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   A horizon
         n 1: the top layer of a soil profile; usually contains humus
               [syn: {A-horizon}, {A horizon}]

English Dictionary: Argumentation by the DICT Development Group
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
A-horizon
n
  1. the top layer of a soil profile; usually contains humus
    Synonym(s): A-horizon, A horizon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
aerogenerator
n
  1. generator that extracts usable energy from winds [syn: windmill, aerogenerator, wind generator]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Air Combat Command
n
  1. a command that is the primary provider of air combat weapon systems to the United States Air Force; operates fighter, bomber, reconnaissance, battle-management, and rescue aircraft
    Synonym(s): Air Combat Command, ACC
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air compressor
n
  1. a compressor that takes in air at atmospheric pressure and delivers it at a higher pressure
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air conditioner
n
  1. a system that keeps air cool and dry [syn: {air conditioner}, air conditioning]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air conditioning
n
  1. a system that keeps air cool and dry [syn: {air conditioner}, air conditioning]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air gun
n
  1. a gun that propels a projectile by compressed air [syn: air gun, airgun, air rifle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air reconnaissance
n
  1. reconnaissance either by visual observation from the air or through the use of airborne sensors
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air-condition
v
  1. control the humidity and temperature of; "The room was cool because it had been air-conditioned"
  2. equip with an apparatus for controlling the humidity and temperature; "Our house is not air-conditioned"
    Synonym(s): air- cool, air-condition
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
air-conditioned
adj
  1. cooled by air conditioning
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
airgun
n
  1. a gun that propels a projectile by compressed air [syn: air gun, airgun, air rifle]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arachnid
n
  1. air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
    Synonym(s): arachnid, arachnoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arachnida
n
  1. a large class of arthropods including spiders and ticks and scorpions and daddy longlegs; have four pairs of walking legs and no wings
    Synonym(s): Arachnida, class Arachnida
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arachnidian
adj
  1. relating to or resembling a member of the class Arachnida
    Synonym(s): arachnoid, arachnidian, spidery, spiderlike, spiderly
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arachnoid
adj
  1. relating to or resembling a member of the class Arachnida
    Synonym(s): arachnoid, arachnidian, spidery, spiderlike, spiderly
n
  1. the middle of the 3 meninges [syn: arachnoid, {arachnoid membrane}]
  2. air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
    Synonym(s): arachnid, arachnoid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arachnoid membrane
n
  1. the middle of the 3 meninges [syn: arachnoid, {arachnoid membrane}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arachnophobia
n
  1. a morbid fear of spiders
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Aragon
n
  1. French writer who generalized surrealism to literature (1897-1982)
    Synonym(s): Aragon, Louis Aragon
  2. a region of northeastern Spain; a former kingdom that united with Castile in 1479 to form Spain (after the marriage of Ferdinand V and Isabella I)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
aragonite
n
  1. a mineral form of crystalline calcium carbonate; dimorphic with calcite
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arawakan
adj
  1. of or relating to the peoples who speak the language of the Arawak
n
  1. a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
    Synonym(s): Arawak, Arawakan
  2. a family of South American Indian languages spoken in northeastern South America
    Synonym(s): Arawak, Arawakan
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arc sine
n
  1. the inverse function of the sine; the angle that has a sine equal to a given number
    Synonym(s): arc sine, arcsine, arcsin, inverse sine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arcane
adj
  1. requiring secret or mysterious knowledge; "the arcane science of dowsing"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arcangelo Corelli
n
  1. Italian violinist and composer of violin concertos (1653-1713)
    Synonym(s): Corelli, Arcangelo Corelli
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arcanum
n
  1. information known only to a special group; "the secret of Cajun cooking"
    Synonym(s): secret, arcanum
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archaean
adj
  1. of or relating to the earliest known rocks formed during the Precambrian Eon
    Synonym(s): archean, archaean
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archangel
n
  1. an angel ranked above the highest rank in the celestial hierarchy
  2. a biennial cultivated herb; its stems are candied and eaten and its roots are used medicinally
    Synonym(s): garden angelica, archangel, Angelica Archangelica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archangelic
adj
  1. of or relating to or resembling archangels [syn: archangelic, archangelical]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archangelical
adj
  1. of or relating to or resembling archangels [syn: archangelic, archangelical]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archean
adj
  1. of or relating to the earliest known rocks formed during the Precambrian Eon
    Synonym(s): archean, archaean
n
  1. the time from 3,800 million years to 2,500 million years ago; earth's crust formed; unicellular organisms are earliest forms of life
    Synonym(s): Archean, Archean eon, Archean aeon, Archeozoic, Archaeozoic, Archeozoic eon, Archaeozoic aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Archean aeon
n
  1. the time from 3,800 million years to 2,500 million years ago; earth's crust formed; unicellular organisms are earliest forms of life
    Synonym(s): Archean, Archean eon, Archean aeon, Archeozoic, Archaeozoic, Archeozoic eon, Archaeozoic aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Archean eon
n
  1. the time from 3,800 million years to 2,500 million years ago; earth's crust formed; unicellular organisms are earliest forms of life
    Synonym(s): Archean, Archean eon, Archean aeon, Archeozoic, Archaeozoic, Archeozoic eon, Archaeozoic aeon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archenteron
n
  1. central cavity of the gastrula; becomes the intestinal or digestive cavity
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archiannelid
n
  1. small primitive marine worm lacking external segmentation and resembling polychaete larvae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Archiannelida
n
  1. a class of Annelida [syn: Archiannelida, {class Archiannelida}]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archimandrite
n
  1. the superior of an abbey of monks [syn: abbot, archimandrite]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Archimedes
n
  1. Greek mathematician and physicist noted for his work in hydrostatics and mechanics and geometry (287-212 BC)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Archimedes' principle
n
  1. (hydrostatics) the apparent loss in weight of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid
    Synonym(s): Archimedes' principle, law of Archimedes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archine
n
  1. a Russian unit of length (71 cm)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arching
adj
  1. forming or resembling an arch; "an arched ceiling" [syn: arced, arched, arching, arciform, arcuate, bowed]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
archness
n
  1. inappropriate playfulness [syn: impertinence, perkiness, pertness, sauciness, archness]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arcminute
n
  1. a unit of angular distance equal to a 60th of a degree
    Synonym(s): minute, arcminute, minute of arc
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arcsin
n
  1. the inverse function of the sine; the angle that has a sine equal to a given number
    Synonym(s): arc sine, arcsine, arcsin, inverse sine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arcsine
n
  1. the inverse function of the sine; the angle that has a sine equal to a given number
    Synonym(s): arc sine, arcsine, arcsin, inverse sine
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
areca nut
n
  1. seed of betel palm; chewed with leaves of the betel pepper and lime as a digestive stimulant and narcotic in southeastern Asia
    Synonym(s): betel nut, areca nut
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argemone
n
  1. any plant of the genus Argemone having large white or yellow flowers and prickly leaves and stems and pods; chiefly of tropical America
    Synonym(s): prickly poppy, argemone, white thistle, devil's fig
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argemone mexicana
n
  1. annual herb with prickly stems and large yellow flowers; southern United States to West Indies and Mexico
    Synonym(s): Mexican poppy, Argemone mexicana
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argent
adj
  1. of lustrous grey; covered with or tinged with the color of silver; "silvery hair"
    Synonym(s): argent, silver, silvery, silverish
n
  1. a metal tincture used in heraldry to give a silvery appearance
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argentic
adj
  1. relating to compounds in which silver is bivalent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argentiferous
adj
  1. containing or yielding silver; "argentiferous ore"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentina
n
  1. a republic in southern South America; second largest country in South America
    Synonym(s): Argentina, Argentine Republic
  2. type genus of the Argentinidae: argentines
    Synonym(s): Argentina, genus Argentina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentine
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Argentina or its people; "Argentinian tango"
    Synonym(s): Argentine, Argentinian
n
  1. any of various small silver-scaled salmon-like marine fishes
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentine hemorrhagic fever
n
  1. hemorrhagic fever with neurological signs; caused by the Junin virus
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentine monetary unit
n
  1. monetary unit in Argentina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentine Republic
n
  1. a republic in southern South America; second largest country in South America
    Synonym(s): Argentina, Argentine Republic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentinian
adj
  1. of or relating to or characteristic of Argentina or its people; "Argentinian tango"
    Synonym(s): Argentine, Argentinian
n
  1. a native or inhabitant of Argentina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argentinidae
n
  1. small marine soft-finned fishes with long silvery bodies; related to salmons and trouts
    Synonym(s): Argentinidae, family Argentinidae
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argentinosaur
n
  1. huge herbivorous dinosaur of Cretaceous found in Argentina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argentite
n
  1. a valuable silver ore consisting of silver sulfide (Ag2S)
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argentous
adj
  1. relating to compounds in which silver is univalent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arginine
n
  1. a bitter tasting amino acid found in proteins and necessary for nutrition; its absence from the diet leads to a reduced production of spermatozoa
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argon
n
  1. a colorless and odorless inert gas; one of the six inert gases; comprises approximately 1% of the earth's atmosphere
    Synonym(s): argon, Ar, atomic number 18
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argonaut
n
  1. someone engaged in a dangerous but potentially rewarding adventure
  2. (Greek mythology) one of the heroes who sailed with Jason in search of the Golden Fleece
  3. cephalopod mollusk of warm seas whose females have delicate papery spiral shells
    Synonym(s): paper nautilus, nautilus, Argonaut, Argonauta argo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argonauta
n
  1. type genus of the family Argonautidae: paper nautilus [syn: Argonauta, genus Argonauta]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argonauta argo
n
  1. cephalopod mollusk of warm seas whose females have delicate papery spiral shells
    Synonym(s): paper nautilus, nautilus, Argonaut, Argonauta argo
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argonautidae
n
  1. represented solely by the genus Argonauta [syn: Argonautidae, family Argonautidae]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argonne
n
  1. an American operation in World War I (1918); American troops under Pershing drove back the German armies which were saved only by the armistice on November 11
    Synonym(s): Meuse, Meuse River, Argonne, Argonne Forest, Meuse-Argonne, Meuse-Argonne operation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argonne Forest
n
  1. an American operation in World War I (1918); American troops under Pershing drove back the German armies which were saved only by the armistice on November 11
    Synonym(s): Meuse, Meuse River, Argonne, Argonne Forest, Meuse-Argonne, Meuse-Argonne operation
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argonon
n
  1. any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic table
    Synonym(s): noble gas, inert gas, argonon
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arguing
n
  1. a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
    Synonym(s): controversy, contention, contestation, disputation, disceptation, tilt, argument, arguing
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argument
n
  1. a fact or assertion offered as evidence that something is true; "it was a strong argument that his hypothesis was true"
    Synonym(s): argument, statement
  2. a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
    Synonym(s): controversy, contention, contestation, disputation, disceptation, tilt, argument, arguing
  3. a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal; "the argument over foreign aid goes on and on"
    Synonym(s): argument, argumentation, debate
  4. a summary of the subject or plot of a literary work or play or movie; "the editor added the argument to the poem"
    Synonym(s): argument, literary argument
  5. (computer science) a reference or value that is passed to a function, procedure, subroutine, command, or program
    Synonym(s): argument, parameter
  6. a variable in a logical or mathematical expression whose value determines the dependent variable; if f(x)=y, x is the independent variable
  7. a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"
    Synonym(s): argumentation, logical argument, argument, line of reasoning, line
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argumentation
n
  1. a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal; "the argument over foreign aid goes on and on"
    Synonym(s): argument, argumentation, debate
  2. a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"
    Synonym(s): argumentation, logical argument, argument, line of reasoning, line
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argumentative
adj
  1. given to or characterized by argument; "an argumentative discourse"; "argumentative to the point of being cantankerous"; "an intelligent but argumentative child"
    Antonym(s): unargumentative
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
argumentatively
adv
  1. in a disputatious manner [syn: disputatiously, argumentatively]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argun
n
  1. a river in eastern Asia that arises in China and flows northeast along the border between China and Russia to become a tributary of the Amur River
    Synonym(s): Argun, Argun River, Ergun He
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argun River
n
  1. a river in eastern Asia that arises in China and flows northeast along the border between China and Russia to become a tributary of the Amur River
    Synonym(s): Argun, Argun River, Ergun He
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Argynnis
n
  1. fritillaries
    Synonym(s): Argynnis, genus Argynnis
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arisaema
n
  1. tuberous or rhizomatous herbaceous perennials [syn: Arisaema, genus Arisaema]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arisaema atrorubens
n
  1. common American spring-flowering woodland herb having sheathing leaves and an upright club-shaped spadix with overarching green and purple spathe producing scarlet berries
    Synonym(s): jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip, wake- robin, Arisaema triphyllum, Arisaema atrorubens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arisaema dracontium
n
  1. early spring-flowering plant of eastern North America resembling the related jack-in-the-pulpit but having digitate leaves, slender greenish yellow spathe and elongated spadix
    Synonym(s): green dragon, Arisaema dracontium
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arisaema triphyllum
n
  1. common American spring-flowering woodland herb having sheathing leaves and an upright club-shaped spadix with overarching green and purple spathe producing scarlet berries
    Synonym(s): jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip, wake- robin, Arisaema triphyllum, Arisaema atrorubens
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona
n
  1. a state in southwestern United States; site of the Grand Canyon
    Synonym(s): Arizona, Grand Canyon State, AZ
  2. glossy snake
    Synonym(s): Arizona, genus Arizona
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona ash
n
  1. small shrubby ash of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico
    Synonym(s): Arizona ash, Fraxinus velutina
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona cypress
n
  1. Arizona timber tree with bluish silvery foliage [syn: Arizona cypress, Cupressus arizonica]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona elegans
n
  1. nocturnal burrowing snake of western United States with shiny tan scales
    Synonym(s): glossy snake, Arizona elegans
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona sycamore
n
  1. medium-sized tree of Arizona and adjacent regions having deeply lobed leaves and collective fruits in groups of 3 to 5
    Synonym(s): Arizona sycamore, Platanus wrightii
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona white oak
n
  1. semi-evergreen shrub or small tree of Arizona and New Mexico having acorns with hemispherical cups
    Synonym(s): Arizona white oak, Quercus arizonica
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizona wild cotton
n
  1. shrub of southern Arizona and Mexico [syn: wild cotton, Arizona wild cotton, Gossypium thurberi]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizonan
n
  1. a native or resident of Arizona [syn: Arizonan, Arizonian]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arizonian
n
  1. a native or resident of Arizona [syn: Arizonan, Arizonian]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arjuna
n
  1. (Hindu mythology) the warrior prince in the Bhagavad-Gita to whom Krishna explains the nature of being and of God and how humans can come to know God
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arkansan
n
  1. a native or resident of Arkansas [syn: Arkansan, Arkansawyer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arkansas
n
  1. a state in south central United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
    Synonym(s): Arkansas, Land of Opportunity, AR
  2. a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River
    Synonym(s): Arkansas, Arkansas River
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arkansas kingbird
n
  1. a kingbird seen in western United States; head and back are pale grey and the breast is yellowish and the tail is black
    Synonym(s): Arkansas kingbird, western kingbird
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arkansas River
n
  1. a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River
    Synonym(s): Arkansas, Arkansas River
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
Arkansawyer
n
  1. a native or resident of Arkansas [syn: Arkansan, Arkansawyer]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arraign
v
  1. call before a court to answer an indictment
  2. accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arraignment
n
  1. a legal document calling someone to court to answer an indictment
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arrogance
n
  1. overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors
    Synonym(s): arrogance, haughtiness, hauteur, high-handedness, lordliness
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arrogant
adj
  1. having or showing feelings of unwarranted importance out of overbearing pride; "an arrogant official"; "arrogant claims"; "chesty as a peacock"
    Synonym(s): arrogant, chesty, self-important
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arrogantly
adv
  1. in an arrogant manner; "in the old days she had been harsh and stiff ; afraid of her husband and yet arrogantly proud that she had a husband strong and fierce enough to make her afraid"
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arrowsmith
n
  1. a maker of arrows
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arroz con pollo
n
  1. rice and chicken cooked together Spanish style; highly seasoned especially with saffron
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenal
n
  1. all the weapons and equipment that a country has [syn: arsenal, armory, armoury]
  2. a military structure where arms and ammunition and other military equipment are stored and training is given in the use of arms
    Synonym(s): arsenal, armory, armoury
  3. a place where arms are manufactured
    Synonym(s): armory, armoury, arsenal
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenate
n
  1. a salt or ester of arsenic acid
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenic
n
  1. a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic; used in manufacturing glass and as a pesticide (rat poison) and weed killer
    Synonym(s): arsenic, arsenic trioxide, arsenous anhydride, arsenous oxide, white arsenic, ratsbane
  2. a very poisonous metallic element that has three allotropic forms; arsenic and arsenic compounds are used as herbicides and insecticides and various alloys; found in arsenopyrite and orpiment and realgar
    Synonym(s): arsenic, As, atomic number 33
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenic acid
n
  1. an acid formed from arsenic pentoxide
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenic group
n
  1. the univalent group derived from arsine [syn: cacodyl, cacodyl group, cacodyl radical, arsenic group]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenic trioxide
n
  1. a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic; used in manufacturing glass and as a pesticide (rat poison) and weed killer
    Synonym(s): arsenic, arsenic trioxide, arsenous anhydride, arsenous oxide, white arsenic, ratsbane
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenical
adj
  1. relating to or containing arsenic; "arsenic vapor"
n
  1. a pesticide or drug containing arsenic
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenide
n
  1. a compound of arsenic with a more positive element
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenious
adj
  1. relating to compounds in which arsenic is trivalent
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenopyrite
n
  1. a silver-white or grey ore of arsenic [syn: arsenopyrite, mispickel]
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenous anhydride
n
  1. a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic; used in manufacturing glass and as a pesticide (rat poison) and weed killer
    Synonym(s): arsenic, arsenic trioxide, arsenous anhydride, arsenous oxide, white arsenic, ratsbane
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsenous oxide
n
  1. a white powdered poisonous trioxide of arsenic; used in manufacturing glass and as a pesticide (rat poison) and weed killer
    Synonym(s): arsenic, arsenic trioxide, arsenous anhydride, arsenous oxide, white arsenic, ratsbane
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsine
n
  1. a poisonous colorless flammable gas used in organic synthesis and to dope transistors and as a poison gas in warfare
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arson
n
  1. malicious burning to destroy property; "the British term for arson is fire-raising"
    Synonym(s): arson, incendiarism, fire-raising
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
arsonist
n
  1. a criminal who illegally sets fire to property [syn: arsonist, incendiary, firebug]
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Year \Year\, n. [OE. yer, yeer, [f4]er, AS. ge[a0]r; akin to
      OFries. i[?]r, g[?]r, D. jaar, OHG. j[be]r, G. jahr, Icel.
      [be]r, Dan. aar, Sw. [86]r, Goth. j[?]r, Gr. [?] a season of
      the year, springtime, a part of the day, an hour, [?] a year,
      Zend y[be]re year. [root]4, 279. Cf. {Hour}, {Yore}.]
      1. The time of the apparent revolution of the sun trough the
            ecliptic; the period occupied by the earth in making its
            revolution around the sun, called the astronomical year;
            also, a period more or less nearly agreeing with this,
            adopted by various nations as a measure of time, and
            called the civil year; as, the common lunar year of 354
            days, still in use among the Mohammedans; the year of 360
            days, etc. In common usage, the year consists of 365 days,
            and every fourth year (called bissextile, or leap year) of
            366 days, a day being added to February on that year, on
            account of the excess above 365 days (see {Bissextile}).
  
