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   bacciferous
         adj 1: producing or bearing berries [syn: {berried}, {baccate},
                  {bacciferous}]

English Dictionary: Bassbariton by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
baccivorous
adj
  1. feeding on berries
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
back brace
n
  1. a brace worn to support the back
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
back breaker
n
  1. street name for lysergic acid diethylamide [syn: acid, back breaker, battery-acid, dose, dot, Elvis, loony toons, Lucy in the sky with diamonds, pane, superman, window pane, Zen]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
back burner
n
  1. reduced priority; "dozens of cases were put on the back burner"
    Antonym(s): front burner
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
back porch
n
  1. a porch for the back door
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
back-formation
n
  1. a word invented (usually unwittingly by subtracting an affix) on the assumption that a familiar word derives from it
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
backboard
n
  1. a raised vertical board with basket attached; used to play basketball; "he banked the shot off the backboard"
    Synonym(s): backboard, basketball backboard
  2. a board used to support the back of someone or something
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
backbreaking
adj
  1. characterized by effort to the point of exhaustion; especially physical effort; "worked their arduous way up the mining valley"; "a grueling campaign"; "hard labor"; "heavy work"; "heavy going"; "spent many laborious hours on the project"; "set a punishing pace"
    Synonym(s): arduous, backbreaking, grueling, gruelling, hard, heavy, laborious, operose, punishing, toilsome
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
backfire
n
  1. the backward escape of gases and unburned gunpowder after a gun is fired
    Synonym(s): blowback, backfire
  2. a loud noise made by the explosion of fuel in the manifold or exhaust of an internal combustion engine
  3. a fire that is set intentionally in order to slow an approaching forest fire or grassfire by clearing a burned area in its path
  4. a miscalculation that recoils on its maker
    Synonym(s): backfire, boomerang
v
  1. come back to the originator of an action with an undesired effect; "Your comments may backfire and cause you a lot of trouble"
    Synonym(s): backfire, backlash, recoil
  2. emit a loud noise as a result of undergoing a backfire; "My old car backfires all the time"
  3. set a controlled fire to halt an advancing forest to prairie fire
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
base pair
n
  1. one of the pairs of chemical bases joined by hydrogen bonds that connect the complementary strands of a DNA molecule or of an RNA molecule that has two strands; the base pairs are adenine with thymine and guanine with cytosine in DNA and adenine with uracil and guanine with cytosine in RNA
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
base-forming
adj
  1. yielding a base in aqueous solution
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
baseboard
n
  1. a molding covering the joint formed by a wall and the floor
    Synonym(s): baseboard, mopboard, skirting board
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
baseborn
adj
  1. of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense); "baseborn wretches with dirty faces"; "of humble (or lowly) birth"
    Synonym(s): base, baseborn, humble, lowly
  2. illegitimate
    Synonym(s): base, baseborn
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
basivertebral vein
n
  1. one of a number of veins draining the spongy substance of the vertebrae and emptying into the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus
    Synonym(s): basivertebral vein, vena basivertebralis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bass part
n
  1. the lowest part in polyphonic music [syn: bass, {bass part}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
basso profundo
n
  1. a very deep bass voice
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
beachfront
n
  1. a strip of land running along a beach
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
beech fern
n
  1. any fern of the genus Phegopteris having deeply cut triangular fronds
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
beekeeper
n
  1. a farmer who keeps bees for their honey [syn: beekeeper, apiarist, apiculturist]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
besprent
adj
  1. sprinkled over; "glistening grass besprent with raindrops"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
besprinkle
v
  1. scatter with liquid; wet lightly; "Sprinkle the lawn" [syn: sprinkle, sparge, besprinkle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
big board
n
  1. a stock exchange in New York [syn: {New York Stock Exchange}, N. Y. Stock Exchange, NYSE, big board]
  2. the large display board at the New York Stock Exchange that reports on stocks traded on the exchange
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Big Brother
n
  1. an authoritarian leader and invader of privacy
  2. an older brother
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
big brown bat
n
  1. rather large North American brown bat; widely distributed
    Synonym(s): big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
biosphere
n
  1. the regions of the surface and atmosphere of the Earth (or other planet) where living organisms exist
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Bishop Berkeley
n
  1. Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)
    Synonym(s): Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bishopric
n
  1. the territorial jurisdiction of a bishop [syn: diocese, bishopric, episcopate]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bishopry
