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English Dictionary: experience by the DICT Development Group
2 results for experience
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
experience
n
  1. the accumulation of knowledge or skill that results from direct participation in events or activities; "a man of experience"; "experience is the best teacher"
    Antonym(s): inexperience, rawness
  2. the content of direct observation or participation in an event; "he had a religious experience"; "he recalled the experience vividly"
  3. an event as apprehended; "a surprising experience"; "that painful experience certainly got our attention"
v
  1. go or live through; "We had many trials to go through"; "he saw action in Viet Nam"
    Synonym(s): experience, see, go through
  2. have firsthand knowledge of states, situations, emotions, or sensations; "I know the feeling!"; "have you ever known hunger?"; "I have lived a kind of hell when I was a drug addict"; "The holocaust survivors have lived a nightmare"; "I lived through two divorces"
    Synonym(s): know, experience, live
  3. go through (mental or physical states or experiences); "get an idea"; "experience vertigo"; "get nauseous"; "receive injuries"; "have a feeling"
    Synonym(s): experience, receive, have, get
  4. undergo an emotional sensation or be in a particular state of mind; "She felt resentful"; "He felt regret"
    Synonym(s): feel, experience
  5. undergo; "The stocks had a fast run-up"
    Synonym(s): have, experience
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Experience \Ex*pe"ri*ence\, n. [F. exp[82]rience, L.
      experientia, tr. experiens, [?]entis, p. pr. of experiri,
      expertus, to try; ex out + the root of pertus experienced.
      See {Peril}, and cf. {Expert}.]
      1. Trial, as a test or experiment. [Obs.]
  
                     She caused him to make experience Upon wild beasts.
                                                                              --Spenser.
  
      2. The effect upon the judgment or feelings produced by any
            event, whether witnessed or participated in; personal and
            direct impressions as contrasted with description or
            fancies; personal acquaintance; actual enjoyment or
            suffering. [bd]Guided by other's experiences.[b8] --Shak.
  
                     I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and
                     that is the lamp of experience.         --P. Henry
  
                     To most men experience is like the stern lights of a
                     ship, which illumine only the track it has passed.
                                                                              --Coleridge.
  
                     When the consuls . . . came in . . . they knew soon
                     by experience how slenderly guarded against danger
                     the majesty of rulers is where force is wanting.
                                                                              --Holland.
  
                     Those that undertook the religion of our Savior upon
                     his preaching, had no experience of it. --Sharp.
  
      3. An act of knowledge, one or more, by which single facts or
            general truths are ascertained; experimental or inductive
            knowledge; hence, implying skill, facility, or practical
            wisdom gained by personal knowledge, feeling or action;
            as, a king without experience of war.
  
                     Whence hath the mind all the materials of reason and
                     knowledge? To this I answer in one word, from
                     experience.                                       --Locke.
  
                     Experience may be acquired in two ways; either,
                     first by noticing facts without any attempt to
                     influence the frequency of their occurrence or to
                     vary the circumstances under which they occur; this
                     is observation; or, secondly, by putting in action
                     causes or agents over which we have control, and
                     purposely varying their combinations, and noticing
                     what effects take place; this is experiment. --Sir
                                                                              J. Herschel.
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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