                     Of twenty year of age he was, I guess. --Chaucer.
  
      Note: The civil, or legal, year, in England, formerly
               commenced on the 25th of March. This practice continued
               throughout the British dominions till the year 1752.
  
      2. The time in which any planet completes a revolution about
            the sun; as, the year of Jupiter or of Saturn.
  
      3. pl. Age, or old age; as, a man in years. --Shak.
  
      {Anomalistic year}, the time of the earth's revolution from
            perihelion to perihelion again, which is 365 days, 6
            hours, 13 minutes, and 48 seconds.
  
      {A year's mind} (Eccl.), a commemoration of a deceased
            person, as by a Mass, a year after his death. Cf. {A
            month's mind}, under {Month}.
  
      {Bissextile year}. See {Bissextile}.
  
      {Canicular year}. See under {Canicular}.
  
      {Civil year}, the year adopted by any nation for the
            computation of time.
  
      {Common lunar year}, the period of 12 lunar months, or 354
            days.
  
      {Common year}, each year of 365 days, as distinguished from
            leap year.
  
      {Embolismic year}, [or] {Intercalary lunar year}, the period
            of 13 lunar months, or 384 days.
  
      {Fiscal year} (Com.), the year by which accounts are
            reckoned, or the year between one annual time of
            settlement, or balancing of accounts, and another.
  
      {Great year}. See {Platonic year}, under {Platonic}.
  
      {Gregorian year}, {Julian year}. See under {Gregorian}, and
            {Julian}.
  
      {Leap year}. See {Leap year}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Lunar astronomical year}, the period of 12 lunar synodical
            months, or 354 days, 8 hours, 48 minutes, 36 seconds.
  
      {Lunisolar year}. See under {Lunisolar}.
  
      {Periodical year}. See {Anomalistic year}, above.
  
      {Platonic year}, {Sabbatical year}. See under {Platonic}, and
            {Sabbatical}.
  
      {Sidereal year}, the time in which the sun, departing from
            any fixed star, returns to the same. This is 365 days, 6
            hours, 9 minutes, and 9.3 seconds.
  
      {Tropical year}. See under {Tropical}.
  
      {Year and a day} (O. Eng. Law), a time to be allowed for an
            act or an event, in order that an entire year might be
            secured beyond all question. --Abbott.
  
      {Year of grace}, any year of the Christian era; Anno Domini;
            A. D. or a. d.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   A89rognosy \A`[89]r*og"no*sy\, n. [A[89]ro- + Gr. [?] knowing,
      knowledge: cf. F. a[82]rognosie.]
      The science which treats of the properties of the air, and of
      the part it plays in nature. --Craig.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   A89rogun \A"[89]r*o*gun`\, n. [A[89]ro- + gun.]
      A cannon capable of being trained at very high angles for use
      against aircraft.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Air chamber \Air" cham`ber\
      1. A chamber or cavity filled with air, in an animal or
            plant.
  
      2. A cavity containing air to act as a spring for equalizing
            the flow of a liquid in a pump or other hydraulic machine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      2. pl. Apartments in a lodging house. [bd]A bachelor's life
            in chambers.[b8] --Thackeray.
  
      3. A hall, as where a king gives audience, or a deliberative
            body or assembly meets; as, presence chamber; senate
            chamber.
  
      4. A legislative or judicial body; an assembly; a society or
            association; as, the Chamber of Deputies; the Chamber of
            Commerce.
  
      5. A compartment or cell; an inclosed space or cavity; as,
            the chamber of a canal lock; the chamber of a furnace; the
            chamber of the eye.
  
      6. pl. (Law.) A room or rooms where a lawyer transacts
            business; a room or rooms where a judge transacts such
            official business as may be done out of court.
  
      7. A chamber pot. [Colloq.]
  
      8. (Mil.)
            (a) That part of the bore of a piece of ordnance which
                  holds the charge, esp. when of different diameter from
                  the rest of the bore; -- formerly, in guns, made
                  smaller than the bore, but now larger, esp. in
                  breech-loading guns.
            (b) A cavity in a mine, usually of a cubical form, to
                  contain the powder.
            (c) A short piece of ordnance or cannon, which stood on
                  its breech, without any carriage, formerly used
                  chiefly for rejoicings and theatrical cannonades.
  
      {Air chamber}. See {Air chamber}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Chamber of commerce}, a board or association to protect the
            interests of commerce, chosen from among the merchants and
            traders of a city.
  
      {Chamber council}, a secret council. --Shak.
  
      {Chamber} {counsel [or] counselor}, a counselor who gives his
            opinion in private, or at his chambers, but does not
            advocate causes in court.
  
      {Chamber fellow}, a chamber companion; a roommate; a chum.
  
      {Chamber hangings}, tapestry or hangings for a chamber.
  
      {Chamber lye}, urine. --Shak.
  
      {Chamber music}, vocal or instrumental music adapted to
            performance in a chamber or small apartment or audience
            room, instead of a theater, concert hall, or church.
  
      {Chamber practice} (Law.), the practice of counselors at law,
            who give their opinions in private, but do not appear in
            court.
  
      {To sit at chambers}, to do business in chambers, as a judge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      14. (Paint.)
            (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of
                  the atmospheric medium through which every object in
                  nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc.
            (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of
                  that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt.
  
      15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse.
  
      Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a
               compound term. In most cases it might be written
               indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the
               first element of the compound term, with or without the
               hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder;
               air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump.
  
      {Air balloon}. See {Balloon}.
  
      {Air bath}.
            (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body.
            (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any
                  desired temperature.
  
      {Air castle}. See {Castle in the air}, under {Castle}.
  
      {Air compressor}, a machine for compressing air to be used as
            a motive power.
  
      {Air crossing}, a passage for air in a mine.
  
      {Air cushion}, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated;
            also, a device for arresting motion without shock by
            confined air.
  
      {Air fountain}, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by
            the force of compressed air.
  
      {Air furnace}, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and
            not on blast.
  
      {Air line}, a straight line; a bee line. Hence
  
      {Air-line}, adj.; as, air-line road.
  
      {Air lock} (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between
            the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a
            pneumatic caisson. --Knight.
  
      {Air port} (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit
            air.
  
      {Air spring}, a spring in which the elasticity of air is
            utilized.
  
      {Air thermometer}, a form of thermometer in which the
            contraction and expansion of air is made to measure
            changes of temperature.
  
      {Air threads}, gossamer.
  
      {Air trap}, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas
            from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap.
  
      {Air trunk}, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated
            air from a room.
  
      {Air valve}, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of
            air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler
            and allows air to enter.
  
      {Air way}, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of
            an air pump; an air way in a mine.
  
      {In the air}.
            (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as
                  rumors.
            (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled.
            (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken
                  in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air.
  
      {To take air}, to be divulged; to be made public.
  
      {To take the air}, to go abroad; to walk or ride out.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Air gun \Air" gun`\ (g[ucr]n`).
      A kind of gun in which the elastic force of condensed air is
      used to discharge the ball. The air is powerfully compressed
      into a reservoir attached to the gun, by a condensing pump,
      and is controlled by a valve actuated by the trigger.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnid \A*rach"nid\, n.
      An arachnidan. --Huxley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnidan \A*rach"ni*dan\, n. [Gr. [?] spider.] (Zo[94]l.)
      One of the Arachnida.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnidial \Ar`ach*nid"i*al\, a. (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) Of or pertaining to the Arachnida.
      (b) Pertaining to the arachnidium.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnoid \A*rach"noid\, n.
      1. (Anat.) The arachnoid membrane.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) One of the Arachnoidea.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnoid \A*rach"noid\, a. [Gr. [?] like a cobweb; [?] spider,
      spider's web + [?] form.]
      1. Resembling a spider's web; cobweblike.
  
      2. (Anat.) Pertaining to a thin membrane of the brain and
            spinal cord, between the dura mater and pia mater.
  
      3. (Bot.) Covered with, or composed of, soft, loose hairs or
            fibers, so as to resemble a cobweb; cobwebby.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnoidal \Ar`ach*noid"al\, a. (Anat.)
      Pertaining to the arachnoid membrane; arachnoid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnological \A*rach`no*log"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to arachnology.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnologist \Ar`ach*nol"o*gist\, n.
      One who is versed in, or studies, arachnology.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arachnology \Ar`ach*nol"o*gy\, n. [Gr. [?] spider + -logy.]
      The department of zo[94]logy which treats of spiders and
      other Arachnida.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aragonese \Ar`a*go*nese\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Aragon, in Spain, or to its inhabitants.
      -- n. sing. & pl. A native or natives of Aragon, in Spain.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aragonite \A*rag"o*nite\, n. [From Aragon, in Spain.] (Min.)
      A mineral identical in composition with calcite or carbonate
      of lime, but differing from it in its crystalline form and
      some of its physical characters.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Noah \No"ah\, n. [Heb. N[omac]akh rest.]
      A patriarch of Biblical history, in the time of the Deluge.
  
      {Noah's ark}.
      (a) (Zo[94]l.) A marine bivalve shell ({Arca No[91]}), which
            somewhat resembles an ark, or ship, in form.
      (b) A child's toy, consisting of an ark-shaped box containing
            many different wooden animals.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Arcanum \[d8]Ar*ca"num\, n.; pl. {Arcana}. [L., fr. arcanus
      closed, secret, fr. arca chest, box, fr. arcere to inclose.
      See {Ark}.]
      1. A secret; a mystery; -- generally used in the plural.
  
                     Inquiries into the arcana of the Godhead.
                                                                              --Warburton.
  
      2. (Med.) A secret remedy; an elixir. --Dunglison.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arcane \Ar*cane"\, a. [L. arcanus.]
      Hidden; secret. [Obs.] [bd]The arcane part of divine
      wisdom.[b8] --Berkeley.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arch91an \Ar*ch[91]"an\, a. [Gr. 'archai^os ancient, fr. 'archh`
      beginning.]
      Ancient; pertaining to the earliest period in geological
      history.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arch91an \Ar*ch[91]"an\, n. (Geol.)
      The earliest period in geological period, extending up to the
      Lower Silurian. It includes an Azoic age, previous to the
      appearance of life, and an Eozoic age, including the earliest
      forms of life.
  
      Note: This is equivalent to the formerly accepted term Azoic,
               and to the Eozoic of Dawson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archangel \Arch`an"gel\, n. [L. archangelus, Gr. 'archa`ggelos:
      cf. OF. archangel, F. archange. See {Arch-}, pref., and
      {Angel}.]
      1. A chief angel; one high in the celestial hierarchy.
            --Milton.
  
      2. (Bot.) A term applied to several different species of
            plants ({Angelica archangelica}, {Lamium album}, etc.).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archangelic \Arch`an*gel"ic\, a. [Cf. F. archang[82]lique.]
      Of or pertaining to archangels; of the nature of, or
      resembling, an archangel. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Angelica \An*gel"i*ca\, n. [NL. See {Angelic}.] (Bot.)
      1. An aromatic umbelliferous plant ({Archangelica
            officinalis} or {Angelica archangelica}) the leaf stalks
            of which are sometimes candied and used in confectionery,
            and the roots and seeds as an aromatic tonic.
  
      2. The candied leaf stalks of angelica.
  
      {Angelica tree}, a thorny North American shrub ({Aralia
            spinosa}), called also {Hercules' club}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Cowbane \Cow"bane`\ (kou"b[amac]n`), n. (Bot.)
      A poisonous umbelliferous plant; in England, the {Cicuta
      virosa}; in the United States, the {Cicuta maculata} and the
      {Archemora rigida}. See {Water hemlock}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archenemy \Arch`en"e*my\, n. [Pref. arch- + enemy.]
      A principal enemy. Specifically, Satan, the grand adversary
      of mankind. --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archenteric \Arch`en*ter"ic\, a. (Biol.)
      Relating to the archenteron; as, archenteric invagination.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimage \Ar"chi*mage\, d8Archimagus \[d8]Ar`chi*ma"gus\, n.
      [NL.; pref. archi- + L. magus, Gr. [?], a Magian.]
      1. The high priest of the Persian Magi, or worshipers of
            fire.
  