n
  1. the office and dignity of a bishop [syn: bishopry, episcopate]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bock beer
n
  1. a very strong lager traditionally brewed in the fall and aged through the winter for consumption in the spring
    Synonym(s): bock, bock beer
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
book fair
n
  1. fair organized by publishers or booksellers to promote the sale of books
    Synonym(s): book fair, bookfair
  2. bazaar at which books are sold or auctioned off in order to raise funds for a worthy cause
    Synonym(s): book fair, bookfair
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Book of Baruch
n
  1. an Apocryphal book ascribed to Baruch [syn: Baruch, {Book of Baruch}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Book of Proverbs
n
  1. an Old Testament book consisting of proverbs from various Israeli sages (including Solomon)
    Synonym(s): Proverbs, Book of Proverbs
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Book of Revelation
n
  1. the last book of the New Testament; contains visionary descriptions of heaven and of conflicts between good and evil and of the end of the world; attributed to Saint John the Apostle
    Synonym(s): Revelation, Revelation of Saint John the Divine, Apocalypse, Book of Revelation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Book of Ruth
n
  1. a book of the Old Testament that tells the story of Ruth who was not an Israelite but who married an Israelite and who stayed with her mother-in-law Naomi after her husband died
    Synonym(s): Ruth, Book of Ruth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bookfair
n
  1. fair organized by publishers or booksellers to promote the sale of books
    Synonym(s): book fair, bookfair
  2. bazaar at which books are sold or auctioned off in order to raise funds for a worthy cause
    Synonym(s): book fair, bookfair
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bookkeeper
n
  1. someone who records the transactions of a business
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Bos primigenius
n
  1. large recently extinct long-horned European wild ox; considered one of the ancestors of domestic cattle
    Synonym(s): aurochs, urus, Bos primigenius
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Bosporus
n
  1. a strait connecting the Mediterranean and the Black Sea; separates the European and Asian parts of Turkey; an important shipping route
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Bosporus Bridge
n
  1. a suspension bridge across the Bosporus at Istanbul
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bowsprit
n
  1. a spar projecting from the bow of a vessel
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
box spring
n
  1. a coiled bedspring in a frame that is covered with cloth
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
boxberry
n
  1. creeping woody plant of eastern North America with shiny evergreen leaves and scarlet berries
    Synonym(s): partridgeberry, boxberry, twinberry, Mitchella repens
  2. spicy red berrylike fruit; source of wintergreen oil
    Synonym(s): wintergreen, boxberry, checkerberry, teaberry, spiceberry
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
buck private
n
  1. an enlisted man of the lowest rank in the Army or Marines; "our prisoner was just a private and knew nothing of value"
    Synonym(s): private, buck private, common soldier
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
buckboard
n
  1. an open horse-drawn carriage with four wheels; has a seat attached to a flexible board between the two axles
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bugbear
n
  1. an imaginary monster used to frighten children [syn: bogeyman, bugbear, bugaboo, boogeyman, booger]
  2. an object of dread or apprehension; "Germany was always a bugbear for France"; "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds"--Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Synonym(s): bugbear, hobgoblin
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
bus fare
n
  1. the fare charged for riding a bus or streetcar [syn: {bus fare}, carfare]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
busbar
n
  1. an electrical conductor that makes a common connection between several circuits; "the busbar in this computer can transmit data either way between any two components of the system"
    Synonym(s): busbar, bus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
BuSpar
n
  1. a drug (trade name BuSpar) designed specifically for anxiety
    Synonym(s): buspirone, BuSpar
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
buspirone
n
  1. a drug (trade name BuSpar) designed specifically for anxiety
    Synonym(s): buspirone, BuSpar
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
by experimentation
adv
  1. in an experimental fashion; "this can be experimentally determined"
    Synonym(s): experimentally, by experimentation, through an experiment
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Buffalo \Buf"fa*lo\, n.; pl. {Buffaloes}. [Sp. bufalo (cf. It.
      bufalo, F. buffle), fr. L. bubalus, bufalus, a kind of
      African stag or gazelle; also, the buffalo or wild ox, fr.
      Gr. [?] buffalo, prob. fr. [?] ox. See {Cow} the animal, and
      cf. {Buff} the color, and {Bubale}.]
      1. (Zo[94]l.) A species of the genus {Bos} or {Bubalus} ({B.
            bubalus}), originally from India, but now found in most of
            the warmer countries of the eastern continent. It is
            larger and less docile than the common ox, and is fond of
            marshy places and rivers.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A very large and savage species of the same
            genus ({B. Caffer}) found in South Africa; -- called also
            {Cape buffalo}.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) Any species of wild ox.
  
