {red-spotted trout}, and
      {golet}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dolly Varden \Dol"ly Var"den\
      1. A character in Dickens's novel [bd]Barnaby Rudge,[b8] a
            beautiful, lively, and coquettish girl who wore a
            cherry-colored mantle and cherry-colored ribbons.
  
      2. A style of light, bright-figured dress goods for women;
            also, a style of dress.
  
      {Dolly Varden trout} (Zo[94]l.), a trout of northwest
            America; -- called also {bull trout}, {malma}, and
            {red-spotted trout}. See {Malma}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bull trout \Bull" trout`\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) In England, a large salmon trout of several species, as
            {Salmo trutta} and {S. Cambricus}, which ascend rivers;
            -- called also {sea trout}.
      (b) {Salvelinus malma} of California and Oregon; -- called
            also {Dolly Varden trout} and {red-spotted trout}.
      (c) The huso or salmon of the Danube.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Huch \[d8]Huch\, d8Huchen \[d8]Hu"chen\, n. [G.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A large salmon ({Salmo, [or] Salvelinus, hucho}) inhabiting
      the Danube; -- called also {huso}, and {bull trout}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Malma \Mal"ma\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      A spotted trout ({Salvelinus malma}), inhabiting Northern
      America, west of the Rocky Mountains; -- called also {Dolly
      Varden trout}, {bull trout}, {red-spotted trout}, and
      {golet}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dolly Varden \Dol"ly Var"den\
      1. A character in Dickens's novel [bd]Barnaby Rudge,[b8] a
            beautiful, lively, and coquettish girl who wore a
            cherry-colored mantle and cherry-colored ribbons.
  
      2. A style of light, bright-figured dress goods for women;
            also, a style of dress.
  
      {Dolly Varden trout} (Zo[94]l.), a trout of northwest
            America; -- called also {bull trout}, {malma}, and
            {red-spotted trout}. See {Malma}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bull trout \Bull" trout`\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) In England, a large salmon trout of several species, as
            {Salmo trutta} and {S. Cambricus}, which ascend rivers;
            -- called also {sea trout}.
      (b) {Salvelinus malma} of California and Oregon; -- called
            also {Dolly Varden trout} and {red-spotted trout}.
      (c) The huso or salmon of the Danube.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Huch \[d8]Huch\, d8Huchen \[d8]Hu"chen\, n. [G.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A large salmon ({Salmo, [or] Salvelinus, hucho}) inhabiting
      the Danube; -- called also {huso}, and {bull trout}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bullet-proof \Bul"let-proof`\, a.
      Capable of resisting the force of a bullet.
  
      {Bullet tree}. See {Bully tree}.
  
      {Bullet wood}, the wood of the bullet tree.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bully tree \Bul"ly tree`\ (Bot.)
      The name of several West Indian trees of the order
      {Sapotace[91]}, as {Dipholis nigra} and species of {Sapota}
      and {Mimusops}. Most of them yield a substance closely
      resembling gutta-percha.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Belle Terre, NY (village, FIPS 5672)
      Location: 40.96226 N, 73.06720 W
      Population (1990): 839 (280 housing units)
      Area: 2.3 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Beltrami, MN (city, FIPS 5014)
      Location: 47.54316 N, 96.52801 W
      Population (1990): 137 (66 housing units)
      Area: 5.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56517

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Beltrami County, MN (county, FIPS 7)
      Location: 48.01803 N, 94.92344 W
      Population (1990): 34384 (14670 housing units)
      Area: 6488.9 sq km (land), 1425.3 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bluewater, AZ (CDP, FIPS 7025)
      Location: 34.16853 N, 114.26412 W
      Population (1990): 505 (466 housing units)
      Area: 5.3 sq km (land), 0.8 sq km (water)
   Bluewater, CA (CDP, FIPS 7172)
      Location: 34.17456 N, 114.27066 W
      Population (1990): 261 (485 housing units)
      Area: 3.4 sq km (land), 1.4 sq km (water)
   Bluewater, NM
      Zip code(s): 87005

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder, CO (city, FIPS 7850)
      Location: 40.02688 N, 105.25102 W
      Population (1990): 83312 (36270 housing units)
      Area: 58.4 sq km (land), 2.6 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 80301, 80302, 80303, 80304
   Boulder, MT (town, FIPS 8575)
      Location: 46.23605 N, 112.11946 W
      Population (1990): 1316 (521 housing units)
      Area: 2.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 59632
   Boulder, UT (town, FIPS 7470)
      Location: 37.92904 N, 111.42778 W
      Population (1990): 126 (89 housing units)
      Area: 54.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 84716
   Boulder, WY
      Zip code(s): 82923

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder City, NV (city, FIPS 6500)
      Location: 35.96597 N, 114.83807 W
      Population (1990): 12567 (5390 housing units)
      Area: 86.9 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 89005

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder County, CO (county, FIPS 13)
      Location: 40.08847 N, 105.35729 W
      Population (1990): 225339 (94621 housing units)
      Area: 1923.0 sq km (land), 23.2 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder Creek, CA (CDP, FIPS 7652)
      Location: 37.13750 N, 122.12787 W
      Population (1990): 6725 (2961 housing units)
      Area: 31.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 95006

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder Hill, IL (CDP, FIPS 7419)
      Location: 41.71250 N, 88.33611 W
      Population (1990): 8894 (2969 housing units)
      Area: 3.8 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boulder Junction, WI
      Zip code(s): 54512

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   blitter /blit'r/ n.   [common] A special-purpose chip or
   hardware system built to perform {blit} operations, esp.   used for
   fast implementation of bit-mapped graphics.   The Commodore Amiga and
   a few other micros have these, but since 1990 the trend has been
   away from them (however, see {cycle of reincarnation}).   Syn.
   {raster blaster}.
  
  

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   bloatware n.   [common] Software that provides minimal
   functionality while requiring a disproportionate amount of diskspace
   and memory.   Especially used for application and OS upgrades.   This
   term is very common in the Windows/NT world.   So is its cause.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   blitter
  
      /blit'r/ (Or "{raster blaster}").   A
      special-purpose {integrated circuit} or hardware system built
      to perform {blit} (or "{bit bang}") operations, especially
      used for fast implementation of {bit-mapped} graphics.
  
      The {Commodore} {Amiga} and a few other {microcomputers} have
      these, but in 1991 the trend is away from them (however, see
      {cycle of reincarnation}).
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1996-04-30)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   bloatware
  
      {Software} suffering from {software bloat}.
  
      (1995-10-14)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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