      2. A great magician, wizard, or enchanter. --Spenser.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimandrite \Ar`chi*man"drite\, n. [L. archimandrita, LGr.
      [?]; pref. [?] (E. arch-) + [?] an inclosed space, esp. for
      cattle, a fold, a monastery.] (Gr. Church)
            (a) A chief of a monastery, corresponding to abbot in the
                  Roman Catholic church.
            (b) A superintendent of several monasteries, corresponding
                  to superior abbot, or father provincial, in the Roman
                  Catholic church.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimedean \Ar`chi*me*de"an\, a. [L. Archimedeus.]
      Of or pertaining to Archimedes, a celebrated Greek
      philosopher; constructed on the principle of Archimedes'
      screw; as, Archimedean drill, propeller, etc.
  
      {Archimedean screw}, or {Archimedes' screw}, an instrument,
            said to have been invented by Archimedes, for raising
            water, formed by winding a flexible tube round a cylinder
            in the form of a screw. When the screw is placed in an
            inclined position, and the lower end immersed in water, by
            causing the screw to revolve, the water is raised to the
            upper end. --Francis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimedean \Ar`chi*me*de"an\, a. [L. Archimedeus.]
      Of or pertaining to Archimedes, a celebrated Greek
      philosopher; constructed on the principle of Archimedes'
      screw; as, Archimedean drill, propeller, etc.
  
      {Archimedean screw}, or {Archimedes' screw}, an instrument,
            said to have been invented by Archimedes, for raising
            water, formed by winding a flexible tube round a cylinder
            in the form of a screw. When the screw is placed in an
            inclined position, and the lower end immersed in water, by
            causing the screw to revolve, the water is raised to the
            upper end. --Francis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Screw \Screw\ (skr[udd]), n. [OE. scrue, OF. escroue, escroe,
      female screw, F. [82]crou, L. scrobis a ditch, trench, in
      LL., the hole made by swine in rooting; cf. D. schroef a
      screw, G. schraube, Icel. skr[umac]fa.]
      1. A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a
            continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it
            spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a
            continuous spiral groove between one turn and the next, --
            used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or
            pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of
            the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the
            threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being
            distinguished as the external, or male screw, or, more
            usually the screw; the latter as the internal, or female
            screw, or, more usually, the nut.
  
      Note: The screw, as a mechanical power, is a modification of
               the inclined plane, and may be regarded as a
               right-angled triangle wrapped round a cylinder, the
               hypotenuse of the marking the spiral thread of the
               screw, its base equaling the circumference of the
               cylinder, and its height the pitch of the thread.
  
      2. Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a
            head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver.
            Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to
            fasten something; -- called also {wood screws}, and {screw
            nails}. See also {Screw bolt}, below.
  
      3. Anything shaped or acting like a screw; esp., a form of
            wheel for propelling steam vessels. It is placed at the
            stern, and furnished with blades having helicoidal
            surfaces to act against the water in the manner of a
            screw. See {Screw propeller}, below.
  
      4. A steam vesel propelled by a screw instead of wheels; a
            screw steamer; a propeller.
  
      5. An extortioner; a sharp bargainer; a skinflint; a niggard.
            --Thackeray.
  
      6. An instructor who examines with great or unnecessary
            severity; also, a searching or strict examination of a
            student by an instructor. [Cant, American Colleges]
  
      7. A small packet of tobacco. [Slang] --Mayhew.
  
      8. An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and
            commonly of good appearance. --Ld. Lytton.
  
      9. (Math.) A straight line in space with which a definite
            linear magnitude termed the pitch is associated (cf. 5th
            {Pitch}, 10
            (b) ). It is used to express the displacement of a rigid
                  body, which may always be made to consist of a
                  rotation about an axis combined with a translation
                  parallel to that axis.
  
      10. (Zo[94]l.) An amphipod crustacean; as, the skeleton screw
            ({Caprella}). See {Sand screw}, under {Sand}.
  
      {Archimedes screw}, {Compound screw}, {Foot screw}, etc. See
            under {Archimedes}, {Compound}, {Foot}, etc.
  
      {A screw loose}, something out of order, so that work is not
            done smoothly; as, there is a screw loose somewhere. --H.
            Martineau.
  
      {Endless, [or] perpetual, {screw}, a screw used to give
            motion to a toothed wheel by the action of its threads
            between the teeth of the wheel; -- called also a {worm}.
           
  
      {Lag screw}. See under {Lag}.
  
      {Micrometer screw}, a screw with fine threads, used for the
            measurement of very small spaces.
  
      {Right and left screw}, a screw having threads upon the
            opposite ends which wind in opposite directions.
  
      {Screw alley}. See {Shaft alley}, under {Shaft}.
  
      {Screw bean}. (Bot.)
            (a) The curious spirally coiled pod of a leguminous tree
                  ({Prosopis pubescens}) growing from Texas to
                  California. It is used for fodder, and ground into
                  meal by the Indians.
            (b) The tree itself. Its heavy hard wood is used for
                  fuel, for fencing, and for railroad ties.
  
      {Screw bolt}, a bolt having a screw thread on its shank, in
            distinction from a {key bolt}. See 1st {Bolt}, 3.
  
      {Screw box}, a device, resembling a die, for cutting the
            thread on a wooden screw.
  
      {Screw dock}. See under {Dock}.
  
      {Screw engine}, a marine engine for driving a screw
            propeller.
  
      {Screw gear}. See {Spiral gear}, under {Spiral}.
  
      {Screw jack}. Same as {Jackscrew}.
  
      {Screw key}, a wrench for turning a screw or nut; a spanner
            wrench.
  
      {Screw machine}.
            (a) One of a series of machines employed in the
                  manufacture of wood screws.
            (b) A machine tool resembling a lathe, having a number of
                  cutting tools that can be caused to act on the work
                  successively, for making screws and other turned
                  pieces from metal rods.
  
      {Screw pine} (Bot.), any plant of the endogenous genus
            {Pandanus}, of which there are about fifty species,
            natives of tropical lands from Africa to Polynesia; --
            named from the spiral arrangement of the pineapple-like
            leaves.
  
      {Screw plate}, a device for cutting threads on small screws,
            consisting of a thin steel plate having a series of
            perforations with internal screws forming dies.
  
      {Screw press}, a press in which pressure is exerted by means
            of a screw.
  
      {Screw propeller}, a screw or spiral bladed wheel, used in
            the propulsion of steam vessels; also, a steam vessel
            propelled by a screw.
  
      {Screw shell} (Zo[94]l.), a long, slender, spiral gastropod
            shell, especially of the genus Turritella and allied
            genera. See {Turritella}.
  
      {Screw steamer}, a steamship propelled by a screw.
  
      {Screw thread}, the spiral rib which forms a screw.
  
      {Screw stone} (Paleon.), the fossil stem of an encrinite.
  
      {Screw tree} (Bot.), any plant of the genus {Helicteres},
            consisting of about thirty species of tropical shrubs,
            with simple leaves and spirally twisted, five-celled
            capsules; -- also called {twisted-horn}, and {twisty}.
  
      {Screw valve}, a stop valve which is opened or closed by a
            screw.
  
      {Screw worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of an American fly
            ({Compsomyia macellaria}), allied to the blowflies, which
            sometimes deposits its eggs in the nostrils, or about
            wounds, in man and other animals, with fatal results.
  
      {Screw wrench}.
            (a) A wrench for turning a screw.
            (b) A wrench with an adjustable jaw that is moved by a
                  screw.
  
      {To put the} {screw, [or] screws}, {on}, to use pressure
            upon, as for the purpose of extortion; to coerce.
  
      {To put under the} {screw [or] screws}, to subject to
            pressure; to force.
  
      {Wood screw}, a metal screw with a sharp thread of coarse
            pitch, adapted to holding fast in wood. See Illust. of
            {Wood screw}, under {Wood}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimedean \Ar`chi*me*de"an\, a. [L. Archimedeus.]
      Of or pertaining to Archimedes, a celebrated Greek
      philosopher; constructed on the principle of Archimedes'
      screw; as, Archimedean drill, propeller, etc.
  
      {Archimedean screw}, or {Archimedes' screw}, an instrument,
            said to have been invented by Archimedes, for raising
            water, formed by winding a flexible tube round a cylinder
            in the form of a screw. When the screw is placed in an
            inclined position, and the lower end immersed in water, by
            causing the screw to revolve, the water is raised to the
            upper end. --Francis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Screw \Screw\ (skr[udd]), n. [OE. scrue, OF. escroue, escroe,
      female screw, F. [82]crou, L. scrobis a ditch, trench, in
      LL., the hole made by swine in rooting; cf. D. schroef a
      screw, G. schraube, Icel. skr[umac]fa.]
      1. A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a
            continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it
            spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a
            continuous spiral groove between one turn and the next, --
            used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or
            pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of
            the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the
            threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being
            distinguished as the external, or male screw, or, more
            usually the screw; the latter as the internal, or female
            screw, or, more usually, the nut.
  
      Note: The screw, as a mechanical power, is a modification of
               the inclined plane, and may be regarded as a
               right-angled triangle wrapped round a cylinder, the
               hypotenuse of the marking the spiral thread of the
               screw, its base equaling the circumference of the
               cylinder, and its height the pitch of the thread.
  
      2. Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a
            head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver.
            Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to
            fasten something; -- called also {wood screws}, and {screw
            nails}. See also {Screw bolt}, below.
  
      3. Anything shaped or acting like a screw; esp., a form of
            wheel for propelling steam vessels. It is placed at the
            stern, and furnished with blades having helicoidal
            surfaces to act against the water in the manner of a
            screw. See {Screw propeller}, below.
  
      4. A steam vesel propelled by a screw instead of wheels; a
            screw steamer; a propeller.
  
      5. An extortioner; a sharp bargainer; a skinflint; a niggard.
            --Thackeray.
  
      6. An instructor who examines with great or unnecessary
            severity; also, a searching or strict examination of a
            student by an instructor. [Cant, American Colleges]
  
      7. A small packet of tobacco. [Slang] --Mayhew.
  
      8. An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and
            commonly of good appearance. --Ld. Lytton.
  
      9. (Math.) A straight line in space with which a definite
            linear magnitude termed the pitch is associated (cf. 5th
            {Pitch}, 10
            (b) ). It is used to express the displacement of a rigid
                  body, which may always be made to consist of a
                  rotation about an axis combined with a translation
                  parallel to that axis.
  
      10. (Zo[94]l.) An amphipod crustacean; as, the skeleton screw
            ({Caprella}). See {Sand screw}, under {Sand}.
  
      {Archimedes screw}, {Compound screw}, {Foot screw}, etc. See
            under {Archimedes}, {Compound}, {Foot}, etc.
  
      {A screw loose}, something out of order, so that work is not
            done smoothly; as, there is a screw loose somewhere. --H.
            Martineau.
  
      {Endless, [or] perpetual, {screw}, a screw used to give
            motion to a toothed wheel by the action of its threads
            between the teeth of the wheel; -- called also a {worm}.
           
  
      {Lag screw}. See under {Lag}.
  
      {Micrometer screw}, a screw with fine threads, used for the
            measurement of very small spaces.
  
      {Right and left screw}, a screw having threads upon the
            opposite ends which wind in opposite directions.
  
      {Screw alley}. See {Shaft alley}, under {Shaft}.
  
      {Screw bean}. (Bot.)
            (a) The curious spirally coiled pod of a leguminous tree
                  ({Prosopis pubescens}) growing from Texas to
                  California. It is used for fodder, and ground into
                  meal by the Indians.
            (b) The tree itself. Its heavy hard wood is used for
                  fuel, for fencing, and for railroad ties.
  
      {Screw bolt}, a bolt having a screw thread on its shank, in
            distinction from a {key bolt}. See 1st {Bolt}, 3.
  
      {Screw box}, a device, resembling a die, for cutting the
            thread on a wooden screw.
  
      {Screw dock}. See under {Dock}.
  
      {Screw engine}, a marine engine for driving a screw
            propeller.
  
      {Screw gear}. See {Spiral gear}, under {Spiral}.
  
      {Screw jack}. Same as {Jackscrew}.
  
      {Screw key}, a wrench for turning a screw or nut; a spanner
            wrench.
  
      {Screw machine}.
            (a) One of a series of machines employed in the
                  manufacture of wood screws.
            (b) A machine tool resembling a lathe, having a number of
                  cutting tools that can be caused to act on the work
                  successively, for making screws and other turned
                  pieces from metal rods.
  
      {Screw pine} (Bot.), any plant of the endogenous genus
            {Pandanus}, of which there are about fifty species,
            natives of tropical lands from Africa to Polynesia; --
            named from the spiral arrangement of the pineapple-like
            leaves.
  
      {Screw plate}, a device for cutting threads on small screws,
            consisting of a thin steel plate having a series of
            perforations with internal screws forming dies.
  
      {Screw press}, a press in which pressure is exerted by means
            of a screw.
  
      {Screw propeller}, a screw or spiral bladed wheel, used in
            the propulsion of steam vessels; also, a steam vessel
            propelled by a screw.
  
      {Screw shell} (Zo[94]l.), a long, slender, spiral gastropod
            shell, especially of the genus Turritella and allied
            genera. See {Turritella}.
  
      {Screw steamer}, a steamship propelled by a screw.
  
      {Screw thread}, the spiral rib which forms a screw.
  
      {Screw stone} (Paleon.), the fossil stem of an encrinite.
  
      {Screw tree} (Bot.), any plant of the genus {Helicteres},
            consisting of about thirty species of tropical shrubs,
            with simple leaves and spirally twisted, five-celled
            capsules; -- also called {twisted-horn}, and {twisty}.
  
      {Screw valve}, a stop valve which is opened or closed by a
            screw.
  
      {Screw worm} (Zo[94]l.), the larva of an American fly
            ({Compsomyia macellaria}), allied to the blowflies, which
            sometimes deposits its eggs in the nostrils, or about
            wounds, in man and other animals, with fatal results.
  
      {Screw wrench}.
            (a) A wrench for turning a screw.
            (b) A wrench with an adjustable jaw that is moved by a
                  screw.
  
      {To put the} {screw, [or] screws}, {on}, to use pressure
            upon, as for the purpose of extortion; to coerce.
  
      {To put under the} {screw [or] screws}, to subject to
            pressure; to force.
  
      {Wood screw}, a metal screw with a sharp thread of coarse
            pitch, adapted to holding fast in wood. See Illust. of
            {Wood screw}, under {Wood}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archimedean \Ar`chi*me*de"an\, a. [L. Archimedeus.]
      Of or pertaining to Archimedes, a celebrated Greek
      philosopher; constructed on the principle of Archimedes'
      screw; as, Archimedean drill, propeller, etc.
  
      {Archimedean screw}, or {Archimedes' screw}, an instrument,
            said to have been invented by Archimedes, for raising
            water, formed by winding a flexible tube round a cylinder
            in the form of a screw. When the screw is placed in an
            inclined position, and the lower end immersed in water, by
            causing the screw to revolve, the water is raised to the
            upper end. --Francis.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arch \Arch\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arched}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Arching}.]
      1. To cover with an arch or arches.
  
      2. To form or bend into the shape of an arch.
  
                     The horse arched his neck.                  --Charlesworth.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arching \Arch"ing\, n.
      1. The arched part of a structure.
  