      4. (Zo[94]l.) The bison of North America.
  
      5. A buffalo robe. See {Buffalo robe}, below.
  
      6. (Zo[94]l.) The buffalo fish. See {Buffalo fish}, below.
  
      {Buffalo berry} (Bot.), a shrub of the Upper Missouri
            ({Sherherdia argentea}) with acid edible red berries.
  
      {Buffalo bird} (Zo[94]l.), an African bird of the genus
            {Buphaga}, of two species. These birds perch upon
            buffaloes and cattle, in search of parasites.
  
      {Buffalo bug}, the carpet beetle. See under {Carpet}.
  
      {Buffalo chips}, dry dung of the buffalo, or bison, used for
            fuel. [U.S.]
  
      {Buffalo clover} (Bot.), a kind of clover ({Trifolium
            reflexum} and {T.soloniferum}) found in the ancient
            grazing grounds of the American bison.
  
      {Buffalo cod} (Zo[94]l.), a large, edible, marine fish
            ({Ophiodon elongatus}) of the northern Pacific coast; --
            called also {blue cod}, and {cultus cod}.
  
      {Buffalo fish} (Zo[94]l.), one of several large fresh-water
            fishes of the family {Catostomid[91]}, of the Mississippi
            valley. The red-mouthed or brown ({Ictiobus bubalus}), the
            big-mouthed or black ({Bubalichthys urus}), and the
            small-mouthed ({B. altus}), are among the more important
            species used as food.
  
      {Buffalo fly}, [or] {Buffalo gnat} (Zo[94]l.), a small
            dipterous insect of the genus {Simulium}, allied to the
            black fly of the North. It is often extremely abundant in
            the lower part of the Mississippi valley and does great
            injury to domestic animals, often killing large numbers of
            cattle and horses. In Europe the Columbatz fly is a
            species with similar habits.
  
      {Buffalo grass} (Bot.), a species of short, sweet grass
            ({Buchlo[89] dactyloides}), from two to four inches high,
            covering the prairies on which the buffaloes, or bisons,
            feed. [U.S.]
  
      {Buffalo nut} (Bot.), the oily and drupelike fruit of an
            American shrub ({Pyrularia oleifera}); also, the shrub
            itself; oilnut.
  
      {Buffalo robe}, the skin of the bison of North America,
            prepared with the hair on; -- much used as a lap robe in
            sleighs.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bignonia \Big*no"ni*a\, n. [Named from the Abb[82] Bignon.]
      (Bot.)
      A large genus of American, mostly tropical, climbing shrubs,
      having compound leaves and showy somewhat tubular flowers.
      {B. capreolata} is the cross vine of the Southern United
      States. The trumpet creeper was formerly considered to be of
      this genus.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Trigger \Trig"ger\, n. [For older tricker, from D. trekker, fr.
      trekken to draw, pull. See {Trick}, n.]
      1. A catch to hold the wheel of a carriage on a declivity.
  
      2. (Mech.) A piece, as a lever, which is connected with a
            catch or detent as a means of releasing it; especially
            (Firearms), the part of a lock which is moved by the
            finger to release the cock and discharge the piece.
  
      {Trigger fish} (Zo[94]l.), a large plectognath fish
            ({Balistes Carolinensis} or {B. capriscus}) common on the
            southern coast of the United States, and valued as a food
            fish in some localities. Its rough skin is used for
            scouring and polishing in the place of sandpaper. Called
            also {leather jacket}, and {turbot}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Box \Box\ (b[ocr]ks), n. [As. box, L. buxus, fr. Gr. [?]. See
      {Box} a case.] (Bot.)
      A tree or shrub, flourishing in different parts of the world.
      The common box ({Buxus sempervirens}) has two varieties, one
      of which, the dwarf box ({B. suffruticosa}), is much used for
      borders in gardens. The wood of the tree varieties, being
      very hard and smooth, is extensively used in the arts, as by
      turners, engravers, mathematical instrument makers, etc.
  
      {Box elder}, the ash-leaved maple ({Negundo aceroides}), of
            North America.
  
      {Box holly}, the butcher's broom ({Russus aculeatus}).
  
      {Box thorn}, a shrub ({Lycium barbarum}).
  
      {Box tree}, the tree variety of the common box.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Gum \Gum\, n. [OE. gomme, gumme, F. gomme, L. gummi and commis,
      fr. Gr. [?], prob. from an Egyptian form kam[?]; cf. It.
      {gomma}.]
      1. A vegetable secretion of many trees or plants that hardens
            when it exudes, but is soluble in water; as, gum arabic;
            gum tragacanth; the gum of the cherry tree. Also, with
            less propriety, exudations that are not soluble in water;
            as, gum copal and gum sandarac, which are really resins.
  
      2. (Bot.) See {Gum tree}, {below}.
  
      3. A hive made of a section of a hollow gum tree; hence, any
            roughly made hive; also, a vessel or bin made of a hollow
            log. [Southern U. S.]
  
      4. A rubber overshoe. [Local, U. S.]
  
      {Black gum}, {Blue gum}, {British gum}, etc. See under
            {Black}, {Blue}, etc.
  
