DEEn Dictionary De - En
DeEs De - Es
DePt De - Pt
 Vocabulary trainer

Spec. subjects Grammar Abbreviations Random search Preferences
Search in Sprachauswahl
felt
Search for:
Mini search box
 
English Dictionary: Felt by the DICT Development Group
6 results for Felt
From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:
felt
n
  1. a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers
v
  1. mat together and make felt-like; "felt the wool"
  2. cover with felt; "felt a cap"
  3. change texture so as to become matted and felt-like; "The fabric felted up after several washes"
    Synonym(s): felt, felt up, mat up, matt-up, matte up, matte, mat
From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Felt grain \Felt grain\, the grain of timber which is transverse
      to the annular rings or plates; the direction of the
      medullary rays in oak and some other timber. --Knight. Felt
   \Felt\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Felted}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Felting}.]
      1. To make into felt, or a feltike substance; to cause to
            adhere and mat together. --Sir M. Hale.
  
      2. To cover with, or as with, felt; as, to felt the cylinder
            of a steam emgine.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Felt \Felt\,
      imp. & p. p. [or] a. from {Feel}.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Felt \Felt\, n. [AS. felt; akin to D. vilt, G. filz, and
      possibly to Gr. [?] hair or wool wrought into felt, L. pilus
      hair, pileus a felt cap or hat.]
      1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibers of wool, or wool
            and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by
            rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning
            or weaving.
  
                     It were a delicate stratagem to shoe A troop of
                     horse with felt.                                 --Shak.
  
      2. A hat made of felt. --Thynne.
  
      3. A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt. [Obs.]
  
                     To know whether sheep are sound or not, see that the
                     felt be loose.                                    --Mortimer.

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) [web1913]:
   Feel \Feel\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Felt}; p. pr. & vb. n.
      {Feeling}.] [AS. f[?]lan; akin to OS. gif[?]lian to perceive,
      D. voelen to feel, OHG. fuolen, G. f[81]hlen, Icel. f[be]lma
      to grope, and prob. to AS. folm paim of the hand, L. palma.
      Cf. {Fumble}, {Palm}.]
      1. To perceive by the touch; to take cognizance of by means
            of the nerves of sensation distributed all over the body,
            especially by those of the skin; to have sensation excited
            by contact of (a thing) with the body or limbs.
  
                     Who feel Those rods of scorpions and those whips of
                     steel.                                                --Creecn.
  
      2. To touch; to handle; to examine by touching; as, feel this
            piece of silk; hence, to make trial of; to test; often
            with out.
  
                     Come near, . . . that I may feel thee, my son.
                                                                              --Gen. xxvii.
                                                                              21.
  
                     He hath this to feel my affection to your honor.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      3. To perceive by the mind; to have a sense of; to
            experience; to be affected by; to be sensible of, or
            sensetive to; as, to feel pleasure; to feel pain.
  
                     Teach me to feel another's woe.         --Pope.
  
                     Whoso keepeth the commandment shall feel no evil
                     thing.                                                --Eccl. viii.
                                                                              5.
  
                     He best can paint them who shall feel them most.
                                                                              --Pope.
  
                     Mankind have felt their strength and made it felt.
                                                                              --Byron.
  
      4. To take internal cognizance of; to be conscious of; to
            have an inward persuasion of.
  
                     For then, and not till then, he felt himself.
                                                                              --Shak.
  
      5. To perceive; to observe. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
  
      {To feel the helm} (Naut.), to obey it.

From U.S. Gazetteer (1990) [gazetteer]:
   Felt, ID
      Zip code(s): 83424
   Felt, OK
      Zip code(s): 73937
No guarantee of accuracy or completeness!
©TU Chemnitz, 2006-2021
Your feedback:
Ad partners


Sprachreisen.org