      2. (Naut.) Hogging; -- opposed to {sagging}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archmarshal \Arch`mar"shal\, n. [G. erzmarschall. See {Arch-},
      pref.]
      The grand marshal of the old German empire, a dignity that to
      the Elector of Saxony.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archness \Arch"ness\, n.
      The quality of being arch; cleverness; sly humor free from
      malice; waggishness. --Goldsmith.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archon \Ar"chon\, n. [L. archon, Gr. [?], [?], ruler, chief
      magistrate, p. pr. of [?] to be first, to rule.] (Antiq.)
      One of the chief magistrates in ancient Athens, especially,
      by pre[89]minence, the first of the nine chief magistrates.
      -- {Ar*chon"tic}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archonship \Ar"chon*ship\, n.
      The office of an archon. --Mitford.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archontate \Ar"chon*tate\, n. [Cf. F. archontat.]
      An archon's term of office. --Gibbon.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archon \Ar"chon\, n. [L. archon, Gr. [?], [?], ruler, chief
      magistrate, p. pr. of [?] to be first, to rule.] (Antiq.)
      One of the chief magistrates in ancient Athens, especially,
      by pre[89]minence, the first of the nine chief magistrates.
      -- {Ar*chon"tic}, a.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Archonts \Ar"chonts\, n. pl. [Gr. 'a`rchwn, p. pr. See
      {Archon}.] (Zo[94]l.)
      The group including man alone.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Balisaur \[d8]Bal"i*sa`ur\, n. [Hind.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A badgerlike animal of India ({Arcionyx collaris}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arc \Arc\ ([aum]rk), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Arcked} ([aum]rkt); p.
      pr. & vb. n. {Arcking}.] (Elec.)
      To form a voltaic arc, as an electrical current in a broken
      or disconnected circuit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argand lamp \Ar"gand lamp`\ [Named from the inventor, Aim[82]
      Argand of Geneva.]
      A lamp with a circular hollow wick and glass chimney which
      allow a current of air both inside and outside of the flame.
  
      {Argand burner}, a burner for an Argand lamp, or a gas burner
            in which the principle of that lamp is applied.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Burner \Burn"er\, n.
      1. One who, or that which, burns or sets fire to anything.
  
      2. The part of a lamp, gas fixture, etc., where the flame is
            produced.
  
      {Bunsen's burner} (Chem.), a kind of burner, invented by
            Professor Bunsen of Heidelberg, consisting of a straight
            tube, four or five inches in length, having small holes
            for the entrance of air at the bottom. Illuminating gas
            being also admitted at the bottom, a mixture of gas and
            air is formed which burns at the top with a feebly
            luminous but intensely hot flame.
  
      {Argand burner}, {Rose burner}, etc. See under {Argand},
            {Rose}, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argand lamp \Ar"gand lamp`\ [Named from the inventor, Aim[82]
      Argand of Geneva.]
      A lamp with a circular hollow wick and glass chimney which
      allow a current of air both inside and outside of the flame.
  
      {Argand burner}, a burner for an Argand lamp, or a gas burner
            in which the principle of that lamp is applied.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argean \Ar*ge"an\, a.
      Pertaining to the ship Argo. See {Argo}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Mexican \Mex"i*can\, a.
      Of or pertaining to Mexico or its people. -- n. A native or
      inhabitant of Mexico.
  
      {Mexican poppy} (Bot.), a tropical American herb of the Poppy
            family ({Argemone Mexicana}) with much the look of a
            thistle, but having large yellow or white blossoms.
  
      {Mexican tea} (Bot.), an aromatic kind of pigweed from
            tropical America ({Chenopodium ambrosioides}).

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Poppy \Pop"py\, n.; pl. {Poppies}. [OE. popy, AS. popig, L.
      papaver.] (Bot.)
      Any plant or species of the genus {Papaver}, herbs with showy
      polypetalous flowers and a milky juice. From one species
      ({Papaver somniferum}) opium is obtained, though all the
      species contain it to some extent; also, a flower of the
      plant. See Illust. of {Capsule}.
  
      {California poppy} (Bot.), any yellow-flowered plant of the
            genus {Eschscholtzia}.
  
      {Corn poppy}. See under {Corn}.
  
      {Horn}, [or] {Horned}, {poppy}. See under {Horn}.
  
      {Poppy bee} (Zo[94]l.), a leaf-cutting bee ({Anthocopa
            papaveris}) which uses pieces cut from poppy petals for
            the lining of its cells; -- called also {upholsterer bee}.
           
  
      {Prickly poppy} (Bot.), {Argemone Mexicana}, a
            yellow-flowered plant of the Poppy family, but as prickly
            as a thistle.
  
      {Poppy seed}, the seed the opium poppy ({P. somniferum}).
  
      {Spatling poppy} (Bot.), a species of Silene ({S. inflata}).
            See {Catchfly}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Chicalote \[d8]Chi`ca*lo"te\, n. [Sp., prob. of Mex. origin.]
      (Bot.)
      A Mexican prickly poppy ({Argemone platyceras}), which has
      migrated into California.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argent \Ar"gent\, n. [F. argent, fr. L. argentum, silver; akin
      to Gr. 'a`rgyros silver, 'argo`s, 'argh`s, white, bright,
      Skr. rajata white, silver, raj to shine, Ir. arg white, milk,
      airgiod silver, money, and L. arguere to make clear. See
      {Argue}.]
      1. Silver, or money. [Archaic]
  
      2. (Fig. & Poet.) Whiteness; anything that is white.
  
                     The polished argent of her breast.      --Tennyson.
  
      3. (Her.) The white color in coats of arms, intended to
            represent silver, or, figuratively, purity, innocence,
            beauty, or gentleness; -- represented in engraving by a
            plain white surface. --Weale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argent \Ar"gent\, a.
      Made of silver; of a silvery color; white; shining.
  
               Yonder argent fields above.                     --Pope.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argental \Ar*gen"tal\, a.
      Of or pertaining to silver; resembling, containing, or
      combined with, silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentalium \Ar`gen*ta"li*um\, n. [NL.; L. argentum silver + E.
      aluminium.]
      A (patented) alloy of aluminium and silver, with a density of
      about 2.9.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentamine \Ar*gen"ta*mine\, n. Also -min \-min\ . [L. argentum
      silver + E. amine.] (Med.)
      A solution of silver phosphate in an aqueous solution of
      ethylene diamine, used as an antiseptic astringent and as a
      disinfectant.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nickel \Nick"el\, n. [G., fr. Sw. nickel, abbrev. from Sw.
      kopparnickel copper-nickel, a name given in derision, as it
      was thought to be a base ore of copper. The origin of the
      second part of the word is uncertain. Cf. {Kupfer-nickel},
      {Copper-nickel}.]
      1. (Chem.) A bright silver-white metallic element. It is of
            the iron group, and is hard, malleable, and ductile. It
            occurs combined with sulphur in millerite, with arsenic in
            the mineral niccolite, and with arsenic and sulphur in
            nickel glance. Symbol Ni. Atomic weight 58.6.
  
      Note: On account of its permanence in air and inertness to
               oxidation, it is used in the smaller coins, for plating
               iron, brass, etc., for chemical apparatus, and in
               certain alloys, as german silver. It is magnetic, and
               is very frequently accompanied by cobalt, both being
               found in meteoric iron.
  
      2. A small coin made of or containing nickel; esp., a
            five-cent piece. [Colloq. U.S.]
  
      {Nickel silver}, an alloy of nickel, copper, and zinc; --
            usually called {german silver}; called also {argentan}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentan \Ar"gen*tan\, n.
      An alloy of nickel with copper and zinc; German silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Nickel \Nick"el\, n. [G., fr. Sw. nickel, abbrev. from Sw.
      kopparnickel copper-nickel, a name given in derision, as it
      was thought to be a base ore of copper. The origin of the
      second part of the word is uncertain. Cf. {Kupfer-nickel},
      {Copper-nickel}.]
      1. (Chem.) A bright silver-white metallic element. It is of
            the iron group, and is hard, malleable, and ductile. It
            occurs combined with sulphur in millerite, with arsenic in
            the mineral niccolite, and with arsenic and sulphur in
            nickel glance. Symbol Ni. Atomic weight 58.6.
  
      Note: On account of its permanence in air and inertness to
               oxidation, it is used in the smaller coins, for plating
               iron, brass, etc., for chemical apparatus, and in
               certain alloys, as german silver. It is magnetic, and
               is very frequently accompanied by cobalt, both being
               found in meteoric iron.
  
      2. A small coin made of or containing nickel; esp., a
            five-cent piece. [Colloq. U.S.]
  
      {Nickel silver}, an alloy of nickel, copper, and zinc; --
            usually called {german silver}; called also {argentan}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentan \Ar"gen*tan\, n.
      An alloy of nickel with copper and zinc; German silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentate \Ar"gen*tate\, a. [L. argentatus silvered.] (Bot.)
      Silvery white. --Gray.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentation \Ar`gen*ta"tion\, n. [L. argentare to silver, fr.
      argentum silver. See {Argent}.]
      A coating or overlaying with silver. [R.] --Johnson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Silver \Sil"ver\, a.
      1. Of or pertaining to silver; made of silver; as, silver
            leaf; a silver cup.
  
      2. Resembling silver. Specifically:
            (a) Bright; resplendent; white. [bd]Silver hair.[b8]
                  --Shak.
  
                           Others, on silver lakes and rivers, bathed Their
                           downy breast.                              --Milton.
            (b) Precious; costly.
            (c) Giving a clear, ringing sound soft and clear.
                  [bd]Silver voices.[b8] --Spenser.
            (d) Sweet; gentle; peaceful. [bd]Silver slumber.[b8]
                  --Spenser.
  
      {American silver fir} (Bot.), the balsam fir. See under
            {Balsam}.
  
      {Silver age} (Roman Lit.), the latter part (a. d. 14-180) of
            the classical period of Latinity, -- the time of writers
            of inferior purity of language, as compared with those of
            the previous golden age, so-called.
  
      {Silver-bell tree} (Bot.), an American shrub or small tree
            ({Halesia tetraptera}) with white bell-shaped flowers in
            clusters or racemes; the snowdrop tree.
  
      {Silver bush} (Bot.), a shrubby leguminous plant ({Anthyllis
            Barba-Jovis}) of Southern Europe, having silvery foliage.
           
  
      {Silver chub} (Zo[94]l.), the fallfish.
  
      {Silver eel}. (Zo[94]l.)
            (a) The cutlass fish.
            (b) A pale variety of the common eel.
  
      {Silver fir} (Bot.), a coniferous tree ({Abies pectinata})
            found in mountainous districts in the middle and south of
            Europe, where it often grows to the height of 100 or 150
            feet. It yields Burgundy pitch and Strasburg turpentine.
           
  
      {Silver foil}, foil made of silver.
  
      {Silver fox} (Zo[94]l.), a variety of the common fox ({Vulpes
            vulpes}, variety {argenteus}) found in the northern parts
            of Asia, Europe, and America. Its fur is nearly black,
            with silvery tips, and is highly valued. Called also
            {black fox}, and {silver-gray fox}.
  
      {Silver gar}. (Zo[94]l.) See {Billfish}
            (a) .
  
      {Silver grain} (Bot.), the lines or narrow plates of cellular
            tissue which pass from the pith to the bark of an
            exogenous stem; the medullary rays. In the wood of the oak
            they are much larger than in that of the beech, maple,
            pine, cherry, etc.
  
      {Silver grebe} (Zo[94]l.), the red-throated diver. See
            Illust. under {Diver}.
  
      {Silver hake} (Zo[94]l.), the American whiting.
  
      {Silver leaf}, leaves or sheets made of silver beaten very
            thin.
  
      {Silver lunge} (Zo[94]l.), the namaycush.
  
      {Silver moonfish}.(Zo[94]l.) See {Moonfish}
            (b) .
  
      {Silver moth} (Zo[94]l.), a lepisma.
  
      {Silver owl} (Zo[94]l.), the barn owl.
  
      {Silver perch} (Zo[94]l.), the mademoiselle, 2.
  
      {Silver pheasant} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of
            beautiful crested and long-tailed Asiatic pheasants, of
            the genus {Euplocamus}. They have the tail and more or
            less of the upper parts silvery white. The most common
            species ({E. nychtemerus}) is native of China.
  
      {Silver plate}, domestic utensils made of silver.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentic \Ar*gen"tic\, a. (Chem.)
      Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, silver; -- said
      of certain compounds of silver in which this metal has its
      lowest proportion; as, argentic chloride.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentiferous \Ar`gen*tif"er*ous\, a. [L. argentum silver +
      -ferous: cf. F. argentif[8a]re.]
      Producing or containing silver; as, argentiferous lead ore or
      veins.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentine \Ar"gen*tine\ (?; in the 2d sense, commonly ?), a.
      1. Pertaining to, or resembling, silver; made of, or sounding
            like, silver; silvery.
  
                     Celestial Dian, goddess argentine.      --Shak.
  
      2. Of or pertaining to the Argentine Republic in South
            America.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentine \Ar"gen*tine\, n. [Cf. F. argentin, fr. L. argentum
      silver.]
      1. (Min.) A siliceous variety of calcite, or carbonate of
            lime, having a silvery-white, pearly luster, and a waving
            or curved lamellar structure.
  
      2. White metal coated with silver. --Simmonds.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A fish of Europe ({Maurolicus Pennantii}) with
            silvery scales. The name is also applied to various fishes
            of the genus {Argentina}.
  
      4. A citizen of the Argentine Republic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentite \Ar"gen*tite\, n. [L. argentum silver.] (Min.)
      Sulphide of silver; -- also called {vitreous silver}, or
      {silver glance}. It has a metallic luster, a lead-gray color,
      and is sectile like lead.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentous \Ar*gen"tous\, a. (Chem.)
      Of, pertaining to, or containing, silver; -- said of certain
      silver compounds in which silver has a higher proportion than
      in argentic compounds; as, argentous chloride.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argentry \Ar"gent*ry\, n. [F. argenterie, fr. argent silver, L.
      argentum.]
      Silver plate or vessels. [Obs.]
  
               Bowls of frosted argentry.                     --Howell.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Blood \Blood\, n. [OE. blod, blood, AS. bl[?]d; akin to D.
      bloed, OHG. bluot, G. blut, Goth, bl[?][?], Sw. & Dan. blod;
      prob. fr. the same root as E. blow to bloom. See {Blow} to
      bloom.]
      1. The fluid which circulates in the principal vascular
            system of animals, carrying nourishment to all parts of
            the body, and bringing away waste products to be excreted.
            See under {Arterial}.
  
      Note: The blood consists of a liquid, the plasma, containing
               minute particles, the blood corpuscles. In the
               invertebrate animals it is usually nearly colorless,
               and contains only one kind of corpuscles; but in all
               vertebrates, except Amphioxus, it contains some
               colorless corpuscles, with many more which are red and
               give the blood its uniformly red color. See
               {Corpuscle}, {Plasma}.
  
      2. Relationship by descent from a common ancestor;
            consanguinity; kinship.
  
                     To share the blood of Saxon royalty.   --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
                     A friend of our own blood.                  --Waller.
  
      {Half blood} (Law), relationship through only one parent.
  
      {Whole blood}, relationship through both father and mother.
            In American Law, blood includes both half blood, and whole
            blood. --Bouvier. --Peters.
  
      3. Descent; lineage; especially, honorable birth; the highest
            royal lineage.
  
                     Give us a prince of blood, a son of Priam. --Shak.
  
                     I am a gentleman of blood and breeding. --Shak.
  
      4. (Stock Breeding) Descent from parents of recognized breed;
            excellence or purity of breed.
  
      Note: In stock breeding half blood is descent showing one
               half only of pure breed. Blue blood, full blood, or
               warm blood, is the same as blood.
  
      5. The fleshy nature of man.
  
                     Nor gives it satisfaction to our blood. --Shak.
  
      6. The shedding of blood; the taking of life, murder;
            manslaughter; destruction.
  
                     So wills the fierce, avenging sprite, Till blood for
                     blood atones.                                    --Hood.
  
      7. A bloodthirsty or murderous disposition. [R.]
  
                     He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was
                     timed with dying cries.                     --Shak.
  
      8. Temper of mind; disposition; state of the passions; -- as
            if the blood were the seat of emotions.
  
                     When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      Note: Often, in this sense, accompanied with bad, cold, warm,
               or other qualifying word. Thus, to commit an act in
               cold blood, is to do it deliberately, and without
               sudden passion; to do it in bad blood, is to do it in
               anger. Warm blood denotes a temper inflamed or
               irritated. To warm or heat the blood is to excite the
               passions. Qualified by up, excited feeling or passion
               is signified; as, my blood was up.
  
      9. A man of fire or spirit; a fiery spark; a gay, showy man;
            a rake.
  
                     Seest thou not . . . how giddily 'a turns about all
                     the hot bloods between fourteen and five and thirty?
                                                                              --Shak.
  