      {Gum Acaroidea}, the resinous gum of the Australian grass
            tree ({Xanlhorrh[d2]a}).
  
      {Gum animal} (Zo[94]l.), the galago of West Africa; -- so
            called because it feeds on gums. See {Galago}.
  
      {Gum animi or anim[82]}. See {Anim[82]}.
  
      {Gum arabic}, a gum yielded mostly by several species of
            {Acacia} (chiefly {A. vera} and {A. Arabica}) growing in
            Africa and Southern Asia; -- called also {gum acacia}.
            East Indian gum arabic comes from a tree of the Orange
            family which bears the elephant apple.
  
      {Gum butea}, a gum yielded by the Indian plants {Butea
            frondosa} and {B. superba}, and used locally in tanning
            and in precipitating indigo.
  
      {Gum cistus}, a plant of the genus {Cistus} ({Cistus
            ladaniferus}), a species of rock rose.
  
      {Gum dragon}. See {Tragacanth}.
  
      {Gum elastic}, {Elastic gum}. See {Caoutchouc}.
  
      {Gum elemi}. See {Elemi}.
  
      {Gum juniper}. See {Sandarac}.
  
      {Gum kino}. See under {Kino}.
  
      {Gum lac}. See {Lac}.
  
      {Gum Ladanum}, a fragrant gum yielded by several Oriental
            species of Cistus or rock rose.
  
      {Gum passages}, sap receptacles extending through the
            parenchyma of certain plants ({Amygdalace[91]},
            {Cactace[91]}, etc.), and affording passage for gum.
  
      {Gum pot}, a varnish maker's utensil for melting gum and
            mixing other ingredients.
  
      {Gum resin}, the milky juice of a plant solidified by
            exposure to air; one of certain inspissated saps, mixtures
            of, or having properties of, gum and resin; a resin
            containing more or less mucilaginous and gummy matter.
  
      {Gum sandarac}. See {Sandarac}.
  
      {Gum Senegal}, a gum similar to gum arabic, yielded by trees
            ({Acacia Verek} and {A. Adansoni[84]}) growing in the
            Senegal country, West Africa.
  
      {Gum tragacanth}. See {Tragacanth}.
  
      {Gum tree}, the name given to several trees in America and
            Australia:
            (a) The black gum ({Nyssa multiflora}), one of the largest
                  trees of the Southern States, bearing a small blue
                  fruit, the favorite food of the opossum. Most of the
                  large trees become hollow.
            (b) A tree of the genus {Eucalyptus.} See {Eucalpytus.}
            (c) The sweet gum tree of the United States ({Liquidambar
                  styraciflua}), a large and beautiful tree with
                  pointedly lobed leaves and woody burlike fruit. It
                  exudes an aromatic terebinthine juice.
  
      {Gum water}, a solution of gum, esp. of gum arabic, in water.
           
  
      {Gum wood}, the wood of any gum tree, esp. the wood of the
            {Eucalyptus piperita}, of New South Wales.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bacciferous \Bac*cif"er*ous\, a. [L. baccifer; bacca berry +
      ferre to bear]
      Producing berries. [bd] Bacciferous trees.[b8] --Ray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bacciform \Bac"ci*form\, a. [L. bacca berry + -form. ]
      Having the form of a berry.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Baccivorous \Bac*civ"o*rous\, a. [L. bacca berry + varare to
      devour.] (Zo[94]l.)
      Eating, or subsisting on, berries; as, baccivorous birds.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Back fire \Back fire\
      (a) A fire started ahead of a forest or prairie fire to burn
            only against the wind, so that when the two fires meet
            both must go out for lack of fuel.
      (b) A premature explosion in the cylinder of a gas or oil
            engine during the exhaust or the compression stroke,
            tending to drive the piston in a direction reverse to
            that in which it should travel; also, an explosion in the
            exhaust passages of such ah engine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pressure \Pres"sure\ (?; 138), n. [OF., fr. L. pressura, fr.
      premere. See 4th {Press}.]
      1. The act of pressing, or the condition of being pressed;
            compression; a squeezing; a crushing; as, a pressure of
            the hand.
  
      2. A contrasting force or impulse of any kind; as, the
            pressure of poverty; the pressure of taxes; the pressure
            of motives on the mind; the pressure of civilization.
  
                     Where the pressure of danger was not felt.
                                                                              --Macaulay.
  
      3. Affliction; distress; grievance.
  
                     My people's pressures are grievous.   --Eikon
                                                                              Basilike.
  
                     In the midst of his great troubles and pressures.
                                                                              --Atterbury.
  
      4. Urgency; as, the pressure of business.
  
      5. Impression; stamp; character impressed.
  
                     All saws of books, all forms, all pressures past.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      6. (Mech.) The action of a force against some obstacle or
            opposing force; a force in the nature of a thrust,
            distributed over a surface, often estimated with reference
            to the upon a unit's area.
  
