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hinge
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English Dictionary: hinge by the DICT Development Group
5 results for hinge
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
hinge
n
  1. a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
    Synonym(s): hinge, flexible joint
  2. a circumstance upon which subsequent events depend; "his absence is the hinge of our plan"
v
  1. attach with a hinge
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hinge \Hinge\, n. [OE. henge, heeng; akin to D. heng, LG. henge,
      Prov. E. hingle a small hinge; connected with hang, v., and
      Icel. hengja to hang. See {Hang}.]
      1. The hook with its eye, or the joint, on which a door,
            gate, lid, etc., turns or swings; a flexible piece, as a
            strip of leather, which serves as a joint to turn on.
  
                     The gate self-opened wide, On golden hinges turning.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      2. That on which anything turns or depends; a governing
            principle; a cardinal point or rule; as, this argument was
            the hinge on which the question turned.
  
      3. One of the four cardinal points, east, west, north, or
            south. [R.]
  
                     When the moon is in the hinge at East. --Creech.
  
                     Nor slept the winds . . . but rushed abroad.
                                                                              --Milton.
  
      {Hinge joint}.
            (a) (Anat.) See {Ginglymus}.
            (b) (Mech.) Any joint resembling a hinge, by which two
                  pieces are connected so as to permit relative turning
                  in one plane.
  
      {To be off the hinges}, to be in a state of disorder or
            irregularity; to have lost proper adjustment. --Tillotson.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hinge \Hinge\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hinged}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Hinging}.]
      1. To attach by, or furnish with, hinges.
  
      2. To bend. [Obs.] --Shak.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Hinge \Hinge\, v. i.
      To stand, depend, hang, or turn, as on a hinge; to depend
      chiefly for a result or decision or for force and validity;
      -- usually with on or upon; as, the argument hinges on this
      point. --I. Taylor

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary [easton]:
   Hinge
      (Heb. tsir), that on which a door revolves. "Doors in the East
      turn rather on pivots than on what we term hinges. In Syria, and
      especially in the Hauran, there are many ancient doors,
      consisting of stone slabs with pivots carved out of the same
      piece inserted in sockets above and below, and fixed during the
      building of the house" (Prov. 26:14).
     
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