                     It was the morning costume of a dandy or blood.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      10. The juice of anything, especially if red.
  
                     He washed . . . his clothes in the blood of grapes.
                                                                              --Gen. xiix.
                                                                              11.
  
      Note: Blood is often used as an adjective, and as the first
               part of self-explaining compound words; as,
               blood-bespotted, blood-bought, blood-curdling,
               blood-dyed, blood-red, blood-spilling, blood-stained,
               blood-warm, blood-won.
  
      {Blood baptism} (Eccl. Hist.), the martyrdom of those who had
            not been baptized. They were considered as baptized in
            blood, and this was regarded as a full substitute for
            literal baptism.
  
      {Blood blister}, a blister or bleb containing blood or bloody
            serum, usually caused by an injury.
  
      {Blood brother}, brother by blood or birth.
  
      {Blood clam} (Zo[94]l.), a bivalve mollusk of the genus Arca
            and allied genera, esp. {Argina pexata} of the American
            coast. So named from the color of its flesh.
  
      {Blood corpuscle}. See {Corpuscle}.
  
      {Blood crystal} (Physiol.), one of the crystals formed by the
            separation in a crystalline form of the h[91]moglobin of
            the red blood corpuscles; h[91]matocrystallin. All blood
            does not yield blood crystals.
  
      {Blood heat}, heat equal to the temperature of human blood,
            or about 98[ab] [deg] Fahr.
  
      {Blood horse}, a horse whose blood or lineage is derived from
            the purest and most highly prized origin or stock.
  
      {Blood money}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blood orange}, an orange with dark red pulp.
  
      {Blood poisoning} (Med.), a morbid state of the blood caused
            by the introduction of poisonous or infective matters from
            without, or the absorption or retention of such as are
            produced in the body itself; tox[91]mia.
  
      {Blood pudding}, a pudding made of blood and other materials.
           
  
      {Blood relation}, one connected by blood or descent.
  
      {Blood spavin}. See under {Spavin}.
  
      {Blood vessel}. See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Blue blood}, the blood of noble or aristocratic families,
            which, according to a Spanish prover, has in it a tinge of
            blue; -- hence, a member of an old and aristocratic
            family.
  
      {Flesh and blood}.
            (a) A blood relation, esp. a child.
            (b) Human nature.
  
      {In blood} (Hunting), in a state of perfect health and vigor.
            --Shak.
  
      {To let blood}. See under {Let}.
  
      {Prince of the blood}, the son of a sovereign, or the issue
            of a royal family. The sons, brothers, and uncles of the
            sovereign are styled princes of the blood royal; and the
            daughters, sisters, and aunts are princesses of the blood
            royal.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Argo \[d8]Ar"go\, n. [L. Argo, Gr. [?].]
      1. (Myth.) The name of the ship which carried Jason and his
            fifty-four companions to Colchis, in quest of the Golden
            Fleece.
  
      2. (Astron.) A large constellation in the southern
            hemisphere, called also {Argo Navis}. In modern astronomy
            it is replaced by its three divisions, Carina, Puppis, and
            Vela.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argoan \Ar*go"an\, a.
      Pertaining to the ship Argo.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argon \Ar"gon\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. [?], neut. of [?] inactive; [?]
      priv. + [?] work.] (Chem.)
      A colorless, odorless gas occurring in the air (of which it
      constitutes 0.93 per cent by volume), in volcanic gases,
      etc.; -- so named on account of its inertness by Rayleigh and
      Ramsay, who prepared and examined it in 1894-95. Symbol, A;
      at. wt., 39.9. Argon is condensible to a colorless liquid
      boiling at -186.1[deg] C. and to a solid melting at
      -189.6[deg] C. It has a characteristic spectrum. No compounds
      of it are known, but there is physical evidence that its
      molecule is monatomic. Weight of one liter at 0[deg] C. and
      760 mm., 1.7828 g.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argon \Ar"gon\, n. [Gr. [?] inactive.] (Chem.)
      A substance regarded as an element, contained in the
      atmosphere and remarkable for its chemical inertness.
      --Rayleigh and Ramsay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argonaut \Ar"go*naut\, n.
      One of those who went to California in search of gold shortly
      after it was discovered there in 1848. [U. S.] --Bret Harte.
  
               The [bd]Argonauts of '49[b8] were a strong,
               self-reliant, generous body of men.         --D. S.
                                                                              Jordan.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argonaut \Ar"go*naut\, n. [L. Argonauta, Gr. [?]; [?] + [?]
      sailor, [?] ship. See {Argo}.]
      1. Any one of the legendary Greek heroes who sailed with
            Jason, in the Argo, in quest of the Golden Fleece.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A cephalopod of the genus Argonauta.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argonautic \Ar"go*naut"ic\, a. [L. Argonauticus.]
      Of or pertaining to the Argonauts.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argue \Ar"gue\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Argued}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Arguing}.] [OE. arguen, F. arguer, fr. L. argutare, freq. of
      arguere to make clear; from the same root as E. argent.]
      1. To invent and offer reasons to support or overthrow a
            proposition, opinion, or measure; to use arguments; to
            reason.
  
                     I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will. --Milton.
  
      2. To contend in argument; to dispute; to reason; -- followed
            by with; as, you may argue with your friend without
            convincing him.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argument \Ar"gu*ment\ ([acr]r"g[usl]*m[eit]nt), v. i. [L.
      argumentari.]
      To make an argument; to argue. [Obs.] --Gower.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argument \Ar"gu*ment\, n. [F. argument, L. argumentum, fr.
      arguere to argue.]
      1. Proof; evidence. [Obs.]
  
                     There is.. no more palpable and convincing argument
                     of the existence of a Deity.               --Ray.
  
                     Why, then, is it made a badge of wit and an argument
                     of parts for a man to commence atheist, and to cast
                     off all belief of providence, all awe and reverence
                     for religion?                                    --South.
  
      2. A reason or reasons offered in proof, to induce belief, or
            convince the mind; reasoning expressed in words; as, an
            argument about, concerning, or regarding a proposition,
            for or in favor of it, or against it.
  
      3. A process of reasoning, or a controversy made up of
            rational proofs; argumentation; discussion; disputation.
  
                     The argument is about things, but names. --Locke.
  
      4. The subject matter of a discourse, writing, or artistic
            representation; theme or topic; also, an abstract or
            summary, as of the contents of a book, chapter, poem.
  
                     You and love are still my argument.   --Shak.
  
                     The abstract or argument of the piece. --Jeffrey.
  
                     [Shields] with boastful argument portrayed.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      5. Matter for question; business in hand. [Obs.]
  
                     Sheathed their swords for lack of argument. --Shak.
  
      6. (Astron.) The quantity on which another quantity in a
            table depends; as, the altitude is the argument of the
            refraction.
  
      7. (Math.) The independent variable upon whose value that of
            a function depends. --Brande & C.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentable \Ar`gu*men"ta*ble\ (-m[eit]n"t[adot]*b'l), a. [L.
      argumentabilis.]
      Admitting of argument. [R.] --Chalmers.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumental \Ar`gu*men"tal\, a. [L. argumentalis.]
      Of, pertaining to, or containing, argument; argumentative.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentation \Ar`gu*men*ta"tion\, n. [L. argumentatio, from
      argumentari: cf. F. argumentation.]
      1. The act of forming reasons, making inductions, drawing
            conclusions, and applying them to the case in discussion;
            the operation of inferring propositions, not known or
            admitted as true, from facts or principles known,
            admitted, or proved to be true.
  
                     Which manner of argumentation, how false and naught
                     it is, . . . every man that hath with perceiveth.
                                                                              --Tyndale.
  
      2. Debate; discussion.
  
      Syn: Reasoning; discussion; controversy. See {Reasoning}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentative \Ar`gu*men"ta*tive\, a.
      1. Consisting of, or characterized by, argument; containing a
            process of reasoning; as, an argumentative discourse.
  
      2. Adductive as proof; indicative; as, the adaptation of
            things to their uses is argumentative of infinite wisdom
            in the Creator. [Obs.]
  
      3. Given to argument; characterized by argument;
            disputatious; as, an argumentative writer.
            --{Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ly}, adv. --
            {Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentative \Ar`gu*men"ta*tive\, a.
      1. Consisting of, or characterized by, argument; containing a
            process of reasoning; as, an argumentative discourse.
  
      2. Adductive as proof; indicative; as, the adaptation of
            things to their uses is argumentative of infinite wisdom
            in the Creator. [Obs.]
  
      3. Given to argument; characterized by argument;
            disputatious; as, an argumentative writer.
            --{Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ly}, adv. --
            {Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentative \Ar`gu*men"ta*tive\, a.
      1. Consisting of, or characterized by, argument; containing a
            process of reasoning; as, an argumentative discourse.
  
      2. Adductive as proof; indicative; as, the adaptation of
            things to their uses is argumentative of infinite wisdom
            in the Creator. [Obs.]
  
      3. Given to argument; characterized by argument;
            disputatious; as, an argumentative writer.
            --{Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ly}, adv. --
            {Ar`gu*men"ta*tive*ness}, n.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Argumentize \Ar"gu*men*tize\, v. i.
      To argue or discuss. [Obs.] --Wood.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   d8Aphrodite \[d8]Aph`ro*di"te\, n. [Gr. [?].]
      1. (Classic Myth.) The Greek goddess of love, corresponding
            to the Venus of the Romans.
  
      2. (Zo[94]l.) A large marine annelid, covered with long,
            lustrous, golden, hairlike set[91]; the sea mouse.
  
      3. (Zo[94]l.) A beautiful butterfly ({Argunnis Aphrodite}) of
            the United States.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Water spider \Wa"ter spi"der\ (Zo[94]l.)
      (a) An aquatic European spider ({Argyoneta aquatica}) which
            constructs its web beneath the surface of the water on
            water plants. It lives in a bell-shaped structure of
            silk, open beneath like a diving bell, and filled with
            air which the spider carries down in the form of small
            bubbles attached one at a time to the spinnerets and hind
            feet. Called also {diving spider}.
      (b) A water mite.
      (c) Any spider that habitually lives on or about the water,
            especially the large American species ({Dolomedes
            lanceolatus}) which runs rapidly on the surface of water;
            -- called also {raft spider}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aricine \Ar"i*cine\, n. [From Arica, in Chile.] (Chem.)
      An alkaloid, first found in white cinchona bark.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Dragon \Drag"on\, n. [F. dragon, L. draco, fr. Gr. [?], prob.
      fr. [?], [?], to look (akin to Skr. dar[?] to see), and so
      called from its terrible eyes. Cf. {Drake} a dragon,
      {Dragoon}.]
      1. (Myth.) A fabulous animal, generally represented as a
            monstrous winged serpent or lizard, with a crested head
            and enormous claws, and regarded as very powerful and
            ferocious.
  
                     The dragons which appear in early paintings and
                     sculptures are invariably representations of a
                     winged crocodile.                              --Fairholt.
  
      Note: In Scripture the term dragon refers to any great
               monster, whether of the land or sea, usually to some
               kind of serpent or reptile, sometimes to land serpents
               of a powerful and deadly kind. It is also applied
               metaphorically to Satan.
  
                        Thou breakest the heads of the dragons in the
                        waters.                                          -- Ps. lxxiv.
                                                                              13.
  
                        Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder; the
                        young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample
                        under feet.                                    -- Ps. xci.
                                                                              13.
  
                        He laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent,
                        which is the Devil and Satan, and bound him a
                        thousand years.                              --Rev. xx. 2.
  
      2. A fierce, violent person, esp. a woman. --Johnson.
  
      3. (Astron.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere
            figured as a dragon; Draco.
  
      4. A luminous exhalation from marshy grounds, seeming to move
            through the air as a winged serpent.
  
      5. (Mil. Antiq.) A short musket hooked to a swivel attached
            to a soldier's belt; -- so called from a representation of
            a dragon's head at the muzzle. --Fairholt.
  
      6. (Zo[94]l.) A small arboreal lizard of the genus Draco, of
            several species, found in the East Indies and Southern
            Asia. Five or six of the hind ribs, on each side, are
            prolonged and covered with weblike skin, forming a sort of
            wing. These prolongations aid them in making long leaps
            from tree to tree. Called also {flying lizard}.
  
      7. (Zo[94]l.) A variety of carrier pigeon.
  
      8. (Her.) A fabulous winged creature, sometimes borne as a
            charge in a coat of arms.
  
      Note: Dragon is often used adjectively, or in combination, in
               the sense of relating to, resembling, or characteristic
               of, a dragon.
  
      {Dragon arum} (Bot.), the name of several species of
            {Aris[91]ma}, a genus of plants having a spathe and
            spadix. See {Dragon root}(below).
  
      {Dragon fish} (Zo[94]l.), the dragonet.
  
      {Dragon fly} (Zo[94]l.), any insect of the family
            {Libellulid[91]}. They have finely formed, large and
            strongly reticulated wings, a large head with enormous
            eyes, and a long body; -- called also {mosquito hawks}.
            Their larv[91] are aquatic and insectivorous.
  
      {Dragon root} (Bot.), an American aroid plant ({Aris[91]ma
            Dracontium}); green dragon.
  
      {Dragon's blood}, a resinous substance obtained from the
            fruit of several species of {Calamus}, esp. from {C.
            Rotang} and {C. Draco}, growing in the East Indies. A
            substance known as dragon's blood is obtained by exudation
            from {Drac[91]na Draco}; also from {Pterocarpus Draco}, a
            tree of the West Indies and South America. The color is
            red, or a dark brownish red, and it is used chiefly for
            coloring varnishes, marbles, etc. Called also {Cinnabar
            Gr[91]corum}.
  
      {Dragon's head}.
            (a) (Bot.) A plant of several species of the genus
                  {Dracocephalum}. They are perennial herbs closely
                  allied to the common catnip.
            (b) (Astron.) The ascending node of a planet, indicated,
                  chiefly in almanacs, by the symbol [?]. The deviation
                  from the ecliptic made by a planet in passing from one
                  node to the other seems, according to the fancy of
                  some, to make a figure like that of a dragon, whose
                  belly is where there is the greatest latitude; the
                  intersections representing the head and tail; -- from
                  which resemblance the denomination arises. --Encyc.
                  Brit.
  
      {Dragon shell} (Zo[94]l.), a species of limpet.
  
      {Dragon's skin}, fossil stems whose leaf scars somewhat
            resemble the scales of reptiles; -- a name used by miners
            and quarrymen. --Stormonth.
  
      {Dragon's tail} (Astron.), the descending node of a planet,
            indicated by the symbol [?]. See {Dragon's head} (above).
           
  
      {Dragon's wort} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Artemisia} ({A.
            dracunculus}).
  
      {Dragon tree} (Bot.), a West African liliaceous tree
            ({Drac[91]na Draco}), yielding one of the resins called
            dragon's blood. See {Drac[91]na}.
  
      {Dragon water}, a medicinal remedy very popular in the
            earlier half of the 17th century. [bd]Dragon water may do
            good upon him.[b8] --Randolph (1640).
  
      {Flying dragon}, a large meteoric fireball; a bolide.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Green \Green\, a. [Compar. {Greener}; superl. {Greenest.}] [OE.
      grene, AS. gr?ne; akin to D. groen, OS. gr?ni, OHG. gruoni,
      G. gr?n, Dan. & Sw. gr?n, Icel. gr?nn; fr. the root of E.
      grow. See {Grow.}]
      1. Having the color of grass when fresh and growing;
            resembling that color of the solar spectrum which is
            between the yellow and the blue; verdant; emerald.
  
      2. Having a sickly color; wan.
  
                     To look so green and pale.                  --Shak.
  
      3. Full of life aud vigor; fresh and vigorous; new; recent;
            as, a green manhood; a green wound.
  
                     As valid against such an old and beneficent
                     government as against . . . the greenest usurpation.
                                                                              --Burke.
  
