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English Dictionary: loss by the DICT Development Group
4 results for loss
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
loss
n
  1. something that is lost; "the car was a total loss"; "loss of livestock left the rancher bankrupt"
  2. gradual decline in amount or activity; "weight loss"; "a serious loss of business"
  3. the act of losing someone or something; "everyone expected him to win so his loss was a shock"
  4. the disadvantage that results from losing something; "his loss of credibility led to his resignation"; "losing him is no great deprivation"
    Synonym(s): loss, deprivation
  5. the experience of losing a loved one; "he sympathized on the loss of their grandfather"
  6. the amount by which the cost of a business exceeds its revenue; "the company operated at a loss last year"; "the company operated in the red last year"
    Synonym(s): loss, red ink, red
    Antonym(s): gain
  7. military personnel lost by death or capture
    Synonym(s): personnel casualty, loss
  8. euphemistic expressions for death; "thousands mourned his passing"
    Synonym(s): passing, loss, departure, exit, expiration, going, release
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Loss \Loss\, n. [AS. los loss, losing, fr. le[a2]san to lose.
      [?]. See {Lose}, v. t.]
      1. The act of losing; failure; destruction; privation; as,
            the loss of property; loss of money by gaming; loss of
            health or reputation.
  
                     Assured loss before the match be played. --Shak.
  
      2. The state of losing or having lost; the privation, defect,
            misfortune, harm, etc., which ensues from losing.
  
                     Though thou repent, yet I have still the loss.
                                                                              --Shak
  
      3. That which is lost or from which one has parted; waste; --
            opposed to {gain} or {increase}; as, the loss of liquor by
            leakage was considerable.
  
      4. The state of being lost or destroyed; especially, the
            wreck or foundering of a ship or other vessel.
  
      5. Failure to gain or win; as, loss of a race or battle.
  
      6. Failure to use advantageously; as, loss of time.
  
      7. (Mil.) Killed, wounded, and captured persons, or captured
            property.
  
      8. (Insurance) Destruction or diminution of value, if brought
            about in a manner provided for in the insurance contract
            (as destruction by fire or wreck, damage by water or
            smoke), or the death or injury of an insured person; also,
            the sum paid or payable therefor; as, the losses of the
            company this year amount to a million of dollars.
  
      {To bear a loss}, to make a loss good; also, to sustain a
            loss without sinking under it.
  
      {To be at a loss}, to be in a state of uncertainty.
  
      Syn: Privation; detriment; injury; damage.

From Jargon File (4.2.0, 31 JAN 2000) [jargon]:
   loss n.   Something (not a person) that loses; a situation in
   which something is losing.   Emphatic forms include `moby loss', and
   `total loss', `complete loss'.   Common interjections are "What a
   loss!"   and "What a moby loss!"   Note that `moby loss' is OK even
   though **`moby loser' is not used; applied to an abstract noun, moby
   is simply a magnifier, whereas when applied to a person it implies
   substance and has positive connotations.   Compare {lossage}.
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   loss
  
      Something (not a person) that loses; a situation in
      which something is losing.   Emphatic forms include "moby
      loss", and "total loss", "complete loss".   Common
      interjections are "What a loss!"   and "What a moby loss!"
      Note that "moby loss" is OK even though **"moby loser" is not
      used; applied to an abstract noun, moby is simply a magnifier,
      whereas when applied to a person it implies substance and has
      positive connotations.
  
      Compare {lossage}.
  
      (1995-04-19)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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