      {Atmospheric pressure}, {Center of pressure}, etc. See under
            {Atmospheric}, {Center}, etc.
  
      {Back pressure} (Steam engine), pressure which resists the
            motion of the piston, as the pressure of exhaust steam
            which does not find free outlet.
  
      {Fluid pressure}, pressure like that exerted by a fluid. It
            is a thrust which is normal and equally intense in all
            directions around a point. --Rankine.
  
      {Pressure gauge}, a gauge for indicating fluid pressure; a
            manometer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Back \Back\, a.
      1. Being at the back or in the rear; distant; remote; as, the
            back door; back settlements.
  
      2. Being in arrear; overdue; as, back rent.
  
      3. Moving or operating backward; as, back action.
  
      {Back charges}, charges brought forward after an account has
            been made up.
  
      {Back filling} (Arch.), the mass of materials used in filling
            up the space between two walls, or between the inner and
            outer faces of a wall, or upon the haunches of an arch or
            vault.
  
      {Back pressure}. (Steam Engine) See under {Pressure}.
  
      {Back rest}, a guide attached to the slide rest of a lathe,
            and placed in contact with the work, to steady it in
            turning.
  
      {Back slang}, a kind of slang in which every word is written
            or pronounced backwards; as, nam for man.
  
      {Back stairs}, stairs in the back part of a house; private
            stairs. Also used adjectively. See {Back stairs},
            {Backstairs}, and {Backstair}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Back step} (Mil.), the retrograde movement of a man or body
            of men, without changing front.
  
      {Back stream}, a current running against the main current of
            a stream; an eddy.
  
      {To take the back track}, to retrace one's steps; to retreat.
            [Colloq.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Spread \Spread\, n.
      1. An arbitrage transaction operated by buying and selling
            simultaneously in two separate markets, as Chicago and New
            York, when there is an abnormal difference in price
            between the two markets. It is called a
  
      {back spread}when the difference in price is less than the
            normal one.
  
      2. (Gems) Surface in proportion to the depth of a cut stone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Backboard \Back"board`\, n. [2nd back, n. + board.]
      1. A board which supports the back wen one is sitting;
  
      Note: specifically, the board athwart the after part of a
               boat.
  
      2. A board serving as the back part of anything, as of a
            wagon.
  
      3. A thin stuff used for the backs of framed pictures,
            mirrors, etc.
  
      4. A board attached to the rim of a water wheel to prevent
            the water from running off the floats or paddies into the
            interior of the wheel. --W. Nicholson.
  
      5. A board worn across the back to give erectness to the
            figure. --Thackeray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Back-fire \Back"-fire`\, v. i.
      1. (Engin.) To have or experience a back fire or back fires;
            -- said of an internal-combustion engine.
  
      2. Of a Bunsen or similar air-fed burner, to light so that
            the flame proceeds from the internal gas jet instead of
            from the external jet of mixed gas and air. --
            {Back"-fir`ing}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Back-fire \Back"-fire`\, v. i.
      1. (Engin.) To have or experience a back fire or back fires;
            -- said of an internal-combustion engine.
  
      2. Of a Bunsen or similar air-fed burner, to light so that
            the flame proceeds from the internal gas jet instead of
            from the external jet of mixed gas and air. --
            {Back"-fir`ing}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Backfriend \Back"friend`\, n. [Back, n. or adv. + friend]
      A secret enemy. [Obs.] --South.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Baseboard \Base"board\, n. (Arch.)
      A board, or other woodwork, carried round the walls of a room
      and touching the floor, to form a base and protect the
      plastering; -- also called washboard (in England), mopboard,
      and scrubboard.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Baseborn \Base"born`\, a.
      1. Born out of wedlock. --Gay.
  
      2. Born of low parentage.
  
      3. Vile; mean. [bd]Thy baseborn heart.[b8] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Base-burner \Base"-burn`er\, n.
      A furnace or stove in which the fuel is contained in a hopper
      or chamber, and is fed to the fire as the lower stratum is
      consumed.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Basifier \Ba"si*fi`er\, n. (Chem.)
      That which converts into a salifiable base.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bespirt \Be*spirt"\, v. t.
      Same as {Bespurt}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bespread \Be*spread"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bespread}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Bespreading}.]
      To spread or cover over.
  
               The carpet which bespread His rich pavilion's floor.
                                                                              --Glover.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bespread \Be*spread"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bespread}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Bespreading}.]
      To spread or cover over.
  
               The carpet which bespread His rich pavilion's floor.
                                                                              --Glover.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprent \Be*sprent"\, p. p. [OE. bespreynt, p. p. of
      besprengen, bisprengen, to besprinkle, AS. besprengan, akin
      to D. & G. besprengen; pref. be- + sprengan to sprinkle. See
      {Sprinkle}.]
      Sprinkled over; strewed.
  