      4. Not ripe; immature; not fully grown or ripened; as, green
            fruit, corn, vegetables, etc.
  
      5. Not roasted; half raw. [R.]
  
                     We say the meat is green when half roasted. --L.
                                                                              Watts.
  
      6. Immature in age or experience; young; raw; not trained;
            awkward; as, green in years or judgment.
  
                     I might be angry with the officious zeal which
                     supposes that its green conceptions can instruct my
                     gray hairs.                                       --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
      7. Not seasoned; not dry; containing its natural juices; as,
            green wood, timber, etc. --Shak.
  
      {Green brier} (Bot.), a thorny climbing shrub ({Emilaz
            rotundifolia}) having a yellowish green stem and thick
            leaves, with small clusters of flowers, common in the
            United States; -- called also {cat brier}.
  
      {Green con} (Zo[94]l.), the pollock.
  
      {Green crab} (Zo[94]l.), an edible, shore crab ({Carcinus
            menas}) of Europe and America; -- in New England locally
            named {joe-rocker}.
  
      {Green crop}, a crop used for food while in a growing or
            unripe state, as distingushed from a grain crop, root
            crop, etc.
  
      {Green diallage}. (Min.)
            (a) Diallage, a variety of pyroxene.
            (b) Smaragdite.
  
      {Green dragon} (Bot.), a North American herbaceous plant
            ({Aris[91]ma Dracontium}), resembling the Indian turnip;
            -- called also {dragon root}.
  
      {Green earth} (Min.), a variety of glauconite, found in
            cavities in amygdaloid and other eruptive rock, and used
            as a pigment by artists; -- called also {mountain green}.
           
  
      {Green ebony}.
            (a) A south American tree ({Jacaranda ovalifolia}), having
                  a greenish wood, used for rulers, turned and inlaid
                  work, and in dyeing.
            (b) The West Indian green ebony. See {Ebony}.
  
      {Green fire} (Pyrotech.), a composition which burns with a
            green flame. It consists of sulphur and potassium
            chlorate, with some salt of barium (usually the nitrate),
            to which the color of the flame is due.
  
      {Green fly} (Zo[94]l.), any green species of plant lice or
            aphids, esp. those that infest greenhouse plants.
  
      {Green gage}, (Bot.) See {Greengage}, in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Green gland} (Zo[94]l.), one of a pair of large green glands
            in Crustacea, supposed to serve as kidneys. They have
            their outlets at the bases of the larger antenn[91].
  
      {Green hand}, a novice. [Colloq.]
  
      {Green heart} (Bot.), the wood of a lauraceous tree found in
            the West Indies and in South America, used for
            shipbuilding or turnery. The green heart of Jamaica and
            Guiana is the {Nectandra Rodi[d2]i}, that of Martinique is
            the {Colubrina ferruginosa}.
  
      {Green iron ore} (Min.) dufrenite.
  
      {Green laver} (Bot.), an edible seaweed ({Ulva latissima});
            -- called also {green sloke}.
  
      {Green lead ore} (Min.), pyromorphite.
  
      {Green linnet} (Zo[94]l.), the greenfinch.
  
      {Green looper} (Zo[94]l.), the cankerworm.
  
      {Green marble} (Min.), serpentine.
  
      {Green mineral}, a carbonate of copper, used as a pigment.
            See {Greengill}.
  
      {Green monkey} (Zo[94]l.) a West African long-tailed monkey
            ({Cercopithecus callitrichus}), very commonly tamed, and
            trained to perform tricks. It was introduced into the West
            Indies early in the last century, and has become very
            abundant there.
  
      {Green salt of Magnus} (Old Chem.), a dark green crystalline
            salt, consisting of ammonia united with certain chlorides
            of platinum.
  
      {Green sand} (Founding) molding sand used for a mold while
            slightly damp, and not dried before the cast is made.
  
      {Green sea} (Naut.), a wave that breaks in a solid mass on a
            vessel's deck.
  
      {Green sickness} (Med.), chlorosis.
  
      {Green snake} (Zo[94]l.), one of two harmless American snakes
            ({Cyclophis vernalis}, and {C. [91]stivus}). They are
            bright green in color.
  
      {Green turtle} (Zo[94]l.), an edible marine turtle. See
            {Turtle}.
  
      {Green vitriol}.
            (a) (Chem.) Sulphate of iron; a light green crystalline
                  substance, very extensively used in the preparation of
                  inks, dyes, mordants, etc.
            (b) (Min.) Same as {copperas}, {melanterite} and {sulphate
                  of iron}.
  
      {Green ware}, articles of pottery molded and shaped, but not
            yet baked.
  
      {Green woodpecker} (Zo[94]l.), a common European woodpecker
            ({Picus viridis}); -- called also {yaffle}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
  
  
      {Jack rabbit} (Zo[94]l.), any one of several species of large
            American hares, having very large ears and long legs. The
            California species ({Lepus Californicus}), and that of
            Texas and New Mexico ({L. callotis}), have the tail black
            above, and the ears black at the tip. They do not become
            white in winter. The more northern prairie hare ({L.
            campestris}) has the upper side of the tail white, and in
            winter its fur becomes nearly white.
  
      {Jack rafter} (Arch.), in England, one of the shorter rafters
            used in constructing a hip or valley roof; in the United
            States, any secondary roof timber, as the common rafters
            resting on purlins in a trussed roof; also, one of the
            pieces simulating extended rafters, used under the eaves
            in some styles of building.
  
      {Jack salmon} (Zo[94]l.), the wall-eyed pike, or glasseye.
  
      {Jack sauce}, an impudent fellow. [Colloq. & Obs.]
  
      {Jack shaft} (Mach.), the first intermediate shaft, in a
            factory or mill, which receives power, through belts or
            gearing, from a prime mover, and transmits it, by the same
            means, to other intermediate shafts or to a line shaft.
  
      {Jack sinker} (Knitting Mach.), a thin iron plate operated by
            the jack to depress the loop of thread between two
            needles.
  
      {Jack snipe}. (Zo[94]l.) See in the Vocabulary.
  
      {Jack staff} (Naut.), a staff fixed on the bowsprit cap, upon
            which the jack is hoisted.
  
      {Jack timber} (Arch.), any timber, as a rafter, rib, or
            studding, which, being intercepted, is shorter than the
            others.
  
      {Jack towel}, a towel hung on a roller for common use.
  
      {Jack truss} (Arch.), in a hip roof, a minor truss used where
            the roof has not its full section.
  
      {Jack tree}. (Bot.) See 1st {Jack}, n.
  
      {Jack yard} (Naut.), a short spar to extend a topsail beyond
            the gaff.
  
      {Blue jack}, blue vitriol; sulphate of copper.
  
      {Hydraulic jack}, a jack used for lifting, pulling, or
            forcing, consisting of a compact portable hydrostatic
            press, with its pump and a reservoir containing a supply
            of liquid, as oil.
  
      {Jack-at-a-pinch}.
            (a) One called upon to take the place of another in an
                  emergency.
            (b) An itinerant parson who conducts an occasional
                  service for a fee.
  
      {Jack-at-all-trades}, one who can turn his hand to any kind
            of work.
  
      {Jack-by-the-hedge} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Erysimum}
            ({E. alliaria}, or {Alliaria officinalis}), which grows
            under hedges. It bears a white flower and has a taste not
            unlike garlic. Called also, in England, {sauce-alone}.
            --Eng. Cyc.
  
      {Jack-in-a-box}.
            (a) (Bot.) A tropical tree ({Hernandia sonora}), which
                  bears a drupe that rattles when dry in the inflated
                  calyx.
            (b) A child's toy, consisting of a box, out of which,
                  when the lid is raised, a figure springs.
            (c) (Mech.) An epicyclic train of bevel gears for
                  transmitting rotary motion to two parts in such a
                  manner that their relative rotation may be variable;
                  applied to driving the wheels of tricycles, road
                  locomotives, and to cotton machinery, etc.; an
                  equation box; a jack frame; -- called also
                  {compensating gearing}.
            (d) A large wooden screw turning in a nut attached to the
                  crosspiece of a rude press.
  
      {Jack-in-office}, an insolent fellow in authority. --Wolcott.
  
      {Jack-in-the-bush} (Bot.), a tropical shrub with red fruit
            ({Cordia Cylindrostachya}).
  
      {Jack-in-the-green}, a chimney sweep inclosed in a framework
            of boughs, carried in Mayday processions.
  
      {Jack-in-the-pulpit} (Bot.), the American plant {Aris[91]ma
            triphyllum}, or Indian turnip, in which the upright spadix
            is inclosed.
  
      {Jack-of-the-buttery} (Bot.), the stonecrop ({Sedum acre}).
           
  
      {Jack-of-the-clock}, a figure, usually of a man, on old
            clocks, which struck the time on the bell.
  
      {Jack-on-both-sides}, one who is or tries to be neutral.
  
      {Jack-out-of-office}, one who has been in office and is
            turned out. --Shak.
  
      {Jack the Giant Killer}, the hero of a well-known nursery
            story.
  
      {Jack-with-a-lantern}, {Jack-o'-lantern}.
            (a) An ignis fatuus; a will-o'-the-wisp. [bd][Newspaper
                  speculations] supplying so many more jack-o'-lanterns
                  to the future historian.[b8] --Lowell.
            (b) A lantern made of a pumpkin so prepared as to show in
                  illumination the features of a human face, etc.
  
      {Yellow Jack} (Naut.), the yellow fever; also, the quarantine
            flag. See {Yellow flag}, under {Flag}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arise \A*rise"\ ([adot]*r[imac]z"), v. i. [imp. {Arose}
      (-r[omac]z"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Arising}; p. p. {Arisen}
      (-r[icr]z"'n).]. [AS. [be]r[c6]san; [be] (equiv. to Goth.
      us-, ur-, G. er-, orig. meaning out) + r[c6]san to rise; cf.
      Goth. urreisan to arise. See {Rise}.]
      1. To come up from a lower to a higher position; to come
            above the horizon; to come up from one's bed or place of
            repose; to mount; to ascend; to rise; as, to arise from a
            kneeling posture; a cloud arose; the sun ariseth; he arose
            early in the morning.
  
      2. To spring up; to come into action, being, or notice; to
            become operative, sensible, or visible; to begin to act a
            part; to present itself; as, the waves of the sea arose; a
            persecution arose; the wrath of the king shall arise.
  
                     There arose up a new king . . . which knew not
                     Joseph.                                             --Ex. i. 8.
  
                     The doubts that in his heart arose.   --Milton.
  
      3. To proceed; to issue; to spring.
  
                     Whence haply mention may arise Of something not
                     unseasonable to ask.                           --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arise \A*rise"\ ([adot]*r[imac]z"), v. i. [imp. {Arose}
      (-r[omac]z"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Arising}; p. p. {Arisen}
      (-r[icr]z"'n).]. [AS. [be]r[c6]san; [be] (equiv. to Goth.
      us-, ur-, G. er-, orig. meaning out) + r[c6]san to rise; cf.
      Goth. urreisan to arise. See {Rise}.]
      1. To come up from a lower to a higher position; to come
            above the horizon; to come up from one's bed or place of
            repose; to mount; to ascend; to rise; as, to arise from a
            kneeling posture; a cloud arose; the sun ariseth; he arose
            early in the morning.
  
      2. To spring up; to come into action, being, or notice; to
            become operative, sensible, or visible; to begin to act a
            part; to present itself; as, the waves of the sea arose; a
            persecution arose; the wrath of the king shall arise.
  
                     There arose up a new king . . . which knew not
                     Joseph.                                             --Ex. i. 8.
  
                     The doubts that in his heart arose.   --Milton.
  
      3. To proceed; to issue; to spring.
  
                     Whence haply mention may arise Of something not
                     unseasonable to ask.                           --Milton.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arouse \A*rouse"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Aroused}; p. pr. & vb.
      n. {Arousing}.] [Pref. a- + rouse.]
      To excite to action from a state of rest; to stir, or put in
      motion or exertion; to rouse; to excite; as, to arouse one
      from sleep; to arouse the dormant faculties.
  
               Grasping his spear, forth issued to arouse His brother,
               mighty sovereign on the host.                  --Cowper.
  
               No suspicion was aroused.                        --Merivale.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arragonite \Ar*rag"o*nite\, n.
      See {Aragonite}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraign \Ar*raign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arraigned}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Arraigning}.] [OE. arainen, arenen, OF. aragnier,
      aranier, araisnier, F. arraisonner, fr. LL. arrationare to
      address to call before court; L. ad + ratio reason,
      reasoning, LL. cause, judgment. See {Reason}.]
      1. (Law) To call or set as a prisoner at the bar of a court
            to answer to the matter charged in an indictment or
            complaint. --Blackstone.
  
      2. To call to account, or accuse, before the bar of reason,
            taste, or any other tribunal.
  
                     They will not arraign you for want of knowledge.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     It is not arrogance, but timidity, of which the
                     Christian body should now be arraigned by the world.
                                                                              --I. Taylor.
  
      Syn: To accuse; impeach; charge; censure; criminate; indict;
               denounce. See {Accuse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraign \Ar*raign"\, n.
      Arraignment; as, the clerk of the arraigns. --Blackstone.
      Macaulay.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraign \Ar*raign"\, v. t. [From OF. aramier, fr. LL.
      adhramire.] (Old Eng. Law)
      To appeal to; to demand; as, to arraign an assize of novel
      disseizin.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraign \Ar*raign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arraigned}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Arraigning}.] [OE. arainen, arenen, OF. aragnier,
      aranier, araisnier, F. arraisonner, fr. LL. arrationare to
      address to call before court; L. ad + ratio reason,
      reasoning, LL. cause, judgment. See {Reason}.]
      1. (Law) To call or set as a prisoner at the bar of a court
            to answer to the matter charged in an indictment or
            complaint. --Blackstone.
  
      2. To call to account, or accuse, before the bar of reason,
            taste, or any other tribunal.
  
                     They will not arraign you for want of knowledge.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     It is not arrogance, but timidity, of which the
                     Christian body should now be arraigned by the world.
                                                                              --I. Taylor.
  
      Syn: To accuse; impeach; charge; censure; criminate; indict;
               denounce. See {Accuse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraigner \Ar*raign"er\, n.
      One who arraigns. --Coleridge.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraign \Ar*raign"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arraigned}; p. pr. &
      vb. n. {Arraigning}.] [OE. arainen, arenen, OF. aragnier,
      aranier, araisnier, F. arraisonner, fr. LL. arrationare to
      address to call before court; L. ad + ratio reason,
      reasoning, LL. cause, judgment. See {Reason}.]
      1. (Law) To call or set as a prisoner at the bar of a court
            to answer to the matter charged in an indictment or
            complaint. --Blackstone.
  
      2. To call to account, or accuse, before the bar of reason,
            taste, or any other tribunal.
  
                     They will not arraign you for want of knowledge.
                                                                              --Dryden.
  
                     It is not arrogance, but timidity, of which the
                     Christian body should now be arraigned by the world.
                                                                              --I. Taylor.
  
      Syn: To accuse; impeach; charge; censure; criminate; indict;
               denounce. See {Accuse}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arraignment \Ar*raign"ment\, n. [Cf. OF. arraynement,
      aresnement.]
      1. (Law) The act of arraigning, or the state of being
            arraigned; the act of calling and setting a prisoner
            before a court to answer to an indictment or complaint.
  
      2. A calling to an account to faults; accusation.
  
                     In the sixth satire, which seems only an Arraignment
                     of the whole sex, there is a latent admonition.
                                                                              --Dryden.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrasene \Ar`ras*ene"\, n. [From {Arras}.]
      A material of wool or silk used for working the figures in
      embroidery.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrogance \Ar"ro*gance\, n. [F., fr. L. arrogantia, fr.
      arrogans. See {Arrogant}.]
      The act or habit of arrogating, or making undue claims in an
      overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in
      exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or
      which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an
      undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordliness;
      haughtiness; self-assumption; presumption.
  
