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pluck
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English Dictionary: pluck by the DICT Development Group
5 results for pluck
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
pluck
n
  1. the trait of showing courage and determination in spite of possible loss or injury
    Synonym(s): gutsiness, pluck, pluckiness
    Antonym(s): gutlessness
  2. the act of pulling and releasing a taut cord
v
  1. pull or pull out sharply; "pluck the flowers off the bush"
    Synonym(s): pluck, tweak, pull off, pick off
  2. sell something to or obtain something from by energetic and especially underhanded activity
    Synonym(s): hustle, pluck, roll
  3. rip off; ask an unreasonable price
    Synonym(s): overcharge, soak, surcharge, gazump, fleece, plume, pluck, rob, hook
    Antonym(s): undercharge
  4. pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion; "he plucked the strings of his mandolin"
    Synonym(s): pluck, plunk, pick
  5. strip of feathers; "pull a chicken"; "pluck the capon"
    Synonym(s): pluck, pull, tear, deplume, deplumate, displume
  6. look for and gather; "pick mushrooms"; "pick flowers"
    Synonym(s): pick, pluck, cull
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Lyrie \Ly"rie\ (l[imac]"r[icr]), n. [Icel. hl[ymac]ri a sort of
      fish.] (Zo[94]l.)
      A European fish ({Peristethus cataphractum}), having the body
      covered with bony plates, and having three spines projecting
      in front of the nose; -- called also {noble}, {pluck},
      {pogge}, {sea poacher}, and {armed bullhead}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pluck \Pluck\, v. i.
      To make a motion of pulling or twitching; -- usually with at;
      as, to pluck at one's gown.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pluck \Pluck\, n.
      1. The act of plucking; a pull; a twitch.
  
      2. [Prob. so called as being plucked out after the animal is
            killed; or cf. Gael. & Ir. pluc a lump, a knot, a bunch.]
            The heart, liver, and lights of an animal.
  
      3. Spirit; courage; indomitable resolution; fortitude.
  
                     Decay of English spirit, decay of manly pluck.
                                                                              --Thackeray.
  
      4. The act of plucking, or the state of being plucked, at
            college. See {Pluck}, v. t., 4.
  
      5. (Zo[94]l.) The lyrie. [Prov. Eng.]

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Pluck \Pluck\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Plucked}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Plucking}.] [AS. pluccian; akin to LG. & D. plukken, G.
      pfl[81]cken, Icel. plokka, plukka, Dan. plukke, Sw. plocka.
      [?]27.]
      1. To pull; to draw.
  
                     Its own nature . . . plucks on its own dissolution.
                                                                              --Je[?].
                                                                              Taylor.
  
      2. Especially, to pull with sudden force or effort, or to
            pull off or out from something, with a twitch; to twitch;
            also, to gather, to pick; as, to pluck feathers from a
            fowl; to pluck hair or wool from a skin; to pluck grapes.
  
                     I come to pluck your berries harsh and crude.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
                     E'en children followed, with endearing wile, And
                     plucked his gown to share the good man's smile.
                                                                              --Goldsmith.
  
      3. To strip of, or as of, feathers; as, to pluck a fowl.
  
                     They which pass by the way do pluck her. --Ps.
                                                                              lxxx.[?]2.
  
      4. (Eng. Universities) To reject at an examination for
            degrees. --C. Bront[82].
  
      {To pluck away}, to pull away, or to separate by pulling; to
            tear away.
  
      {To pluck down}, to pull down; to demolish; to reduce to a
            lower state.
  
      {to pluck off}, to pull or tear off; as, to pluck off the
            skin.
  
      {to pluck up}.
            (a) To tear up by the roots or from the foundation; to
                  eradicate; to exterminate; to destroy; as, to pluck up
                  a plant; to pluck up a nation. --Jer. xii. 17.
            (b) To gather up; to summon; as, to pluck up courage.
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©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2019
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