               His face besprent with liquid crystal shines.
                                                                              --Shenstone.
  
               The floor with tassels of fir was besprent.
                                                                              --Longfellow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprinkle \Be*sprin"kle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Besprinkled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Besprinkling}.]
      To sprinkle over; to scatter over.
  
               The bed besprinkles, and bedews the ground. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprinkle \Be*sprin"kle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Besprinkled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Besprinkling}.]
      To sprinkle over; to scatter over.
  
               The bed besprinkles, and bedews the ground. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprinkler \Be*sprin"kler\, n.
      One who, or that which, besprinkles.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprinkle \Be*sprin"kle\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Besprinkled}; p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Besprinkling}.]
      To sprinkle over; to scatter over.
  
               The bed besprinkles, and bedews the ground. --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Besprinkling \Be*sprin"kling\, n.
      The act of sprinkling anything; a sprinkling over.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bespurt \Be*spurt"\, v. t.
      To spurt on or over; to asperse. [Obs.] --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bickford fuse \Bick"ford fuse\ [or] fuze \fuze\, or Bickford
   match \Bickford match\
      A fuse used in blasting, consisting of a long cylinder of
      explosive material inclosed in a varnished wrapping of rope
      or hose. It burns from 2 to 4 feet a minute.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bickford fuse \Bick"ford fuse\ [or] fuze \fuze\, or Bickford
   match \Bickford match\
      A fuse used in blasting, consisting of a long cylinder of
      explosive material inclosed in a varnished wrapping of rope
      or hose. It burns from 2 to 4 feet a minute.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Ray \Ray\, n. [F. raie, L. raia. Cf. {Roach}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) Any one of numerous elasmobranch fishes of the order
            Rai[91], including the skates, torpedoes, sawfishes, etc.
      (b) In a restricted sense, any of the broad, flat,
            narrow-tailed species, as the skates and sting rays. See
            {Skate}.
  
      {Bishop ray}, a yellow-spotted, long-tailed eagle ray
            ({Stoasodon n[85]rinari}) of the Southern United States
            and the West Indies.
  
      {Butterfly ray}, a short-tailed American sting ray
            ({Pteroplatea Maclura}), having very broad pectoral fins.
           
  
      {Devil ray}. See {Sea Devil}.
  
      {Eagle ray}, any large ray of the family {Myliobatid[91]}, or
            {[92]tobatid[91]}. The common European species
            ({Myliobatis aquila}) is called also {whip ray}, and
            {miller}.
  
      {Electric ray}, or {Cramp ray}, a torpedo.
  
      {Starry ray}, a common European skate ({Raia radiata}).
  
      {Sting ray}, any one of numerous species of rays of the
            family {Trygonid[91]} having one or more large, sharp,
            barbed dorsal spines on the whiplike tail. Called also
            {stingaree}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bishopric \Bish"op*ric\, n. [AS. bisceopr[c6]ce; bisceop bishop
      + r[c6]ce dominion. See {-ric}.]
      1. A diocese; the district over which the jurisdiction of a
            bishop extends.
  
      2. The office of a spiritual overseer, as of an apostle,
            bishop, or presbyter. --Acts i. 20.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bock beer \Bock" beer`\ [G. bockbier; bock a buck + bier beer;
      -- said to be so named from its tendency to cause the drinker
      to caper like a goat.]
      A strong beer, originally made in Bavaria. [Also written
      {buck beer}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bogberry \Bog"ber`ry\, n. (Bot.)
      The small cranberry ({Vaccinium oxycoccus}), which grows in
      boggy places.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bogue \Bogue\, n. (Zo[94]l.)
      The boce; -- called also {bogue bream}. See {Boce}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Proverb \Prov"erb\, n. [OE. proverbe, F. proverbe, from L.
      proverbium; pro before, for + verbum a word. See {Verb}.]
      1. An old and common saying; a phrase which is often
            repeated; especially, a sentence which briefly and
            forcibly expresses some practical truth, or the result of
            experience and observation; a maxim; a saw; an adage.
            --Chaucer. Bacon.
  
      2. A striking or paradoxical assertion; an obscure saying; an
            enigma; a parable.
  
                     His disciples said unto him, Lo, now speakest thou
                     plainly, and speakest no proverb.      --John xvi.
                                                                              29.
  
      3. A familiar illustration; a subject of contemptuous
            reference.
  
                     Thou shalt become an astonishment, a proverb, and a
                     by word, among all nations.               --Deut.
                                                                              xxviii. 37.
  