               I hate not you for her proud arrogance.   --Shak.
  
      Syn: Haughtiness; hauteur; assumption; lordliness;
               presumption; pride; disdain; insolence; conceit;
               conceitedness. See {Haughtiness}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrogancy \Ar"ro*gan*cy\, n.
      Arrogance. --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrogant \Ar"ro*gant\, a. [F. arrogant, L. arrogans, p. pr. of
      arrogare. See {Arrogate}.]
      1. Making, or having the disposition to make, exorbitant
            claims of rank or estimation; giving one's self an undue
            degree of importance; assuming; haughty; -- applied to
            persons.
  
                     Arrogant Winchester, that haughty prelate. --Shak.
  
      2. Containing arrogance; marked with arrogance; proceeding
            from undue claims or self-importance; -- applied to
            things; as, arrogant pretensions or behavior.
  
      Syn: Magisterial; lordly; proud; assuming; overbearing;
               presumptuous; haughty. See {Magisterial}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrogantly \Ar"ro*gant*ly\, adv.
      In an arrogant manner; with undue pride or self-importance.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrogantness \Ar"ro*gant*ness\, n.
      Arrogance. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arrosion \Ar*ro"sion\, n. [L. arrodere, arrosum, to gnaw: cf. F.
      arrosion.]
      A gnawing. [Obs.] --Bailey.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenal \Ar"se*nal\, n. [Sp. & F. arsenal arsenal, dockyard, or
      It. arzanale, arsenale (cf. It. & darsena dock); all fr. Ar.
      d[be]r[?]in[be]'a house of industry or fabrication; d[be]r
      house + [?]in[be] art, industry.]
      A public establishment for the storage, or for the
      manufacture and storage, of arms and all military equipments,
      whether for land or naval service.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenate \Ar"se*nate\, n. (Chem.)
      A salt of arsenic acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arseniate \Ar*se"ni*ate\, n.
      See {Arsenate}. [R.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenic \Ar"se*nic\ ([aum]r"s[esl]*n[icr]k; 277), n. [L.
      arsenicum, Gr. 'arseniko`n, 'arreniko`n, yellow orpiment,
      perh. fr. 'arseniko`s or better Attic 'arreniko`s masculine,
      'a`rrhn male, on account of its strength, or fr. Per.
      zern[c6]kh: cf. F. arsenic.]
      1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a solid substance resembling
            a metal in its physical properties, but in its chemical
            relations ranking with the nonmetals. It is of a
            steel-gray color and brilliant luster, though usually dull
            from tarnish. It is very brittle, and sublimes at 356[deg]
            Fahrenheit. It is sometimes found native, but usually
            combined with silver, cobalt, nickel, iron, antimony, or
            sulphur. Orpiment and realgar are two of its sulphur
            compounds, the first of which is the true arsenicum of the
            ancients. The element and its compounds are active
            poisons. Specific gravity from 5.7 to 5.9. Atomic weight
            75. Symbol As.
  
      2. (Com.) Arsenious oxide or arsenious anhydride; -- called
            also {arsenious acid}, {white arsenic}, and {ratsbane}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenic \Ar*sen"ic\, a. (Chem.)
      Pertaining to, or derived from, arsenic; -- said of those
      compounds of arsenic in which this element has its highest
      equivalence; as, arsenic acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenical \Ar*sen"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to, or containing, arsenic; as, arsenical
      vapor; arsenical wall papers.
  
      {Arsenical silver}, an ore of silver containing arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pyrites \Py*ri"tes\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?], fr. [?] fire. See
      {Pyre}.] (Min.)
      A name given to a number of metallic minerals, sulphides of
      iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, and tin, of a white or
      yellowish color.
  
      Note: The term was originally applied to the mineral pyrite,
               or iron pyrites, in allusion to its giving sparks when
               struck with steel.
  
      {Arsenical pyrites}, arsenopyrite.
  
      {Auriferous pyrites}. See under {Auriferous}.
  
      {Capillary pyrites}, millerite.
  
      {Common pyrites}, isometric iron disulphide; pyrite.
  
      {Hair pyrites}, millerite.
  
      {Iron pyrites}. See {Pyrite}.
  
      {Magnetic pyrites}, pyrrhotite.
  
      {Tin pyrites}, stannite.
  
      {White iron pyrites}, orthorhombic iron disulphide;
            marcasite. This includes cockscomb pyrites (a variety of
            marcasite, named in allusion to its form), spear pyrites,
            etc.
  
      {Yellow}, [or] {Copper}, {pyrites}, the sulphide of copper
            and iron; chalcopyrite.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenopyrite \Ar`sen*o*pyr"ite\, n. [Arsenic + pyrite.] (Min.)
      A mineral of a tin-white color and metallic luster,
      containing arsenic, sulphur, and iron; -- also called
      {arsenical pyrites} and {mispickel}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pyrites \Py*ri"tes\, n. [L., fr. Gr. [?], fr. [?] fire. See
      {Pyre}.] (Min.)
      A name given to a number of metallic minerals, sulphides of
      iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, and tin, of a white or
      yellowish color.
  
      Note: The term was originally applied to the mineral pyrite,
               or iron pyrites, in allusion to its giving sparks when
               struck with steel.
  
      {Arsenical pyrites}, arsenopyrite.
  
      {Auriferous pyrites}. See under {Auriferous}.
  
      {Capillary pyrites}, millerite.
  
      {Common pyrites}, isometric iron disulphide; pyrite.
  
      {Hair pyrites}, millerite.
  
      {Iron pyrites}. See {Pyrite}.
  
      {Magnetic pyrites}, pyrrhotite.
  
      {Tin pyrites}, stannite.
  
      {White iron pyrites}, orthorhombic iron disulphide;
            marcasite. This includes cockscomb pyrites (a variety of
            marcasite, named in allusion to its form), spear pyrites,
            etc.
  
      {Yellow}, [or] {Copper}, {pyrites}, the sulphide of copper
            and iron; chalcopyrite.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenopyrite \Ar`sen*o*pyr"ite\, n. [Arsenic + pyrite.] (Min.)
      A mineral of a tin-white color and metallic luster,
      containing arsenic, sulphur, and iron; -- also called
      {arsenical pyrites} and {mispickel}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenical \Ar*sen"ic*al\, a.
      Of or pertaining to, or containing, arsenic; as, arsenical
      vapor; arsenical wall papers.
  
      {Arsenical silver}, an ore of silver containing arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenicate \Ar*sen"i*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arsenicated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Arsenicating}.]
      To combine with arsenic; to treat or impregnate with arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenicate \Ar*sen"i*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arsenicated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Arsenicating}.]
      To combine with arsenic; to treat or impregnate with arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenicate \Ar*sen"i*cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Arsenicated};
      p. pr. & vb. n. {Arsenicating}.]
      To combine with arsenic; to treat or impregnate with arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenicism \Ar*sen"i*cism\, n. (Med.)
      A diseased condition produced by slow poisoning with arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenide \Ar"sen*ide\, n. (Chem.)
      A compound of arsenic with a metal, or positive element or
      radical; -- formerly called arseniuret.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arseniferous \Ar`sen*if"er*ous\, a. [Arsenic + -ferous.]
      Containing or producing arsenic.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenious \Ar*se"ni*ous\, a. [Cf. F. ars[82]nieux.]
      1. Pertaining to, consisting of, or containing, arsenic; as,
            arsenious powder or glass.
  
      2. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, arsenic, when
            having an equivalence next lower than the highest; as,
            arsenious acid.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenic \Ar"se*nic\ ([aum]r"s[esl]*n[icr]k; 277), n. [L.
      arsenicum, Gr. 'arseniko`n, 'arreniko`n, yellow orpiment,
      perh. fr. 'arseniko`s or better Attic 'arreniko`s masculine,
      'a`rrhn male, on account of its strength, or fr. Per.
      zern[c6]kh: cf. F. arsenic.]
      1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a solid substance resembling
            a metal in its physical properties, but in its chemical
            relations ranking with the nonmetals. It is of a
            steel-gray color and brilliant luster, though usually dull
            from tarnish. It is very brittle, and sublimes at 356[deg]
            Fahrenheit. It is sometimes found native, but usually
            combined with silver, cobalt, nickel, iron, antimony, or
            sulphur. Orpiment and realgar are two of its sulphur
            compounds, the first of which is the true arsenicum of the
            ancients. The element and its compounds are active
            poisons. Specific gravity from 5.7 to 5.9. Atomic weight
            75. Symbol As.
  
      2. (Com.) Arsenious oxide or arsenious anhydride; -- called
            also {arsenious acid}, {white arsenic}, and {ratsbane}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenite \Ar"sen*ite\, n. [Cf. F. ars[82]nite.] (Chem.)
      A salt formed by the union of arsenious acid with a base.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arseniuret \Ar`se*ni"u*ret\, n. (Chem.)
      See {Arsenide}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arseniureted \Ar`se*ni"u*ret`ed\, a. (Chem.)
      Combined with arsenic; -- said some elementary substances or
      radicals; as, arseniureted hydrogen. [Also spelt
      {arseniuretted}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arseniureted \Ar`se*ni"u*ret`ed\, a. (Chem.)
      Combined with arsenic; -- said some elementary substances or
      radicals; as, arseniureted hydrogen. [Also spelt
      {arseniuretted}.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsenopyrite \Ar`sen*o*pyr"ite\, n. [Arsenic + pyrite.] (Min.)
      A mineral of a tin-white color and metallic luster,
      containing arsenic, sulphur, and iron; -- also called
      {arsenical pyrites} and {mispickel}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsine \Ar"sine\ ([aum]r"s[icr]n or -s[emac]n), n. [From
      {Arsenic}.] (Chem.)
      A compound of arsenic and hydrogen, {AsH3}, a colorless and
      exceedingly poisonous gas, having an odor like garlic;
      arseniureted hydrogen.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arsmetrike \Ars`met"rike\ ([aum]rz`m[ecr]t"r[icr]k), n. [An
      erroneous form of arithmetic, as if from L. ars metrica the
      measuring art.]
      Arithmetic. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Arson \Ar"son\ ([aum]r"s'n; 277), n. [OF. arson, arsun, fr. L.
      ardere, arsum, to burn.] (Law)
      The malicious burning of a dwelling house or outhouse of
      another man, which by the common law is felony; the malicious
      and voluntary firing of a building or ship. --Wharton.
  
      Note: The definition of this crime is varied by statues in
               different countries and states. The English law of
               arson has been considerably modified in the United
               States; in some of the States it has been materially
               enlarged, while in others, various degrees of arson
               have been established, with corresponding punishment.
               --Burrill.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aurocyanide \Au`ro*cy"a*nide\, n. [Aurum + cyanide.] (Chem.)
      A double cyanide of gold and some other metal or radical; --
      called also {cyanaurate}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Aworking \A*work"ing\, adv. [Pref. a- + working.]
      At work; in action. [Archaic or Colloq.] --Spenser.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Aragon, GA (city, FIPS 2592)
      Location: 34.04615 N, 85.05770 W
      Population (1990): 902 (352 housing units)
      Area: 2.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 30104
   Aragon, NM
      Zip code(s): 87820

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arcanum, OH (village, FIPS 2330)
      Location: 39.99155 N, 84.55382 W
      Population (1990): 1953 (829 housing units)
      Area: 2.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Argenta, IL (village, FIPS 1972)
      Location: 39.98498 N, 88.81868 W
      Population (1990): 940 (369 housing units)
      Area: 1.4 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Argentine, MI (CDP, FIPS 3400)
      Location: 42.79018 N, 83.83197 W
      Population (1990): 1907 (814 housing units)
      Area: 6.4 sq km (land), 2.0 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Argonia, KS (city, FIPS 2250)
      Location: 37.26529 N, 97.76449 W
      Population (1990): 529 (264 housing units)
      Area: 1.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67004

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Argonne, IL
      Zip code(s): 60439

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arizona Boys Ran, AZ
      Zip code(s): 85242

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arizona City, AZ (CDP, FIPS 3530)
      Location: 32.75080 N, 111.66982 W
      Population (1990): 1940 (1077 housing units)
      Area: 15.8 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arkansas City, AR (city, FIPS 1990)
      Location: 33.60882 N, 91.20566 W
      Population (1990): 523 (236 housing units)
      Area: 1.2 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 71630
   Arkansas City, KS (city, FIPS 2300)
      Location: 37.06882 N, 97.04064 W
      Population (1990): 12762 (5774 housing units)
      Area: 19.1 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 67005

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arkansas County, AR (county, FIPS 1)
      Location: 34.28887 N, 91.37634 W
      Population (1990): 21653 (9575 housing units)
      Area: 2560.3 sq km (land), 117.4 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arkansaw, WI
      Zip code(s): 54721

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arkoma, OK (town, FIPS 2650)
      Location: 35.33200 N, 94.45141 W
      Population (1990): 2393 (989 housing units)
      Area: 9.1 sq km (land), 0.2 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 74901

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arrowsmith, IL (village, FIPS 2362)
      Location: 40.44886 N, 88.63148 W
      Population (1990): 313 (112 housing units)
      Area: 0.5 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water)
      Zip code(s): 61722

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arroyo zona, PR (urbana, FIPS 3927)
      Location: 17.97082 N, 66.06211 W
      Population (1990): 8763 (2877 housing units)
      Area: 2.6 sq km (land), 0.6 sq km (water)

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Arsenal, PA
      Zip code(s): 15201

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Archimedes
  
      A family of {microcomputers} produced by {Acorn
      Computers}, Cambridge, UK.   The Archimedes, launched in June
      1987, was the first {RISC} based {personal computer}
      (predating {Apple Computer}'s {Power Mac} by some seven
      years).   It uses the {Advanced RISC Machine} (ARM) processor
      and includes Acorn's {multitasking} {operating system} and
      {graphical user interface}, {RISC OS} on {ROM}, along with an
      interpreter for Acorn's enhanced {BASIC}, {BASIC V}.
  
      The Archimedes was designed as the successor to Acorn's
      sucessful {BBC Microcomputer} series and includes some
      backward compatibility and a {6502} {emulator}.   Several
      utilities are included free on disk (later in ROM) such as a
      {text editor}, paint and draw programs.   Software emulators
      are also available for the {IBM PC} as well as add-on {Intel}
      processor cards.
  
      There have been several series of Archimedes: A300, A400,
      A3000, A5000, A4000 and {RISC PC}.
  
      {Usenet FAQ
      (ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/acorn/)}.
      {Archive site list
      (http://www.cs.vu.nl/~gerben/acorn/acorn-archives.txt)}.
      {HENSA archive (ftp://micros.hensa.ac.uk/)}.   {Stuttgart
      archive (ftp://ftp.uni-stuttgart.de/pub/systems/acorn)}.
  
      See also {Crisis Software}, {Warm Silence Software}.
  
      (1998-04-03)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   ARCnet
  
      A {network} developed by {DataPoint}.   ARCnet was
      {proprietary} until the late 1980s and had about as large a
      marketshare as {Ethernet} among small businesses.   It was
      almost as fast and was considerably cheaper at the time.
  
      (1995-01-16)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   argument
  
      (Or "arg") A value or reference passed to a
      {function}, {procedure}, {subroutine}, command or program, by
      the caller.   For example, in the function
  
      square(x) = x * x
  
      x is the {formal argument} or "parameter" and in the call
  
      y = square(3+3)
  
      3+3 is the {actual argument}.   This will, in most cases,
      execute the function square with x having the value 6.
  
      There are many different conventions for passing arguments to
      functions and procedures including {call-by-value},
      {call-by-name}, {call-by-need}.   These affect whether the
      value of the argument is computed by the caller or the callee
      (the function) and whether the callee can modify the value of
      the argument as seen by the caller (if it is a variable).
  
      Arguments to functions are usually, following mathematical
      notation, written in parentheses after the function name,
      separated by commas.   Arguments to a program are usually given
      after the command name, separated by spaces, e.g.:
  
      cat myfile yourfile hisfile
  
      Here "cat" is the command and "myfile", "yourfile", and
      "hisfile" are the arguments.
  
