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English Dictionary: net by the DICT Development Group
10 results for net
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
net
adj
  1. remaining after all deductions; "net profit" [syn: net, nett]
    Antonym(s): gross
  2. conclusive in a process or progression; "the final answer"; "a last resort"; "the net result"
    Synonym(s): final, last, net
n
  1. a computer network consisting of a worldwide network of computer networks that use the TCP/IP network protocols to facilitate data transmission and exchange
    Synonym(s): internet, net, cyberspace
  2. a trap made of netting to catch fish or birds or insects
  3. the excess of revenues over outlays in a given period of time (including depreciation and other non-cash expenses)
    Synonym(s): net income, net, net profit, lucre, profit, profits, earnings
  4. a goal lined with netting (as in soccer or hockey)
  5. game equipment consisting of a strip of netting dividing the playing area in tennis or badminton
  6. an open fabric of string or rope or wire woven together at regular intervals
    Synonym(s): net, network, mesh, meshing, meshwork
v
  1. make as a net profit; "The company cleared $1 million"
    Synonym(s): net, sack, sack up, clear
  2. yield as a net profit; "This sale netted me $1 million"
    Synonym(s): net, clear
  3. construct or form a web, as if by weaving
    Synonym(s): web, net
  4. catch with a net; "net a fish"
    Synonym(s): net, nett
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Neat \Neat\, a. [Compar. {Neater}; superl. {Neatest}.] [OE.
      nett, F. nett, fr. L. nitidus, fr. nitere to shine. Cf.
      {Nitid}, {Net}, a., {Natty}.]
      1. Free from that which soils, defiles, or disorders; clean;
            cleanly; tidy.
  
                     If you were to see her, you would wonder what poor
                     body it was that was so surprisingly neat and clean.
                                                                              --Law.
  
      2. Free from what is unbecoming, inappropriate, or tawdry;
            simple and becoming; pleasing with simplicity; tasteful;
            chaste; as, a neat style; a neat dress.
  
      3. Free from admixture or adulteration; good of its kind; as,
            neat brandy. [bd]Our old wine neat.[b8] --Chapman.
  
      4. Excellent in character, skill, or performance, etc.; nice;
            finished; adroit; as, a neat design; a neat thief.
  
      5. With all deductions or allowances made; net.
  
      Note: [In this sense usually written {net}. See {Net}, a.,
               3.]
  
      {neat line} (Civil Engin.), a line to which work is to be
            built or formed.
  
      {Neat work}, work built or formed to neat lines.
  
      Syn: Nice; pure; cleanly; tidy; trim; spruce.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Net \Net\, v. i.
      To form network or netting; to knit.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Net \Net\, a. [F. See {Neat} clean.]
      1. Without spot; pure; shining. [Obs.]
  
                     Her breast all naked as net ivory.      --Spenser.
  
      2. Free from extraneous substances; pure; unadulterated;
            neat; as, net wine, etc. [R.]
  
      3. Not including superfluous, incidental, or foreign matter,
            as boxes, coverings, wraps, etc.; free from charges,
            deductions, etc; as, net profit; net income; net weight,
            etc. [Less properly written {nett}.]
  
      {Net tonnage} (Naut.), the tonnage of a vessel after a
            deduction from the gross tonnage has been made, to allow
            space for crew, machinery, etc.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Net \Net\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Netted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Netting}.]
      To produce or gain as clear profit; as, he netted a thousand
      dollars by the operation.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Net \Net\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Netted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Netting}.]
      1. To make into a net; to make n the style of network; as, to
            net silk.
  
      2. To take in a net; to capture by stratagem or wile.
  
                     And now I am here, netted and in the toils. --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
      3. To inclose or cover with a net; as, to net a tree.

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   net.- /net dot/ pref.   [Usenet] Prefix used to describe people
   and events related to Usenet.   From the time before the {Great
   Renaming}, when most non-local newsgroups had names beginning
   `net.'.   Includes {net.god}s, `net.goddesses' (various charismatic
   net.women with circles of on-line admirers), `net.lurkers' (see
   {lurker}), `net.person', `net.parties' (a synonym for {boink}, sense
   2), and many similar constructs.   See also {net.police}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   net.-
  
      /net dot/ A prefix used to
      describe people and events related to {Usenet} and the
      {Internet}.   The convention dates from the time before the
      {Great Renaming}, when most non-local {Usenet} newsgroups had
      names beginning "net.".   Includes {net.god}s, "net.goddesses"
      (various charismatic net.women with circles of on-line
      admirers), "net.lurkers" (see {lurker}), "net.person",
      "net.parties" (a synonym for {boink}), and many similar
      constructs.
  
      See also {net.police}.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1995-03-21)
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   net
  
      1. {network}.
  
      2. {network, the}.
  
      3. {neural network}.
  
      4. The {top-level domain} originally for
      networks, although it sees heavy use for {vanity domains} of
      all types.
  
      [{Jargon File}]
  
      (1999-01-26)
  
  

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Net
      in use among the Hebrews for fishing, hunting, and fowling. The
      fishing-net was probably constructed after the form of that used
      by the Egyptians (Isa. 19:8). There were three kinds of nets.
      (1.) The drag-net or hauling-net (Gr. sagene), of great size,
      and requiring many men to work it. It was usually let down from
      the fishing-boat, and then drawn to the shore or into the boat,
      as circumstances might require (Matt. 13:47, 48). (2.) The
      hand-net or casting-net (Gr. amphiblestron), which was thrown
      from a rock or a boat at any fish that might be seen (Matt.
      4:18; Mark 1:16). It was called by the Latins funda. It was of
      circular form, "like the top of a tent." (3.) The bag-net (Gr.
      diktyon), used for enclosing fish in deep water (Luke 5:4-9).
     
         The fowling-nets were (1) the trap, consisting of a net spread
      over a frame, and supported by a stick in such a way that it
      fell with the slightest touch (Amos 3:5, "gin;" Ps. 69:22; Job
      18:9; Eccl. 9:12). (2) The snare, consisting of a cord to catch
      birds by the leg (Job 18:10; Ps. 18:5; 116:3; 140:5). (3.) The
      decoy, a cage filled with birds as decoys (Jer. 5:26, 27).
      Hunting-nets were much in use among the Hebrews.
     
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