      4. A drama exemplifying a proverb.
  
      {Book of Proverbs}, a canonical book of the Old Testament,
            containing a great variety of wise maxims.
  
      Syn: Maxim; aphorism; apothegm; adage; saw.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bookkeeper \Book"keep`er\, n.
      One who keeps accounts; one who has the charge of keeping the
      books and accounts in an office.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bosporus \Bos"po*rus\ (b[ocr]s"p[osl]*r[ucr]s), n. [L.]
      A strait or narrow sea between two seas, or a lake and a
      seas; as, the Bosporus (formerly the Thracian Bosporus) or
      Strait of Constantinople, between the Black Sea and Sea of
      Marmora; the Cimmerian Bosporus, between the Black Sea and
      Sea of Azof. [Written also {Bosphorus}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bosporian \Bos*po"ri*an\, a. [L. Bosporus, G. Bo`sporos, lit.,
      ox-ford, the ox's or heifer's ford, on account of Io's
      passage here as a heifer; fr. boy^s ox, heifer + po`ros
      ford.]
      Of or pertaining to the Thracian or the Cimmerian Bosporus.
  
               The Alans forced the Bosporian kings to pay them
               tribute and exterminated the Taurians.   --Tooke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bosporus \Bos"po*rus\ (b[ocr]s"p[osl]*r[ucr]s), n. [L.]
      A strait or narrow sea between two seas, or a lake and a
      seas; as, the Bosporus (formerly the Thracian Bosporus) or
      Strait of Constantinople, between the Black Sea and Sea of
      Marmora; the Cimmerian Bosporus, between the Black Sea and
      Sea of Azof. [Written also {Bosphorus}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bowsprit \Bow"sprit`\, n. [Bow + sprit; akin to D. boegspriet;
      boeg bow of a ship + spriet, E. sprit, also Sw. bogspr[94]t,
      G. bugspriet.] (Naut.)
      A large boom or spar, which projects over the stem of a ship
      or other vessel, to carry sail forward.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Shroud \Shroud\ (shroud), n. [OE. shroud, shrud, schrud, AS.
      scr[umac]d a garment, clothing; akin to Icel. skru[edh] the
      shrouds of a ship, furniture of a church, a kind of stuff,
      Sw. skrud dress, attire, and E. shred. See {Shred}, and cf.
      {Shrood}.]
      1. That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a
            garment. --Piers Plowman.
  
                     Swaddled, as new born, in sable shrouds. --Sandys.
  
      2. Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet. [bd]A
            dead man in his shroud.[b8] --Shak.
  
      3. That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
  
                     Jura answers through her misty shroud. --Byron.
  
      4. A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or
            den; also, a vault or crypt. [Obs.]
  
                     The shroud to which he won His fair-eyed oxen.
                                                                              --Chapman.
  
                     A vault, or shroud, as under a church. --Withals.
  
      5. The branching top of a tree; foliage. [R.]
  
                     The Assyrian wad a cedar in Lebanon, with fair
                     branches and with a shadowing shroad. --Ezek. xxxi.
                                                                              3.
  
      6. pl. (Naut.) A set of ropes serving as stays to support the
            masts. The lower shrouds are secured to the sides of
            vessels by heavy iron bolts and are passed around the head
            of the lower masts.
  
      7. (Mach.) One of the two annular plates at the periphery of
            a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a
            shroud plate.
  
      {Bowsprit shrouds} (Naut.), ropes extending from the head of
            the bowsprit to the sides of the vessel.
  
      {Futtock shrouds} (Naut.), iron rods connecting the topmast
            rigging with the lower rigging, passing over the edge of
            the top.
  
      {Shroud plate}.
            (a) (Naut.) An iron plate extending from the dead-eyes to
                  the ship's side. --Ham. Nav. Encyc.
            (b) (Mach.) A shroud. See def. 7, above.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Boxberry \Box"ber`ry\, n. (Bot.)
      The wintergreen. ({Gaultheria procumbens}). [Local, U.S.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Boxkeeper \Box"keep`er\, n.
      An attendant at a theater who has charge of the boxes.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bock beer \Bock" beer`\ [G. bockbier; bock a buck + bier beer;
      -- said to be so named from its tendency to cause the drinker
      to caper like a goat.]
      A strong beer, originally made in Bavaria. [Also written
      {buck beer}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Buckboard \Buck"board`\, n.
      A four-wheeled vehicle, having a long elastic board or frame
      resting on the bolsters or axletrees, and a seat or seats
      placed transversely upon it; -- called also {buck wagon}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bugaboo \Bug`a*boo"\, Bugbear \Bug"bear`\, n. [See {Bug}.]
      Something frightful, as a specter; anything imaginary that
      causes needless fright; something used to excite needless
      fear; also, something really dangerous, used to frighten
      children, etc. [bd]Bugaboos to fright ye.[b8] --Lloyd.
  
