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English Dictionary: Scheme by the DICT Development Group
5 results for Scheme
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
scheme
n
  1. an elaborate and systematic plan of action [syn: scheme, strategy]
  2. a statement that evades the question by cleverness or trickery
    Synonym(s): dodge, dodging, scheme
  3. a group of independent but interrelated elements comprising a unified whole; "a vast system of production and distribution and consumption keep the country going"
    Synonym(s): system, scheme
  4. an internal representation of the world; an organization of concepts and actions that can be revised by new information about the world
    Synonym(s): schema, scheme
  5. a schematic or preliminary plan
    Synonym(s): outline, schema, scheme
v
  1. form intrigues (for) in an underhand manner [syn: scheme, intrigue, connive]
  2. devise a system or form a scheme for
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scheme \Scheme\, n. [L. schema a rhetorical figure, a shape,
      figure, manner, Gr. [?], [?], form, shape, outline, plan, fr.
      [?], [?], to have or hold, to hold out, sustain, check, stop;
      cf. Skr. sah to be victorious, to endure, to hold out, AS.
      sige victory, G. sieg. Cf. {Epoch}, {Hectic}, {School}.]
      1. A combination of things connected and adjusted by design;
            a system.
  
                     The appearance and outward scheme of things.
                                                                              --Locke.
  
                     Such a scheme of things as shall at once take in
                     time and eternity.                              --Atterbury.
  
                     Arguments . . . sufficient to support and
                     demonstrate a whole scheme of moral philosophy. --J.
                                                                              Edwards.
  
                     The Revolution came and changed his whole scheme of
                     life.                                                --Macaulay.
  
      2. A plan or theory something to be done; a design; a
            project; as, to form a scheme.
  
                     The stoical scheme of supplying our wants by lopping
                     off our desires, is like cutting off our feet when
                     we want shoes.                                    --Swift.
  
      3. Any lineal or mathematical diagram; an outline.
  
                     To draw an exact scheme of Constantinople, or a map
                     of France.                                          --South.
  
      4. (Astrol.) A representation of the aspects of the celestial
            bodies for any moment or at a given event.
  
                     A blue silk case, from which was drawn a scheme of
                     nativity.                                          --Sir W.
                                                                              Scott.
  
      Syn: Plan; project; contrivance; purpose; device; plot.
  
      Usage: {Scheme}, {Plan}. Scheme and plan are subordinate to
                  design; they propose modes of carrying our designs
                  into effect. Scheme is the least definite of the two,
                  and lies more in speculation. A plan is drawn out into
                  details with a view to being carried into effect. As
                  schemes are speculative, they often prove visionary;
                  hence the opprobrious use of the words schemer and
                  scheming. Plans, being more practical, are more
                  frequently carried into effect.
  
                           He forms the well-concerted scheme of mischief;
                           'T is fixed, 't is done, and both are doomed to
                           death.                                          --Rowe.
  
                           Artists and plans relieved my solemn hours; I
                           founded palaces, and planted bowers. --Prior.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scheme \Scheme\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Schemed}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Scheming}.]
      To make a scheme of; to plan; to design; to project; to plot.
  
               That wickedness which schemed, and executed, his
               destruction.                                          --G. Stuart.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Scheme \Scheme\, v. i.
      To form a scheme or schemes.

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (15Feb98) [foldoc]:
   Scheme
  
      (Originally "Schemer", by analogy with {Planner}
      and {Conniver}).   A small, uniform {Lisp} dialect with clean
      {semantics}, developed initially by {Guy Steele} and {Gerald
      Sussman} in 1975.   Scheme uses {applicative order reduction}
      and {lexical scope}.   It treats both {functions} and
      {continuations} as {first-class} objects.
  
      One of the most used implementations is {DrScheme}, others
      include {Bigloo}, {Elk}, {Liar}, {Orbit}, {Scheme86} (Indiana
      U), {SCM}, {MacScheme} (Semantic Microsystems), {PC Scheme}
      (TI), {MIT Scheme}, and {T}.
  
      See also {Kamin's interpreters}, {PSD}, {PseudoScheme},
      {Schematik}, {Scheme Repository}, {STk}, {syntax-case}, {Tiny
      Clos}, {Paradigms of AI Programming}.
  
      There have been a series of revisions of the report defining
      Scheme, known as {RRS} (Revised Report on Scheme), {R2RS}
      (Revised Revised Report ..), {R3RS}, {R3.99RS}, {R4RS}.
  
      {Scheme resources (http://www.schemers.org/)}.
  
      Mailing list: scheme@mc.lcs.mit.edu.
  
      [IEEE P1178-1990, "IEEE Standard for the Scheme Programming
      Language", ISBN 1-55937-125-0].
  
      (2003-09-14)
  
  
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
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