      See also: {curried function}.
  
      (2002-07-02)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Arjuna
  
      An {object-oriented programming} system developed
      by a team led by Professor Santosh Shrivastava at the
      {University of Newcastle}, implemented entirely in {C++}.
      Arjuna provides a set of tools for the construction of
      {fault-tolerant} {distributed} applications.   It exploits
      features found in most object-oriented languages (such as
      {inheritance}) and only requires a limited set of system
      capabilities commonly found in conventional {operating
      systems}.   Arjuna provides the programmer with {classes} that
      implement {atomic transactions}, {object level recovery},
      {concurrency} control and {persistence}.   The system is
      {portable}, modular and flexible; the system software has been
      available via FTP since 1992.
  
      {Home (http://arjuna.ncl.ac.uk/)}.
  
      (1995-03-06)
  
  

From The Elements (22Oct97) [elements]:
   argon
   Symbol: Ar
   Atomic number: 18
   Atomic weight: 39.948
   Monatomic noble gas. Makes up 0.93% of the air. Colourless, odorless. Is
   inert and has no true compounds. Lord Rayleigh and Sir william Ramsey
   identified argon in 1894.
  
  

From The Elements (22Oct97) [elements]:
   arsenic
   Symbol: As
   Atomic number: 33
   Atomic weight: 74.922
   Metalloid element of group 15. There are three allotropes, yellow, black,
   and grey. Reacts with halogens, concentrated oxidizing acids and hot
   alkalis. Albertus Magnus is believed to have been the first to isolate the
   element in 1250.
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Archangel
      (1Thess. 4:16; Jude 1:9), the prince of the angels.
     

From The CIA World Factbook (1995) [world95]:
   Argentina
  
   Argentina:Geography
  
   Location: Southern South America, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean,
   between Chile and Uruguay
  
   Map references: South America
  
   Area:
   total area: 2,766,890 sq km
   land area: 2,736,690 sq km
   comparative area: slightly less than three-tenths the size of the US
  
   Land boundaries: total 9,665 km, Bolivia 832 km, Brazil 1,224 km,
   Chile 5,150 km, Paraguay 1,880 km, Uruguay 579 km
  
   Coastline: 4,989 km
  
   Maritime claims:
   contiguous zone: 24 nm
   continental shelf: 200 nm or to the edge of the continental margin
   exclusive economic zone: 200 nm
   territorial sea: 12 nm
  
   International disputes: short section of the boundary with Uruguay is
   in dispute; short section of the boundary with Chile is indefinite;
   claims British-administered Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas); claims
   British-administered South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands;
   territorial claim in Antarctica
  
   Climate: mostly temperate; arid in southeast; subantarctic in
   southwest
  
   Terrain: rich plains of the Pampas in northern half, flat to rolling
   plateau of Patagonia in south, rugged Andes along western border
  
   Natural resources: fertile plains of the pampas, lead, zinc, tin,
   copper, iron ore, manganese, petroleum, uranium
  
   Land use:
   arable land: 9%
   permanent crops: 4%
   meadows and pastures: 52%
   forest and woodland: 22%
   other: 13%
  
   Irrigated land: 17,600 sq km (1989 est.)
  
   Environment:
   current issues: erosion results from inadequate flood controls and
   improper land use practices; irrigated soil degradation;
   desertification; air pollution in Buenos Aires and other major cites;
   water pollution in urban areas; rivers becoming polluted due to
   increased pesticide and fertilizer use
   natural hazards: Tucuman and Mendoza areas in the Andes subject to
   earthquakes; pamperos are violent windstorms that can strike the
   Pampas and northeast; heavy flooding
   international agreements: party to - Antarctic-Environmental Protocol,
   Antarctic Treaty, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Endangered Species,
   Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Marine Dumping, Nuclear
   Test Ban, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Wetlands, Whaling;
   signed, but not ratified - Desertification, Law of the Sea, Marine
   Life Conservation
  
   Note: second-largest country in South America (after Brazil);
   strategic location relative to sea lanes between South Atlantic and
   South Pacific Oceans (Strait of Magellan, Beagle Channel, Drake
   Passage)
  
   Argentina:People
  
   Population: 34,292,742 (July 1995 est.)
  
   Age structure:
   0-14 years: 28% (female 4,706,793; male 4,903,589)
   15-64 years: 62% (female 10,680,074; male 10,689,728)
   65 years and over: 10% (female 1,922,552; male 1,390,006) (July 1995
   est.)
  
   Population growth rate: 1.11% (1995 est.)
  
   Birth rate: 19.51 births/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Death rate: 8.62 deaths/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Net migration rate: 0.19 migrant(s)/1,000 population (1995 est.)
  
   Infant mortality rate: 28.8 deaths/1,000 live births (1995 est.)
  
   Life expectancy at birth:
   total population: 71.51 years
   male: 68.22 years
   female: 74.97 years (1995 est.)
  
   Total fertility rate: 2.65 children born/woman (1995 est.)
  
   Nationality:
   noun: Argentine(s)
   adjective: Argentine
  
   Ethnic divisions: white 85%, mestizo, Indian, or other nonwhite groups
   15%
  
   Religions: nominally Roman Catholic 90% (less than 20% practicing),
   Protestant 2%, Jewish 2%, other 6%
  
   Languages: Spanish (official), English, Italian, German, French
  
   Literacy: age 15 and over can read and write (1990 est.)
   total population: 95%
   male: 96%
   female: 95%
  
   Labor force: 10.9 million
   by occupation: agriculture 12%, industry 31%, services 57% (1985 est.)
  
   Argentina:Government
  
   Names:
   conventional long form: Argentine Republic
   conventional short form: Argentina
   local long form: Republica Argentina
   local short form: Argentina
  
   Digraph: AR
  
   Type: republic
  
   Capital: Buenos Aires
  
   Administrative divisions: 23 provinces (provincias, singular -
   provincia), and 1 federal district* (distrito federal); Buenos Aires;
   Catamarca; Chaco; Chubut; Cordoba; Corrientes; Distrito Federal*;
   Entre Rios; Formosa; Jujuy; La Pampa; La Rioja; Mendoza; Misiones;
   Neuquen; Rio Negro; Salta; San Juan; San Luis; Santa Cruz; Santa Fe;
   Santiago del Estero; Tierra del Fuego, Antartida e Islas del Atlantico
   Sur; Tucuman
   note: the US does not recognize any claims to Antarctica or
   Argentina's claims to the Falkland Islands
  
   Independence: 9 July 1816 (from Spain)
  
   National holiday: Revolution Day, 25 May (1810)
  
   Constitution: 1 May 1853; revised August 1994
  
   Legal system: mixture of US and West European legal systems; has not
   accepted compulsory ICJ jurisdiction
  
   Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
  
   Executive branch:
   chief of state and head of government: President Carlos Saul MENEM
   (since 8 July 1989); Vice President (position vacant); election last
   held 14 May 1995 (next to be held NA May 1999); results - Carlos Saul
   MENEM was reelected
   cabinet: Cabinet; appointed by the president
  
   Legislative branch: bicameral National Congress (Congreso Nacional)
   Senate: elections last held May 1989, but provincial elections in late
   1991 set the stage for indirect elections by provincial senators for
   one-third of 48 seats in the national senate in May 1992; seats (48
   total) - PJ 29, UCR 11, others 7, vacant 1
   Chamber of Deputies: elections last held 3 October 1993 ( next to be
   held October 1995); elections are held every two years and half of the
   total membership is elected each time for four year terms; seats -
   (257 total) PJ 122, UCR 83, MODIN 7, UCD 5, other 40
  
   Judicial branch: Supreme Court (Corte Suprema)
  
   Political parties and leaders: Justicialist Party (PJ), Carlos Saul
   MENEM, Peronist umbrella political organization; Radical Civic Union
   (UCR),Raul ALFONSIN, moderately left-of-center party; Union of the
   Democratic Center (UCD), Jorge AGUADO, conservative party; Dignity and
   Independence Political Party (MODIN), Aldo RICO, right-wing party;
   Grand Front (Frente Grande), Carlos ALVAREZ, center-left coalition;
   several provincial parties
  
   Other political or pressure groups: Peronist-dominated labor movement;
   General Confederation of Labor (CGT; Peronist-leaning umbrella labor
   organization); Argentine Industrial Union (manufacturers'
   association); Argentine Rural Society (large landowners' association);
   business organizations; students; the Roman Catholic Church; the Armed
   Forces
  
   Member of: AfDB, AG (observer), Australia Group, BCIE, CCC, ECLAC,
   FAO, G- 6, G-11, G-15, G-19, G-24, G-77, GATT, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO,
   ICC, ICFTU, ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, IMO, INMARSAT,
   INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, IOM, ISO, ITU, LAES, LAIA, MERCOSUR, MINURSO,
   MTCR, NSG (observer), OAS, ONUSAL, OPANAL, PCA, RG, UN, UNAVEM II,
   UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNFICYP, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNIKOM, UNITAR, UNMIH, UNOMOZ,
   UNPROFOR, UNTSO, UNU, UPU, WCL, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO
  
   Diplomatic representation in US:
   chief of mission: Ambassador Raul Enrique GRANILLO OCAMPO
   chancery: 1600 New Hampshire Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20009
   telephone: [1] (202) 939-6400 through 6403
   consulate(s) general: Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami,
   New Orleans, New York, San Francisco, and San Juan (Puerto Rico)
  
   US diplomatic representation:
   chief of mission: Ambassador James R. CHEEK
   embassy: 4300 Colombia, 1425 Buenos Aires
   mailing address: Unit 4334; APO AA 34034
   telephone: [54] (1) 777-4533, 4534
   FAX: [54] (1) 777-0197
  
   Flag: three equal horizontal bands of light blue (top), white, and
   light blue; centered in the white band is a radiant yellow sun with a
   human face known as the Sun of May
  
   Economy
  
   Overview: Argentina, rich in natural resources, benefits also from a
   highly literate population, an export-oriented agricultural sector,
   and a diversified industrial base. Nevertheless, following decades of
   mismanagement and statist policies, the economy in the late 1980s was
   plagued with huge external debts and recurring bouts of
   hyperinflation. Elected in 1989, in the depths of recession, President
   MENEM has implemented a comprehensive economic restructuring program
   that shows signs of putting Argentina on a path of stable, sustainable
   growth. Argentina's currency has traded at par with the US dollar
   since April 1991, and inflation has fallen to its lowest level in 20
   years. Argentines have responded to the relative price stability by
   repatriating flight capital and investing in domestic industry. The
   economy registered an impressive 6% advance in 1994, fueled largely by
   inflows of foreign capital and strong domestic consumption spending.
   The government's major short term objective is encouraging exports,
   e.g., by reducing domestic costs of production. At the start of 1995,
   the government had to deal with the spillover from international
   financial movements associated with the devaluation of the Mexican
   peso. In addition, unemployment had become a serious issue for the
   government. Despite average annual 7% growth in 1991-94, unemployment
   surprisingly has doubled - due mostly to layoffs in government bureaus
   and in privatized industrial firms and utilities and, to a lesser
   degree, to illegal immigration. Much remains to be done in the 1990s
   in dismantling the old statist barriers to growth, extending the
   recent economic gains, and bringing down the rate of unemployment.
  
   National product: GDP - purchasing power parity - $270.8 billion (1994
   est.)
  
   National product real growth rate: 6% (1994 est.)
  
   National product per capita: $7,990 (1994 est.)
  
   Inflation rate (consumer prices): 3.9% (1994 est.)
  
   Unemployment rate: 12% (1994 est.)
  
   Budget:
   revenues: $48.46 billion
   expenditures: $46.5 billion, including capital expenditures of $3.5
   billion (1994 est.)
  
   Exports: $15.7 billion (f.o.b., 1994 est.)
   commodities: meat, wheat, corn, oilseed, manufactures
   partners: US 12%, Brazil, Italy, Japan, Netherlands
  
   Imports: $21.4 billion (c.i.f., 1994 est.)
   commodities: machinery and equipment, chemicals, metals, fuels and
   lubricants, agricultural products
   partners: US 22%, Brazil, Germany, Bolivia, Japan, Italy, Netherlands
  
   External debt: $73 billion (April 1994)
  
   Industrial production: growth rate 12.5% accounts for 31% of GDP (1994
   est.)
  
   Electricity:
   capacity: 17,330,000 kW
   production: 54.8 billion kWh
   consumption per capita: 1,610 kWh (1993)
  
   Industries: food processing, motor vehicles, consumer durables,
   textiles, chemicals and petrochemicals, printing, metallurgy, steel
  
   Agriculture: accounts for 8% of GDP (including fishing); produces
   abundant food for both domestic consumption and exports; among world's
   top five exporters of grain and beef; principal crops - wheat, corn,
   sorghum, soybeans, sugar beets
  
   Illicit drugs: increasing use as a transshipment country for cocaine
   headed for the US and Europe
  
   Economic aid:
   recipient: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $1 billion;
   Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
   (1970-89), $4.4 billion; Communist countries (1970-89), $718 million
  
   Currency: 1 nuevo peso argentino = 100 centavos
  
   Exchange rates: pesos per US$1 - 0.99870 (December 1994), 0.99901
   (1994), 0.99895 (1993), 0.99064 (1992), 0.95355 (1991), 0.48759 (1990)
  
   Fiscal year: calendar year
  
   Argentina:Transportation
  
   Railroads:
   total: 34,572 km
   broad gauge: NA km 1.676-m gauge
   standard gauge: NA km 1.435-m
   narrow gauge: 400 km 0.750-m gauge; NA km 1.000-m gauge (209 km
   electrified)
  
   Highways:
   total: 208,350 km
   paved: 57,000 km
   unpaved: gravel 39,500 km; improved/unimproved earth 111,850 km
  
   Inland waterways: 11,000 km navigable
  
   Pipelines: crude oil 4,090 km; petroleum products 2,900 km; natural
   gas 9,918 km
  
   Ports: Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Comodoro Rivadavia, Concepcion del
   Uruguay, La Plata, Mar del Plata, Necochea, Rio Gallegos, Rosario,
   Santa Fe, Ushuaia
  
   Merchant marine:
   total: 44 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 434,525 GRT/667,501 DWT
   ships by type: bulk 3, cargo 21, chemical tanker 1, container 4, oil
   tanker 8, railcar carrier 1, refrigerated cargo 5, roll-on/roll-off
   cargo 1
  
   Airports:
   total: 1,602
   with paved runways over 3,047 m: 5
   with paved runways 2,438 to 3,047 m: 25
   with paved runways 1,524 to 2,437 m: 55
   with paved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 48
   with paved runways under 914 m: 703
   with unpaved runways over 3,047 m: 2
   with unpaved runways 2,438 to 3,047 m: 1
   with unpaved runways 1,524 to 2,438 m: 70
   with unpaved runways 914 to 1,523 m: 693
  
   Argentina:Communications
  
   Telephone system: 2,650,000 telephones; 12,000 public telephones; 78
   telephones/1,000 persons; extensive modern system but many families do
   not have telephones; microwave widely used; however, during
   rainstorms, the telephone system frequently grounds out, even in
   Buenos Aires
   local: NA
   intercity: microwave radio relay and domestic satellite network with
   40 earth stations
   international: 2 INTELSAT (Atlantic Ocean) earth stations
  
   Radio:
   broadcast stations: AM 171, FM 0, shortwave 13
   radios: NA
  
   Television:
   broadcast stations: 231
   televisions: NA
  
   Argentina:Defense Forces
  
   Branches: Argentine Army, Navy of the Argentine Republic, Argentine
   Air Force, National Gendarmerie, Argentine Naval Prefecture (Coast
   Guard only), National Aeronautical Police Force
  
   Manpower availability: males age 15-49 8,573,780; males fit for
   military service 6,954,584; males reach military age (20) annually
   301,166 (1995 est.)
  
   Defense expenditures: $NA, NA% of GDP
  
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2020
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