               But, to the world no bugbear is so great As want of
               figure and a small estate.                     --Pope.
  
               The bugaboo of the liberals is the church pray. --S. B.
                                                                              Griffin.
  
               The great bugaboo of the birds is the owl. --J.
                                                                              Burroughs.
  
      Syn: Hobgoblin; goblin; specter; ogre; scarecrow.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bugbear \Bug"bear`\, n.
      Same as {Bugaboo}. -- a. Causing needless fright. --Locke.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Bugbear \Bug"bear`\, v. t.
      To alarm with idle phantoms.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Byssiferous \Bys*sif"er*ous\, a. [Byssus + -ferous.]
      Bearing a byssus or tuft.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bay Springs, MS (town, FIPS 4060)
      Location: 31.98016 N, 89.28414 W
      Population (1990): 1729 (688 housing units)
      Area: 18.4 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 39422

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Beach Park, IL (village, FIPS 4303)
      Location: 42.42495 N, 87.85623 W
      Population (1990): 9513 (3405 housing units)
      Area: 16.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bee Spring, KY
      Zip code(s): 42207

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Bar, CA
      Zip code(s): 96010

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Bear City, CA (CDP, FIPS 6406)
      Location: 34.26634 N, 116.84553 W
      Population (1990): 4920 (4670 housing units)
      Area: 9.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 92314

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Bear Lake, CA (city, FIPS 6434)
      Location: 34.24369 N, 116.89448 W
      Population (1990): 5351 (8564 housing units)
      Area: 16.2 sq km (land), 0.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Park, AZ (CDP, FIPS 6015)
      Location: 34.78018 N, 111.76183 W
      Population (1990): 3024 (1924 housing units)
      Area: 11.9 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Prairie, OH
      Zip code(s): 44611

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Spring, KY
      Zip code(s): 40106
   Big Spring, MD
      Zip code(s): 21722
   Big Spring, TX (city, FIPS 8236)
      Location: 32.23998 N, 101.47890 W
      Population (1990): 23093 (9876 housing units)
      Area: 49.3 sq km (land), 0.3 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Big Springs, NE (village, FIPS 4895)
      Location: 41.06341 N, 102.07465 W
      Population (1990): 495 (224 housing units)
      Area: 1.0 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 69122

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bigfork, MN (city, FIPS 5698)
      Location: 47.74840 N, 93.65341 W
      Population (1990): 384 (175 housing units)
      Area: 4.1 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 56628

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bosque Farms, NM (village, FIPS 8580)
      Location: 34.85477 N, 106.70088 W
      Population (1990): 3791 (1384 housing units)
      Area: 10.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 87068

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boxboro, MA
      Zip code(s): 01719

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Boxford, MA (CDP, FIPS 7385)
      Location: 42.67353 N, 70.98658 W
      Population (1990): 2072 (685 housing units)
      Area: 14.3 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 01921

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Bucksport, ME (CDP, FIPS 8780)
      Location: 44.60791 N, 68.79249 W
      Population (1990): 2989 (1289 housing units)
      Area: 29.5 sq km (land), 8.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 04416
   Bucksport, SC (CDP, FIPS 10000)
      Location: 33.67204 N, 79.11274 W
      Population (1990): 1022 (341 housing units)
      Area: 9.9 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 29527

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   bug-for-bug compatible n.   Same as {bug-compatible}, with the
   additional implication that much tedious effort went into ensuring
   that each (known) bug was replicated.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   backport
  
      To make a feature from a later version of a piece
      of software available in an earlier version.   Backporting of
      features enables users of the older version to benefit from a
      feature without upgrading fully.
  
      (2003-12-18)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   back-propagation
  
      (Or "backpropagation") A learning {algorithm} for modifying a
      {feed-forward} {neural network} which minimises a continuous
      "{error function}" or "{objective function}."
      Back-propagation is a "{gradient descent}" method of training
      in that it uses gradient information to modify the network
      weights to decrease the value of the error function on
      subsequent tests of the inputs.   Other gradient-based methods
      from {numerical analysis} can be used to train networks more
      efficiently.
  
      Back-propagation makes use of a mathematical trick when the
      network is simulated on a digital computer, yielding in just
      two traversals of the network (once forward, and once back)
      both the difference between the desired and actual output, and
      the derivatives of this difference with respect to the
      connection weights.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Bookviewer
  
      A hypertext documentation system from Oracle based on Oracle
      Toolkit.   It allows the user to create private links and
      bookmarks, and to make multimedia annotations.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   bug-for-bug compatible
  
      Same as {bug-compatible}, with the additional implication that
      much tedious effort went into ensuring that each (known) bug
      was replicated.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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